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City manager brings council together on budget

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

The City Council unanimously approved the city’s $524 million two-year budget Tuesday with a unanimous vote and many are saying the rare council consensus is an endorsement of City Manager Weldon Rucker. 

“The manager really tried to include the desires of the councilmembers and meet the needs of the city,” said Dayle Bartlett, aide to Vice Mayor Maudelle Shirek. “And as evidence of his success there was a 9 to nothing vote to support him.” 

Rucker is quick to deflect praise by saying it was a cooperative council that is really responsible for the smooth budget process, which in the past has been fraught with ill will and acrimony. 

“The results were favorable, but it is really due to the staff and the commissioners buying into the process and the participation of all the councilmembers establishing their priorities,” Rucker said. “From there it was relatively easy to focus in on including those priorities.” 

Rucker also gave credit for the success of the budget to staff members Deputy City Manager Phil Kamlarz and Budget Manager Paul Navazio who were the architects of the budget. He said working out a municipal budget is like trying to hit a moving target because revenues are subject to uncertainties such as the current energy crisis, which can cause fluctuations in state and federal funding as well as the local economy. 

“Phil may be one of the best budget people in the nation and Paul brought a tremendous energy to the process,” Rucker said.  

The last biennial budget was approved on June 22, 1999 by vote of 5-3 with one abstention. According to Councilmember Kriss Worthington, that budget was approved after the progressives fought with the moderates who were aligned with former City Manager James Keene. Keene left Berkeley in August to take the city manager post in Tucson, Ariz.  

Rucker, who has worked for the city for 29 years, was previously acting city manager from 1993 to 1996. He assumed the post as acting city manager again after Keene’s departure and was given the position officially by the City Council in February.  

Rucker is credited by both factions on the council for proposing a budget that found a solid middle ground between council priorities and what was available in the city’s coffers. 

“It was an astronomical improvement over the last budget process,” Worthington said. “The city manager took both the mayor’s suggestions and (Councilmember) Dona (Spring)’s suggestions and put almost all of them in and took the time to explain the reasons for those suggestions he didn’t include.”  

Both Mayor Shirley Dean and Spring submitted budget recommendations for programs they felt needed more funding or for new programs that were not included in the city manager’s proposed budget.  

Dean agreed that Rucker did a good job of finding a practical middle ground. An example is the recommendations for arts grants. Dean suggested $143,000 in her proposal; Spring wanted $70,000 and the city manager suggested $100,000 which is the amount the council finally approved.  

Dean said it’s important the council work to stay focused on the current budget proposals and not try to add programs that would tip the budget’s balance. 

“The city manager certainly deserves a lot of credit for balancing the budget and getting unanimous agreement,” Dean said. “But the budget is only a plan. Now it’s up to the council to stick by what’s been approved and not wander all over the place.”  

Currently the budget is not technically balanced. For example in the adopted budget expenditures during the first year are greater than revenues by nearly $5 million. But according to Kamlarz, the budget cannot legally pencil in certain grants or include unspent funds from previous year’s programs, both of which he said would cover expenditures. 

Bartlett summed up the budget process: 

“The councilmembers are happy, our reserves are healthy and if there’s any problems, we still have the midyear review opportunity to rethink, redo and if necessary reformulate things.”


Calendar of Events & Activities

Saturday June 30, 2001


Saturday, June 30

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 548-3333 

 

First Annual Brower Day  

David Brower’s Environmental Legacy Celebrated 

Noon - 5 p.m. 

Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park 

Outdoor festival celebrating the Earth and the late David Brower. Lee Stetson will perform “The Spirit of John Muir” in the Florence Schwimley Little Theater, 12:30 and 2 p.m., and at 3 p.m. a special screening of "In the Light of Reverence" by the Sacred Land Film Project. Julia Butterfly Hill will join filmmaker Toby McLeod for a special panel following the film. 415-788-3666 

 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 

925-830-2975  

 

Bonfire III: Stories  

and Songs By the Sea 

7:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Marina 

Spinnaker Way, near Olympic Circle Sailing Club 

Come for Havdala and share stories, sing and watch the flames dance. Bring food and drink to share, kosher s’mores provided. 

848-0237 

 

Know Your Rights 

11 - 2 p.m. 

2022 Blake St. 

Copwatch workshop: Learn what your rights are when dealing with the police. Special section on juvenile rights.  

548-0425 

Bay Area Eco-Crones 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1066 Creston Road 

Networking, information sharing, project planning and ritual.  

Call ahead, 874-4935. 

 

2001 Paul G. Hearne  

Leadership Award Workshop 

4 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Ave. at MLK 

Michai Freeman, one of 11 recipients of the 2000 Paul Hearne Leadership Award of $10,000, will discuss how she applied for the award and how you can too. The award is given by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and is open to any individual with a disability.  

RSVP required. Reserve your space by e-mailing your name and address to michai@gladtobehere.org, or by calling 548-6425 ext 2. First 10 registrants will receive free membership to AAPD. 


Sunday, July 1

 

Buddhist Psychology 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Annette Anderson on “Insights from Buddhist Psychology.” Free. 

843-6812 

 

Jazz on the Pier 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Berkeley Pier  

The Christy Dana Quartet performs on the Berkeley Pier at the foot of University Ave. and Seawall Dr. The CDQ ensemble led by trumpeter and jazz educator Christy Dana with the Bay as a backdrop. Bring your folding chairs, sunblock and jackets. Free.  

AC Transit Bus 51M 

649-3929 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Avenue 

Group meditation using instrumental music and devotional songs. Free.  

496-3468 


Monday, July 2

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panels on Ulysses, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Finnegans Wake, and Joyce in the Classroom. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  


Tuesday, July 3

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panel on Finnegans Wake as well as looking at issues such as Joyce and carnality, computers, border-crossings, and cinema. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 642-2754  


Wednesday, July 4

 

Ice Cream Social 

Noon - 2 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Part of the Lawrence Hall of Science Wednesday FUN-days. Bring your own picnic, ice cream provided by LHS. Free museum admission today with a library card, regular admission $3 - $7. 

642-5132  

 

4th of July at the  

Berkeley Marina 

Noon - 10 p.m. 

People can decorate their bikes at the Shorebird Nature Center and participate in the Decorated Bicycle Parade at 7 p.m. Madame Ovary’s egg puppets will perform and Adventure Playground will be open all day. Music begins at 2 p.m. with Zambombazo 2; Bird Legg and the Tite Fit Blues Band come on at 5 p.m.; Kollasuyo it at 7 p.m. and MotorDude Zydeco’s at 9 p.m. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Cars in by 7 p.m. when street closes to traffic, out only after 10 p.m. Free admission. No alcohol. Sponsored by the city. 548-5335 

 

Berkeley Communicator  

Toastmasters Club 

7:15 a.m. 

Vault Cafe 

3250 Adeline 

Learn to speak with confidence. Ongoing first and third Wednesdays each month. 

527-2337 


Thursday, July 5

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Capoeira Arts Cafe and company, Brazilian extravaganza. 

 

— compiled by Sabrina Forkish and Guy Poole 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meetings discussions will center on “What do we/can we expect from the Church?”  

654-5486 

 

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

(gp) 

Bear Safety 

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc. 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Learn how to travel in bear country without mishap. Wilderness guide Ken Hanley will discuss the characteristics of black bears and grizzlies for anyone venturing into their territories. Free. 

527-4140 

 

(gp) 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. 

Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panels on Dubliners, Ulysses, Marginal Feelings in Joyce, and Joyce and Anarchy. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  


Letters to the Editor

Saturday June 30, 2001

Let The Sales Tax Yo-Yo 

 

Remember the state’s economic boom way back in 1998-2000? Because of those flush times, Californians are enjoying a nice sunny-day bonus this calendar year: a quarter-cent cut in the state sales tax. 

Didn’t notice? Well, the cut will save each person only about $31 a year. But that adds up to $1.2 billion in state revenue.  

And now that gloomier economic times are here the state needs every quarter-cent it can get to avoid making deep cuts in programs such as health care and education. 

The quarter-cent was added a decade ago, when recession was slamming California. As a result of a political compromise, legislators crafted the law in a way that the amount would automatically be cut in good times and be reinstated in bad.  

So, at the end of this year, it’ll be back. Maybe. 

Republicans, you see, want to cut that amount from the sales tax permanently, and they are threatening to block passage of the $100-billion-plus budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1.  

They’re being penny-wise and pound-foolish. 

The tax was raised in 1991, with a provision that it would be cut again if the state had two consecutive years with budget surpluses amounting to more than 4 percent of the state’s general fund total.  

Since then, the state has enjoyed several billion dollars’ worth of other tax cuts as well, including cuts in the income tax and a major reduction in the vehicle registration tax.  

The state’s tax burden is now at about the national average, and there has been little clamor for more cuts. 

Critics point out that by nature, sales taxes are regressive, hitting low-income people hardest because much of their income goes for necessities — even in California, where groceries and prescription drugs are exempt.  

Some moderate Democrats have expressed concern about letting the sales tax climb back to its previous statewide level of 7.25 percent. They don’t want to be depicted by their 2002 election campaign opponents as tax-raisers. 

But this is not a new tax or a raised tax. It merely is reverting to its former level. If better times return, the tax cut will go into effect again. Rainy days are here.  

The prudent thing for California this year is to put this money to use on important state programs. 

– Los Angeles Times 

June 26  

 

 

Affirmative action loses more ground 

 

Yesterday the U.S. Supreme Court took a step in the right direction of ending all discrimination, even that based on the seemingly benign intention of helping minorities. The matter remains unresolved, but the United States is closer to the day when people are treated as individuals, not members of favored or disfavored groups. 

The case was Texas v. Hopwood and involved the University of Texas Law School’s policy of granting special preferences to the admission of Latino and African-American applicants. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the policy as discrimination against whites.  

The state of Texas appealed the ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court, which refused to hear the case, allowing the 5th Circuit ruling to stand. 

“It’s an important decision,” Ward Connerly told us; the Oakland businessman also heads the American Civil Rights Institute and was co-author of the California Civil Rights Initiative, Proposition 209, which banned such discrimination in state government. In 1997 the U.S. Supreme Court, similar to this new case, allowed Prop. 209 to stand without comment.  

And just last year the California Supreme Court upheld Prop. 209. 

“It’s a not the decisive decision I would like to see, which will have to await further court action,” he added. “But there’s a steady pattern coming from the courts, two steps forward, one step backward, to get rid of preferences in this nation. That does not bode well for those wanting preferences for race, gender and ethnicity.” 

He pointed out that on May 29, the Supreme Court also refused to hear a case decided by the 9th Circuit Court allowing — in a step backward — such preferences to stand at the University of Washington. 

“This is an untenable situation in the long run,” Roger Clegg, general counsel of the Center for Equal Opportunity, told us of the conflicting decisions. “Sooner or later the Supreme Court will have to settle this issue.” 

The cases that might do this include a lawsuit against affirmative action at the University of Georgia, which last month was argued before the 11th U.S. Circuit, a lawsuit against the University of Michigan’s undergraduate admissions policy and another against the U of M’s Law School admissions policy. 

The continuing confusion, he explained, stems from the 1978 Bakke decision concerning admission to the University of California Medical School at Davis, in which the high court splintered, producing six different opinions.  

Four members were four affirmative action, four against. Justice Lewis Powell also was in favor, but only to the extent that race may be taken into account as one factor of diversity among many. His opinion turned out to be the “controlling” opinion most cited since then. 

Mr. Clegg pointed out that such confusing decisions not surprisingly produce confusing results in cases in lower courts. Moreover, the historical discrimination that the Bakke case was supposed to remedy ended a generation ago. 

From our position here in California, in the midst of a society that is increasingly mixed racially, ethnically, culturally and in many other ways — with intermarriage producing combined backgrounds in offspring — the best chance of harmony is to treat persons as individuals. 

Quotas and other forms of discrimination are the prescription for division and hatred. We hope that the Hopwood decision is a harbinger of the Supreme Court finally ending the confusion by taking up a major case and ruling clearly against preferences. 

 

The Orange County Register  

June 26, 2001 

 

 

Bracing for blackouts: Will FERC’s cap lower the price? 

 

As the political temperature rises along with the thermometer, the guiding hand of government is beginning to reappear on the West’s energy landscape.  

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has devised a new floating price cap for electricity that moves with the mix of plants operating at any given hour in 11 western states. 

The free-market purists inside FERC have resisted this reality. But after more than a year of skyrocketing prices and billions of dollars of bleeding in California, FERC is reluctantly attempting to define a decades-old law that is supposed to keep prices “just” and “reasonable.” 

The idea is to cap the price of power at any given time based on what it costs the least efficient generator to produce power. In theory, this is supposed to provide a reasonable reward to generators that are more efficient.  

The question is whether this indeed will be reasonable, or excessive. The only track record — and it is limited — is what has happened inside California for the past few months. Here a similar price cap has been in place, but only when demand has crept close to outstripping supply.  

The resulting price has been less than in a troubled market without caps, but far more than California paid before the market went haywire. 

Any price cap can be gamed and this one is no exception. The FERC system creates the obvious incentive for power producers to withhold electricity from an efficient unit (suddenly down for “maintenance”) and offer as a replacement some pricey power from an inefficient “peaker.”  

If any grid operator throughout the West bites at this bait, all 11 states lose, and potentially lose big. 

FERC is misguidedly attempting to avoid another form of short-term price intervention, which would be to cap the price of each generating facility based on its actual costs. This smells too much like the era of regulation for some.  

Yet compared to FERC’s new, ever-floating price cap, a firmer cap would have been easier to implement.  

Perhaps more important, this system stood a better chance of increasing the availability of supply since it would have removed any incentive to withhold power to game the price. 

That said, FERC’s new cap is an important political milestone. FERC should remain ready to learn and react quickly to any lessons about this cap that the market may soon teach us. 

 

June 19, 2001 

The Sacramento Bee —  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 21, 2001 

The Sacramento Bee — Justice Stanley Mosk: California loses its tribune of human rights 

For longer than most Californians have been alive, state Supreme Court Justice Stanley Mosk, who died Tuesday at age 88, was California’s brightest beacon of liberty. From the beginning of his public career, when he served at age 30 as the youngest Superior Court judge in the state, to the end of his tenure as the longest-sitting Supreme Court justice in California history, he turned his abundant energy and intellect to protecting and expanding individual rights. 

In 1947, as a Los Angeles Superior Court judge, he struck down as unconstitutional racially restrictive real estate covenants used to prevent blacks and others from buying houses in particular neighborhoods, a decision that prefigured a later U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Elected as attorney general in 1958, he fought to force the Professional Golfers Association to end its whites-only clause. 

Appointed to the high court in 1964 by Gov. Edmund G. “Pat” Brown, he wrote decisions barring prosecutors from racially discriminating in removing jurors and the University of California from using racial quotas in admissions. Some saw this latter ruling as a detour from Mosk’s generally liberal views, but for Mosk it was consistent with his understanding of equal treatment under the law. 

Mosk’s greatest contribution to the law and rights was pioneering the theory of “independent state grounds.” The rights of the people were lodged not just in the Bill of Rights and the transitory interpretations of the U.S. Supreme Court majority, Mosk argued. They were embedded as well in state constitutions, which sometimes offered greater protection to individuals than the minimum required by federal courts. The doctrine, widely adopted by state courts around the country, is the source of many path-breaking state privacy rulings and has given states the chance to become agents for legal change. 

A devoted liberal, Mosk was also an adept politician, twice elected to statewide office and handily winning reconfirmation to the court each time he appeared on the ballot. He knew how far and how fast the court could go without provoking a public backlash. Personally opposed to the death penalty, he nevertheless followed the law in capital cases, even voting to expand its application. Had Gov. Jerry Brown named Mosk chief justice in 1977, instead recklessly appointing the rigid and mercurial Rose Bird, chances are good that California could have been spared a decade of polarization that harmed the courts and set the state on a course that limited some of the rights that Mosk so eloquently championed. 

In choosing a successor to Mosk, Gov. Gray Davis must remember that he isn’t replacing just a single justice. He is filling a void on the court that has lost its best legal mind, its best writer, its institutional memory and its most watchful guardian of individual rights. The chances of finding another Stanley Mosk are slim. But the governor who uses Mosk as a model won’t go far wrong, for either the court or California. 

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June 20, 2001 

The Sacramento Bee — Paying for the pill: Court points the way to gender equity 

Last week, a federal judge ruled under federal antidiscrimination laws that a Seattle drugstore chain must cover the cost of birth control pills for female employees. That welcome outcome might come off as old news to California women, who have enjoyed the benefits of a similar state law signed by Gov. Gray Davis back in 1999. But the suit, filed by Planned Parenthood on behalf of Jennifer Erickson, a pharmacy manager for the Bartell Drug Co. stores, is very important to women here and in the 11 other states that have passed gender-equity prescription-coverage laws. 

That’s because Bartell doesn’t use an HMO or outside carrier to provide health insurance. Instead, like many large companies, it is “self-insured” and pays for insurance claims out of a company cash reserve. According to a 1974 federal law, these “self-insured” companies are exempt from state insurance law, and therefore don’t have to pay for birth control pills, or the other Federal Drug Administration-approved contraceptive prescriptions in states where such coverage is mandated. 

With this ruling, Bartell will have to pay. Beyond Bartell, however, it’s unclear the impact this decision will have on employers nationwide. Planned Parenthood representatives say they hope the decision will scare companies into compliance or spur other cheated female employees to seek justice in the courts. 

But even if the Bartell decision gets applied broadly, women at companies with fewer than 15 employees and those who purchase their own insurance would still have to open their own wallets for birth control. This will only change with a revision of federal law. 

Critics contend that forced coverage of birth control will send monthly insurance payments through the roof. Their argument doesn’t make much sense. Why battle against paying for a relatively inexpensive prescription that can prevent a $10,000 pregnancy, plus continued health costs for an additional child? 

Maybe this is the reason a federal bill, the Equity in Prescription Coverage Act, has languished in Congress since 1997. This year, the bill has been reintroduced, and it is time for Congress to act to make the coverage available to all women. In 1998, Congress approved contraceptive prescription coverage for members of the House, the Senate and their families. Maybe this year, they’ll see fit to return the favor and extend the benefit to the rest of us. 

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June 26, 2001 

The Fresno Bee — Cal Grants still beyond reach for many 

California’s expanded student aid program was supposed to pave a golden road to college for thousands of graduating high school seniors this year. Get good grades and prove your financial need, students were told, and the state will give you a Cal Grant — up to $3,500 a year for tuition and other expenses at a public university or $9,708 at a private university. 

The trouble is, the state’s application process has proven to be so complex that many students who most need scholarships haven’t been able to get them. 

California now must either simplify the Cal Grant process or provide extensive application assistance to prospective students — probably both — if the state is to deliver what Gov. Davis has touted as “the most generous college financial aid program in the nation.” 

Despite a Cal Grant funding boost of 35 percent, the California Student Aid Commission, or CSAC, expects to hand out 2,100 fewer awards this year. It’s not for a lack of need. 

More than 100,000 high school seniors applied. A third were rejected for not meeting income or achievement guidelines. 

What’s truly worrisome is the one in four students who may have been eligible but were disqualified because they’d omitted application information or, in some instances, simply checked the wrong box. The complex, six-page federal application form required by CSAC asks detailed questions about a student’s family assets and income, including tax return information that some applicants may not have had by the March filing deadline. 

California had expected to give $221 million in grants to incoming college freshmen by fall. But officials have only spent $186 million on awards. 

The balance — $35 million — has been sent back to the state’s general fund. 

Meanwhile, thousands of students who could have used a slice of that money for their college dreams are pondering how to pay tuition fees in the fall. Returning college students and others who took time off after high school aren’t entitled to grants but can compete for a set pool of financial aid through a separate Cal Grant program. 

There are plenty of qualified applicants in this group: More than 51,000 prospective students were eligible, yet more than half were turned away for lack of funds. So why not shift the untapped $35 million — an amount less than the state has been known to burn in a single day of electricity purchases — to the grant program for older and re-entry students? 

Despite long odds in a summer when the governor wants to increase his budget reserve, some legislators are sensibly trying to do just that. If they succeed, some 20,000 students whose average family income is $19,000 will get the help they need to go to college. 

But in the longer term, if California is to keep its promise, the Cal Grant application process needs major surgery, soon. 


Arts & Entertainment

Staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Space Weather Exhibit now - Sept. 2; now - Sept. 9 Science in Toyland; June 21: 6 a.m., Solar Eclipse Day Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

The UC Berkeley Art Museum is closed for renovations until the fall. 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 30: The Cost, Pg. 99, Majority Rule, 7 Days of Samsara, Since by Man, Creation is Crucifixion; July 6: Victim’s Family, Fleshies, The Modern Machines, Once For Kicks, The Blottos; July 7: The Stitches, Real MacKenzies, The Briefs, The Eddie Haskells, The Spits 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m. unless noted otherwise. June 30: Larry Stefl Jazz Quartet; July 3: 9 p.m., pickPocket ensemble; July 4: Whiskey Brothers; July 5: Keni “El Lebrijano.” 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m. June 30: Anna and Susie Laraine and Peri Poston; 10 p.m., The Ducksan Distone. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 30: 9:30 p.m. Tropical Vibrations. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Berkeley Arts Festival June 30: 7:30 p.m. Marvin Sanders and Vera Berheda, plus Mozart, Beethoven, Hadyn and Fuare in the gallery; July 1: 11 a.m., “Free Jazz on the Pier” The Christy Dana Quartet (on the Berkeley Pier). All shows at 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted Donations requested 2200 Shattuck Avenue 665-9496 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 30: Jim Hurst & Missy Raines, Due West; July 5: Druha Trava; July 6 and 7: Ferron. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org; 548-1761 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 30: Go Van Gogh 2881 Shattuck Ave. 843-8277 

 

Julia Morgan Center for the Arts July 1: 1 & 2 p.m., “Kourosh Taghavi: The Beauty of Iranian Music and Stories of its Origins” $5 - $10. 2640 College Ave. 654-0100 

 

Live Oaks Concerts, Berkeley Art Center, July 1: Matthew Owens; July 15: David Cheng, Marvin Sanders, Ari Hsu; July 27: Monica Norcia, Amy Likar, Jim Meredith. All shows at 7:30 unless otherwise noted Admission $10 (BACA members $8, students and seniors $9, children under 12 free) 

 

125 Records Release Party June 30: 9:45 p.m. Anton Barbeau and Belle De Gama will celebrate the release of their albums The Golden Boot: Antology 2 and Garden Abstract respectively. These are the first two albums released on the 125 Records label, founded by Joe Mallon with his winnings from his appearance on “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.” $5. Starry Plough 3101 Shattuck Avenue 841-2082  

 

Leopold’s Fancy July 2: 8 p.m., Traditional Irish music, part of “Extreme Joyce/Reading On the Edge,” a conference celebrating the works of James Joyce. Free. 2271 Shattuck Ave. 642-2754 

 

Dramatic Joyce July 3: 7:30 p.m. Dramatic interpretations of the works of James Joyce by local and international actors. Introduction by UC Berkeley Professor John Bishop with commentary by and conversation with the audience. Part of the week-long conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” Free. Krutch Theater, Clark Kerr Campus 2601 Warring Street 642-2754 

 

“Cuatro Maestros Touring Festival” July 4: 8 p.m. Music and dance performed by four elder folk artists and their young counterparts, accompanied by Los Cenzontles. $12 - $18. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Do You Hear What I Am Seeing?” July 5: 7:30 p.m. One man show by David Norris, a two-hour sampling of Joyce’s works with Norris’ insights. Part of the week-long conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” $10. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Romeo and Juliet” Through July 14, Thurs. - Sat. 8 p.m. Set in early 1930s just before the rise of Hitler in the Kit Kat Klub, Juliet is torn between ties to the Nazi party and Romeo’s Jewish heritage. $8 - $10. La Val’s Subterranean Theater 1834 Euclid 234-6046 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 22: Weds. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. (After July 8 no Wednesday performance, no Sunday matinee on July 22.) Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shepherd’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Iphegenia in Aulis” Through August 12: Sat. and Sun. 5 p.m. No performances July 14 and 15, special dawn performance on August 12 at 7 a.m. A free park performance by the Shotgun Players of Euripides’ play about choices and priorities. With a masked chorus, singing, dancing, and live music. Feel free to bring food and something soft to sit on. John Hinkel Park, Southhampton Place at Arlington Avenue (different locations July 7 and 8). 655-0813 

 

Films 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 30: 7, 9:10 p.m. Nenette and Boni; July 3: 7:30 p.m., Pineapple. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

Exhibits 

 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato Through June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Rachel Davis and Benicia Gantner Works on Paper Through July 14, Tues. - Sat., 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Watercolors by Davis, mixed-media by Gantner. Opening reception June 13, 6 - 8 p.m. Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Constitutional Shift Through July 13, Tuesdays - Fridays, noon - 5 p.m. Permanence and personal journey link Hee Jae Suh, Ursula Neubauer and Marci Tackett. Korean-born Suh explores an inner psychological world with a dramatic series of self-portraits. Neubauer explores self-portraiture as a travel map of identity with multiple points of view. Tackett explores Antarctica’s other-worldly landscape in a series of stunning digital photographs. Kala Art Institute 1060 Heinz Ave. 549-2977 

 

“The Trip to Here: Paintings and Ghosts by Marty Brooks” Through July 31, Tues. - Sun. 11 a.m. - 1 a.m. View Brooks’ first California show at Bison Brewing Company 2598 Telegraph Ave. 841-7734  

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“New Visions: Introductions 2001” July 12 - August 18, Wed. - Sat.: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Juried by Artist- Curator Rene Yanez and Robbin Henderson, Executive Director of the Berkeley Art Center, the exhibition features works from some of California’s up-and-coming artists. Reception July 12 from 6 - 8 p.m. Pro Arts 461 Ninth St., Oakland 763-9425 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethiopia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext. 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910” chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Through September. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

 

Readings 

 

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m. sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. June 25: Featuring Steve Arntsen; July 2: Featured artist April Ipock. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

“Berkeley Stories” June 29: 7:30 p.m. Stories of local Celebrity Artists. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 549-3564  

 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

 


Panthers serve notice with win over Modesto Christian

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

St. Mary’s shines at Cal team camp 

 

Jose Caraballo said in March that his St. Mary’s basketball team would be ready to play with any team in the state next season. The Panthers took their first step toward proving that on Friday, beating reigning Northern California champion Modesto Christian, 42-35, at the Cal Basketball Team Camp in the RSF Fieldhouse. 

“We just want to make sure we can compete at this level, and the only way to figure that out is to play teams of this caliber,” Caraballo said. 

The game wasn’t the most formal, with a running clock and uneven officiating, but the Panthers’ diversified offense and suffocating pressure defense left no doubt that it meant a lot to the home team. Despite a distinct height disadvantage (6-foot-10 center Simon Knight had knee surgery last week and is lost for the summer), St. Mary’s used their superior quickness and shooting to put Modesto Christian away. 

“We’ve got the best guards in the state, on the West Coast, and we’re proving that we’re a force to be reckoned with,” said St. Mary’s point guard DeShawn Freeman. 

The most spectacular matchup was at the point, where Modesto Christian’s Richard Midgely faced off against Freeman. Midgely, who has verbally committed to Cal, is considered by many to be the top point guard in California, but he looked a step slow at times against the quicksilver Freeman, who penetrated seemingly at will.  

“We both know each other’s games. I’m good, and that’s all that matters to me,” Freeman said. “We’re both big-time players, so it’s all good.” 

Freeman converted several spectacular layups over the Modesto Christian big men, but also dished out assists to John Sharper and DeMarcus Nelson on the wings. Sharper was hot early, hitting two three-pointers in the first five minutes. 

“We’re improved with DeMarcus, no doubt. Now when I drive, I can go either way, because I’ve got John on one side and DeMarcus on the other to kick the ball out to,” Freeman said. 

Friday was Nelson’s first game with the Panthers. The sophomore transfer from Vallejo High inserted himself nicely into the offense, penetrating and shooting pull-up jumpers with ease, but looked a little confused at times in Caraballo’s full-court press defense. But given a full season of work with his new coaches and teammates, last year’s Cal-Hi Sports Freshman of the Year should add another dimension to an already fearsome defense. 

“The fast-breaking and up-tempo stuff is part of the reason I wanted to play here. It’s good for me, makes me a better player,” Nelson said. 

The newest Panther said he isn’t worried about moving from the point to a wing position. 

“I can do other things. I can pass, I can rebound, I can defend. So it’s not a real big adjustment for me.” 

Without Knight, the inside work fell to forward Chase Moore. Moore is just 6-foot-4 and was overmatched by the oversized Modesto Christian front line, which included a seven-footer. The Crusaders dominated the boards but failed to capitalize on several putbacks, and Moore showed a nice touch by pulling up over the seven-footer for three straight scores in the second half. 

Meanwhile, the Crusaders were simply outmatched in the open court. Freeman, Sharper, Nelson and fellow guards Matt Straus and Tim Fanning were never all on the court together, but at times it seemed like the Panthers had seven men on the floor, scrambling to get their hands on the ball. With Moore cleaning up any sloppy Crusader outlet passes, when the ball left Midgely’s hands it was in serious jeopardy. 

“As long as I have this type of player, I’m going to play this type of ball,” Caraballo said. “I’ve got John and DeShawn back, and they’re great players. Now with DeMarcus? Look out.” 

The Panthers played it cool after the game, probably because they have more challenges ahead this weekend. They were set to play De La Salle on Friday night, and will face perennial SoCal power Mater Dei at 9 a.m. today. After the morning round of games, the 16 teams in at the camp will be placed in a tournament which will culminate with a final four on Sunday. 

“It’s good to get out here against these teams. It lets us know that we can play at the D-1 level,” Freeman said.


Group discussion centers on infant hearing tests

By Daniela Mohor Daily Planet staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

About 30 representatives of local and state health-care institutions met to discuss California’s inadequate hearing screenings for newborns at the Berkeley-based Center for the Education of the Infant Deaf Friday. 

The group, convened by CEID Director Jill Ellis and Assemblymember Dion Aroner, has met once each year for three years to discuss the need for hearing screenings for newborns and the role early recognition of hearing problems plays in the  

language, cognition, social, and emotional  

development of deaf and hearing-impaired  

children. 

“It’s everybody’s issue,” Aroner said in her introductory remarks. “We have to cross the border incomewise as well as every other way, to ensure that every youngster has been screened, so that we can ensure that when these kids will be entering school, they are not going to have such a significant deficit that they will never catch up.” 

In July 1999, the state legislature passed AB 2780, which makes all hospitals approved by the California Children Services responsible for providing hearing screenings to all newborns. The law also allocates state funding for screening tests and follow-up services. But few hospitals meet the state requirements.  

According to specialists, this is a serious problem because screening a newborn’s hearing helps optimize the treatment for hearing loss. Studies have shown that a hearing-impaired child diagnosed within the first six months of life has a much greater chance of reaching the reading and speaking level of a child with no hearing loss by age two or three. 

“Most people in California are unaware that there is a law because many hospitals here are not doing (the screening) yet,” Ellis said. “Fifty percent of the deaf kids are healthy kids. So many times they are not identified until they are two and a half or three years old.” 

The experience of Sarah Moulton and Tammy Taylor, both mothers of hearing-impaired children who attend the CEID, illustrate the difference between early- and later-identified children with a hearing loss. Moulton’s daughter, Kirian, was about two years old when doctors diagnosed her severe-to-profound hearing loss. Today, Kirian is articulate, but she has to struggle more than children such as J.B., who was tested at the birth and received his hearing aid when he was only 10 weeks old. Thanks to the early diagnostic evaluation and the early intervention program he was soon enrolled in, J.B. now has the language of other two year olds. 

Nationally, the number of babies screened has increased from 35 percent to 65 percent. In California that figure only reaches 19 percent. But according to Rick Jimenez from Natus Medical, a company producing medical devices for newborns, the number of children who are screened and don’t receive follow-up services is even more alarming. The first two hearing screenings happen before the baby leaves the hospital, he explained. The diagnostic evaluation happens later. Today, in 30 to 50 percent of the cases of newborns referred for diagnostic evaluation, there are no records of whether the babies are actually screened.  

AB 2780 addresses that problem, but it may still take more than a year until the state requirements are put into practice. Hospitals have until Dec. 21, 2002 to be certified for a hearing screening program and many of them are likely to wait until the last minute.  

“The hospitals are not ignoring this programs,” said Toni Will, director of the UCSF Hearing Coordination Center. “But there are obstacles.” Challenges include the cost of the equipment required to perform newborn hearing screenings and inadequate staffing. Another issue still to be addressed is the problem of insurance coverage for the tests. 


Strategies sought to reduce greenhouse gases

By Ben LumpkinDaily Planet staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

At a time when commentators around the world are still taking turns lambasting President George Bush’s decision to withdraw from the 1997 Kyoto agreements for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by industrialized nations, representatives from India, Indonesia, South African and the Philippines have been in Berkeley this week studying strategies for reducing such emissions in their own cities. 

It’s all part of the Cities for Climate Protection Program (CCP), a global campaign launched by the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives in 1993 to help cities around the world create and implement aggressive strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.  

More than 400 city and county governments in the United States, Europe, Asia, African and Australia are participating in the program today, including, as of Thursday, New York City.  

In the United States alone about 100 participating cities managed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by a total of 10 million tons in 2000, according to Michelle Wyman, director of public affairs for ICLEI’s U.S. office, which is in Berkeley. 

Berkeley has been part of the CCP program since the very beginning and has a detailed plan for reducing greenhouse gas emissions that is in some ways a model for other cities to follow, according to ICLEI Outreach Coordinator Susan Ode. While the Kyoto agreement would have called for the United States to reduce its emission levels to 7 percent below 1990 levels by 2012, for example, the Berkeley plan approved in 1998 aims to reduce emissions to 15 percent below 1990 levels by 2010. 

“We are thrilled that staff from our international offices are here to learn about how effective local action on climate protection has been in the United State,” said Nancy Skinner, international director of the CCP campaign, in a written statement. “They will take what they learn here to engage cities in their own countries to reduce global warming pollution in their communities.” 

A study by the prestigious National Academy of Sciences concluded earlier this month that greenhouse gas emissions could raise temperatures by between 2.5 and 10.4 degrees before the end of the century, contributing to rising sea levels and changing weather patterns. 

The visitors to Berkeley this week have little trouble imagining the impact of such a change. 

“As an island nation, the Philippine people are concerned about sea-level rise, and the increase in the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tropical storms,” said Pam Gallares-Oppus, CCP Regional Manager for Southeast Asia and a native of the Philippines. 

In India, climate change is “something people are facing every day,” according to Ramamurthi Sreedhar, one of two visitors from India in the Berkeley ICLEI office this week. Sreedhar said extreme weather events such as droughts, cyclones and floods have helped people at least understand the potential impact of global warming – even if there is still reluctance to acknowledge the ways in which they contribute to the problem, both as individuals and as a nation. 

“They have to recognize that there are certain activities of their own that are effecting it: energy use, cutting forests, and industries not following regulations,” Sreedhar said.  

But in a country where nearly 40 percent of the population lives in poverty, Sreedhar added, the emphasis tends to be on finding ways to expand industry and create new jobs rather than on environmental protection. 

Even the pollution regulations that are in place in India are often not obeyed, Sreedhar said. 

“Enforcement systems are weak, so you can get away with violating laws.” 

These are just some of the obstacles that Sreedhar, Gallares-Oppus and the other visitors to Berkeley this week must work to overcome when they return home and attempt to persuade municipal leaders to join the CCP campaign, said CCP Technical Program Coordinator Jim Yienger. 

“To get cities to agree, you need to go through a political process,” Yienger said. “That’s basically the first step.” 

Sreedhar said he plans to concentrate on cities with populations ranging from 300,000 to 1.2 million to start, with the hope that in relatively small communities (both Bombay and Delhi India have more than 10 million people) it will be easier to organize support for the CCP strategies and objectives. 

In the past CCP-participating cities have worked to: create building codes that enhance energy efficiency; launch home weatherization programs; promote solar energy use; create energy audit plans for businesses; encourage dense residential develop near public transit hubs; implement and expand recycling programs; and promote greater reliance on “green” power generation, to name just a few strategies. 

“A lot of political commitment is required in these kinds of activities,” Sreedhar said. “It’s easier to generate that kind of interest in small places.” 

Lorraine Mashiane, a representative from South Africa’s CCP office visiting Berkeley this week, said she has been amazed to see how far Berkeley has come already in its own efforts to reduce emissions.  

“The amount of work that has already been done; the efforts by everybody – the whole community – not just a particular group of people; it’s really impressive,” Mashiane said. 

The South Africa CCP office has already sent out invitations to 25 South African cities to submit proposals for how they might become involved in the CCP program, Mashiane said. She said she expects to choose five cities to work with intensively in the year ahead. 

Leluma Matooane, another South African CCP representative, said some cities in South African have already begun efforts to reduce emissions, in part because air pollution has reached levels where it significantly impacts the quality of life. The cities of Cape Town and Durban, in particular, suffer from a “brown haze” created by automobile exhaust and oil refinery emissions, he said. 

But while most of the foreign CCP representatives in Berkeley this week were looking for tools to improve the quality of life at home, the recognized that there was only so much they can do working in isolation.  

“The climate change thing is a global issue,” Mashiane said. “It’s not just about a particular country.” 

According to Skinner, the United States is responsible for 26 percent of the greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere each year, although it accounts for only 4 percent of the world population. 

Matooane said Bush’s decision to withdraw from the Kyoto commitments represents a “setback” for those working to reverse climate change everywhere. But, he said, “It doesn’t stop us from doing something about it.” 

 


Hillside club promoted idea of simple and healthy living

By Susan Cerny
Saturday June 30, 2001

Berkeley Observed 

Looking back, seeing ahead 

 

In 1898 a group of north Berkeley women founded a club devoted to educating the public on the healthful benefits of living simply in homes designed to provide plenty of fresh air, sunlight and greenery.  

The club was called the Hillside Club. The ideals promoted by the club were published in pamphlets and distributed to the public.  

In reaction to the excesses of the Victorian Age, the club advocated that homes should be simple and free of unnecessary decoration; wood siding should be left unpainted to weather naturally; and interiors should be filled with handmade or homemade furniture and decorative objects.  

The club believed that the benefits of country living could be developed in Berkeley, thereby creating a new kind of city that was in harmony with the landscape. 

Writer and naturalist Charles Keeler, a great proponent of this “arts and crafts” philosophy and an important influence in the founding of the Hillside Club, wrote a book “The Simple Home” in 1904 that describes how to achieve such a house.  

Architect Bernard Maybeck, whose name is associated with the concept of “building with nature,” designed his first “simple home” for Keeler at the top of Ridge Road in 1895.  

The house was built of unpainted redwood, both inside and out, and all the construction members were left exposed. Soon the north Berkeley hillside was covered with unpainted wood-sided houses set in lushly informal gardens. 

Even the neighborhood public Hillside School was designed in the rustic, back-to-nature style.  

It was built in 1915.  

It was covered with unpainted brown shingles and its wide covered porch was supported with posts of unpeeled redwood logs.  

The children went to school in a building very much like the homes they lived in.  

On September 17, 1923, a raging wildfire swept down from Wildcat Canyon destroying much of the early hillside neighborhood including the original Hillside School.  

Only a few of the early homes north of the university campus still stand.  

 

Susan Cerny writes Berkeley Observed in conjunction with the Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association


Irish chess champs face Berkeley team

By Guy Poole Daily Planet staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

Last summer, eight members of the Berkeley Bishops Chess Team traveled to Straffen, Ireland, to compete with the top-rated European Junior Champion Chess Team.  

This week the Berkeley Bishops are hosting nine children and five adults from Straffen, continuing the cultural exchange that began with a chess tournament last year. 

Straffen is a small village of 850 people, situated 40 miles west of Dublin. Last year Straffen Elementary School won the title of Junior Champions of Europe.  

The Berkeley Bishops spent a week with host families in the village. When the final tournament was played the Bishops won two out of three matches.  

Organizer Elizabeth Shaughnessy was the Irish Women’s Chess Champion in 1970 and former head of the Berkeley Board of Education.  

Shaughnessy said she was the first to start a school-based chess program on the West Coast in 1982 when she founded the Berkeley Chess School. Since then enrollment continues to climb, with 4,000 kids enrolled throughout the Bay Area in this year’s program.  

“It is the largest program on the West Coast,” Shaughnessy said.  

The children participating in the program generally range from third to sixth grade with a few exceptions.  

“If a younger kid is particularly bright, we let them join,” Shaughnessy said.  

How do kids benefit from such a program? 

“It helps the kids to learn how to focus, to problem solve, how to make decisions, and understanding the consequences of those decisions,” said Lanette Chan-Gordon, executive director of the Berkeley Chess School. 

Shaughnessy said, “The kids learn the responsibility of their own decisions.” 

A part from chess, the Irish children are enjoying their trip. 

Straffen student Niall Kiernan,11, was impressed by the Golden Gate Bridge. 

“We don’t have anything like that in Ireland,” he said. “There are more lights here too.” 

Donal Spring, 14, also of Straffen, agreed that not only were there more lights, but there is “more sun too.” 

The weather in Ireland made a big impression on Mahnoosh Moghadam, 9, of Berkeley, who visited Straffen last year with the team.  

“They have a lot of rainbows there. It’s always raining. I saw two rainbows at a time. Lots of horses too.” 

The big rematch is on Monday. 

 


BART officials ask governor for help

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

OAKLAND — Unions representing BART employees have asked Gov. Gray Davis to help avert a strike on the commuter train network. 

BART’s three largest unions, representing 2,800 employees, have voted to authorize a strike beginning midnight Saturday. 

But they also have asked Davis to impose a 60-day cooling off period that would allow negotiations to continue. 

“Should the governor grant our request, BART riders can be assured there will be no strike on Sunday morning,” said Larry Hendel with the Service Employees International Union 790, which represents maintenance and clerical workers. 

A Davis spokesman said Friday evening the governor has not yet decided how to respond to the requested intervention. 

BART managers have opposed the cooling-off period, saying they to reach an agreement this weekend. 

“They have to get serious at the bargaining table,” BART General Manager Tom Margro said of his union counterparts. 

A strike would affect 335,000 commuters in the San Francisco Bay area.


Friends say lotto prize went to great manv

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

SAN JOSE — The nation’s largest state lottery prize, a record $141 million, couldn’t have gone to a more deserving man, according to friends and neighbors of Alcario “Al” Castellano, a retired grocery store clerk who volunteered often to help Mexican-American groups. 

Castellano, 66, chose the one-time cash option when he bought his ticket, which means that within the next six weeks he will receive $70,794,364. After taxes, Castellano will net about $50.9 million. 

“My wife and I will never be able to spend all of this money. This is for our family and future generations,” he grinned. 

The former migrant farm worker plans to retire in comfort, take vacations with his wife, and most importantly, provide for his family.  

He said he would immediately pay off his three children’s student loans. 

“I am the luckiest man alive today because I have a loving wife, three great children and some grandchildren,” he said.  

“I am proud to take care of their every need from now on because I just got luckier.” 

The couple also plans to donate to local charities they are familiar with, particularly ones fostering education, leadership and arts and culture for Latinos. 

 

“We know that winning the Lotto will change our lives,” Castellano said. “The one thing we do know is this will not change our core values.” 

Castellano thanked his wife Carmen profusely for the years of support that she had given him. 

She wants to visit Mexico, Europe and Peru. 

“I’ve always dreamed of seeing those pyramids,” she said. “Now maybe our dreams will come true.” 

Castellano is a fairly quiet man, but one whose face is well-known at the city’s many Mexican American cultural events, acquaintances say. Often behind the lens of a video or still camera, Castellano has spent many years amassing images of the city’s rich Hispanic culture. 

“He was the most supportive person,” said Melinda Chacon, a box office worker at Mexican Heritage Plaza in San Jose who met Castellano when he videotaped a beauty pageant she was in. “He’s very well deserving. I’m sure everybody felt the same way.” 

Carmen Castellano, a semiretired secretary at 62, is a board member of the folkloric dance group Los Lupenos, among other organizations. 

“We went through a pretty rough year last year, and he and his wife have been there doing pretty much whatever they could,” Maria De La Rosa, the dance group’s artistic director. “He took it upon himself to come in and clean for us, mopping the lobby, vacuuming the floors and taking the garbage out.” 

Castellano was the dairy manager at a San Jose Safeway store before he retired with a bad back, said coworker Bob Skillicorn. 

“You sit and think ’It’s a sin for one person to win that much money.’ But when it’s someone like him, well, I’m really happy for him,” Skillicorn said. “He’s a real down to earth individual and a very strong family man. I know he’ll do the best for his family and community by giving back something.” 

Castellano bought the ticket Saturday at Alex Wang’s liquor store, where he has bought tickets for 15 years. 

“We’ve known each other so long,” Wang said. “He’s a nice guy. He’s smiling all the time.” 

Wang’s smiling, too: he gets $705,000 for selling the ticket. He plans to buy a car for his wife, Ling, and put the rest in the bank. 

Wang said Castellano always marked two of his own numbers and let the computer do the rest with quick picks. The winner was the last number he bought that day: 3, 22, 43, 44 and 45 and Mega number 8. 

Ticket buyers must decide at the time of purchase whether to take a one-time payment or 26 annual checks. Castellano chose the lump sum when he bought his ticket Saturday. 

He said he woke at dawn Sunday, brewed coffee, and plucked his ticket from the refrigerator where it was posted with a magnet. 

He sat down to read the paper and began matching the numbers, one by one. 

“Now, what’s going on here?” he said to himself. “Is this real? I can’t believe it.” 

He went outside for a walk, came back into the kitchen and checked the numbers again. He woke Carmen, “and she started getting hysterical and started dancing.” 

Born in New Mexico, he moved with his family to California to pick crops when he was 9. He volunteered for the Army after high school in the mid-1950s. He and Carmen met at a dance in Salinas. 

He has been a member of the local chapter of the American GI Forum, a Hispanic veterans group that produces annual Cinco de Mayo and Fiestas Patrias festivals. He shows up with his video camera at Hispanic parades, mariachi festivals, charity fund-raisers and other community events so often that the newspaper called him “the Mexican-American community’s unofficial videographer.” 

The largest previous single-state lottery prize before the current record jackpot was $118.8 million in 1991 in California — that was shared by 54 winners. 

The largest multistate jackpot came in a Powerball game in 1998: $295.7 million, shared by 13 machinists in Westerville, Ohio. The world’s largest jackpot ever won by an individual was $197 million, won by a nanny in Boston in 1999 in the multistate Big Game lottery. 

The Castellanos were quiet and nervous as they turned in the ticket Thursday, Lottery spokeswoman Norma Minas said. 


Hispanics see new political clout at conference

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

With shouts of “Arriba!” whistles and thunderous applause, Los Angeles mayoral candidate Antonio Villaraigosa was greeted like a conquering hero here at a gathering of Hispanic officials. 

Though Villaraigosa lost the race to white candidate James Hahn, Hispanic officials, buoyed by census data showing their growing numbers, believe that victory – greater political power – is inevitable. 

This year, census findings showed there were 35.3 million Hispanics in 2000, or about 12.5 percent of the population. They now rivals blacks, who number between 33.9 million and 35.4 million, as the country’s leading minority group. 

“It means influence, it means buying power, it means having a greater voice and being able to have more officials that can represent that voice,” said Deborah Ortega, a city council member in Denver, Colo. 

Ortega was one of about 900 Hispanic elected officials, from city council and school board members to members of Congress, that attended this week’s National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Education Fund annual meeting. 

At the conference, they swapped strategy on how to translate their growing numbers into political power by mobilizing the immigrant vote and by backing “crossover” candidates with broad appeal in areas without Hispanic majorities. 

Many were brimming with excitement generated by Villaraigosa’s campaign, which they said raised the profile of Hispanic politicians and demonstrated Hispanic voters’ support and higher-than-average turnout. Hispanics made up 22 percent of the electorate June 5, compared to 15 percent in 1997. 

“I have no tears. I put all my sweat on that battlefield,” Villaraigosa said Thursday to a crowd of about 500 who greeted him with hugs, cheers and a standing ovation. “There was an energy, an excitement there, that all of us can tap into.” 

There are about 5,000 Hispanic elected and appointed officials across the country, ranging from sheriffs and school board members to mayors and U.S. representatives. 

Still, Hispanics represent just 1 percent of elected officials in the country. Hispanics account for 4 percent of members of Congress and there are just seven Latinos in elected, statewide offices. 

On one hand, these numbers “generate great pride,” said Arturo Vargas, executive director of the NALEO Educational Fund. “On the other side, they show we have so much more work to get done.” 

Much of that work lies in cultivating crossover candidates that appeal to voters beyond the Hispanic community. The association chose the Bay Area as the site for its conference to highlight San Jose Mayor Ron Gonzales’ success at garnering votes outside the Hispanic community, which accounts for about 30 percent of the city’s population. 

Hispanic leaders are hoping to apply the lessons learned in California to North Carolina, Arkansas and other areas that saw explosive growth in Hispanic populations over the last decade. 

Forthcoming mayoral elections in New York and Houston promise to be high-profile tests of Hispanic candidates Fernando Ferrer and Orlando Sanchez, and the association plans to make phone calls and walk precincts in those cities to get out the vote. 

“The Latino mayors of large cities that have succeeded have that crossover appeal,” said Michael Madrid, vice president of San Antonio, Texas-based political consulting firm Guerra DeBerry Coody. “It allows them to transcend ethnic labels.” 

Dale Prairie, a council member in Bernalillo, N.M., said he plans to take that lesson to heart in his next campaign. He believes he lost a bid for county treasurer because he did not have the votes of high-tech employees and elderly people. Now he realizes the importance of courting those constituencies. 

“Latinos are looking forward to growing more in numbers and being able to win more elections in their own communities,” he said. 

Besides appealing to broad coalitions of voters, candidates must also attract a new bloc of immigrant voters. Since 1993, 5.3 million immigrants became naturalized citizens; of those, 2.3 million were Hispanics, said Louis DeSipio, an associate professor of political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Helping immigrants to register to vote, teaching them about voting rights and the importance of voting, and urging them to go to the polls were the focus of one workshop at the conference. 

Officials also dug into the nuts and bolts of governing at workshops on school finance, municipal budgets, education and affordable housing. Such discussions indicate political maturity in the Hispanic community, Madrid said. “It’s not just about breaking into the system, it’s about making the system work.” 

What’s next? “Short of electing somebody to the White House, electing a United States senator is the next breakthrough we need to make,” Vargas said. 

“The last election in 2000 broke new ground. You had two middle-aged white men speaking Spanish,” Vargas said. “Success at the ballot box is going to require Latino strategies. We want these parties to work for the vote of the Latino community.” 

 

 

On the Net: 

National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials: http://www.naleo.org/


Immigrant workers seek crack down on labor laws

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Frustrated by the postponement of a state hearing on workers’ rights, dozens of immigrant workers rallied outside Gov. Gray Davis’ local office Friday and urged full enforcement of labor laws. 

A delegation of activists delivered a letter to Davis’ office and met with a member of the governor’s staff who assured the workers there would be a budget increase for the Department of Industrial Relations and agreed to look into the group’s request to have a meeting with Davis, said Joann Lo with the Garment Worker Center. 

A phone call to Davis’ press office was not immediately returned. 

“We demand more attention and resources to ensure the rights of workers to fair wages, safe working conditions and an efficient process to demand recourse for labor law violations,” the 

letter stated. 

“Conditions for immigrant workers are not better now than they were under the previous administration, and the Department of Industrial Relations continues to fail under your administration to adequately uphold and enforce current labor laws.” 

Day laborers marched up and down the sidewalk in front of the Ronald Reagan State Building alongside janitors and garment and restaurant workers carrying signs that said “put labor laws into action.”  

Wearing brightly colored T-shirts and chanting in Spanish, a couple hundred workers turned out for the midday rally. 

Assemblyman Paul Koretz, D-West Hollywood, is chairman of the Assembly Labor and Employment Committee that had been scheduled to hear from the workers Friday.  

The meeting was postponed until July 26 because of schedule conflicts, Koretz said, including prolonged budget negotiations that are under way in Sacramento. 

Workers want the next budget to include an additional $5.5 million for enforcement of labor laws.  

The budget likely will include about a $5 million increase, Koretz said, which is only part of what is needed to improve the situation. 

“Funding is the problem. There’s not enough funding for inspectors. If the laws were enforced actively it would make a huge difference,” Koretz said. 

The Department of Industrial Relations is so short-staffed and underfunded that the average employer of immigrant workers is likely only to get a random visit from inspectors every 60 to 100 years, Koretz said. 

Immigrant workers who claimed to have fallen victim to corrupt employers spoke through interpreters Friday to tell of their own experiences and frustrations in trying to get the state to respond to their complaints. 

Mateo Cruz, a day laborer who said he cleaned restaurants for 40 days for one employer, contends he is owed $2,000 after putting in 12-hour days. 

Yeny Saavedra, a garment worker who says she worked up to 15 hours a day sometimes, filed a complaint against her employer for failure to receive overtime pay, but has not received any funds. She said she is owed some $15,000 in back overtime pay, penalties and damages. 

The workers want a commitment that the hearing will be held at the new scheduled date of July 26, and Koretz said he hopes it won’t have to be rescheduled again. 

“One way or another we’re going to have a hard-hitting hearing, and we’re going to dramatize (these abuses) as much as possible,” he said.


Some want to evict ‘worst of the worst’ from San Quentin

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

SAN QUENTIN — They call them the “worst of the worst” – death row inmates who spend hours fashioning weapons out of unlikely materials and hurl filthy concoctions at passing guards. 

Some want violent inmates evicted to other facilities, pointing to an increase in attacks on staff as proof that aging San Quentin State Prison, built in 1852, isn’t equipped for the bleeding edge of 21st-century malefaction. 

“The people in (maximum security) prisons are in more secure prisons than our current death row,” says Stephen Green, assistant secretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency. “That’s the problem with San Quentin. It just simply isn’t as secure as it should be to have that kind of inmate there.” 

Part of the nation’s largest prison system – California has 160,000 inmates – San Quentin doesn’t have the no-contact design of modern prisons, which use remote-control doors and other innovations to keep prisoners separate from guards. 

At San Quentin, officers have constant hand-to-hand dealing with inmates, pushing in and retrieving food trays, exchanging clean laundry for dirty, and escorting prisoners to the showers and exercise yards. The cells, which are made of bars, have a metal screen in front, but that’s not enough to stop “gassing” attacks, the noxious practice  

of throwing mixtures of urine and feces. 

Officers also are at risk when they collect an inmate’s food tray.  

The design of the food slot means the officer and inmate are inches apart and if the officer is distracted, sometimes intentionally by another inmate, the inmate can pull the officer’s hands through the slot. 

While the majority of death row prisoners do not cause problems, attacks have increased threefold in the past year and a half in the Adjustment Center, the place where the most disruptive death row inmates are sent, prison officials say.  

Forty-five of the center’s 85 inmates have attacked guards, according to prison staff. 

“We’ve had officers that have had their arms grabbed as they’re trying to issue a tray of food and the inmate takes a slashing device and slashes at their wrists,” says Tony Jones, president of the San Quentin correctional officers’ union. Some inmates have made spears by rolling up a newspaper very tightly, coating it with oatmeal to create a hard crust and then finding a piece of metal for the tip, creating a weapon “every bit strong enough to stick into a cement wall or stick into you.” 

A number of ideas have been floated about what to do with San Quentin: Close it, move death row, split death row into two or break it down into smaller units distributed to maximum security prisons throughout the state. 

A state study on the feasibility of closing San Quentin is due at the end of this month for review by state officials and the governor, who has final say. 

Meanwhile, a more modest proposal is making its way through the Legislature that would send up to 30 of the most troublesome inmates to California State Prison, Sacramento, a modern facility next to Folsom State Prison. 

That idea, put forward by Assemblyman Joe Nation, D-San Rafael, has passed in the Assembly and is scheduled for a Senate committee hearing July 10.  

Not surprisingly, the bill is less than popular with residents of the Folsom area. 

Jones opposes the idea of closing San Quentin. 

“We’ve rebuilt this institution in the last 10 years completely. I don’t think that it’s a broken-down institution that can’t go on,” he said. 

But he thinks getting rid of the worst death row inmates is a good idea. 

“Even if it was to move 10, it would help,” he says. “You’re housing an inmate in a facility that currently poses a clear and present danger to all staff that works with them.” 

Inmate advocates say not all violence can be blamed on inmates.  

They suggest some of the recent violence may have been in reaction to restrictions on visiting and access to exercise yards. They oppose the idea of moving inmates away from San Francisco, which is where a large number of death row lawyers practice. 

“The only people who should be moved out are the ones who suffer from severe mental illness,” says Robert Bryan, who represents a number of death row inmates. 

Steve Fama of the Prison Law Office, which provides free legal services to help improve inmates’ living conditions, said he’s concerned that inmates who get moved out won’t have the same access to legal resources like law libraries and will be allowed fewer attorney visiting days. 

Fama’s also unsure whether the increased assaults are “the start of the trend or merely another turn of the wheel” and thinks the state should take a closer look at the Adjustment Center to see what’s going on with inmates, staff and supervisors. 

“The idea that moving 10 or 20 inmates ... is going to solve the problem is a little naive,” Fama says.


California nearing recession

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

LOS ANGELES — California’s power crisis and the struggling technology market will keep the state’s economy teetering on the edge of recession for at least the rest of the year, economic forecasters say. 

Even without factoring in the continuing costs of keeping the state’s cash-strapped utilities in operation, California’s economy – the fifth largest in the world – is rapidly slowing and will struggle to keep from shrinking, according to the Anderson Forecast released Thursday. 

Californians are jittery over the reliability of the state’s power system, worried about their jobs and have lost much of their confidence in the economy, said Tom Lieser, senior economist with the quarterly report, based at the University of California at Los Angeles. 

The UCLA economists estimated consumer spending in the first quarter, adjusted for inflation, declined 3.3 percent in the state as paper riches based on vanishing stock options, known as the “wealth effect,” disappeared. “The recent weakness of taxable sales ... likely means that the wealth effect on consumer spending, which was an important determinant of the 1999-2000 gains, is now dead in California,” Lieser said. 

He estimated the state’s unemployment rate – 4.9 percent in May – would reach 6.3 percent by 2003 before turning around. 

One bright spot in the forecast was state exports, which remained high with 13.2 percent year-to-year growth from the first quarter last year, Lieser said. 

But the power crisis, fueled in part by increasing demand from the high-tech industry and limited hydroelectric capacity due to drought in the Northwest, is an increasing drain on the state. 

California has spent billions of dollars buying electricity for its largest utilities, which have been losing money for the past year due to high wholesale power prices and deregulation rules that prevented them from passing the high costs on to consumers. 

A report prepared by Cambridge Energy Research Associates, an energy research group that co-sponsored Thursday’s Anderson Forecast forum, concluded that by bailing out the utilities and shielding consumers, the state would end up with huge debt and more rolling blackouts this summer. 

The report suggests the power crisis would end sooner if consumers bore the brunt of rising electricity costs because that would force conservation. 

That drew sharp criticism from Steve Maviglio, spokesman for Gov. Gray Davis. 

“Already without a rate increase we’ve had an 11 percent reduction in energy use from last May to this May,” Maviglio said. “And there’ll be a rate increase hitting June bills that should cause even further reductions.” 

On the national front, Anderson Forecast Director Edward Leamer said the risk of recession had dropped slightly from an earlier report, from 90 percent to 80 percent. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Anderson Forecast: http://www.uclaforecast.com 


Doctor agrees not to try human cloning for now

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

WASHINGTON — A researcher who had been preparing to work on human cloning has agreed not to attempt an experiment or research until the legality of the effort is determined, the Food and Drug Administration reported. 

FDA spokesman Lawrence Bachorik said Friday that his agency has inspected a lab set up by Brigitte Boisselier in an effort to attempt human cloning. 

She signed a statement committing not to attempt human cloning and not to do research using human eggs until the legality of human cloning is determined, Bachorik said. 

Lawmakers have been preparing legislation to outlaw human cloning. In the meantime, FDA has insisted that no experiments can go forward without its approval.  

That hasn’t discouraged a religious organization called the Raelian Movement, which argues that life on Earth was created by extraterrestrial scientists. 

Its leader, Rael, started a lab – directed by Boisselier – where he vowed to clone a human somewhere in the United States. 

Another group, led by an Italian fertility doctor, is promising to find another country where cloning is legal. Both teams say they have people ready to volunteer for the first human effort. 

In its issue due on newsstands Monday, U.S. News & World Report says that a federal grand jury in Syracuse, N.Y., is investigating the Raelian lab. Bachorik declined to say where the lab is located. Boisselier formerly taught chemistry at Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y. Boisselier told a House energy and commerce subcommittee in March that her lab had received a letter from FDA warning that it would be against the law to proceed with cloning without permission. 

At that time she said she did not know whether the company operating the lab, Clonaid, would proceed anyway. 

She dismissed safety concerns, saying the problems have all come in cloning animals and do not apply to potential human cloning.  

She said she was working with a father who was devastated by the death of his son and wants to clone him. 

The FDA says any human cloning experiments in the United States would need its approval and, based on safety concerns, the agency would not approve any applications at this time.  

Clones are created when the genetic material from a single cell is injected into an egg cell that has had its genes removed. The resulting baby would be like an identical twin born years later. 

Ethicists note that the clone would not be a copy of the original person.  

He or she would grow up in a different environment at a different time, said Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.


Medicare expands services

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

WASHINGTON — Screening tests for breast cancer, cervical cancer and colorectal cancer will be covered by Medicare beginning on July 1, the Department of Health and Human Services announced Friday. 

The new coverage comes under a law passed by Congress last December. The legislation calls for The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to phase in coverage for certain tests and therapies that detect diseases early, when there is the best chance for treatment. 

“Medicare must play a leading role in preventing, containing or slowing illness,” said HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson. “By increasing preventive services we can save lives.” 

Under the law, most preventive services require a 20 percent co-pay of a Medicare-approved amount. The new law applies to those who are not considered at high risk for cancer – those who are considered high-risk cases are already covered. Under the new measure, women can request coverage every two years for Pap Smear tests, which help millions detect precancerous cervical cells in time to prevent cancer.  

Medicare recipients are also now entitled to a screening colonoscopy every 10 years. 

On The Net: 

Medicare: http://www.medicare.gov 


Senate passes patients’ rights bill

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

WASHINGTON — Defying a veto threat, the Democratic-controlled Senate passed sweeping patients’ rights legislation Friday night, promising millions of Americans new health care protections and the ability to sue their HMOs. 

The 59-36 vote sent the bill to the House, where the White House and Republican leaders were hoping to rework it to restrict lawsuits. 

The legislation is a “going to protect the patients of this country, the families, the children, the women, the workers in this nation,” said Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., a leading supporter. 

GOP critics saw it differently, and said so. Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn., a physician, said the measure was “more concerned about protecting the rights of trial lawyers than providing Americans with affordable high-quality health care.” 

But an alternative proposal that would have reduced the threat of lawsuits, supported mostly by Republicans, was swept aside, 59-36, moments before the final vote. 

Designed to combat HMO horror stories, the legislation as originally drafted would give an estimated 190 million Americans new protections such as the right to emergency room care, access to specialists, minimum hospital stays for mastectomies and access to government-run clinical trials. 

Patients could appeal any HMO’s denial of care to an independent reviewer. The legislation also would permit patients to sue if they lose their appeal and to recover substantial damages if they win in court. 

President Bush issued a veto threat against the bill last week, saying he agreed with the need to protect patients but was concerned the measure would prompt lawsuits, drive up the cost of insurance and cause businesses to cancel coverage. 

Republicans made the same point repeatedly during the debate, and Democrats agreed to a series of changes they said would alleviate the problem. 

“I think we made a lot of improvements,” Daschle told reporters. “And I think the president should reconsider” his veto threat. 

Republican officials said that was unlikely, at least until Democrats agreed to further reduce the threat of lawsuits and the potential for enormous sums to be awarded in damages. 

Supporters and critics of the bill have generally agreed on the need for patient protections – an issue that garners consistently high support in public opinion polls. 

But they clashed often over the lawsuits that Democrats, aligned politically with the nation’s trial lawyers, say are necessary to enforce those rights. Republicans, generally aligned with the health insurance industry, tried at several points to curtail the potential for suits. 

One change, adopted on Thursday, would shield an estimated 94 percent of the nation’s employers from lawsuits. 

The bill’s supporters agreed to others on Friday. 

 

One would limit class action lawsuits. Another would require virtually all patients to complete an independent appeal of an HMO’s denial of care before going to court. 

Supporters raised objections to proposals to limit damages that patients could recover in successful lawsuits, and also objected to further restrictions on patients’ abilities to bring suits. 

“At some point Senator Kennedy and Senator (John) McCain and Senator (John) Edwards are going to get serious and negotiate” on the legal issues, said Nickles, referring to the lead sponsors of the measure. 

Sen. Fred Thompson, R-Tenn., proposed the amendment to foreclose most suits while independent appeals were ongoing. 

Passage, on a vote of 98-0, means denial of care decisions will ultimately be reviewed by “somebody who is objective, somebody who is an expert,” he said, and will result in “doctors making decisions instead of lawyers.” 

Thompson’s amendment would permit lawsuits in limited circumstances when appeals were in progress, principally when they consumed more than 31 days. 

Sen. Mike DeWine, R-Ohio, authored the amendment to reduce the potential for class action suits, and it, too, cleared on a vote of 98-0. 

But other changes advanced by critics were swiftly sidetracked by the bill’s supporters. 

Among them was one amendment by Sen. Wayne Allard, R-Colo., to ban all patients’ rights lawsuits against employers with 15 employees or fewer. It was killed on a vote of 55-43. 

——— 

The bill, S. 1052, can be found at http://thomas.loc.gov 


Vice President Cheney headed back to hospital

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

WASHINGTON — Vice President Dick Cheney, experiencing heart problems for the third time since last November’s election, expected doctors to implant a pacemaker Saturday to even out a rapid heartbeat. Declaring himself otherwise fit, he said he would resign if ill health began hindering his work. 

Looking trim and bit pale at a surprise White House news conference, Cheney tried to minimize his latest ailment by predicting he would return to work Monday and welcoming the prospect of a second term. 

He has suffered four heart attacks over a quarter century, the last one in November, and was hospitalized in March to reopen a partially blocked artery — a health history that has become a nagging political question for the administration. 

“The doctors have assured me there’s no reason why either the procedure or the device that’s being implanted should in any way inhibit my capacity to function as the vice president,” said Cheney, 60. 

The odds were that he would need the pacemaker implanted, Cheney said, and he seemed resigned to it. “I look on this an insurance policy,” he said. 

The 30 minute news conference was conducted with almost no notice, a rare breach of protocol that aides hoped would give Cheney a chance to deliver the news before it leaked. Bush advisers felt they had mishandled the November and March hospitalizations, which raised questions about whether Cheney was fit to remain as next in line to the presidency. 

“If it were the doctors’ judgment that any of these developments constituted the kind of information that indicated I would not be able to perform, I would be the first to step down,” the vice president said. “I don’t have any interest in continuing in the post unless I’m able to perform adequately.” 

Clearly trying to ease any voter concern, he repeated the sentiment in the news conference – and again for a Philadelphia radio station. “If the docs ever come in and say, ‘Look, we really think you ought to ease off,’ I’ll be the first to recognize that and step down and let somebody else take over,” Cheney told WPHT. 

An unusually influential vice president, Cheney headed Bush’s transition team, played a major role in Cabinet and top personnel selections and chaired the White House energy task force. He is a top foreign policy adviser, the chief congressional lobbyist and sure to be at nearly every important White House meeting. 

Cheney said he informed Bush on Tuesday that doctors were recommending the test and, probably, a pacemaker. The news was closely guarded, though some in the White House spent as much as two days preparing for Friday’s announcement, which included a statement from Cheney’s doctor. 

In that statement, Dr. Jonathan Samuel Reiner said Cheney wore a heart monitor for 34 hours and the device detected four brief episodes of abnormally fast heartbeats. “Mr. Cheney felt none of these occurrences,” the statement said. Advisers later said Cheney wore the device over the weekend at home, not at work. 

Saturday’s test will involve running thin wires through a vein in Cheney’s leg, and into his heart.  

The wires have sensors that detect the way electricity ripples across the muscles that pump the heart, and will help doctors assess the risk of future arrhythmia. Doctors will decide on the spot whether to implant the pacemaker. 

That device is about the size of a pager, weighing less than 80 grams, and is placed under the skin of the upper chest. It can correct an irregular heartbeat with a low-level shock. 

More than 150,000 Americans, mostly over 60, have pacemakers. The devices are usually used to adjust slowing heartbeats; Cheney’s rapid heartbeat could be more serious. 

“This has the potential to become a serious issue,” said Dr. Jeff A. Brinker, a cardiologist and pacemaker specialist at Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. He called Cheney’s type of arrhythmia “more disturbing” than a normal pacing problem with the heart. 

Cheney said the pacemaker was merely insurance against the possibility that his heart would again begin pumping out of time. “It may never actually be needed,” he said. 

He calmly fielded 26 questions and showed some humor. With a crooked half-smile, he said the pacemaker is “an energy efficient device. It runs for five to eight years, without having to replace the batteries.” He also repeated that his wife, Lynne, “is in charge of my food supply.” 

Aides say he has lost more than 20 pounds in recent months, 

Cheney said Bush would have to decide who would be the GOP running mate in 2004 but “if I’m in shape to do it, and if my health permits, then I’d be perfectly happy to serve.” 


Russia opposed to Iraqi sanction plans

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

PARIS — Secretary of State Colin Powell voiced doubt Friday that a U.S.-British plan to overhaul sanctions on Iraq would be approved soon by the U.N. Security Council. The problem is Russia, which is holding out. 

“We’ve had some progress over the last 24 hours with the French and the Chinese, but I’m not saying they are all aboard yet,” Powell said. 

In New York, acting U.N. Ambassador James Cunningham announced that four of the five permanent council members – the United States, Britain, China and France – had agreed on a list of military-related items that might be exported. The list would have to be reviewed by the U.N. committee monitoring sanctions against Iraq. 

“We were very encouraged” by the support from France and China, Cunningham said, calling the list a key part of the U.S.-British plan. 

But Russia, Iraq’s closest council ally, remains adamantly opposed to the proposal, and did not agree on the list. Russia has threatened to veto the resolution if it comes to a vote. 

Powell said Russia was protecting its commercial interests and was not convinced all sanctions would ultimately be removed. 

The secretary of state said he would speak to Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov over the weekend. Cunningham and other diplomats said they expect high-level diplomatic contacts to continue ahead of a Tuesday deadline. The Security Council scheduled another meeting on Iraq for Monday afternoon. 

The U.S.-British plan would lift most restrictions on civilian goods entering Iraq while plugging up lucrative Iraqi smuggling routes and tightening enforcement of an arms embargo imposed after Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait. The Iraqi government vehemently opposes the plan. 

The proposal is incorporated in a resolution to extend the U.N. oil-for-food program, which allows Iraq to sell oil if the proceeds are spent on food, medicine and other essential goods. When agreement wasn’t reached on a sanctions overhaul in early June, the program was extended until July 3. 

The current Security Council president, Bangladesh’s U.N. Ambassador Anwarul Chowdhury, said he expects another temporary extension because of differences on the sanctions overhaul. 

“I believe the bigger resolution is not possible,” Chowdhury said. “It is absolutely difficult.” He explained that his assessment was based on a discussion on Iraq held by the council behind closed doors Friday afternoon. 

While in the Middle East, Powell lobbied Foreign Ministers Hubert Vedrine of France, Tang Jiaxuan of China and Jack Straw of Britain by telephone. 

As he flew from Jordan to Paris for a meeting with Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, Powell told reporters he was pleased with the success he had rallying other Security Council members to support a new sanctions policy. 

In Jordan, Powell said, he promised King Abdullah II that the United States would try to minimize the impact of the new sanctions. Jordan, a neighbor and key trading partner of Iraq, has voiced deep reservations about the U.S.-British proposal, worried that it would devastate its economy. 

In New York, Iraq’s Foreign Ministry Undersecretary Riyadh Al-Qaisi reiterated Baghdad’s vehement opposition to the plan during an open Security Council meeting Thursday and at a press conference on Friday. 

Iraq halted all oil exports, except to its neighbors, in protest. Al-Qaisi said Friday that Iraq will not resume oil exports if the Security Council approves a resolution that makes any mention of altering the current sanctions.


U.S. Navy bombing exercises near end on Vieques island amid protests

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

VIEQUES, Puerto Rico — Fighter jets dropped dummy bombs on the U.S. Navy’s firing range on the island of Vieques on Friday, while security officers detained five protesters who invaded Navy lands. 

F-14 Tomcats and F-18 Hornets conducted exercises over the range on the island’s eastern tip, said Navy spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Katherine Goode. She said the exercises would continue into the night and would conclude either Friday night or Saturday. 

Among three protesters detained Thursday was New York State legislator Adam Clayton Powell IV, who was turned over to U.S. marshals. In a court appearance on Friday, he refused to post $2,000 bail and was returned to a federal detention center in the San Juan suburb of Guaynabo. 

No trial date has been set for Powell, the latest of several New York City politicians to join local protesters in calling for an immediate end to the bombing.  

At least 73 people have been arrested for trespassing on restricted lands since the bombing resumed last week, Goode said. 

The five detained on Friday were captured near the fence bordering the island’s civilian area, where most protesters have been detained. 

Although President George W. Bush this month ordered the Navy to leave in 2003, many Puerto Ricans say that is too long to wait. 

Three other New York politicians who were imprisoned for protesting were freed Friday morning after spending 37 days in jail. 

State Assemblyman Jose Rivera, 65; Bronx County Democratic Party chairman Roberto Ramirez, 51; and New York City Councilman Adolfo Carrion Jr., 40, walked out of the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn shortly before 9 a.m. 

Their fellow prisoner, the Rev. Al Sharpton, also convicted of tresspassing during Vieques protests, must remain in jail until Aug. 15. 

In the Puerto Rican capital of San Juan, meanwhile, tensions had subsided after a Thursday night clash between opponents of the bombing and pro-U.S. statehood activists, who raised a U.S. flag above a chapel built as a center of prayer for those who oppose the Navy bombing. 

 

Five people were injured in clashes between the groups, and many demanded that the U.S. flag be lowered. 

On Friday, the U.S. flag still flew at the top of the pole, above a Puerto Rican flag and a smaller blue-and-white Vieques flag. Police stood guard around the flagpole. 

——— 

On the Net: 

U.S. Navy site: www.navyvieques.navy.mil 

Anti-Navy site: www.viequeslibre.org 


Dealerships seem to wait people out

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi King Features Syndicate
Saturday June 30, 2001

Dear Tom and Ray: 

I've been reading your column for a long time, and I've noticed an interesting pattern in the questions. I see a lot of dealerships trying to “wait out” customers on repairs that should be done under warranty. I was under the impression that if the dealership does work under warranty, it gets the same amount of money as if it had done the work for a retail customer. So why would they want to wait people out? Am I wrong? — Matt 

TOM: Well, legally, they can't “wait people out” as a way to avoid fixing a problem, Matt. If you complain about a problem while the car is covered under warranty, the manufacturer is obligated to fix the problem, even if the warranty expires before they actually fix it. 

RAY: But you're right that a lot of dealers are not eager to fix problems under warranty. Generally speaking, the manufacturer pays a lower labor rate to the dealer for warranty work. And, since the parts come from the manufacturer, the dealership can't earn its usual markup on the cost of parts, either. 

TOM: Plus, it's hard to sweet-talk the manufacturer into buying a fresh set of fuzzy dice every time they come in. 

RAY: But a lot of the fault here lies with the manufacturer. The manufacturers have traditionally made it less appealing for dealers to do repairs under warranty. In order to keep dealers from taking advantage of the warranty reimbursements, they've historically made those reimbursements small and authorization hard to get. 

TOM: In recent years, most manufacturers have seen the effects of these policies (angry customers), so they've increased their warranty reimbursements and have used other means of ensuring that unnecessary work doesn't get charged to them (like installing secret video cameras in the coffee machine). But manufacturers still don't pay as much as you do when you make an appointment. 

RAY: Despite the disincentive, some dealerships have realized that doing warranty work graciously can be good – in the long term – for business. Such good service can create a customer for life. And, over a lifetime, that customer can be worth a lot more to the dealership than the few hundred bucks they forgo by replacing the customer's transmission under warranty. 

TOM: But until warranty repairs generate income equivalent to nonwarranty repairs, there will always be dealers out there who will shirk the warranty work -- assuming they've got enough work that they can pick and choose. So you can blame the shortsighted dealers, but some of the blame also has to go to the manufacturers for creating this customer-unfriendly disincentive.  

Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or e-mail them by visiting the Car Talk section of cars.com on the World Wide Web.


Reaction to rate cut reminder of market’s woes

By Lisa Singahina The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

NEW YORK — An interest rate cut by the Federal Reserve is usually cause for celebration on Wall Street. But investors had to sleep on it before rallying the day after the Fed’s sixth such move of the year. 

Analysts weren’t surprised by the initially cautious response to the rate cut Wednesday; the market has become increasingly convinced that better corporate earnings, not Fed policy, will presage any business turnaround. 

“We still haven’t seen the effect of the initial rate cuts, so it’s harder to get excited about the sixth one,” said Rafael Tamargo, director of equity research at Wilmington Trust. 

The rate reduction also was widely anticipated, meaning investors had been buying and selling on lower rates ahead of the official announcement. And the cut was smaller than the market had wanted — a quarter of a percentage point, rather than the half-point many money managers predicted. 

What changed? 

“I think people thought about it overnight and realized it didn’t matter” that the cut was smaller than expected, Tamargo said. “What mattered was that the Fed had made the cut and indicated it would cut again if necessary.” 

Still, the market’s reaction illustrates one of the frustrating truths about Wall Street in an economic downturn. 

Although the Fed’s interest rate cuts have provided a buffer against strong selloffs by reassuring investors that help is on the way, the reductions haven’t provided a catalyst for a significant, sustainable rally. 

Instead, with more than 600 corporate warnings this quarter, the market has become even more hesitant to commit to stocks of companies that can’t say their performance will soon improve. 

Analysts say the market is mired in what’s called a trading range, with the averages unable to advance or fall below a certain level. 

The Dow Jones industrials, for example, have been trading between 10,500 and 11,400 since mid-April. The Nasdaq has been hovering between 2,000 and 2,300 since about the same time, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 index has traded between 1,200 and 1,300. 

“In a trading range, people generally trade off extremes in investor sentiment,” said Richard Cripps, chief market strategist at Legg Mason in Baltimore.  

“What we’ve seen this week is a market that had become oversold and negative, so people started buying.  

“They’ll sell when the market becomes too high. But the overall market won’t advance beyond that.” 

Don’t expect the time of year to help either. Summer is traditionally a slower time for Wall Street and business deals. Trading volumes tend to decrease as the nation goes on vacation. 

All of these factors played a role this past week. 

So did news that a federal appeals court had reversed a lower court ruling that had ordered the breakup of Microsoft intensified the positive sentiment. Analysts say bargain hunting influenced trading, too. 

The end of the quarter was still another contributor. With the second-quarter ending Friday, professional money manager spent the early part of the week selling and adjusting their portfolios.  

As the week wore on, that pressure decreased, allowing stocks to advance somewhat. 

New earnings warnings on Friday dampened investors’ enthusiasm somewhat, although the indexes managed moderate gains. Trading volume was also light before the Independence Day holiday. 

“The problems still remain, and until there’s solid signs that the economy and earnings are improving, the sustainability of any advance is going to be questionable,” said Charles White, portfolio manager for Avatar Associates. 

For the week, the Dow lost 102.19, or 1 percent, after dropping 63.81 to 10,502.40 on Friday. 

The Nasdaq gained 125.70, or 6.2 percent, for the week, following a 35.08-point gain to 2,160.54 Friday. 

The S&P 500 index was essentially unchanged for the week, slipping 0.97, or 0.1 percent. It dipped 1.82 Friday to 1,224.38. 

The Russell 2000, which measures the performance of smaller company stocks, 23.99 or 4.9 percent for the week after gaining 9.65 Friday and closing at 512.64. 

The Wilshire Associates Equity Index, the market value of NYSE, American and Nasdaq issues, was $11.41 trillion Friday, up $94.69 billion from last week. A year ago the index was $13.62 trillion. 

Lisa Singahina is a business writer for The Associated Press.


HP asks workers to take cuts

The Associated Press
Saturday June 30, 2001

PALO ALTO — Computer and printer giant Hewlett-Packard Co. has asked its 45,000 U.S. employees to take pay cuts or use additional vacation days in an effort to trim costs. 

According to a memo released Thursday, employees have three choices: a 10 percent pay cut, eight additional paid vacation days, or a 5 percent cut and four additional vacation days. The program is not mandatory. 

The vacation must be taken before the end of October, when HP’s fiscal year ends. The pay cuts would last through Oct. 31. 

Accrued vacation days are a liability, the company says, and the program would help HP save money. 

The company has been hard-hit as demand for personal computers, peripherals and servers collapsed amid the economic downturn. 

Analysts expect Hewlett-Packard to earn 20 cents a share for the third quarter, which ends July 31, and 30 cents a share for the fourth quarter ending Oct. 31, according to Thomson Financial/First Call. 

A year ago, the company earned 49 cents in the third quarter and 41 cents in the fourth quarter. 

In January, HP announced it was cutting 1,700 marketing positions. Four months later, HP said it was trimming 3,000 management jobs. The company currently employs about 90,000 people worldwide. 

International employees also will be asked to make sacrifices, but their choices will depend on local labor laws. 

Shares of HP were up 9 cents, to $27.34, in early afternoon trading Friday on the Nasdaq Stock Market. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Hewlett-Packard: http://www.hp.com 

 


Panthers get their first shot at the big boys at Cal camp

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Friday June 29, 2001

By Jared Green 

Daily Planet Staff 

 

The St. Mary’s boys’ basketball team won a Division IV state championship last season and will move up to Division I next year to take a shot at the state’s bigger schools. It will be a big adjustment for the coaches and players to make, but the Panthers will get their first up-close look at the big boys this weekend at the Cal Basketball Team Camp at the RSF Fieldhouse in Berkeley. 

The camp will consist of a combination of drills, competitive games and a speech by Cal head coach Ben Braun. 

The St. Mary’s players will play at least four games against some of the best teams in the state. Their first opponent at 3 p.m. on Friday will be Division I runner-up Modesto Christian, which returns star point guard Richard Midgely, a senior-to-be who has verbally committed to play for the Bears. The Panthers won’t get much of a rest following that game, as perennial power Mater Dei awaits at 9 p.m.  

A good night’s sleep will be in order at that point, because a matchup with state semi-finalist De La Salle awaits at 10 a.m. on Saturday. And if that isn’t enough, the 16 teams at the camp will be organized into a mini-tournament that afternoon, continuing into Sunday. 

Other teams at the camp include St. Mary’s BSAL rival Salesian, Bishop O’Dowd and Oakland Tech, who will bring their budding star, junior forward Leon “The Show” Powe. 

The camp will be the first chance for most of the Panthers to get to know their newest teammate. Sophomore transfer DeMarcus Nelson is expected to be a big part of the championship push next year, as he should slot in nicely at the swingman spot vacated by Jeremiah Fielder, the team’s lone senior starter last season. Nelson was named the state’s best freshman last year by several organizations.


Entertainment Calendar

Friday June 29, 2001

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Space Weather Exhibit now - Sept. 2; now - Sept. 9 Science in Toyland; June 21: 6 a.m., Solar Eclipse Day Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

The UC Berkeley Art Museum is closed for renovations until the fall. 

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 29: Barfeeders, Pac-Men, Hell After Dark, A.K.A. Nothing, Maurice’s Little Bastards; June 30: The Cost, Pg. 99, Majority Rule, 7 Days of Samsara, Since by Man, Creation is Crucifixion; July 6: Victim’s Family, Fleshies, The Modern Machines, Once For Kicks, The Blottos; July 7: The Stitches, Real MacKenzies, The Briefs, The Eddie Haskells, The Spits 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m. unless noted otherwise. June 30: Larry Stefl Jazz Quartet; July 3: 9 p.m., pickPocket ensemble; July 4: Whiskey Brothers; July 5: Keni “El Lebrijano.” 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m.June 29: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sally Hanna-Rhine; 10 p.m., Hideo Date; June 30: Anna and Susie Laraine and Peri Poston; 10 p.m., The Ducksan Distone. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 29: 8:30 p.m., Fountain’s Muse CD release party and Musicians and Fine Artists for World Peace fundraiser, with Obeyjah and others; June 30: 9:30 p.m. Tropical Vibrations. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Berkeley Arts Festival June 30: 7:30 p.m. Marvin Sanders and Vera Berheda, plus Mozart, Beethoven, Hadyn and Fuare in the gallery; July 1: 11 a.m., “Free Jazz on the Pier” The Christy Dana Quartet (on the Berkeley Pier). All shows at 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted Donations requested 2200 Shattuck Avenue 665-9496 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 29: Don’t Look Back; June 30: Jim Hurst & Missy Raines, Due West; July 5: Druha Trava; July 6 and 7: Ferron. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org; 548-1761 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 29: Zoe Ellis Quartet; June 30: Go Van Gogh 2881 Shattuck Ave. 843-8277 

 

Julia Morgan Center for the Arts July 1: 1 & 2 p.m., “Kourosh Taghavi: The Beauty of Iranian Music and Stories of its Origins” $5 - $10. 2640 College Ave. 654-0100 

 

Live Oaks Concerts, Berkeley Art Center, July 1: Matthew Owens; July 15: David Cheng, Marvin Sanders, Ari Hsu; July 27: Monica Norcia, Amy Likar, Jim Meredith. All shows at 7:30 unless otherwise noted Admission $10 (BACA members $8, students and seniors $9, children under 12 free) 

 

125 Records Release Party June 30: 9:45 p.m. Anton Barbeau and Belle De Gama will celebrate the release of their albums The Golden Boot: Antology 2 and Garden Abstract respectively. These are the first two albums released on the 125 Records label, founded by Joe Mallon with his winnings from his appearance on “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.” $5. Starry Plough 3101 Shattuck Avenue 841-2082  

Leopold’s Fancy July 2: 8 p.m., Traditional Irish music, part of “Extreme Joyce/Reading On the Edge,” a conference celebrating the works of James Joyce. Free. 2271 Shattuck Ave. 642-2754 

 

Dramatic Joyce July 3: 7:30 p.m. Dramatic interpretations of the works of James Joyce by local and international actors. Introduction by UC Berkeley Professor Part of the conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” Free. Krutch Theater, Clark Kerr Campus 2601 Warring Street 642-2754 

 

“Cuatro Maestros Touring Festival” July 4: 8 p.m. Music and dance performed by four elder folk artists and their young counterparts, accompanied by Los Cenzontles. $12 - $18. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Do You Hear What I Am Seeing?” July 5: 7:30 p.m. One man show by David Norris, a two-hour sampling of Joyce’s works with Norris’ insights. $10. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Romeo and Juliet” Through July 14, Thurs. - Sat. 8 p.m. Set in early 1930s just before the rise of Hitler in the Kit Kat Klub, Juliet is torn between ties to the Nazi party and Romeo’s Jewish heritage. $8 - $10. La Val’s Subterranean Theater 1834 Euclid 234-6046 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 22: Weds. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. (After July 8 no Wednesday performance, no Sunday matinee on July 22.) Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shepherd’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Iphegenia in Aulis” Through August 12: Sat. and Sun. 5 p.m. No performances July 14 and 15, special dawn performance on August 12 at 7 a.m. A free park performance by the Shotgun Players of Euripides’ play about choices and priorities. With a masked chorus, singing, dancing, and live music. Feel free to bring food and something soft to sit on. John Hinkel Park, Southhampton Place at Arlington Avenue (different locations July 7 and 8). 655-0813 

 

Films 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 29: Molba 7:30, Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors 9:10; June 30: 7, 9:10 p.m. Nenette and Boni; July 3: 7:30 p.m., Pineapple. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

Exhibits 

 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato Through June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Rachel Davis and Benicia Gantner Works on Paper Through July 14, Tues. - Sat., 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Watercolors by Davis, mixed-media by Gantner. Opening reception June 13, 6 - 8 p.m. Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Constitutional Shift Through July 13, Tuesdays - Fridays, noon - 5 p.m. Permanence and personal journey link Hee Jae Suh, Ursula Neubauer and Marci Tackett. Korean-born Suh explores an inner psychological world with a dramatic series of self-portraits. Neubauer explores self-portraiture as a travel map of identity with multiple points of view. Tackett explores Antarctica’s other-worldly landscape in a series of stunning digital photographs. Kala Art Institute 1060 Heinz Ave. 549-2977 

 

“The Trip to Here: Paintings and Ghosts by Marty Brooks” Through July 31, Tues. - Sun. 11 a.m. - 1 a.m. View Brooks’ first California show at Bison Brewing Company 2598 Telegraph Ave. 841-7734  

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“New Visions: Introductions 2001” July 12 - August 18, Wed. - Sat.: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Juried by Artist- Curator Rene Yanez and Robbin Henderson, Executive Director of the Berkeley Art Center, the exhibition features works from some of California’s up-and-coming artists. Reception July 12 from 6 - 8 p.m. Pro Arts 461 Ninth St., Oakland 763-9425 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethiopia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext. 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910” chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Through September. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Avenue All events at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. June 25: Pamela Rafael Berkman reads from her book “Her Infinite Variety: Stories of Shakespeare and the Women He Loved.” 845-7852 

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m. sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. June 25: Featuring Steve Arntsen; July 2: Featured artist April Ipock. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

“Berkeley Stories” June 29: 7:30 p.m. Stories of local Celebrity Artists. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 549-3564  

 

 

Tours 

 

“Berkeley in the Sixties” Berkeley Arts Festival presents free speech Veterans Kate Coleman and Michael Rossman leading a tour from Sather Gate Friday June 29, 3 p.m. 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

 


Forum

Friday June 29, 2001

Dog rage case captures headlines 

Editor:  

Same day cases of two criminals showed unequal justice and unbalanced news coverage. Sadly, they apparently reflect the fact that in our warped society cute little dogs are more important than vulnerable women and children. Subsequent information indicates that donations in dog cases attract more donors than cases involving children and other innocent crime victims. The rest of the civilized world is aware of our distorted values. I am one of many decent Americans who are offended by these trends.  

The road rage dog killer’s conviction made front page headlines in major newspapers. Back pages reported the criminally worse Berkeley landlord who imported teenage girls for sex. Proudly, Berkeley Daily Planet provided more balanced coverage.  

A pregnant teenage victim died. The lenient sentence is another affront to the numerous victims and U.S, laws. Lakireddy Bali Reddy committed innumerable crimes in America, for over 20 years, of rape and exploitation of women, children and workers from his native India. He has chronically violated tax, labor, visa and immigration laws plus committed countless sex crimes. He is an habitual, serial rapist and pedofile. His Berkeley rental real estate empire is worth over $50 million. This is only a portion of his vast wealth. The fines and prison time should fit the serious crimes.  

Two million dollars and 97 months is not justice. The creepy dog killer deserves 36 months.  

Unfortunately, Federal Prosecutor John Kennedy appears to have been influenced by Reddy’s wealth and high-priced attorneys. Conscientiously, Judge Saundra Brown Armstrong addressed the leniency. Her hands were tied by Kennedy’s dubious reluctance to fully prosecute, and rigid sentencing guide lines. She lengthened the sentence because of; (1) terrible harm to some of the younger victims; (2) efforts of Reddy to tamper with witnesses. Reddy’s light sentence probably won’t be fully served. He’ll likely be allowed to serve time at Club Fed, Lompac, the plushest of U.S. prisons. The defense sought and defended leniency because Reddy reluctantly apologized and at 64 and will be over 70 when probationed. This greedy pervert showed no mercy to his frightened, young, vulnerable, defenseless, powerless and impoverished victims. Ironically, the judge took into account Reddy’s philanthropy. He donated schools and other good deeds to the village where the exploited victims, who’s victimhood subsidized his wealth, came from.  

This case is another deplorable example of a wealthy criminal influencing the judicial system. Yet another case of under prosecuted abuse and exploitation of women and children by a rich, male criminal in our all too sexist and racist society. But the vile killing of a pet is more news worthy. Double shame.  

 

Carol Gesbeck DeWitt 

Oakland 

 

Sewer spills do real creek damage 

Editor: 

Opponents of the Beth-El relocation project declare their concern with the construction on Codornices Creek. They might better concern themselves with the city sewer system, which allows raw sewage to discharge into Codornices Creek and other waterways in the surrounding hill area. Fish cannot spawn in contaminated water. 

The city has systematically looted sewer funds over the years, leaving citizens with a poorly functioning, polluting sewer system. Now City Hall suggests that the sewer tax be raised 3 percent to cover the shortfall.  

Let’s just say that if the tax money were spent as intended by the voters we would have functioning sewers and cleaner creeks. The argument against the relocation of Beth-El might then be less specious. 

 

Evelyn Giardina 

Berkeley 

Enron fries state  

Editor: 

Confused by the good cop act of Pat Wood, new powerhouse on FERC (the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)? Look at it this way: the Enron-brokered fix is in. 

The Bush gang realized that the generators went too far and a revolution had begun. California has established a statewide public Power Authority, cities are looking into municipal power (even in Republican Orange and San Diego Counties) , State officials are suing and sounding almost serious about seizing plants and jailing executives. Jeffords jumps ship - and everywhere, States put deregulation on hold. 

Suddenly, there’s Wood, hand-picked by Enron, announcing something sort of like price controls - and the media declares a Davis victory. But to see who’s really winning, notice how Davis and Enron want so many of the same things: 

Preserve deregulation, just “make it more fair.” Enron’s middleman “marketer” business - buy and sell anything, anywhere, to anyone - only works in deregulated markets. Davis pretends deregulation is irreversible. 

Enron’s had a field day for the past year, but now it’s time to move on to the next scam. CEO 

Ken Lay has engineered a strong-sounding FERC for the same reasons the most powerful electricity company of 1903 invented state Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) and convinced fellow gougers to play along: 

• to protect investor-owned companies from public power. Outraged at the high rates and low tricks of profit-mad companies, many cities established non-profit municipal utilities, which provided more reliable power for 50 percent lower rates; 

• to protect investor-owned companies from each other, reducing ruinous competition that caused wild price swings, disrupted service and drove some companies into bankruptcy (note: this didn’t work with the weak regulation of 1903 and it won’t work now); 

• because regulators would always be just paper tigers, easily manipulated, no match for wealthy energy companies. 

Stamp out environmental restrictions. Strip away our power to stop construction of power plants and transmission lines. Force us to accept dirty air. 

BUILD MORE GAS-FIRED POWER PLANTS! Davis has signed long-term contracts that lock California into a whole new generation of gas-fired power. Energy gougers will make way more than “market rates” for years to come; Wall Street and Bechtel will get a big cut of this bonanza. 

Forget energy efficiency. Davis claims to promote energy efficiency, while eliminating the most effective programs. 

Build huge centralized power plants, maintaining firm control of energy in very few corporate hands. Postpone adoption of “distributed generation” (aka “self-generation” - small-scale power sources located at point of use) such as “cogeneration” (using waste heat from factories to generate electricity), fuel cells, rooftop solar panels or microturbines (small, gas-fired generators). Begin a vast expansion of the grid - more high-voltage lines and towers - even though a lot of power is lost in transmission. Excess transmission capacity benefits marketers like Enron. 

Co-opt the “renewable energy” crowd. Rooftop solar will not be an option, but Enron’s talking wind farms in California and Duke’s planning high-tech solar installations in the desert. Both fit in with long-distance transmission and centralized control. (Strange as it may seem, Texas now leads the nation in wind energy.) One of the great mysteries of the year is why Davis hardly ever mentions renewable energy. Does he think Duke and Enron are enough? 

Davis’ favorite sayings: “Get the State out of the power business” and “Get California utilities back in business” are not the comments of a man committed to making the most of the State Power Authority. 

But we have one now. And now, more than ever: we need public power, lower rates, clean air and water, jobs and money stay in the community.  

Barbara George, director Women’s Energy Matters 

Sacramento 

 

 

 

 

clutches of the energy corporations. Begin a vast expansion of the grid, more high-voltage lines and towers rammed through by sweeping powers of eminent domain. Excess transmission capacity benefits marketeers like Enron.  

Coopt the “renewable energy” crowd. Rooftop solar will not be an option, but Enron’s talking wind farms in California and Duke is planning huge high-tech solar installations in the desert. Both fit in with long-distance transmission and centralized control. (Strange as it may seem, Texas now leads the nation in wind energy.) 

Davis’ favorite sayings: “Get the State out of the power business” and “Get California utilities back in business” are not the comments of a man committed to a State Power Authority. But we have one now. And that could make all the difference. 

By Barbara George, Director of Women’s Energy Matters


Out & About

Friday June 29, 2001


Friday, June 29

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women: Arts, Herstory  

and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

3 p.m. 

Sather Gate 

UC Berkeley 

Telegraph at Bancroft 

Walking tour from Sather Gate to People’s Park entitled “Berkeley in the Sixties.” Free. 486-04 11  

 


Saturday, June 30

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

First Annual Brower Day  

David Brower’s Environmental Legacy Celebrated 

Noon - 5 p.m. 

Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park 

Sustainable Crafts Market, organic and vegetarian food. Lee Stetson will perform “The Spirit of John Muir” in the Florence Schwimley Little Theater, 12:30 and 2 p.m., and at 3 p.m. a special screening of "In the Light of Reverence" by the Sacred Land Film Project. Julia Butterfly Hill will join filmmaker Toby McLeod for a special panel following the film. 

415-788-3666 

 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 

925-830-2975  

 

Bonfire III: Stories and  

Songs By the Sea 

7:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Marina 

Spinnaker Way, near Olympic Circle Sailing Club 

Come for Havdala and share stories, sing and watch the flames dance. Bring food and drink to share, kosher s’mores provided. 

848-0237 

 

Know Your Rights 

11 - 2 p.m. 

2022 Blake St. 

Copwatch workshop: Learn what your rights are when dealing with the police. Special section on juvenile rights.  

548-0425 

 

Bay Area Eco-Crones 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1066 Creston Road 

Networking, information sharing, project planning and ritual.  

Call ahead, 874-4935. 

 

2001 Paul G. Hearne Leadership 

Award Workshop 

4 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Ave. at MLK 

Michai Freeman, one of 11 recipients of the 2000 Paul Hearne Leadership Award of $10,000, will discuss how she applied for the award and how you can too. The award is given by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and is open to any individual with a disability.  

RSVP required. Reserve your space by emailing your name and address to michai@gladtobehere.org, or by calling 548-6425 ext 2. First 10 registrants will receive free membership to AAPD. 

 

— compiled by Sabrina Forkish and Guy Poole


Allegations of roaming pit bulls

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Friday June 29, 2001

If Planning Commissioners have their way, the city-owned parking lot on Oxford Street (between Allston Way and Kittridge Street) may one day be home to a world class environmental education center, a community theater and the largest single concentration of affordable housing built in the city in the last  

15 years. 

And it would all fit under one roof. 

That, at least, is the vision described in the Oxford Lot Project Recommendations document approved by the Planning Commission Wednesday. 

The question of what to do with the Oxford lot is not a new one. Most agree that it is the most significant parcel of land available for new development in downtown Berkeley today. As recently as four years ago, according to Planning Commission Chairperson Rob Wrenn, city officials and UC Berkeley officials discussed the possibility of building a multi-level parking structure on the site to accommodate the increasing numbers of cars visiting the downtown area. 

That, said Wrenn, would have been “an atrocious use of that site.” 

A few years later the City Council approved a statement saying the preferred use for the Oxford lot, under any future development plans, would be for affordable housing and “art space” – performance and exhibition space for the numerous “nomad” art groups in Berkeley who have no dedicated facilities of their own. 

But when the city made no moves to actually develop the site, Wrenn and  

Planning Commissioner Vice Chair Zelda Bronstein asked council members for the chance to come up with a more specific development plan – to help get the ball rolling. (Any plan created by the Planning Commission would then be submitted to the City Council as a non-binding recommendation to be considered whenever the council found time to put it on the agenda.) 

Wrenn, who has led 11 subcommittee meetings and two public workshops on the Oxford lot project since December, said Wednesday that the a Planning Commission subcommittee came at the project from the point of view of trying to determine “what public benefit we can provide with this public land.” 

The subcommittee identified four things that serve the public interest, but are extremely hard to come by in Berkeley, Wrenn said: affordable housing, community art space, nonprofit office space and parking. 

The final recommendation to the City Council, approved by the Planning Commission at its Wednesday meeting by a vote of 8-to-0 with one abstention, constitutes one of the most ambitious mixed-use development projects ever envisioned for Berkeley’s downtown, according to Stephen Barton, Berkeley’s interim director of housing. 

On top of two floors of underground parking – with somewhere between 150 and 200 public parking spaces – the Planning Commissioners have envisioned a five-story building. The top three floors would include at least 90 units of housing, with no less than 50 percent of them reserved for people with a household income at 60 percent or less of the median household income for the Berkeley area (today around $70,000 for a family of four).  

Affordable housing in Berkeley has been built in increments of 10 and 20 in recent years, Wrenn said, and has fallen far short of meeting the demand. 

The first and second floor of the building envisioned by the Planning Commission would be divided between a 100-seat community theater and gallery space (on the ground floor) and office and conference meeting space for the recently-formed David Brower Center, an international environmental education center proposed by a consortium of environmental groups including the Earth Island Institute and the Rain Forest Action Network.  

“This is a very complex and ambitious process that we’re putting forward, and it would be wonderful if we could pull it off,” said Zelda Bronstein Wednesday. 

Stephen Barton warned the commission, however, that it is still far from clear that its plan is feasible. 

“We need to clearly see what’s being put forward by the Planning Commission as an ideal, rather than what’s going to come out of the other side of the process,” Barton said. 

In an interview Thursday, Barton said the proposed project would have to involve numerous funding sources to get off the ground, including a major investment from the city to build the parking structure and the affordable housing. Furthermore, Barton said, the sheer number of arts groups which would have to collaborate on the project, helping to raise money for the art space and then keeping the space rented out after its built, complicates the project. 

There are still no good estimates of what such a project might cost, Barton added. If the cost proves to be too high, the city might have to consider a different mix of uses for the building, such as a mix that could provide more future revenue to balance the development cost. 

Still, Gilbert Chan, a construction and project management consultant working with the proposed Brower Center, said the group has already raised $2 million for the project and expects to raise up to $10 million more in the months ahead. The are numerous wealthy benefactors who revere David Brower, the Berkeley native and founder of the Sierra Club for whom the center is named, and are eager to contribute to a center in Berkeley that would work to uphold his legacy, Chan said. 

Furthermore, Chan said he has worked on projects more complex than the one proposed for the Oxford lot, in terms of the number of players expected to collaborate in the work and the multiple sources of funding that must be tapped. 

“If we didn’t think it was possible, we wouldn’t be in there pulling for it,” Chan said. 

Chan said he hopes to see the City Council adopt the Planning Commission’s recommendation this summer and begin to advertise for developers, so more detailed project planning can begin in the fall. It could be three to four years before the project is completed, Chan estimated. 


Lampley headed home to Chicago

Daily Planet Wire Services
Friday June 29, 2001

Cal forward Sean Lampley, the 2001 Pac-10 Player of the Year, was drafted in the second round of the NBA Draft Wednesday by his hometown Chicago Bulls.  

A graduate of St. Francis DeSales High School in Chicago, Lampley finished his Golden Bear career this past season as Cal’s all-time leading scorer with 1,776 points. As a senior, he was voted an honorable mention Associated Press All-American. He led the Pac-10 in scoring with 19.5 points per game, while also averaging 7.2 rpg and 3.3 apg.  

The 6-foot-7, 225-pounder was a two-time All-Pac-10 selection and was voted Most Valuable Player of the 1999 National Invitation Tournament when he led the Bears to the title.  

Taken with the 45th overall selection of the draft, Lampley was one of four players chosen by the Bulls Wednesday. Chicago also added high schoolers Tyson Chandler and Eddy Curry and shooting guard Trenton Hassell out of Austin Peay.  

“He’s a real seasoned kind of college player,” TNT analyst Kenny Smith said of Lampley. “He knows his limitations. It’s a good pick. He’s going to be able to score in the NBA.”  

Lampley is the first Cal player to be drafted since Sean Marks was taken in the second round of the 1998 draft by the New York Knicks.


Commission OKs plan for Oxford Street lot

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Friday June 29, 2001

If Planning Commissioners have their way, the city-owned parking lot on Oxford Street (between Allston Way and Kittridge Street) may one day be home to a world class environmental education center, a community theater and the largest single concentration of affordable housing built in the city in the last  

15 years. 

And it would all fit under one roof. 

That, at least, is the vision described in the Oxford Lot Project Recommendations document approved by the Planning Commission Wednesday. 

The question of what to do with the Oxford lot is not a new one. Most agree that it is the most significant parcel of land available for new development in downtown Berkeley today. As recently as four years ago, according to Planning Commission Chairperson Rob Wrenn, city officials and UC Berkeley officials discussed the possibility of building a multi-level parking structure on the site to accommodate the increasing numbers of cars visiting the downtown area. 

That, said Wrenn, would have been “an atrocious use of that site.” 

A few years later the City Council approved a statement saying the preferred use for the Oxford lot, under any future development plans, would be for affordable housing and “art space” – performance and exhibition space for the numerous “nomad” art groups in Berkeley who have no dedicated facilities of their own. 

But when the city made no moves to actually develop the site, Wrenn and  

Planning Commissioner Vice Chair Zelda Bronstein asked council members for the chance to come up with a more specific development plan – to help get the ball rolling. (Any plan created by the Planning Commission would then be submitted to the City Council as a non-binding recommendation to be considered whenever the council found time to put it on the agenda.) 

Wrenn, who has led 11 subcommittee meetings and two public workshops on the Oxford lot project since December, said Wednesday that the a Planning Commission subcommittee came at the project from the point of view of trying to determine “what public benefit we can provide with this public land.” 

The subcommittee identified four things that serve the public interest, but are extremely hard to come by in Berkeley, Wrenn said: affordable housing, community art space, nonprofit office space and parking. 

The final recommendation to the City Council, approved by the Planning Commission at its Wednesday meeting by a vote of 8-to-0 with one abstention, constitutes one of the most ambitious mixed-use development projects ever envisioned for Berkeley’s downtown, according to Stephen Barton, Berkeley’s interim director of housing. 

On top of two floors of underground parking – with somewhere between 150 and 200 public parking spaces – the Planning Commissioners have envisioned a five-story building. The top three floors would include at least 90 units of housing, with no less than 50 percent of them reserved for people with a household income at 60 percent or less of the median household income for the Berkeley area (today around $70,000 for a family of four).  

Affordable housing in Berkeley has been built in increments of 10 and 20 in recent years, Wrenn said, and has fallen far short of meeting the demand. 

The first and second floor of the building envisioned by the Planning Commission would be divided between a 100-seat community theater and gallery space (on the ground floor) and office and conference meeting space for the recently-formed David Brower Center, an international environmental education center proposed by a consortium of environmental groups including the Earth Island Institute and the Rain Forest Action Network.  

“This is a very complex and ambitious process that we’re putting forward, and it would be wonderful if we could pull it off,” said Zelda Bronstein Wednesday. 

Stephen Barton warned the commission, however, that it is still far from clear that its plan is feasible. 

“We need to clearly see what’s being put forward by the Planning Commission as an ideal, rather than what’s going to come out of the other side of the process,” Barton said. 

In an interview Thursday, Barton said the proposed project would have to involve numerous funding sources to get off the ground, including a major investment from the city to build the parking structure and the affordable housing. Furthermore, Barton said, the sheer number of arts groups which would have to collaborate on the project, helping to raise money for the art space and then keeping the space rented out after its built, complicates the project. 

There are still no good estimates of what such a project might cost, Barton added. If the cost proves to be too high, the city might have to consider a different mix of uses for the building, such as a mix that could provide more future revenue to balance the development cost. 

Still, Gilbert Chan, a construction and project management consultant working with the proposed Brower Center, said the group has already raised $2 million for the project and expects to raise up to $10 million more in the months ahead. The are numerous wealthy benefactors who revere David Brower, the Berkeley native and founder of the Sierra Club for whom the center is named, and are eager to contribute to a center in Berkeley that would work to uphold his legacy, Chan said. 

Furthermore, Chan said he has worked on projects more complex than the one proposed for the Oxford lot, in terms of the number of players expected to collaborate in the work and the multiple sources of funding that must be tapped. 

“If we didn’t think it was possible, we wouldn’t be in there pulling for it,” Chan said. 

Chan said he hopes to see the City Council adopt the Planning Commission’s recommendation this summer and begin to advertise for developers, so more detailed project planning can begin in the fall. It could be three to four years before the project is completed, Chan estimated. 


Cal AD wins Pac-10 honor

Daily Planet Wire Services
Friday June 29, 2001

Cal Athletic Director and Men’s Head Crew Coach Steve Gladstone was named Pac-10 Conference Men’s Rowing Coach of the Year by Pac-10 Comissioner Tom Hansen on Thursday.  

Gladstone led the California men to the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national title this spring for the third consecutive year. California was ranked No. 1 in the U.S. Rowing Coaches Poll throughout the year and completed a third-consecutive undefeated season. The Bears also won the Pac-10 Championships for the fourth straight year.  

Gladstone earned his ninth Varsity Challenge Cup title, which ranks second to Cornell’s Charles “Pop” Courtney, who won 11 IRA’s between 1901-1915. The Coach of the Year honor is the fourth consecutive for Gladstone and fifth overall. Gladstone, who completed his fifth season in his second stint as head coach at California, also won the award in 1979.


Nonprofit group files suit against UC Thursday

By Daniela Mohor Daily Planet staff
Friday June 29, 2001

The nonprofit organization East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse filed a lawsuit against the University of California on Tuesday morning, to contest its refusal to renew the Depot’s lease of the university-owned Marchant building at 6701 San Pablo Ave. 

The lawsuit filed at the Alameda County Superior Courthouse in Oakland is the latest step the Depot has taken in a dispute that started more than a year ago. At that time, UC Berkeley announced it wouldn’t extend the Depot’s lease because it wanted to use the space to relocate part of its staff during the retrofitting of campus buildings. The 1995 agreement between the Depot and the university had given the nonprofit organization a five-year lease and an option to rent the space for an additional five years after the expiration of the first rental term on Jan. 1, 2001. The lawsuit contests the university’s claim that the depot has the right to exercise the renewal option only “with landlord’s consent.” 

“Normally an option to extend the lease is absolute. It’s the right of the tenants in their own discretion to decide whether to exercise it and the landlord has no choice,” said Myron Moskovitz, one of the two attorneys representing the Depot, during a press conference. “This language that the university put in at the last minute ‘with landlord consent’ is very unusual. It was not part of the original agreement and should not be given (credence).” 

The university, Moskovitz said, could have denied the option between January and May of this year by proving that it needed the space for its own purposes, but failed to do so. “They’ve claimed in the abstract that they might need it, but there has never been a particular department, a particular professor that has asserted the need for that place,” said Moskovitz. 

Created in 1979, the award-winning East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse recycles used art, educational, and household material and provides them at low cost to schoolteachers and artists. It primarily serves the communities of Berkeley, Emeryville and Oakland, but also does recycling in Contra Costa County. As many nonprofit organizations, it has a tight budget and would probably not be able to subsist if it had to pay more for rent than the 47 cents per square foot it pays now.  

According to David Elliott, president of the Depot’s Board of Directors, raising the rent of the 4,500 square-feet space may be the real motive for the university’s refusal to renew the lease. “They have brought several people from the outside to rent this place at market rates, which means it’s not the university’s need,” he said. “It’s just a way of getting more money.” 

To attorney Zona Sage, this lawsuit raises the question of the responsibility of the university toward the community. The initial rental agreement between the two parts involved, she recalled, was the result of a mitigation plan developed by UC Berkeley that now seems to be neglected. 

“This was part of a joint effort between the city of Berkeley and the university to minimize negative aspects of its expansion within the city,” she said. “It’s unfortunate that they’re going back and have made this with the this non-profit organization and essentially with the city of Berkeley.” 

The University Real Estate Services refused to comment on the dispute Tuesday afternoon. 

If the outcome of the lawsuit goes in favor of the university, the Depot will face eviction on a 90-day notice. Director Linda Levitsky, who has the support of more than 1,500 artists, teachers, students, and other Depot customers, as well as of councilmembers Linda Maio and Donna Spring, said she was optimistic. She hopes the lawsuit will set an example for other organizations facing the same difficulties.  

“I’m sad it has come to this, but it has and now we move forward,” she said. “The way we go as a nonprofit that is being evicted will pretty much set the course for how other nonprofits will have to respond.” 

 


BRIEFS

Friday June 29, 2001

Panel on infant hearing screening reconvenes 

 

In conjunction with the Center for the Education of the Infant Deaf, Assemblymember Dion Aroner will reconvene an advisory panel today to address the lack of consistent newborn hearing screenings. State law mandates that newborns and infants undergo hearing screenings and that a system is in place to perform follow up and tracking of those diagnosed with hearing impairments. 

“However, close to three years after the passage of (the state law) there are still newborns who are not being tested in California,” according to a statement issued by Aroner’s office. “Systems, equipment and processes are still not in place and hearing impaired children are undiagnosed and experiencing developmental delays as a result.” 

The meeting is at 11:30 a.m. at the Center for the Education of the Infant Deaf, 1810 Hopkins Street, at The Alameda. Call Ian Barlow, 540-3660. 

 

Applications available for Solano Stroll space 

 

Applications for booth space for the Solano Stroll are available and may be downloaded from the Internet at www.solanostroll.org. The stroll will be Sept. 9. Organizers say it draws crowds of 150,000 people from all over California. Call 548-5335. 

 

Women arrested for protesting on restaurant 

 

SAN FRANCISCO – Polly Strand, a 68-year-old Berkeley resident, along with Erica Sutherlan, a 19-year-old student and Jennifer Schneider, a 32-year-old San Francisco resident were arrested Wednesday after climbing onto the roof of a San Francisco Burger King during a protest sponsored by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.  

The animal rights organization wants Burger King to commit to maintaining the animals it uses in more humane conditions.


Redwood grove poised for protection

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — A stand of redwoods that is the size of San Francisco and is home to 23 endangered species would be preserved in a $60 million plan between the state, a timber company and a Bay Area open-space group. 

The Save-the-Redwoods League is hoping to purchase 25,000 acres of land along California’s North Coast from Portland, Ore.-based Stimson Lumber Co. and turn control over it to the state. 

The land, known as the Mill Creek property, is three times the size of the Headwaters Forest, the preservation of which attracted stiff opposition in 1998. 

The plan for this parcel of densely forested hills about 475 miles north of San Francisco has been less controversial, but will likely find its biggest challenge in getting state budget approval. 

So far, state lawmakers have allocated $17.5 million in the proposed budget for acquiring the land, but that could change as budget negotiations continue — Gov. Gray Davis has said he wants to trim $400 million from the proposed $101 billion budget. The money promised to the deal faces a challenge from park-starved urban areas. 

“It’s in a key area, we’re constantly trying to link existing parks,” said Steve Capps, a spokesman for the State Parks Department. “We’re competing against urban interests, especially in Southern California, which is park-starved.” 

Save-the-Redwoods has already raised $15 million in private funds, which the state’s Wildlife Conservation Board has matched. With $30 million in their pocket, preservationists need the state funding to help seal the deal. 

The land would link up existing parks, including Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park and parts of the Smith River National Recreation area and Redwood National Park. 

The land also contains some of the healthiest watersheds in the state because its waterways – including Mill and Rock creeks and the Smith River – are generally clear of sediment and stay at a good temperature for the fish. That makes it an ideal home to endangered fish including the coho, chum and chinook salmon, as well as steelhead and cutthroat trout. 

“When you find these key ecosystems that are in good condition, it’s important to keep those healthy,” said Mark Stopher, habitat conservation manager with the state Department of Fish and Game. “It’s important to have these sources that keep generating these fish.” 

Most of the land has been logged in the past 50 years, but there are still more than 100 acres of old growth redwoods left. 

Save-the-Redwoods has eyed the property since the 1930s, when it listed it as one of four major acquisition goals. The others, which include land in Humboldt County on the North Coast, and in the Big Sur area, have been accomplished. 

Representatives of Stimson Lumber could not be reached for comment Thursday. 

If it gets further funding, the acquisition is expected to be completed in a year. 

“I don’t think this opportunity will come up again,” said Kate Anderton, executive director of Save-the-Redwoods. “This forest will reconnect these forests in a fabric of habitat.” 


Governor accused of failing state in energy crisis

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

LONG BEACH — Giving a glimpse at the hostile tone the state’s next gubernatorial contest likely will take, Secretary of State Bill Jones attacked Democratic Gov. Gray Davis on Thursday for his handling of California’s energy crisis. 

Jones, who is seeking the Republican nomination for governor in 2002, expects to face Davis in next year’s general election. 

Davis, who is expected to seek re-election, has not formally announced his candidacy but has already raised more than $26 million. Jones has not had to report his campaign contributions yet but it is widely believed he will have only a fraction of that sum. 

“During all my years in public service, I have never seen anyone shirk as many tough decisions or seek to blame as many people for his own shortcomings as I’ve seen from Gray Davis in the last two years,” the secretary of state said at a Long Beach Chamber of Commerce luncheon. 

“His inattention to duty, inaction and lack of leadership has unnecessarily caused much of the economic turmoil our state faces today.” 

Davis press secretary Steve Maviglio said Thursday the governor will be “putting more power online in the next two weeks than in the previous 12 years.”  

He pointed to Davis’ 23 executive orders to speed the building of power plants and the 25 percent reduction in energy use in state-run buildings. 

“The facts speak for themselves,” Maviglio said. “The governor licensed the first power plant in 12 years within four months of taking office, in April 1999.  

While federal regulators were still holding hearings, the governor last summer signed legislation and executive orders.” 

Davis has cited the energy deregulation plan signed into law by his Republican predecessor, former Gov. Pete Wilson, as the start of California’s energy woes and has accused power suppliers of manipulating prices. 

He also has attacked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which regulates wholesale energy transactions, and President Bush for not stepping in to help the state.  

Regulators recently agreed to cap electricity prices throughout the West; Bush has opposed price controls in energy markets. 

Jones laid the blame for the state’s energy crisis on Davis, who he said failed to heed early warning signs of the problem last summer and has devoted more attention to building his campaign coffers than solving the state’s problems. 

“Rather than practicing political gamesmanship, Gray Davis should have paid more attention to the state’s pressing policy issues and avoided his multibillion dollar energy mistakes,” Jones said. 

Although Davis took office during a time of prosperity, the state now faces a weakening economy and “antibusiness climate,” Jones said.  

Stealing a page from the book of California’s favorite son, former President Reagan, he asked voters if they are better off than they were four years ago. 

A survey published Thursday by the Los Angeles Times showed that a majority of Californians agree with Davis that energy companies have manipulated the electricity market to boost their profits.  

Nearly half of those polled also gave Davis low marks for his handling of the crisis. Still, he received nearly four times as much support as Bush. 

More than 60 percent of respondents deemed the energy crisis the state’s top problem and more than half believe there hasn’t been enough progress to resolve it. 

The Times interviewed 1,541 residents over four days beginning Saturday. The paper said the poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points. 

Jones made no reference in his speech to his Republican opponents by name, but noted that he’s the only GOP candidate to have won statewide elections twice.  

Outgoing Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan, a moderate Republican who has endorsed Democrats in the past, is contemplating a run for the office, and businessman William E. Simon Jr. recently announced his candidacy. 

In an interview with The Associated Press, Jones criticized Riordan for having crossed party lines in partisan races with both endorsements and donations.  

Jones also trumpeted his own experience as a longtime lawmaker and faithful Republican and noted that Simon hasn’t held statewide office.


No word from winning lotto ticket holder

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

The person holding the winning lottery ticket from Saturday’s record-breaking $141 million jackpot is losing thousands of dollars in interest money for each day spent laying low, financial advisers say. 

“How much they’re losing every day is amazing,” said Richard Del Monte, director of Del Monte Group Retirement Planning in Danville. 

“I don’t think the person knows, because why would you walk away from that kind of money every day?” 

The winner, who chose a lump sum payment rather than annual payments, will get about $70 million now for the winning ticket. After taxes, the person will receive a net amount of about $42.3 million, Del Monte said. 

If that money were invested in a money market account with four percent interest, the total earned per day would be $4,635, or nearly $1.7 million per year, he said. 

Still, the lucky winner has 180 days to come forward from the date of the win. 

The lottery has a list of unclaimed jackpots dating back to 1987 and totaling nearly $132.3 million – not counting the smaller prizes, as little as $1, that go unclaimed each year, lottery spokeswoman Norma Minas said. 

“Every year we have about $30 million that goes unclaimed statewide,” she said. “Every now and then we do have an unclaimed jackpot. But for this particular jackpot, I highly doubt that it will go unclaimed.” 

Minas said she thinks the winner is probably getting his financial advisers together. 

“It takes a team of financial advisers to deal with this type of thing,” she said. “Because all of a sudden, you’ve come into a very large amount of money – and managing that is a job in itself. 

“Once winners find a good adviser, they can relax and enjoy their lives. They can help their families, purchase new homes and cars and fund a college education.” 

Thirty-four percent of lottery sales go to public education, Minas said. That money is paid quarterly. This winning jackpot alone raised $80 million for public schools in the state. If no one comes forward to claim the record-breaking jackpot, that money will also be handed over to public education. 

Who can win the prize isn’t limited. Even illegal aliens or non-U.S. residents can claim a jackpot. 

“You can be from any country in the world and buy a lottery ticket,” Minas said. 

But a person who is not a U.S. citizen must pay a 31 percent federal withholding tax, rather than the 28 percent normally charged to a citizen. 

The largest unclaimed lottery jackpot to date was a $25 million prize won on Jan. 8, 2000, in San Diego. Another unclaimed jackpot was won in Pearblossom, Calif. in Los Angeles County on Jan. 20, 1996, Minas said. Though there are only 2,235 residents in the unincorporated town, no one ever claimed that $15 million dollar prize. 

Winners cannot change their payment option after buying a lottery ticket, officials said. If the winner didn’t choose a payment option, the state pays a lump sum. 

When the winner does come forward, he or she will have to wait two to four weeks for a check to be issued while the ticket is checked for authenticity and tampering.


Abduction declared a hoax

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

PETALUMA — A 17-year-old boy who said a man abducted him at gunpoint and forced him to drive fours from the North Coast to the Central Valley early Monday now says the kidnapping was a hoax. 

Petaluma police cited and released the boy on a misdemeanor charge of filing a false report, Sgt. Ralph Evans said. The boy apologized, but was admitted Tuesday to a Santa Rosa mental health center for evaluation. 

He told police he was driving to his job as a sheet metal worker in Novato on Monday morning when a man approached his Ford truck, flashed a gun, got in and ordered him to drive to Interstate 5 near Fresno. 

The boy did indeed drive to the Central Valley town of Mendota, where he called his mother and said he had dropped the man off. But police investigators soon learned from a gas station clerk that they boy was alone. 

When police detectives questioned him Tuesday morning, the boy admitted the story was false. 

“He said he was under a lot of stress lately,” Evans said. 

Family members cited a grandfather who is terminally ill with a neurological disease. The boy has no criminal record. 

An adult could face up to a year in county jail for a false police report. In juvenile court, the boy might face probation, a recommendation for counseling — or, possibly, incarceration. 


Scientist accused of poisoning husband defended

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

SAN DIEGO — An accusation that a respected lab toxicologist intentionally poisoned her husband has shocked former colleagues who recall her as a meticulous scientist with a sweet disposition. 

“It just doesn’t fit,” said Richard Hogrefe, the president of TriLink Biotechnologies, where Kristin Rossum worked until her arrest. “We don’t believe it.” 

Prosecutors have charged Rossum, 24, with murder for the death of her husband, who was found dead in his bed, rose petals scattered around him. The scene was reminiscent of the film “American Beauty,” and police said that was her favorite film. 

One of Rossum’s lawyers, however, said the film wasn’t a favorite of hers, but of her husbands. They also argue that Rossum lacked the motivation or the personality to kill Greg de Villers last November. 

“Anyone who meets her loves her,” attorney Gretchen von Helms said Thursday. “She’s just a sweet, genuine person.” 

Rossum intends to plead innocent at her arraignment Monday, von Helms said. 

The case has sparked interest because of the macabre details and the unlikely principals — two successful young people with accomplished parents and bright prospects. 

Prosecutors allege Rossum stole a powerful painkiller from the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s office, where she worked at the time of de Villers’ death in November. She allegedly administered a fatal dose to him, possibly with other drugs, then scattered the rose petals on the body. But that sounds unlikely to Dale Chatfield, Rossum’s chemistry professor who worked in a university lab with her for six hours a week for one semester in 1999 and doubts that his former student would commit murder, then incriminate herself by sprinkling flower petals on the body. 

“She’s a very bright, meticulous young lady,” Chatfield said. “She’s not a person to do things that are sloppy and out of place.” 

Rossum told authorities that her husband committed suicide, though his family, police and prosecutors rejected that possibility. 

“My son couldn’t have killed himself,” his father, Dr. Yves de Villers, said by telephone from his home in Monaco. 

His brother, Jerome, told the Los Angeles Times that before their 1999 marriage, de Villers worried that Rossum had a drug problem but felt he could rescue her. 

“They were in love for some time and then something happened,” he told the paper. “I don’t have all the pieces to the puzzle. But I hope by questioning her, the truth will come out.” 

Investigators have pointed to an affair that Rossum was having with her boss at the medical examiner’s office, Michael D. Roberston, who police say is a suspect in the case and is believed to have returned to his native Australia. 

But Rossum’s lawyer, who acknowledges the affair, said it suggests a likely motivation for de Villers’ suicide, not murder. Rossum had no insurance claim or anything else to gain by his death, von Helms said. 

Rossum and de Villers met as they were starting college in San Diego. They became serious but her parents, both professors, insisted they not marry until after graduation, she said. 

In 1999, Rossum graduated with highest honors in biochemistry from San Diego State University and the couple wed soon after. 

De Villers went to work at a biotech firm; Rossum worked at the medical examiner’s office, where authorities said she used methamphetamine and became involved with Robertson, a nationally known expert on toxicology. 

About a month after de Villers’ Nov. 6th death, both Rossum and Robertson were fired from the medical examiner’s office. In February, she joined TriLink as an assistant chemist. 

At the biotech firm, she volunteered for extra work, joined the softball team and was well-liked by other employees at the small company, Hogrefe said. Her arrest Monday came as a shock. 

“She’s a star here. She’d only been here four months but she was going places,” he said. 


Court decision cripples assault weapons ban

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

Judges cannot declare firearms illegal under the state’s assault-weapons ban law, the California Supreme Court ruled Thursday in a decision the dissenting chief justice said created a “loophole” in the 1989 act. 

In a 4-2 vote that featured a blistering dissent by Chief Justice Ronald M. George, the high court ruled that a semiautomatic rifle is legal if it is not explicitly designated illegal under 1991 amendments to the act. 

Justice Janice Rogers Brown, agreeing with arguments made in the case by the National Rifle Association, wrote that the 1991 provisions – enacted to ban the proliferation of generic versions of outlawed weapons – was too vague for gun owners to know which of the so-called copycat weapons of the Russian-made “AK series” were illegal. 

Without explicitly listing each weapon, Brown wrote, “Ordinary law-abiding citizens could suddenly find themselves ... subject to prosecution.” 

The immediate fallout of Thursday’s decision is that an untold number of copycat weapons to the AK series are now legal in California. 

George wrote that the “Legislature recognized the impossibility of compiling a comprehensive list” of all AK series rifles and therefore chose not to when it wrote the 1991 amendments. 

“By refusing to heed the clear statutory language classifying all AK series rifles as assault weapons, whether specifically identified by name or model or not, the majority creates a loophole in California’s assault weapons control legislation that the Legislature plainly intended to eliminate,” George wrote. 

Thousands of people in California have been convicted wrongly for possessing, transporting or using AK series weapons, said Chuck Michel, a lawyer for the National Rifle Association. 

“It took years to clarify this mess and in the meantime hundreds or perhaps thousands of accidental felons were created by a law that was pushed through without a full consideration of the consequences,” Michel said. 

The state attorney general’s office was reviewing the decision Thursday and would not comment on Michel’s assertions, spokesman Nathan Barankin said. 

Thursday’s decision was based on a 1994 confiscation of an AK series rifle from a Delano attorney who was given the gun instead of payment from a client. 

Authorities seized the weapon on grounds it was banned under the 1991 amendments. Kings County Superior Court Judge Peter M. Schultz ruled that the weapon was illegal, a decision the high court reversed Thursday. 

Still, George wrote that the court’s decision may be minimized by amendments the Legislature enacted to the assault-weapons act in 1999. 

That year, lawmakers adopted a provision that bans assault-weapons based on a host of features instead of makes and models – a move that makes illegal hundreds of so-called copycat weapons not clearly defined in the law. That provision has not been tested in California’s courts. Gun proponents said the Supreme Court decision gives them fodder to challenge it. 

The NRA’s Michel said Thursday’s decision bolsters arguments that the 1999 amendments are illegal because outlawed guns are not clearly identified. 

“A lawsuit will be filed challenging this,” he said. 

The decision means that some copycat weapons to the AK series will now be legal. 

That is because some of the weapons do not have the features that would make them illegal under the 1999 provisions. Those features include semiautomatic rifles having a detachable magazine for bullets, and one of the following: a pistol grip, a stock with a hole for a thumb, a grenade launcher and, among other features, a flair launcher. 

“It’s conceivable that you have an assault weapon that fell under the 1991 category and isn’t covered by the new legislation,” said John S. Dulcich, the attorney who won Thursday’s case on behalf of Delano lawyer J.W. Harrott. 

Under the high court’s closely watched decision last year upholding the original assault-weapons law, a majority of justices noted that the state attorney general’s office has the discretion to add weapons to the list of the hundreds of weapons already banned. 

Gun-control advocates said Thursday that Attorney General Bill Lockyer has greatly expanded the number of illegal weapons, but worried Thursday’s decision gives the state’s top law enforcement officer too much leeway. 

“What if the next attorney general is not as aggressive as Lockyer?” asked Dennis Henigan, an attorney for the Center to Prevent Handgun Violence. 

The Roberti-Roos Assault Weapons Control Act of 1989 originally outlawed 75 weapons that are high-powered and have rapid-fire capabilities. The Legislature passed the nation’s first law banning such weapons after a gunman, Patrick Purdy, fired a semiautomatic weapon into a Stockton school yard, killing five children and injuring 30. 

Following California’s lead, several states and the federal government passed similar or even stricter bans. 

The case decided Thursday is J.W. Harrott v. Kings County, S055064. 


Bush’s timber czar loved, loathed by interests

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

WASHINGTON — Timber industry groups hope Mark Rey will champion their causes, since he once worked for them. But environmentalists see him more as Darth Vader. 

“There is nobody who has been more intimately involved in the timber industry’s various efforts in the last 20 years to promote logging in the national forest than Mark Rey,” said Mike Anderson, senior research analyst with The Wilderness Society. 

Rey’s supporters say environmentalists are being unfair – that he is a man who does compromise and that he should be listened to because of his expertise. 

If confirmed by the Senate, Rey will become the Agriculture Department’s undersecretary in charge of the Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service – responsible for 192 million acres of public lands, over 46,000 employees and a $6.4 billion budget. 

Rey would come to the job as conservationists raise flags about Bush’s environmental decisions. Many have protested as the administration works to revamp a Clinton-era ban on logging and road-building on a third of the national forests – a policy Rey regularly criticized as a sweeping, misguided national initiative. 

Some environmentalists are just as concerned about administration efforts to revise rules regarding forest management, unveiled last year, that give increased importance to the ecological values of national forests, among other changes. Rey also has complaints about that Clinton-era policy, but he declined  

an interview. 

Rey, 48, was born in suburban, middle-class Canton, Ohio. His parents, not exactly the outdoor types, scratched their heads when he began studying forestry in college. But Rey’s credentials as an Eagle Scout explained his interest in the trees. 

He earned degrees in wildlife management and forestry, and went on to get a masters of science in natural resources policy and administration in 1975 from the University of Michigan. 

Rey has worked for the National Forest Products Association, American Forest Resources Alliance and American Forest & Paper Association, all timber industry groups. In 1995, he took a job working for Senate Republicans as the top aide to the Energy and Natural Resources’ forests subcommittee. 

But his positions — as policy analyst, strategist, lobbyist and eventually public servant – have pitted him against environmentalists. 

And his work for the timber industry reportedly caught the attention of the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, who had Rey’s name in his Montana cabin. It was found along with other Northwest timber industry leaders, whom Kaczynski had targeted. 

Environmentalists such as Mike Anderson worry that Rey will try to chip away at Clinton legacies, such as the Northwest Forest Plan, a 1993 management plan adopted after a federal judge shut down logging in the region to protect the endangered spotted owl. 

Though Anderson has a list of grievances with Rey, he highlights the timber salvage rider, a piece of legislation that temporarily suspended environmental laws to expedite the sale of timber killed by forest fires and insects on national forests around the country. 

The rider ushered in a revival of old-growth timber sales in the Northwest that had been withdrawn for environmental concerns. 

While Rey s– for writing it, the former general counsel for oversight and investigations at the House Resources Committee points out that many others had a hand in it. 

“You find this mythical notion that has been manufactured by environmentalist opponents in order to create a target. Mark, like others at times, has become that target,” said Duane Gibson, now the staff director of the House Transportation highways and transit subcommittee. 

The forest products industry, though encouraged by the nomination, insists it still has to win its cases on the merits with Rey. 

“We don’t feel he approaches our issues with hostility, as the Clinton administration did,” said Michael Klein, spokesman for American Forest & Paper Association. On some issues, Rey is part of compromises. This included a bill last year to provide communities near federal forests the option to break a historic link between timber harvest and funding schools and roads. 

But the bill also reconnected communities to the land by offering greater flexibility in how they spend the money — a key element of Western Republican support. 

“Though we had profound differences, we were able to work out some pretty constructive approaches,” said Chris Wood, a top Forest Service aide during the Clinton administration. 

“He’s not Darth Vader. He’s maybe Darth Vader Lite,” Wood added. 

Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, believes much of the resistance from environmental groups is “out of respect” for Rey. He considers him “one of the most authoritative people on forest management issues of anyone in Congress.” 

“He is someone to be reckoned with,” the senator said. 


Campaign finance reform bills head to House floor

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

WASHINGTON — A committee on Thursday sent dueling campaign finance bills to the House floor, moving Congress a step closer to enacting the biggest changes in a quarter-century in the way the nation pays for its elections. 

“Today we are here to mark the beginning of the end of the soft money system in American politics,” said Rep. Marty Meehan, D-Mass., author with Rep. Christopher Shays, R-Conn., of the bill that would ban the flow of unregulated donations to political parties. 

In a carefully orchestrated procedure, the Republican-controlled House Administration Committee unfavorably reported the Shays-Meehan bill to the floor while favorably reporting legislation by Rep. Bob Ney, R-Ohio, that is the choice of the House Republican leadership. 

But Shays-Meehan, similar to the legislation that passed the Senate in April, will be the bill to beat when the House takes up the campaign finance issue in the week after the July 4th recess. 

A coalition of Democrats and about 50 RepubLicans pAssed similar versions in the House in 1998 and 1999, only to see the bills die in the Senate. But this year Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Russ Feingold, D-Wis., succeeded in passing their partner bill, vastly improving chances for the first big change in campaign spending law since 1974. 

“We can’t be arrogant about this because we could lose big time,” said Shays, noting that the GOP leadership was mobilizing to defeat or debilitate their bill. “But we’ve had a little practice at this.” 

“We’re in an arms race,” Shays said, noting that the previous night his own party, led by President Bush, had gathered at a fund-raiser that brought in a record $20 million for GOP congressional candidates. 

“I’m a little hung over from the fund-raiser last night,” joked McCain, a longtime critic of money politics, as he joined Shays and Meehan at a news conference. 

Shays-Meehan would attempt to slow down this flow of money into politics by banning soft money, or unlimited contributions that unions, corporations and individuals may donate to political parties for uses other than expressly advocating a candidate’s election or defeat. 

It also bars unions, corporations and some independent groups from broadcasting certain types of political advertising within 60 days of an election or 30 days of a primary. 

On the issue of hard money, the regulated contributions made directly to candidates, the bill makes a concession to the Congressional Black Caucus and other Democrats unhappy with the Senate bill’s doubling of the hard money limit an individual can make to a candidate per election to $2,000. 

Under Shays-Meehan, the limit for Senate campaigns would increase to $2,000, but it would stay at $1,000, adjusted for inflation, for House elections. 

On the whole though, Shays-Meehan mirrors the Senate-passed bill. The sponsors hope to get their bill through the House with few changes, so that it can be accepted by the Senate without the need for a House-Senate conference that could be used by opponents to derail final passage. 

 

 

Ney would ban parties from raising or using soft money for federal election activities such as TV ads, but would permit soft money that goes to voter registration and get-out-the-vote activities. The limit to such donations would be $75,000. 

Ney requires those running “issue ads” in the final days of an election to better identify themselves, but doesn’t ban them as Shays-Meehan does. He keeps the current hard money limits for individual donations, but allows hard money contributions to political parties to increase. 

His approach, he said, was “a reasonable step that should appeal to many interests.” 

At stake is a soft money flow that reached nearly $500 million in the last election, about double what the two parties raised during the 1996 presidential election. 

“Any bill which doesn’t ban soft money is not a reform bill at all,” said Rep. Michael Castle, R-Del. “Soft money is a curse on our system.” 

The Supreme Court this week bolstered the Shays-Meehan side by ruling that hard money contributions that parties make to candidates could be limited. Opponents argued that limits were illegal and undemocratic. 

“The campaign finance zealots have chosen to limit and regulate two of America’s most precious commodities, free speech and freedom of association,” said Rep. Bob Barr, R-Ga. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Congress: http://thomas.loc.gov/ 


Oscar winner Jack Lemmon dies at 76

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

Jack Lemmon, who brought a jittery intensity to his roles as finicky Felix Unger in “The Odd Couple,” the boastful Ensign Pulver in “Mr. Roberts” and a cross-dressing musician in “Some Like It Hot,” has died. He was 76. 

The two-time Oscar winner died at a hospital Wednesday night from complications related to cancer, spokesman Warren Cowan said. 

Lemmon’s talents were so broad that of his seven lead-actor Oscar nominations, five were for dramas and two were for comedies. 

Among his dramatic roles were the violently thirsty alcoholic in “Days of Wine and Roses,” the aging, past-his-prime salesman driven to theft in “Glengarry Glen Ross,” and a father desperately searching for his son in “Missing.” 

“What a career. What range,” said John Davis, producer of “Grumpy Old Men,” “Grumpier Old Men” and “Out to Sea,” three of Lemmon’s last pairings with Walter Matthau. “He made some of the most memorable movies of our time. Jack was always changing gears.” 

Throughout his career, and especially in films with Matthau, Lemmon was often cast as the well-meaning fellow, a trifle square, who is taken advantage of or beset by disaster. 

The Harvard-trained actor started in films in the mid-1950s, shooting to stardom in 1955 as the mousy Pulver in the World War II comic drama “Mr. Roberts.” The role won him a supporting-actor Oscar. 

In 1962, Lemmon switched from lighthearted comedies to intense drama, earning his first Academy Award nomination as a lead actor for “Days of Wine and Roses.” 

Lemmon won a best-actor Oscar for 1973 with “Save the Tiger,” in which he played a dress manufacturer whose shady dealings are at odds with the idealism of his youth. 

“I seldom think that I’m up for a good role,” he said in 1975. “I nearly walked out on ‘Days of Wine and Roses’ and ‘Some Like It Hot’ because I didn’t think I could handle the demands they made upon me as an actor. But if you think I’m insecure now, you should’ve seen me when I was first breaking in.” 

Off-screen, the actor seemed sad, said Don Widener, who wrote the 1975 biography “Lemmon.” 

“For all his persona on screen, he was one of the saddest men I’ve known,” Widener said Thursday. “You could see it in his eyes. The face would be laughing, but his eyes were sad. I never found out why that was.” 

Last year, he won an Emmy for playing a dying professor in the TV adaptation of the best seller “Tuesdays With Morrie.” Also last year, he received a Golden Globe for best actor in a TV production of “Inherit the Wind.” 

“Just watching Jack Lemmon made me want to get into this business,” said Hank Azaria, a co-star in “Tuesdays With Morrie.” “He could bring grace and dignity to his work even when he was playing ungraceful, undignified people.” 

Lemmon was at the center of an unusual tribute in 1998, when Ving Rhames beat him out for a Golden Globe for best actor in a TV movie or miniseries. Rhames called Lemmon up on stage and gave him the trophy. 

Rhames said Thursday it was a spur-of-the-moment gesture and that he had at that time only seen a couple of Lemmon’s films. 

“God laid it on my heart to give him that award. I was just the vessel to show him the love that Hollywood has for this man,” said Rhames, who later had dinner with Lemmon. “I didn’t know him well, but I really feel the influence of Jack Lemmon on my life from that little moment, that little 20 seconds we had together.” 

Much of Lemmon’s best-loved work resulted from collaborations with Matthau, who died last summer, and writer-director Billy Wilder. 

Lemmon first teamed with Wilder for “Some Like It Hot,” the 1959 comedy in which he and Tony Curtis played musicians who dress in drag and join an all-girl band to hide out from mobsters. 

 

 

A year later, Lemmon and Wilder were back with “The Apartment,” with the actor starring as a sad-sack loser at love who falls for his boss’ mistress, an elevator girl played by Shirley MacLaine. 

“Anything I could say about this great human being and artist is not enough,” MacLaine said. “We have lost the profound master of emotional canvas painting. Name the feeling, he could paint it with himself as the brush.” 

Wilder and Lemmon teamed up on five other films. Among them was “The Fortune Cookie,” the actor’s first film with Matthau. 

Lemmon’s prim-and-proper persona and Matthau’s slovenly grouchiness made for a combination that stood alongside Bud Abbott and Lou Costello or Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis as one of the great comic buddy duos. 

Among their best-loved collaborations was “The Odd Couple” in 1968, with Lemmon’s Felix a fussy contrast to Matthau’s sloppy Oscar Madison in the comedy about two divorced men sharing an apartment. Thirty years later, they reprised those roles in an unsuccessful sequel. 

Lemmon and Matthau had better results with the two “Grumpy Old Men” movies in the 1990s. 

John Uhler Lemmon III was born Feb. 8, 1925, in a hospital elevator in Newton, Mass. He had a case of jaundice, prompting a nurse to comment, “My, look at the little yellow Lemmon.” 

His father owned a bakery business, and he was brought up in comfortable circumstances. He made his acting debut at 4 in an amateur play. He also taught himself to play piano. 

Lemmon was a sickly boy who required 13 operations before he was 13. To build himself up, he trained in the gym at Andover prep school and became a fleet runner. 

When he returned from Navy service as an ensign in World War II, Lemmon told his father he wanted to act, saying, “I’ll have to try it or all my life I’ll wonder.” 

With $300 from his father, Lemmon moved to New York, landing roles on radio, television and Broadway. When Lemmon got to Hollywood, studio boss Harry Cohn insisted on changing the actor’s name, arguing that critics would use it as a weapon by declaring him and his movie lemons. Lemmon stood his ground. 

Lemmon returned to Broadway in 1985 for a well-received revival of Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey into Night” and had cameo roles in recent years in such movies as “JFK” and “The Player.” 

Lemmon was married from 1950 to 1956 to actress Cynthia Stone, and they had a son, Chris. In 1962, he married actress Felicia Farr, with whom he had a daughter, Courtney. 

Besides his wife and children, Lemmon is survived by a granddaughter and two grandsons. A private funeral is planned. 


Sharpening knives can be an art form

By James and Morris Carey The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

A sharp knife can make a carving job easier and safer. 

We learned this from our dad. During his stint in World War II, he was a meat cutter in the Army. As kids, we were spellbound by dad’s “war stories” about Marseilles, New Caledonia and Fiji. 

Instead of the standard issue rifle, dad settled for a carving knife. 

He remained proud of his trade, and no dull knives ever were found in the Carey home. Dad never let the already sharp blade touch the meat until giving it a few swipes on his bone-handled honing rod or “steel.” The sound of the blade gliding along the honing rod was a Pavlovian experience, as young Carey mouths watered in anticipation. 

Many who cook expect a knife to perform at peak although they do little more than wash it. They spend hours in the kitchen preparing culinary delights only to massacre them with a dull knife. 

A razor-sharp knife can make a world of difference when carving the turkey at Thanksgiving or slicing ham during the holidays. 

All knives are not created equal. Most are made of carbon steel. They hold an edge well, but they are tough to care for. When washed, if they are not promptly dried, they will easily stain. On the other hand they are the easiest to sharpen. 

Knives made of stainless steel are the easiest to care for. They are unbelievably wear-resistant and the chromium in their steel makes them virtually rust- and stain-resistant. In contrast to a carbon steel knife, the stainless steel knife is hard to sharpen, due to its excellent wear- resistance. 

Always on the cutting edge, knife manufacturers have combined beauty with function to come up with a steel alloy known as high-carbon stainless steel.  

These knives of the future combine the sharpening properties of carbon steel with the stain-resistant qualities of stainless. 

Simply stated, sharpening a knife involves grinding the steel blade against something abrasive like a sharpening stone. While there are a myriad of sharpening devices on the market, the most effective is the whetstone.  

It is an abrasive block make from natural stone. Some whetstones are made from manufactured materials such as ceramic, aluminum oxide or carbonium. 

Whetstones are made with varying degrees of abrasives. The smaller the abrasive material, the finer the stone and the smoother the finish. 

A whetstone works best when lubricated with a touch of light-grade machine oil or water.  

Some stones work properly only when used with water. The lubricant acts to carry away metal particles as they are removed from the surface of the knife. The lubricant also helps to suspend these particles to prevent them from being ground into the stone’s surface. Don’t be stingy when using the lubricant. It can make a difference in the finished product. 

Knife sharpening is a lot like sanding wood where you start with a coarse paper and complete the job with fine paper. In the same fashion, start the sharpening process using a stone with a coarse surface and repeat the process on a stone with a fine surface.  

Separate stones can be used for each phase; however, a combination stone (one with both surfaces) is less expensive. 

A few essentials required when sharpening are above-average light, eye protection and a location where metal particles won’t contaminate food.  

Start by placing the whetstone on a stable surface with its end facing you and lubricate the stone with oil or water.  

Continue to add lubricant periodically during the sharpening process. 

Lay the heel of the blade flat on the stone with the edge of the knife facing you. The spline of the knife should be slightly raised so that the angle between the blade and the stone is about 15 degrees. 

Gently draw the blade across the stone, making several passes – moving it from the heel toward the tip as you go. Be careful to catch the entire length of the blade. Next, switching hands, do the other edge, always making sure to draw the blade toward you. Periodically wipe the blade with a clean soft cloth or paper towel, and have a close look at your progress under ample light. 

Don’t expect to be a pro immediately.  

It takes practice. With time and a bit of patience you’ll find that holding the correct angle will become easier and the back-and-forth motion natural. 

The final step involves removing the waste metal, which is created when sharpening, but not ground off during the process.  

These particles are wire-like burrs along the knife’s edge. This “wire edge” is not readily visible, and must be removed for the knife to be truly sharp. The tool most commonly used to remove the wire edge is called a “steel” or steel-honing rod.  

These are available at most department stores and fine cutlery shops. Use a steel with a secure handle that is protected by a guard to avoid injury. 

As with the whetstone, the angle between the blade and the rod should be maintained at about 15 degrees. Beginning at the blade’s heel, draw the knife along the rod toward the handle, maintaining a steady, gentle pressure. Flip the blade over and repeat the process. 

For more home improvement tips and information visit our Web site at www.onthehouse.com. 

Readers can mail questions to: On the House, APNewsfeatures, 50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020, or e-mail Careybro@onthehouse.com. To receive a copy of On the House: Plumbing or On the House: Painting, send a check or money order payable to The Associated Press for $6.95 per booklet and mail to: On the House, PO Box 1562, New York, NY 10016-1562, or through these online sites: www.onthehouse.com or apbookstore.com. 

James and Morris Carey are feature writers for The Associated Press


Hearing a train when turning on the tap

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

Q: I open any tap in my house and I hear a train-like noise. It also feels as if air is being sucked into the tap. When we use two taps, the noise disappears. Using two taps is not a permanent solution. So tell us what kind of problem we are facing and how to fix it. 

A: If faucets screech when you turn them on and pipes hum when water’s running, chances are you have a bad main inlet valve or a bad pressure- regulator valve. Water enters a home at only one point, and if all faucets groan and howl the same all through the house, the main inlet valve is bad where water enters your home.  

Over time, rubber gaskets can become brittle. Running water rushes in, passing over the gasket and acts like the reed in a clarinet with pipes carrying the sound to every faucet and fixture, making it hard to pin down the source. In this case, check the main inlet valve, but if it screeches at only one location, then check the gasket of that particular faucet. Repairs can be done with basic tools, for under $10. 

Q: I have well water in my home and of course the water smells. Someone told me if you take out the rod in the water heater, the water won’t smell anymore. But what rod is it and how do I get it out? 

A: The problem occurs when the metal rod in-glass lined water heaters (used to improve the life expectancy of the glass lining) combines with waterborne sulfate-reducing bacteria (not harmful to consume), resulting in the production of hydrogen sulfide. The water is not dangerous to consume, but is difficult to swallow if you dislike the smell of rotten eggs. 

Solution 1: Replace the magnesium metal rod (cathodic protection anode) with one made of aluminum (it might not be available for your brand water heater). The aluminum rod produces 30 percent less current and therefore generates less hydrogen gas, while causing enough current to adequately protect the glass liner. 

Solution 2: We do not recommend this alternative. Doing so will void the manufacturer’s warranty. Unscrewing it from the tank and replacing it with a threaded plug can accomplish complete removal of the metal rod. 

Solution 3: Find the origination point of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and eliminate it. SRB is most prevalent in new-water supply pipes contaminated by soil during construction.  

The soil carrying the SRB eventually ends up as solids at the bottom of the water heater. A thorough flushing to remove the dirt, then a second flushing with a dash of chlorine, and finally a third flush to clean should do the trick. Hydrogen gas without the presence of SRB will go unnoticed. SRB is not so easy to remove if your water company pumps the bacteria into your home right along with the water. This will, in fact, be the case as increasingly water districts continue to reduce or cease their use of chlorine (as many have). Sulfate-reducing bacteria are devastated by chlorination, but will thrive otherwise. 

It is possible to inadvertently contaminate your own water supply by allowing sulfate-reducing bacteria (not to mention other more dangerous bugs) to enter your water system at your own property through your sprinklers, for example, by not using anti-siphon sprinkler valves, which prevent “backwash.” Backwash could also result when a water main in your neighborhood is turned off while your garden hose is running in a muddy puddle.


Competitors shake heads at Microsoft

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

SAN JOSE — Three years after the government brought antitrust charges against Microsoft Corp., the competitors with the most to gain from the case find themselves shaking their fists at the software titan more than ever. 

The federal appeals court decision Microsoft cheered Thursday was largely expected by rivals – some already had been pushing for a second antitrust lawsuit being considered by state attorneys general. 

The more immediate issue for the high-tech world is the power Microsoft is wielding as it includes, or “bundles,” an increasing amount of software with its new operating system, Windows XP, and links more Web applications through its .NET and Hailstorm initiatives. 

“I think we’re dealing with the most vicious competitor of the last 30 years in technology, and they’re only getting stronger,” said Matthew Szulik, chief executive of Red Hat Inc., a North Carolina-based seller of software for open-source computing systems. “All the industry has ever wanted is a level playing field.” 

Two of Microsoft’s biggest competitors, Yahoo! Inc. and America Online Inc., had no comment. Sun Microsystems Inc. also did not immediately respond to the ruling. 

The decision is not expected to have any immediate affect on most rivals, since none has operated under the assumption that the breakup would be carried out. 

“We’ve been competing with Microsoft for five years and winning,” said Eric Liu, a spokesman for RealNetworks Inc., which makes Internet audio- and video-playing software.  

“We’ve never built our strategy around any legal or regulatory action.” 

Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft says its strategies are aimed at making life easier for consumers and speeding up the development of the Web. But other companies say Microsoft’s real agenda is to insinuate itself into nearly everything on personal computers and the Internet. 

“Microsoft is always in a position to copy what you got, bundle it with Windows and give it away for nothing,” Oracle Corp. chief executive Larry Ellison said this week.  

“You have got to give them credit. They’ll keep bundling things with Windows and driving people out of business.” 

When U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson ordered Microsoft to split into an operating system company and a separate software seller, some of the biggest winners figured to be AOL, Sun and Oracle, which have Internet-services plans of their own.  

It also appeared to be a victory for the Linux open-source operating system for PCs. 

Though the breakup was reversed and punishment of Microsoft was turned over to a different judge, competitors were pleased that the court confirmed an essential element of the case: that Microsoft illegally used its monopoly to gain an unfair advantage. 

Among the features being rolled into XP are “firewalls” and other anti-hacker programs.  

That puts the software giant in more direct competition with a whole new field of companies, including makers of Internet security hardware like SonicWALL Inc. of Sunnyvale. 

Raj Dhingra, SonicWALL’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, doesn’t sound too scared. He said most businesses realize they need hardware like SonicWALL’s plugged into their networks to ensure security. 

However, he said many consumers might get a false sense of security from having firewall software in XP. If anything, the well-known and widely distributed Windows systems make fat targets for hackers, Dhingra said. Having security features in an operating system “does not equate to having full-fledged protection,” he said. 

RealNetworks has made similar claims that the individual features thrown in with Windows are not the best in their classes. 

Red Hat’s Szulik worries more about the products and ideas that he says may never come to fruition.  

Fewer and fewer people, he says, are willing to start a software company that can’t win distribution through Microsoft’s platforms. 

“I hear about this kind of stuff all the time,” said Mike Pettit, president of ProComp, a coalition of Microsoft opponents. “A company can’t get the first round of financing from anyone other than their relatives once they run into that roadblock. That’s frightening. ... (Microsoft has) just sucked all of the innovation from the industry.” 

Some venture capitalists, however, say Microsoft’s Internet initiatives are creating new opportunities for developers. 

“If there are people in the valley telling you that Microsoft has such a heavy hand that nothing can get out the door that’s competitive, that’s ludicrous,” said Chuck Hirsch, who once sold a startup he founded to Microsoft and now is a managing director at Madrona Venture Group in Seattle. 

“Microsoft is clearly a very strong and smart competitor,” he said. “However, even they, as great as they are across the board, can’t do everything. So there are opportunities.” 

——— 

On the Net: 

http://www.microsoft.com 

http://www.procompetition.org 


Job cuts may be easing

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

WASHINGTON — The number of U.S. workers filing new claims for state unemployment insurance fell last week, the third drop in a row, suggesting that the flurry of job cuts this year may be easing. 

The Labor Department reported Thursday that new applications for jobless benefits for the workweek ending June 23 declined by a seasonally adjusted 16,000 claims to 388,000, the lowest point since early May. 

Many economists were predicting that claims would rise. 

The week before, new claims plunged by 31,000, after dropping by 2,000 in the prior week. 

“This is certainly a bright spot for a labor market that has been weak,” said Richard Yamarone, economist with Argus Research Corp. “The job market may be stabilizing.” 

On Wall Street, stocks soared as investors cheered a federal appeals court’s reversal of the breakup of software giant Microsoft and the Fed’s interest-rate cut. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 131.37 at 10,566.21. 

The Federal Reserve on Wednesday cut interest rates for the sixth time this year to boost the sagging economy. The latest reduction was a conservative one-quarter percentage point; the other five were one-half point each.  

Investors were unmoved by the smaller cut Wednesday but they decided on Thursday that it was a good enough reason to rally. 

Meanwhile, the more stable four-week moving average of jobless claims, which smoothes out week-to-week fluctuations, also fell last week to 416,000, the lowest level since the beginning of the month. 

Economist Clifford Waldman of Waldman Associates viewed the decline in jobless claims as a positive development, but cautioned: “It’s way too premature to call this a turning point in the labor market, especially because of a rash of weak earnings reports coming from the corporate sector.” 

The economic slowdown has been hard on companies struggling with slumping demand. 

To cope, they have sharply cut production and laid off workers. In May, the unemployment rate edged down to 4.4 percent, but businesses eliminated 19,000 jobs. Nortel Networks and International Paper are among companies that have recently announced layoffs, and economists expect the jobless rate will rise in the months ahead. 

In addition, higher energy costs have squeezed corporate profits. 

Still, the jobless claims report comes during a week that has generated other good economic news, offering hope that the economy, which has been mired in a slowdown for a year, may be showing some signs of improving. 

On Tuesday three reports showed that consumer confidence in June rose to its highest level of the year; demand for big-ticket items jumped in May; and new-home sales rose solidly. 

Thursday’s report also showed that for the workweek ending June 16, 42 states and territories reported a decrease in claims and 11 reported increases. The information lags a week behind the national figures and is not seasonally adjusted. 

North Carolina reported the biggest drop in claims, down by 12,427 because of fewer layoffs in the food, electronics, trade, textile, apparel and furniture industries. Illinois saw claims go down by 3,175 due to fewer layoffs in the construction, service and manufacturing businesses. 

Tennessee had a 2,675 decline in claims because of fewer layoffs in a variety of industries, including transportation, textile, apparel and lumber. 

California reported the biggest jump in new claims, up by 1,262 because of layoffs in the electronics and agriculture industries. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Department of Labor: http://www.doleta.gov/ 


Author tries to teach importance of quietness

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

NEW YORK — This is about the mouse that didn’t roar. 

An anthropomorphic cartoon mouse, star character of “Listen to the Raindrops,” is the latest recruit in the campaign to persuade kids and their elders that too much noise can not only drown out the simple, pleasurable sounds of life but hurt their hearing and learning. 

“Listen to the tick-tock 

...of the clock 

“Listen to the key turn 

...in the lock,” says the mouse, as it cocks its ear to capture sounds often lost under the thunder of machines and traffic. 

Just published by the League for the Hard of Hearing in New York City, the book is destined, the organization hopes, to homes, schools, libraries and ultimately, into the consciousness of very young children to help them avoid learning 

and hearing problems caused by  

excessive noise. 

It’s light entertainment for a child but a serious part of the League’s “Stop That Noise” campaign to get the public to listen up about the dangers of noise. 

” ‘Listen..’ helps us fill an important niche in these efforts, by reaching very young kids, and is in every state of the union,” says Joseph Brown, League spokesman. 

No pricey public relations consultants were called in to dream it up. Both author and artist of this brief rhyming tale to be read by or to young children have long been dedicated to the dual causes of quiet and hearing. 

For Arline Bronzaft, the author, it’s her first children’s book. Bronzaft’s landmark study about the deleterious effects of subway noise on children’s learning, done in 1975 as her doctorate dissertation, established her reputation as one of the country’s leading authorities on noise pollution. Since then her expertise has been sought for issues as diverse as air flight patterns and decibel levels in New Orleans’ French Quarter. 

For the artist, Steve Parton, it’s very personal. His daughter, Caitlin, lost her hearing to meningitis at 22 months and at 2 years became one of the first and youngest recipients of a cochlear implant. Parton, a professional artist who has illustrated children’s books and created animated sequences for Broadway and television, has been active with the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and the League for the Hard of Hearing. 

With the implant, Caitlin, now 15, was able to master language and join mainstream school classes. She’s an honors student at a suburban high school, active on the school newspaper and, according to her mother, Melody James, enjoys all types of music. 

Bronzaft recalls she resisted at first when a friend and colleague, the late children’s author Augusta Goldin, told her she must write a children’s book with a message about noise. 

“It wasn’t my thing. It wasn’t my field,” she says. Her writing has been academic, based on her research into noise, education and psychology. But she started jotting down lines on the way home from her visit to Goldin. 

“Within an hour, I had the whole thing written. It was just as it is in its final form. 

“It was in verse, but I wasn’t even aware I had written it that way.” 

What a reader will notice in the book is ears. Big ones. In one drawing, the mouse is shown with ears stretching clear across a double-page spread. 

“Because it was about sound, I was interested in creatures with ears,” Parton says. “So we went down from elephants to mice. And it just made sense to use a mouse because that’s what you would expect to find in such a noisy place like New York City, where I lived.” 

Where there are, as the text says, “Airplane roars,/ firecrackers,/ and jackhammers,/ honking horns, sirens,/ and door slammers.” 

Bronzaft received the book’s first “review” from her toddler granddaughter, Alexandra Rose Santoro. 

“When she came to that page that shows all the things that make bad noise — the airplanes, jackhammers, sirens — she banged her fist on the page and shouted, ’No! No!’ ” 

——— 

On the Web: 

http://www.lhh.org/noise/index.htm 


Differences are bone deep between men and women

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

ROSEMONT, Ill. — Men and women aren’t created equal, at least when it comes to problems with their bones, joints and muscles. 

You’ve probably heard that women athletes are more likely than their male counterparts to suffer serious knee injuries on the basketball court – in fact, four to six times more likely, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.  

And that young women preoccupied with body image can abuse their nutrition, leading to musculoskeletal disorders. 

But you may be surprised to learn that men are increasingly at risk for that allegedly female condition, osteoporosis. 

The AAOS looked at how sex differences affect these conditions during an overview session at its spring meeting. 

Research doctors investigating the higher rate of knee injuries among women – often an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) – looked at biomechanical and neuromuscular factors that may contribute to the risks. 

They compared women and men in both pivoting sports – basketball, volleyball, soccer – and non-pivoting sports – cycling, crew, and running, for example. 

“We found that female athletes in the pivoting sports often has less muscle protection at the knee that their male counterparts,” said Dr. Edward M. Wojtys, director of the Med Sport section of orthopedic surgery at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.  

“That lack of muscle protection, which helps absorb the load on the knee joint, may contribute to the injury susceptibility.” 

Movement technique also may play a role, according to Dr. Freddie H. Fu, chairman of orthopedic surgery at the University of Pittsburgh.  

“Neuromuscular factors, like how an athlete lands from a jump, may also be factors in injury risk.  

“It’s important that female athletes learn proper and jumping and landing techniques as part of their conditioning and training.” 

Women active in sports are especially susceptible to a condition known as the Female Athlete Triad: eating disorders that can range from mild to severe, as in anorexia and bulimia; absence of menstruation; and the increased risk of stress fractures and development of osteoporosis. 

“We have found that there are certain types of stress fractures that may be predictive of underlying osteoporosis, and these fractures are seen in patients with disordered eating,” said Dr. Jo A. Hannafin, associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Cornell University Medical College and orthopedic director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. 

Osteoporosis is something that men have to think about, too. One in eight men will develop an osteoporosis-related fracture in his lifetime, according to the researchers. 

“Men have a different pattern of osteoporosis than women,” said Dr. Joseph M. Lane, professor of orthopedic surgery and assistant dean of medical students at Cornell University Medical College in New York City. 

“For example, a drug used to treat prostate cancer in men can put a man at increased risk of developing osteoporosis because it interferes with gonadal hormones. 

“It’s important that awareness of osteoporosis among men is raised, because men are much more likely to die from the complications of an osteoporosis-related fracture than women.” 

On the Web: 

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons - http://www.aaos.org.


Beth El hearing continued – again

By John Geluardi
Thursday June 28, 2001

The City Council heard from 39 speakers Tuesday during the second session of a public hearing on the controversial proposal to build a synagogue, school and social hall at 1301 Oxford St. 

At 11:30 p.m. the council agreed to continue the public hearing to a third session at a special meeting on July 16. The council has added two special meetings to its schedule, the second on July 19, in the hopes of resolving the issue before its seven-week summer recess, which begins on July 24. 

The council opened the hearing on June 5, during which nearly 60 people spoke on both sides of the neighborhood land-use issue that has attracted citywide attention. The first session of the public hearing drew so many people that about 300 people were unable to get into the City Council Chambers. The overflow crowd watched the proceedings on a television in the lobby of Old City Hall or listened to speakers that were placed outside the building. 

A representative from the City Clerk’s Office estimated there are still 40 people who have signed up to address the council, but who have not had an opportunity to do so. 

The controversy is over a proposal by the Beth El congregation to build a 33,000-square-foot facility, with 33 parking spaces, on a two-acre site that is a city landmark and has Codornices Creek running through it.  

Neighbors, organized into the Live Oak Codornices Creek Neighborhood Association, initiated the public hearing by appealing a March 8 Zoning Adjustments Board approval of a use permit for the project. 

At the July 16 meeting, the council is expected to open a second public hearing based on a Beth El appeal of a conflicting commission decision, the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s denial of an alteration permit. Without the permit, Beth El will not be able to demolish existing structures on the site, which include the former Chinese Alliance Church and some smaller structures. None of the structures are currently in use. 

LOCCNA, which has garnered the support of at least 10 environmental groups, has fought the project strenuously since it was first proposed four years ago. They contend the project is too big and will preclude daylighting of the creek, which runs across the north side of the property mostly through a culvert. They are also concerned the synagogue will cause traffic and parking problems in the quiet neighborhood.  

Beth El, which has the support of several churches in west Berkeley and Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson, argues that the project is respectful of the historic nature of the site and has made many design changes to assure neighbors that the creek could be daylighted in the future.  

Beth El member Harry Pollack told the council that the congregation has made at least 20 significant changes to the project at the suggestions of the Zoning Adjustments Board, the Design Review Commission and the neighbors.  

He said those changes include moving the parking lot off the culverted section of the creek to ease any possible daylighting project, breaking up the blockish design of the building and altering the height and street frontage along Oxford Street. 

Pollack said Beth El is not like the typical developer who designs the largest project possible to keep profits high. He said reducing the size of a place of worship is not the same as reducing the size of an apartment complex or an office building. 

“You can’t just lob off a few apartments or get rid of office space,” he said. “Here you’re cutting off the heart and soul of our project. We didn’t come into this with a wish list, we came in with a needs list.” 

LOCCNA member Juliet Lamont said she doesn’t agree that there have been significant changes to the project. She said the square footage of the project has been reduced by only 6 percent.  

“The original proposal was for 35,000 square feet and now it’s down to 33,000 square feet,” she sai. “Those changes are not ‘significant,’ they’re cosmetic.” 

Lamont said the congregation has yet to address any of LOCCNA’s real concerns. The neighborhood group is asking for no development on the north side of the property, so there can be a “true” daylighting project, reduced building size and limits on the intensity of use that might be expected from a building of that size. 

An alternate plan, prepared by a landscape architect hired by LOCCNA, was presented to the council during the public hearing. The plan incorporated some of the alterations LOCCNA would like to see. 

Pollack argued that to be presented with an alternate plan so late in the process was “distressing,” but he said Beth El would be willing to take it into consideration. 

Lamont also announced to the council that the Urban Creeks Council had recently received a second grant of $200,000 for removing fish migration barriers along Codornices Creek. The UCC received another $200,000 for the same project in early May.  

Lamont said the UCC would probably be willing to apply some of that grant money to a daylighting project on the Beth El site if the congregation is willing to cooperate.  

Both Beth El and LOCCNA are currently in mediation. The two sides have met with professional mediator Peter Bluhan four times and each side has met with Bluhan individually several times. Bluhan told the council the content of the meetings is confidential and he could not predict the likelihood of an agreement between the two sides. He said he hoped to have some results by July 24 when the council is scheduled to vote on the appeals.


Sabrina Forkish and Guy Poole
Thursday June 28, 2001


Thursday, June 28

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at:  

quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley Opera performs pieces of Carmen. 

 

Pink Slip Party and Career  

Mixer 

6 - 9 p.m. 

Pyramid Brewery and Alehouse 

901 Gilman Street 

Meet with East Bay job seekers while listening to music by DJ and Emcee Marty Nemko. Also, cash bar, free hors d’oeurves, and prize giveaways. Free and open to the public. Call 251-1401. 

www.eastbaytechjobs.com/mixer/ 

 

Take the Terror Out  

of Talking! 

Noon to 1:30 p.m. 

California Dept. of Health Services 

2151 Berkeley Way 

Room 804 

Open house at State Health Toastmasters Club to celebrate its 40th anniversary. Free. 

649-7750 

 


Friday, June 29

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women: Arts, Herstory  

and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

3 p.m. 

Sather Gate 

UC Berkeley 

Telegraph at Bancroft 

Walking tour from Sather Gate to People’s Park entitled “Berkeley in the Sixties.” Led by Free Speech veterans and Berkeley residents Kate Coleman and Michael Rossman, the tour will include important locations and discussions of the Free Speech movement, the Vietnam Day Committee, the rise of affirmative action, and other events and movements. Free. 486-04 11  

 


Saturday, June 30

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 548-3333 

 

First Annual Brower Day  

David Brower’s Environmental Legacy Celebrated 

Noon - 5 p.m. 

Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park 

Outdoor festival celebrating the Earth and the late David Brower. Sustainable Crafts Market, organic and vegetarian food. Lee Stetson will perform “The Spirit of John Muir” in the Florence Schwimley Little Theater, 12:30 and 2 p.m., and at 3 p.m. a special screening of "In the Light of Reverence" by the Sacred Land Film Project. Julia Butterfly Hill will join filmmaker Toby McLeod for a special panel following the film. 

415-788-3666 

 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 

925-830-2975  

 

Bonfire III: Stories and  

Songs By the Sea 

7:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Marina 

Spinnaker Way, near Olympic Circle Sailing Club 

Come for Havdala and share stories, sing and watch the flames dance. Bring food and drink to share, kosher s’mores provided. 

848-0237 

 

Know Your Rights 

11 - 2 p.m. 

2022 Blake St. 

Copwatch workshop: Learn what your rights are when dealing with the police. Special section on juvenile rights.  

548-0425 

 

Bay Area Eco-Crones 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1066 Creston Road 

Networking, information sharing, project planning and ritual.  

Call ahead, 874-4935. 

 

2001 Paul G. Hearne Leadership 

Award Workshop 

4 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Ave. at MLK 

Michai Freeman, one of 11 recipients of the 2000 Paul Hearne Leadership Award of $10,000, will discuss how she applied for the award and how you can too. The award is given by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and is open to any individual with a disability.  

RSVP required. Reserve your space by e-mailing your name and address to michai@gladtobehere.org, or by calling 548-6425 ext 2. First 10 registrants will receive free membership to AAPD. 

 


Sunday, July 1

 

Buddhist Psychology 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Annette Anderson on “Insights from Buddhist Psychology.” Free. 

843-6812 

 

Jazz on the Pier 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Berkeley Pier  

The Christy Dana Quartet performs on the Berkeley Pier at the foot of University Ave. and Seawall Dr. The CDQ ensemble led by trumpeter and jazz educator Christy Dana with the Bay as a backdrop. Bring your folding chairs, sunblock and jackets. Free.  

AC Transit Bus 51M 

649-3929 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Avenue 

Group meditation using instrumental music and devotional songs. Free. 

496-3468 

 


Monday, July 2

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panels on Ulysses, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Finnegans Wake, and Joyce in the Classroom. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  

 


Tuesday, July 3

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panel on Finnegans Wake as well as looking at issues such as Joyce and carnality, computers, border-crossings, and cinema. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  

 


Wednesday, July 4

 

Ice Cream Social 

Noon - 2 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Part of the Lawrence Hall of Science Wednesday FUN-days. Bring your own picnic, ice cream provided by LHS. Free museum admission today with a library card, regular admission $3 - $7. 

642-5132  

 

4th of July at the Berkeley Marina 

Noon - 10 p.m. 

Bring your family for an exciting day. Picnic on great international food, hit the beach, take a free sailboat ride, get your face painted or a massage. Decorate your bike at the Shorebird Nature Center and participate in the Decorated Bicycle Parade at 7 p.m. Visit Madame Ovary’s egg puppets and Adventure Playground all day or the Wacky Art Cars. Dance to Southbound or Zambombazo 2-5 p.m.; Bird Legg and the Tite Fit Blues Band 5-7 p.m.; Kollasuyo 5-7 p.m.; MotorDude Zydeco 7-9 p.m. Fireworks at dusk. No personal fireworks allowed. An alcohol-free event. Cars in by 7 p.m. when street closes to traffic, out only after 10 p.m. Free admission. Sponsored by the City of Berkeley. 

548-5335 

 

Berkeley Communicator Toastmasters Club 

7:15 a.m. 

Vault Cafe 

3250 Adeline 

Learn to speak with confidence. Ongoing first and third Wednesdays each month. 

527-2337 

 


Thursday, July 5

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Capoeira Arts Cafe and company, Brazilian extravaganza. 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meetings discussions will center on “What do we/can we expect from the Church?”  

654-5486 

 

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

Bear Safety 

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc. 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Learn how to travel in bear country without mishap. Wilderness guide Ken Hanley will discuss the characteristics of black bears and grizzlies for anyone venturing into their territories. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. 

Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panels on Dubliners, Ulysses, Marginal Feelings in Joyce, and Joyce and Anarchy. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  

 


Friday, July 6

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women; The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. Free.  

Call 549-2970 

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panels on Ulysses, Ireland and the Politics of Culture, Joycean Border-Crossings, and Joyce and Frank Zappa. $15 - $25.  

642-2754 

 

James Joyce Conference 

Closing Banquet 

6 - 11 p.m. 

UC Faculty Club 

UC Berkeley Campus 

Joycean entertainment and dancing. Reservations required, call 415-392-1137. 

 

Saturday, July 7  

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, a non-profit sailing and windsurfing cooperative, give free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

Visit www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 


Sunday, July 8

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, a non-profit sailing and windsurfing cooperative, give free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

Visit www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Open House 

3 - 5 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Free introduction to Tibetan Buddhist culture, including: Prayer wheel and meditation garden tour, Tibetan yoga demonstration, information on Tibetan art project, class and program counseling and a talk on “Relaxation and Meditation.” Followed at 6 p.m. by “Mind and Mental Events.” Free.  

 

Buddhist Psychology 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Sylvia Gretchen on “Mind and Mental Events.” Free. 

843-6812 

 


Monday, July 9

 

Draft Environmental  

Impact Report 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

105 North Gate Hall 

UC Berkeley 

Public hearing on the Draft Environmental Impact Report for the Northeast Quadrant Science and Safety Projects, which will replace old, seismically poor research facilities with modern, safe structures. 

642-7720 

 


Tuesday, July 10

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 


Wednesday, July 11

 

What’s Cooking? 

Noon - 2 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Part of the Lawrence Hall of Science Wednesday FUN-days. Fun expiriments you can do in your own kitchen. Museum admission $3 - $7. 

642-5132  

 


Thursday, July 12

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week East Bay Science and Arts Middle School evoke the sounds of Trinidadian Carnival with a steel drum performance. 

 

Hiking the Tahoe Rim Trail 

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc. 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Slide Presentation. 

Twenty years in the making, the 150-mile Tahoe Rim Trail is now complete. Tahoe Rim Trail Association board member Trena Bristol joins TRT through-hikers Steve Andersen and Art Presser for a slide presentation on great day hikes and backpacking trips on the TRT. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. 

Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Remediation of Under Prescribing  

Pain Medication 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1902 Hearst Avenue 

A public hearing on AB 487, Remediation of Under Prescribing Pain Medication, with Assemblywoman Dion Aroner, medical experts, and patients. 

540-3660 

 

art.SITES SPAIN 

7:30 p.m. 

Easy Going Travel Shop and Bookstore 

1385 Shattuck Avenue 

Sidra Stitch, author of “art.SITES SPAIN: Contemporary Art and Architecture Handbook,” will present a slide show and talk on the most recent trends in art and architecture in Spain. Free. 

843-3533 

 


Friday, July 13

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women; The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. Free.  

Call 549-2970 

 


Saturday, July 14

 

 


Sunday, July 15

 

Hands-On Bicycle Repair Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn drive train maintenance and chain repair from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free  

527-4140 

 

Buddhist Practice 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Mark Henderson on “Fearlessness on the Bodhisattva Path.” Free. 

843-6812 

 

Second Annual Wobbly High Mass 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck (@ Prince St.) 

Presented by Folk This! and friends, an evening of musical satire, subversion and sacrilege. This year’s theme is “Reclaiming Tomorrow,” a historical journey toward a future society without classes or bosses. 

$8 

849-2568 

 


Monday, July 16

 

 


Tuesday, July 17

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion will center on best vacations, trips, and travel experiences. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

Berkeley School Volunteers 

10:30 a.m. - noon 

1835 Allston Way 

Orientation for volunteers interested in helping in academic and recreation programs being held in Berkeley public schools this summer. 

644-8833 

 

 


Wednesday, July 18

 

Blisters No More: Finding the Proper Boot Fit 

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc. 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

REI footwear expert Brad Bostrom will show you how to make your feet more comfortable out on the trail. Bring your boots and socks to this interactive clinic. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Berkeley Communicator Toastmasters Club 

7:15 a.m. 

Vault Cafe 

3250 Adeline 

Learn to speak with confidence. Ongoing first and third Wednesdays each month. 

527-2337 

 

Ice Cream Day at LHS 

Noon - 2 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Part of the Lawrence Hall of Science Wednesday FUN-days. Make your own ice cream and compare it to a commercial brand. Museum admission $3 - $7. 

642-5132 

 

Support Group for Family/Friends  

Caring for Older Adults 

4 - 5:30 p.m. - 3rd Wednesday of each month 

Alta Bates Medical Center  

Herrick Campus 

2001 Dwight Way 

3rd floor, Room 3369B (elevator - B) 

The group will focus on the needs of the older adult with serious medical problems, psychiatric illnesses, substance abuse, and their caregivers. Facilitated by Monica Nowakowski, LCSW. 

Free. For more information call 802-1725 

 


Thursday, July 19

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meeting will be a game night.  

654-5486 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week The Waikiki Steel Works perform vintage acoustic Hawaiian steel guitar music. 

 

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. 

Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Backpacking Yosemite’s High Country 

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc. 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Slide Presentation. 

Marvin Schinnerer will share highlights from two favorite trips out of Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Berkeley School Volunteers 

3 - 4:30 p.m. 

1835 Allston Way 

Orientation for volunteers interested in helping in academic and recreation programs being held in Berkeley public schools this summer. 

644-8833 

 


Friday, July 20

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women; The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. Free. 

Call 549-2970 

 


Saturday, July 21

 

Ohtani Bazaar 

4 p.m. - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Higashi Honganji Temple 

1524 Oregon Street 

Games, prizes and activities for children. Japanese food will be available. Free admission. 

236-2550 

 


Sunday, July 22

 

Ohtani Bazaar 

Noon - 7 p.m. 

Berkeley Higashi Honganji Temple 

1524 Oregon Street 

Games, prizes and activities for children. Japanese food will be available. Free admission. 

236-2550 

 

Buddhist Practice 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Jack Petranker on “Going Beyond the Way We Live Now.” Free. 

843-6812 

 


Tuesday, July 24

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

Round-the-World Journey 

7:30 p.m. 

Easy Going Travel Shop and Bookstore 

1385 Shattuck Avenue 

Brad Newsham, author of “Take Me With You: A Round-the-World Journey to Invite a Stranger Home,” will present a talk and slide show. Newsham took a 100-day trip through the Philippines, India, Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and South Africa looking for a stranger to bring to America. Free. 

843-3533 

 


Wednesday, July 25

 

Toymaker Day 

Noon - 2 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Part of the Lawrence Hall of Science Wednesday FUN-days. Make toys out of recycled materials with artists from the East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse. Museum admission $3 - $7. 

642-5132 

 


Thursday, July 26

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week The Brazilian Workshop under the direction of Marcos Silva, Jazzschool students perform traditional Brazilian music. 

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. 

Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Wilderness First Aid 

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc. 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Jim Morrisey, senior instructor at Wilderness Medical Associates, will teach you the basics of field repair for the human body: Blisters, wounds, fractures, lightning strikes, snake bites and more. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Ancient Native Sites of the East Bay 

7:30 p.m. 

Room 160 Kroeber Hall, University of California Campus 

Andrew Galvan, an Ohlone Indian and co-owner of Archaeor, will discuss and share the benefits of osteological studies of prehistoric human skeletal remains. Prof. Ed Luby, research archaeologist for the Berkeley Natural History Museums, will discuss his work on mortuary feasting practices. $10 

841-2242 

 

Southeast Asia and Japan 

7:30 p.m. 

Easy Going Travel Shop and Bookstore 

1385 Shattuck Avenue 

William Ford, author of “Southeast Asia and Japan: Unusual Travel,” will present a talk and slide show of his adventure travels. Free. 

843-3533 

 


Friday, July 27

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women; The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. Free. 

Call 549-2970 

 


Saturday, July 28

 

 


Sunday, July 29

 

Hands-On Bicycle Repair Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn how to adjust your brakes from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free  

527-4140 

 

Buddhist Teacher 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Eva Casey on “The Life of Padmasambhava.” Free. 

843-6812 

 


Tuesday, July 31

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

Wild Women Travel Writers 

7:30 p.m. 

Easy Going Travel Shop and Bookstore 

1385 Shattuck Avenue 

An evening with members of the Wild Women Travel Writers’ Group, authors of “Wild Writing Women: Stories of World Travel,” will read from their book and conduct a panel discussion on the “Art of Travel Writing.” Free. 

843-3533 


Forum

By Interim Superintendent Stephen A. Goldstone
Thursday June 28, 2001

“Berkeley’s legendary commitment to public education” is one of the reasons Michele Barraza Lawrence cites for her desire to become this city’s new Superintendent of Schools. 

Having served as Berkeley’s Interim Superintendent since February, and in school districts throughout California for the last 35 years, I can affirm that the “legend” is true. Berkeley is unique in its range of resources, ideals, and activism.  

Its schools could and should be the best. 

I hope these parting thoughts will encourage all the talented people I have met here to continue working together to develop first-class schools for all of Berkeley’s students. 

First, it’s important to recognize the vast support this community gives its schools, which can be seen in so many ways.  

The Berkeley Schools Excellence Project, a parcel tax routinely approved by over 80 percent of the voters, adds $9 million to the district’s annual budget.  

This has sustained small class sizes and important academic enrichment programs even in the bleakest days of state funding. The recently passed Measure AA and BB bonds will make sure our newly rebuilt schools are kept in safe and attractive condition. 

Organizations including the Berkeley Public Education Foundation, the Berkeley High School Development Group, In Dulci Jubilo, and active PTAs, generate hundreds of thousands of additional dollars. 

Our classrooms are rich with volunteer literacy tutors, gardening instructors, and other supporters recruited through Berkeley School Volunteers and school-based efforts such as the Writer’s Room at Berkeley High. Community volunteers have saved instrumental music instruction, brought Reading Recovery to our elementary schools, and are working to bring programs like Rebound and Small Learning Communities to fruition at Berkeley High. 

This range of support continues to attract the best teachers, even in the midst of a nationwide shortage. It is key to our relatively high test scores, and will help us close the achievement gap. 

But everyone agrees: our schools aren’t good enough. While 54 percent of our 11th-graders scored “proficient” or better on last year’s Language Arts standards tests – close to double the statewide average of 30 percent – we aren’t satisfied with just being “above average.”  

The number of African American students taking Advanced Placement classes is rising – but not fast enough. The arts are underfunded, security is a problem, and too many students are falling through the cracks. 

Part of the solution to these problems lies in Sacramento. This year, California spent $1,000 less per student than the national average of $7,500 – about the same as Wyoming and Kentucky, and a full $3,500 less than the top states.  

California has one of the largest economies in the world, and we can’t continue to grow if we are below average in support for schools. If Berkeley, this legendary bastion of democratic activism, doesn’t lead the way to increase school support, who will? 

I believe the school district itself can improve.  

Berkeley’s longstanding practice of site-based management relies on the creative, collaborative work of principals, teachers, and the larger community.  

This demanding system, geared toward high expectations, requires an intense level of district support and service. 

Yet, many principals tell me there’s too little time for instructional leadership because the lights aren’t working, or a vendor hasn’t been paid, or there are no janitors.  

Too many teachers haven’t received the books they ordered, or can’t get their computer hooked up. Too many citizens bring great talent and commitment to bear, but cannot get the financial figures they need, or other important information. 

We can do better. Our district should provide the foundation of support so that teachers and principals can educate all of our kids. 

I have recommended a plan to streamline the District’s business and operations, which I believe will help. The plan was approved unanimously by the Board of Education and is currently being implemented. 

I leave Berkeley with great optimism.  

Your incoming Superintendent is known for bringing communities together to achieve important academic improvements. You have some beautiful new schools, and now the maintenance and security funds to keep them clean and safe.  

You have dedicated teachers and principals, and a community with high expectations and the will to make good things happen for students. 

Berkeley can have the best schools in California. I look forward to watching it happen, and hope I have contributed some small part to this grand effort. 

 

 


Staff
Thursday June 28, 2001

MUSEUMS 

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Space Weather Exhibit now - Sept. 2; now - Sept. 9 Science in Toyland; June 21: 6 a.m., Solar Eclipse Day Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

The UC Berkeley Art Museum closed for renovations until the fall. 

 

MUSIC 

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 29: Barfeeders, Pac-Men, Hell After Dark, A.K.A. Nothing, Maurice’s Little Bastards; June 30: The Cost, Pg. 99, Majority Rule, 7 Days of Samsara, Since by Man, Creation is Crucifixion; July 6: Victim’s Family, Fleshies, The Modern Machines, Once For Kicks, The Blottos; July 7: The Stitches, Real MacKenzies, The Briefs, The Eddie Haskells, The Spits 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m. unless noted otherwise. June 28: Keni “El Lebrijano”; June 30: Larry Stefl Jazz Quartet; July 3: 9 p.m., pickPocket ensemble; July 4: Whiskey Brothers; July 5: Keni “El Lebrijano.” 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m. June 28: ConFusion; June 29: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sally Hanna-Rhine; 10 p.m., Hideo Date; June 30: Anna and Susie Laraine and Peri Poston; 10 p.m., The Ducksan Distone. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 28: 9 p.m., Monkey, Stiff Richards, Go Jimmy Go; June 29: 8:30 p.m., Fountain’s Muse CD release party and Musicians and Fine Artists for World Peace fund-raiser, with Obeyjah and others; June 30: 9:30 p.m. Tropical Vibrations. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Berkeley Arts Festival June 28: Con Alma Vocal Jazz Sextet; June 30: 7:30 p.m. Marvin Sanders and Vera Berheda, plus Mozart, Beethoven, Hadyn and Fuare in the gallery; July 1: 11 a.m., “Free Jazz on the Pier” The Christy Dana Quartet (on the Berkeley Pier). All shows at 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted Donations requested 2200 Shattuck Avenue 665-9496 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 28: Jim Campilongo; June 29: Don’t Look Back; June 30: Jim Hurst & Missy Raines, Due West; July 5: Druha Trava; July 6 and 7: Ferron. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org; 548-1761 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 28: Beatdown w/ DJ’s Delon, Yamu & Addi; June 29: Zoe Ellis Quartet; June 30: Go Van Gogh 2881 Shattuck Ave. 843-8277 

 

Julia Morgan Center for the Arts July 1: 1 & 2 p.m., “Kourosh Taghavi: The Beauty of Iranian Music and Stories of its Origins” $5 - $10. 2640 College Ave. 654-0100 

 

Live Oaks Concerts, Berkeley Art Center, July 1: Matthew Owens; July 15: David Cheng, Marvin Sanders, Ari Hsu; July 27: Monica Norcia, Amy Likar, Jim Meredith. All shows at 7:30 unless otherwise noted Admission $10 (BACA members $8, students and seniors $9, children under 12 free) 

 

125 Records Release Party June 30: 9:45 p.m. Anton Barbeau and Belle De Gama will celebrate the release of their albums The Golden Boot: Antology 2 and Garden Abstract respectively. These are the first two albums released on the 125 Records label, founded by Joe Mallon with his winnings from his appearance on “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.” $5. Starry Plough 3101 Shattuck Avenue 841-2082  

 

Leopold’s Fancy July 2: 8 p.m., Traditional Irish music, part of “Extreme Joyce/Reading On the Edge,” a conference celebrating the works of James Joyce. Free. 2271 Shattuck Ave. 642-2754 

 

THEATER 

 

Dramatic Joyce July 3: 7:30 p.m. Dramatic interpretations of the works of James Joyce by local and international actors. Introduction by UC Berkeley Professor John Bishop with commentary by and conversation with the audience. Part of the week-long conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” Free. Krutch Theater, Clark Kerr Campus 2601 Warring Street 642-2754 

 

“Cuatro Maestros Touring Festival” July 4: 8 p.m. Music and dance performed by four elder folk artists and their young counterparts, accompanied by Los Cenzontles. $12 - $18. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Do You Hear What I Am Seeing?” July 5: 7:30 p.m. One man show by David Norris, a two-hour sampling of Joyce’s works with Norris’ insights. Part of the week-long conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” $10. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Romeo and Juliet” Through July 14, Thurs. - Sat. 8 p.m. Set in early 1930s just before the rise of Hitler in the Kit Kat Klub, Juliet is torn between ties to the Nazi party and Romeo’s Jewish heritage. $8 - $10. La Val’s Subterranean Theater 1834 Euclid 234-6046 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 22: Weds. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. (After July 8 no Wednesday performance, no Sunday matinee on July 22.) Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shepherd’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Iphegenia in Aulis” Through August 12: Sat. and Sun. 5 p.m. No performances July 14 and 15, special dawn performance on August 12 at 7 a.m. A free park performance by the Shotgun Players of Euripides’ play about choices and priorities. With a masked chorus, singing, dancing, and live music. Feel free to bring food and something soft to sit on. John Hinkel Park, Southhampton Place at Arlington Avenue (different locations July 7 and 8). 655-0813 

 

FILMS 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 28: 7:30 p.m. The Beginning of an Unknown Era; June 29: Molba 7:30, Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors 9:10; June 30: 7, 9:10 p.m. Nenette and Boni; July 3: 7:30 p.m., Pineapple. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

EXHIBITS 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato Through June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Rachel Davis and Benicia Gantner Works on Paper Through July 14, Tues. - Sat., 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Watercolors by Davis, mixed-media by Gantner. Opening reception June 13, 6 - 8 p.m. Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Constitutional Shift Through July 13, Tuesdays - Fridays, noon - 5 p.m. Permanence and personal journey link Hee Jae Suh, Ursula Neubauer and Marci Tackett. Korean-born Suh explores an inner psychological world with a dramatic series of self-portraits. Neubauer explores self-portraiture as a travel map of identity with multiple points of view. Tackett explores Antarctica’s other-worldly landscape in a series of stunning digital photographs. Kala Art Institute 1060 Heinz Ave. 549-2977 

 

“The Trip to Here: Paintings and Ghosts by Marty Brooks” Through July 31, Tues. - Sun. 11 a.m. - 1 a.m. View Brooks’ first California show at Bison Brewing Company 2598 Telegraph Ave. 841-7734  

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“New Visions: Introductions 2001” July 12 - August 18, Wed. - Sat.: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Juried by Artist- Curator Rene Yanez and Robbin Henderson, Executive Director of the Berkeley Art Center, the exhibition features works from some of California’s up-and-coming artists. Reception July 12 from 6 - 8 p.m. Pro Arts 461 Ninth St., Oakland 763-9425 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethiopia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext. 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910” chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Through September. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Avenue All events at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. June 25: Pamela Rafael Berkman reads from her book “Her Infinite Variety: Stories of Shakespeare and the Women He Loved.” 845-7852 

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m. sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. June 25: Featuring Steve Arntsen; July 2: Featured artist April Ipock. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

“Berkeley Stories” June 29: 7:30 p.m. Stories of local Celebrity Artists. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 549-3564  

 

 

Tours 

 

“Berkeley in the Sixties” Berkeley Arts Festival presents free speech Veterans Kate Coleman and Michael Rossman leading a tour from Sather Gate Friday June 29, 3 p.m. 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

 


Tough time recruiting minority teachers

By Ben Lumpkin
Thursday June 28, 2001

Recruiting minority teachers isn’t easy for any Bay Area school district in these days of astronomical housing costs and a national teacher shortage. 

But the Berkeley Unified School District may have more obstacles to overcome than most. 

Berkeley administrators say recruiting more minority teachers is a high priority. When Berkeley High Vice Principal Michele Patterson traveled to job fairs this year, she went out of her way to meet with minority candidates and try to lure them to the school. (In the 1999-2000 school year Berkeley High’s 184 teachers were 73 percent white and 15 percent African American, compared to a student body that was 37 percent white and 37 percent African American.) 

It wasn’t a hard sell, Patterson said. The Berkeley school district has a very good reputation and many minority teachers-to-be are eager to work here. In fact, Patterson met with a number of minority students finishing up teaching credential programs who had done “student teaching” in Berkeley schools and were ready and waiting to continue their careers here. 

There was just one problem: Berkeley schools are too good. 

Under state and federal programs, graduates from teacher credentialing programs can have most or all of their tuition loans paid off by the government if they volunteer to go to work in “low-performing” schools. But Berkeley has no “low-performing” schools. Hundreds and hundreds of low performing students maybe, but they attend schools with enough high-performing students to boost the Academic Performance Index rating well above the “low-performing” range.  

“That’s been my biggest obstacle: trying to find candidates who don’t need their teacher credential loans paid off,” Patterson said. “You’d have this great interview with them and be all excited about bringing them to Berkeley and then all of a sudden they’d say, ‘Oh, by the way, I need to be in a low-performing school. Which of yours is low performing?’” 

Other obstacles to the recruitment of minority teachers abound. 

To begin with, the district has almost no budget for teacher recruiting. David Gomez, Berkeley’s associate superintendent of administrative services, managed to get $1,500 for recruiting purposes this year, which mostly went to place ads in magazines, including many with high African-American and Latino readership. 

Other than that, the district is left to rely on word of mouth (i.e. Berkeley reputation as an exciting district to work in) and visits to local, free job fairs (like the ones Patterson attended). 

One district program allows minorities (and others) who are interested in a teaching career, but are not yet credentialed to work as paid teachers while they pursue their credentials.  

This program offers more of an incentive than it might seem at first blush. When Patterson did her student teaching 15 years ago, there wasn’t an opportunity to be paid for it, she said. 

As Gomez put it: “If they were just students they wouldn’t be paid anything. And here they’re being paid as teachers and they’re getting benefits and getting experience.” 

However, there is a major drawback to this program, Gomez said: The sheer amount of work involved in being a full time teacher and simultaneously completing classes in a teacher credentialing program. 

“Some of them burn out really fast,” Gomez said. “We’re doing all the common sense type things to help them. But the bottom line is: they’re working full-time and going to school. That’s the killer.” 

The credentialing issue can also be frustrating for Berkeley High teachers, many of whom put in unsolicited efforts to recruit minority teachers to the school. 

English teacher Tammy Harkins told how she, English Department Chair Allison Johnson and others managed to recruit three African-American men to teach in the English department next year. It’s been more than 10 years since the department has hired an African American man, Harkins estimated. 

But one of the candidates - a man who has taught at a private school and worked extensively with “at risk” youth – is being held up because he lacks the proper teaching credential, Harkins said. 

“He just has an amazing resume, but he hasn’t jumped through that hoop of getting credentialed,” she said. 

Harkins said she has watched other teachers who were doing very well at Berkeley High, and succeeded in engaging minority students where others had failed, end up leaving the school because of difficulties in obtaining the proper credentials. 

Katrina Scott-George, a teacher in Berkeley High’s Rebound program, formed in January to create longer and smaller classes in core subjects for students (almost all of them students of color) who failed two or more classes the first semester, said at least one African American man who wanted to teach for Rebound withdrew his application after be hassled about his lack of credentials. The man was studying for his doctorate at the time, Scott-George said. 

Scott-George ended up being the only person of color out of Rebound’s five teachers. She said it didn’t detract from the success of the program, but that there still needed to be more minority teachers at Berkeley High.  

“If (teachers) don’t really have any shared experience (with students), I think it makes it harder (to teach them), not impossible,” Scott-George said.  

“If students don’t see any teachers of color around then it contributes to the whole message of the school not really being for or about students of color,” she added. 

Berkeley school board director John Selawsky said Wednesday that he and other directors have investigated some of the obstacles to recruiting more minority teachers in recent months and are exploring remedies to the problems. 

One solution would involve giving teachers who plan to retire the end of the year some kind of incentive to notify the school district as early in the year as possible. Berkeley is too often in the position of recruiting new teachers in May and June, while other districts are able to do their recruiting in March, Selawsky said. In other words, other districts are able to snatch up the limited pool of minority teachers before Berkeley even starts its recruiting. 

Another solution the district is exploring, along with the city, is creating subsidized housing for teachers and other public employees, to help ease the burden posed by Berkeley’s high cost of living. 

Selawsky said these discussions are in the preliminary stages and are not yet a high priority on the board’s agenda.  

“This hasn’t been a discussion that we’ve all had yet, but we will,” Selawsky said. “Some how we have to figure out ways to make people want to stay in Berkeley.” 

 

 

 


Redistricting of District 5 will extend south

By Daniela Mohor
Thursday June 28, 2001

Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson called on individuals and organizations of his district to participate in the county’s redistricting process, during a public hearing at the South Berkeley Senior center on Tuesday.  

“This has been designed to be an open and inclusive process,” Carson said. “You have an opportunity to submit a whole redistricting plan or to make comments.” 

Every 10 years, when the U.S. Census information is released, supervisors must draw new boundaries to equalize the population of each district.  

The new demographic information indicates that the five districts of Alameda County must now have a target population of 228, 000 people each. To meet this target, approximately 30,000 individuals will have to be added to District 5. 

Carson’s district is currently bounded by Thornhill Drive in Oakland’s Montclair District in the southeast. The boundary then moves south along Highway 13, follows Park Boulevard and Highway 580. Finally, it goes around Lake Merritt on Grand Avenue, connects to Broadway then goes west to the Bay. 

The northern and eastern limits of Carson’s district are on the border with Contra Costa County. District 5 includes Berkeley, Albany, Emeryville, Piedmont, west and north Oakland.  

The area added to District 5 will have to be to the south, moving farther into Oakland. Some scenarios have the extended district taking more of the Oakland hills area, now part of District 4. Other plans suggest that District 5 should encompass the part of District 3 that now includes Oakland’s Chinatown.  

When it started its redistricting process in April, the county scheduled 13 public hearings and created a web site to provide residents with the information they need to participate in the political process. Residents have until July 5 to submit proposals and will also be able to attend a working session with the Board of Supervisors on July 24. The board is scheduled to make its final decision by August. 

Despite the open process, few people have given their input. Only about six individuals and representatives of organizations attended Tuesday’s hearing.  

Jo Ann Price, president of the League of Women Voters of Berkeley, Albany and Emeryville, said all but one of the nine alternative plans submitted have been produced by county supervisors.  

“This year even though (the county) has made efforts to put all the information out, fewer people are getting involved,” Price said.  

She said she attributes part of this lack of participation to the tight deadline to submit proposals – and to cynicism. “People are cynical and have the feeling that if they get involved they won’t make any difference,” she said. 

A few residents, however, expressed their concerns. Jack Fleming, who lives in Berkeley, called for a more thorough definition of the criteria that those producing map proposals have to respect. The criteria, set by the county’s redistricting committee, include geography, cohesiveness, adherence to previously drawn districts, and communities of interest, among others. As they are now, the resident said, these criteria may be interpreted in very different ways and leave the county “vulnerable” to criticism. 

Oakland resident George Pearson said he is worried about the scant attention paid to various racial and cultural issues in the redistricting process. The plans adopted he said, always represent the dominant culture and leave the interests of the minorities aside. 

“It’s always the people who are in control that are given control again,” he said, before adding that the county should bring the dialogue with its citizens to a higher level. The discussion continues to center around questions of the process of redistricting rather than the impact it has on people’s lives, he argued.  

According to Price, several communities in the county have interests at stake in this process, but are not necessarily aware that their involvement is critical. “In Oakland, for example, there is a particular area where a lot of immigrants are living. They have a community of interest that they should try to keep together and that may not happen if they don’t get involved,” she said. “It does make a difference just as voting makes a difference.” 

For additional information on the redistricting process visit the Alameda County Web site at http:///www.co.alameda.ca.us and click on “Redistricting.” The site includes an interactive feature that allows users to post and read public comments about the proposed redistricting plans online.  

The last redistricting hearing will take place Saturday 10 a.m. at the West Oakland Senior Center, 1900 Sixth St. 


Safety guidelines imposed for July 4

Staff
Thursday June 28, 2001

The Police and Fire Departments remind the public that fireworks are not permitted within the City of Berkeley. It is a violation to own, use or sell any type of fireworks within the city limits.  

The City of Berkeley is again presenting a Fourth of July fireworks show at the Berkeley Marina. The fireworks celebration will start at 9:30 p.m., Wednesday. The pyrotechnic display will last about one half-hour. It will be launched from the Berkeley pier at the foot of University Avenue, but will be visible from all over the Marina and elsewhere. 

To handle the crowds, additional police personnel will be present. This year the police will enforce a policy of NO TOLERANCE pertaining to both alcohol and fireworks. 

The following closures will occur as a result of this event: 

• The city will close the Marina to vehicular traffic after the parking lots have been filled, which is usually about 7 p.m. 

• At the same time, the I-80 overpass at University Avenue, West Frontage Road from Emeryville to Albany, and Gilman Street at its intersection with I-80 will also be closed to vehicular traffic. 

• For fire safety reasons, Panoramic Way in the Berkeley Hills will be closed beginning at 6 p.m. except for residents and their guests. A police department checkpoint will monitor traffic there. Centennial Drive will be closed at about 9 p.m. 

• During the road closure, AC Transit's 51M bus will use the bus stop at Third Street and University Avenue as a terminus. 

• Access to the fishing pier will be closed to pedestrians and fishing at 5 p.m. in preparation for the show. The pier is at the foot of University Avenue in the Berkeley Marina. 

• University Avenue to the Marina will be closed to incoming vehicular traffic at 7 p.m., but will remain open to pedestrians the entire evening. The road will reopen about one-half hour after the fireworks display to let people leave the area safely. 

The Marina has several parks and picnic areas available on a first-come basis. No group reservations are available and Adventure Playground in the Marina will be open. The Marina has ample parking, but the parking lots are expected to fill up late in the day. Public transportation to the Marina is available via AC Transit bus 51M, which will stop at Third Street and University Avenue after the overpass has been closed. 

This event is expected to attract 40,000 people. It not only features 30 minutes of continuous, colorful fireworks, but also a rare opportunity for pedestrians to walk on a part of Berkeley's roadways usually closed to foot traffic. Pedestrians and bicyclists have the easiest access to the Marina for the fireworks. 

Due to the high fire danger during the dry season, the police department is asking that if people observe fireworks use within the city, they should call the Police Department non-emergency number at 981-5900, 24 hours a day or contact the Fire Prevention Division Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 981-5585.


California condor chick dies

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

LOS ANGELES — The first California condor chick to hatch in the wild in 17 years has died, the apparent victim of confusion between two mothers that had laid their eggs in the same nest. 

Biologists believe that the 2 -day-old chick died after the female bird caring for it left to feed. When the other female arrived, expecting to see her egg, she may have mistaken the chick for an intruder and killed it sometime Sunday or Monday. 

“It’s not a sad chapter, it’s a sad sentence,” said John Brooks, information education specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “It’s a sad sentence that has some positive twists to it.” 

The chick came from an egg laid at the Los Angeles Zoo. Biologists moved it to a nest in Los Padres National Forest in Santa Barbara County, where it became the adoptive child of a most unconventional condor family. 

Two females there had been displaying courtship behavior with the same male and each laid an egg in the same nest. They were the first intact condor eggs found in the wild since the mid-1980s, when the species nearly disappeared and captive breeding programs began. 

However, the situation clearly confused the birds. Biologists said neither egg was getting the care it needed. 

One egg died and the other was in danger of dying of exposure when biologists decided to remove both eggs and eventually replace them with the egg laid at the zoo to give the first-time parents child-rearing experience. 

“Everyone knew it was a risk,” Brooks said. “But if we gained something out of it, it would be worth it.” 

A biologist removed the eggs June 1 and first replaced them with a single ceramic fake. 

The surviving wild egg was taken to the Los Angeles Zoo, where it hatched June 17. The chick has been accepted by a pair of captive-bred condors and is doing well, Brooks said. 

On June 18, biologists returned to the nest in the wild and swapped the fake egg with the captive-bred egg. The replacement egg hatched Friday with the help of its foster mother. 

No one had been watching the nest for about a day when Fish and Wildlife biologist Mike Barth made the 2.5-hour hike to the nest site Monday afternoon. When Barth reached the cliff-face nest, he found no sign of the chick or any adult condors. Below the nest he found the chick’s body with two deep gashes resembling condor bites on its head and neck. 

A necropsy will be conducted on the body at the San Diego Zoo to confirm the cause of death, Brooks said. 

“In nature things like this happen – especially in first-time breeding situations,” Brooks said. 

After falling to a wild population of just nine in 1984, condors are coming back through captive breeding that has boosted their population to 190. 

Scientists began reintroducing condors to the wild in 1992, and now about 35 birds live in two areas of California. Another 25 soar over the Grand Canyon in Arizona. 


Energy crisis may imperil future of choice

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

SACRAMENTO — California’s energy crisis may claim a substantial victim: deregulation itself. 

“Never again will we embrace a free market – it’s too expensive,” Gov. Gray Davis’ chief energy adviser, S. David Freeman, predicted Wednesday. 

“The marketplace is blind to the need for cleaner air, it is blind to the needs of consumers in a shortage, and it produces a shortage with its volatility,” the former head of the Los Angeles and Sacramento municipal power agencies told a Senate committee plotting California’s energy future. 

The state’s flawed 1996 law freed wholesale electricity rates while capping retail power prices, leaving the state’s three investor-owned utilities trapped in between. 

Now the state has signed $43 billion worth of long-term energy contracts, and created a power authority that could build its own power plants. 

Its Public Utilities Commission stands ready to bar businesses from freely swapping power providers – the incentive that prompted deregulation in the first place. 

Davis wants lawmakers to approve buying the electricity transmission lines from two of the three cash-strapped utilities, and wants to buy the lines of the state’s largest utility, Pacific Gas and Electric, out of bankruptcy court. 

Consumer groups say the state should buy the utilities’ hydroelectric generation and other assets as well, as part of a return to regulation and a shift to publicly owned power supplies. 

“Look what deregulation and handing our electricity supply over to a bunch of private companies has done for us – 50 percent (rate) increases and $20 billion in surcharges. Thank you very much, but no thank you,” Harvey Rosenfield of the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights said last week. 

He argued the state should buy all three utilities at their current “fire-sale prices” – “We’re talking about picking them up for a dime-for-a-dollar when they’re totally out of cash.” 

Enron Corp. President and CEO Jeffrey Skilling is among those urging the state to do the opposite and create a truly open market. Public power only drives up costs and lowers accountability, he said. 

“If you had an open competitive marketplace and not put restrictions on that marketplace, I guarantee you the price of power in California will be significantly lower,” he said in a San Francisco speech last week entitled, “The arrogance of regulation.” 

“California needs to get deregulation right and the rest of the country needs to get deregulation right,” Skilling said, shortly after he was hit by a pie thrown by an irate electricity consumer. 

That means giving consumers more immediate price incentives, other free marketers told the Senate Energy Committee Wednesday. 

Tiered electricity rates would reward consumers who confine their electricity use to lower, cheaper “tiers” of energy consumption. 

Real-time electricity meters would let consumers see the price they are paying at any given time of day or night, encouraging them to, say, run their clothes dryer at 3 a.m. when power would be cheaper. 

Business’ demand for choice drove the deregulation movement, when industries sought the ability to choose among energy wholesalers or generators rather than being locked into buying their money through a local utility. 

But PUC President Loretta Lynch predicted the commission will block that choice Tuesday, for fear departing customers will leave residential and other small consumers to pay a larger share of the $8.2 billion the state has authorized for power buys. 

The move was panned by generators and business groups as a step backward. 

 

Southern California Edison Vice President Bob Foster predicted the state will end up regulating all three legs of its power grid: generation, transmission and distribution. Regulation is needed to smooth out the boom-and-bust business cycle that California has seen so graphically in the last year, he said. 

Freeman predicted the state will likely wind up with some sort of “hybrid” of government regulation that will rein in the excesses of a free market. 

“It’s impossible to say at the moment whether the (investor-owned) utilities will revive,” he warned. If they do, he said their corporate boards may opt to chase the higher profits of the open market while shedding their transmission and distribution systems to state control. 

Yet Freeman and California Energy Commission Chairman Bill Keese predicted residential and business consumers may soon see the sort of freedom of choice they now could only dream about, once fuel cells, photovoltaic generation and micro-turbines become commonplace. 

“The future perhaps belongs to a whole new set of competitors,” Freeman said. “These central station power generators are not going to have it all to themselves.” 


State Supreme Court justice remembered as ‘legal giant’

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

LOS ANGELES —Stanley Mosk, the longest-serving justice on the California Supreme Court, was remembered as both a brilliant and good man whose series of precedent-setting rulings have stood the test of time. 

In 37 years on the state’s high court, Mosk authored nearly 1,700 opinions and made a series of precedent-setting rulings in civil rights, free speech and criminal justice cases – often years before the U.S. Supreme Court followed suit. 

Mosk, 88, died June 19 at his San Francisco home – the very day he had planned to tender his resignation, said his son, Los Angeles attorney Richard Mosk. 

“Today we lay to rest one of California’s true legal giants,” Gov. Gray Davis said during a memorial service Tuesday. “He stood up for those who had no voice.” 

His death “has felt like the loss of a close family member,” said Chief Justice Ronald M. George. 

“He was known inside and outside the court as a man of keen intellect, sharp wit, great wisdom, fierce independence, high principle, and total integrity.” 

About 400 people attended the memorial at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple, including five of Mosk’s six fellow justices, four former justices; Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante; former Gov. Jerry Brown; Attorney General Bill Lockyer; Los Angeles Mayor-elect James Hahn; Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley and former U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher. 

The former state attorney general was appointed to the court in 1964 by Brown’s father, the late Gov. Pat Brown, after serving 16 years as a Superior Court judge. 

Speakers remembered him as a workhorse who saw 31 justices sit on the seven-member court during his tenure, wrote an average of 20 majority opinions a year and issued more dissenting opinions than any other justice, especially during recent years when he was the only Democrat on the court. 

A self-described liberal, Mosk was credited with coining the disparaging phrase “little old ladies in tennis shoes” to describe members of the ultraconservative John Birch Society. 

But he could prove an annoyance to fellow liberals, as well, particularly when he voted in favor of upholding the death penalty and striking down the use of minority preferences for university admissions. 

He consistently stood for individual liberties but “he always kept in mind the common good,” said William P. Clark, a former state Supreme Court Justice and U.S. Secretary of the Interior. 

Vaino Spencer, now presiding justice of the state Court of Appeal, said she still recalls reading in a local black newspaper about Mosk’s 1947 Superior Court decision striking down a local whites-only housing covenant. 

“He identified with the pain (of segregation) ... he felt it deeply,” she said. “I will miss him so very much, but his legacy will live on.”


Census shows war on drugs fell heavily on blacks

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — When an epidemic of crack and gang violence erupted in cities like New Haven in the 1990s, police and lawmakers struck back hard. 

The war on drugs yielded dozens of new laws, including mandatory sentences for drug dealers and heavier penalties for dealing crack rather than powdered cocaine. 

But those laws also had unintended consequences in minority communities. 

Black men make up less than 3 percent of Connecticut’s population but account for 47 percent of inmates in prisons, jails and halfway houses, 2000 census figures show. 

One in 11 black men between the ages of 18 and 64 in Connecticut is behind bars, the census found. In 1990, that figure was about one in 25. 

Similar disparities can be seen across the country. In Louisiana, one of the few states to receive updated race statistics from the census, black inmates outnumber whites 3-to-1; blacks account for only a third of the state’s population. 

Nationwide, the Justice Department reported that 12 percent of all black men between the ages of 20 and 34 were locked up last year. 

“I don’t think anyone intended it to be this way, but if you were trying to design a system to incarcerate as many African-American and Latino men as possible, I don’t think you could have designed a better system,” said state Rep. Michael Lawlor, co-chairman of the Connecticut Legislature’s Judiciary Committee. 

The National Conference of State Legislatures estimates state governments spend $20 billion a year fighting drugs. 

Some states now are trying to ease the drug laws of the 1990s, putting more money toward prevention and treatment instead of incarceration. 

“You can’t put every drug user in jail, because if you do and they don’t get any help, they’re going to be right back in again,” said Chief State’s Attorney Jack Bailey, Connecticut’s top prosecutor for 10 years. 

This year, the Legislature voted to give judges more leeway in sentencing drug dealers who operated near schools, day care centers and public housing projects. 

The old law set a three-year mandatory minimum sentence for dealing within 1,500 feet of those places. In densely populated New Haven, that meant virtually everywhere except the Yale University golf course and the Tweed-New Haven airport runway. 

While drugs also are prevalent in Connecticut’s mostly white suburbs, the preference there for powdered cocaine over crack and sprawling development meant that few suburban dealers faced the same penalties. 

In California this year, a ballot proposition takes effect that will mean treatment instead of prison for many first- and second-time drug offenders. Offenders’ records are cleared if they complete treatment. 

A similar 4-year-old program in Arizona has saved money because treatment is cheaper than prison, a state analysis found. 

Similar programs are being considered in Ohio, Florida and Michigan. 

Some politicians, however, believe a hard line on drugs is appropriate, or do not wish to be seen as soft on crime. 

“I think it sends out a very negative message to the public at large,” said Connecticut state Rep. Ronald San Angelo, a Republican who opposed changing mandatory minimum sentences. 

People who lived through the gang and drug wars also offer caution. While they are angry that a generation of young black men are in prison, they do not want to return to the past. 

Lorraine Stanley, a resident of a New Haven housing project for 13 years, recalled how a drug gang called the Jungle Brothers terrorized her neighborhood. Police eventually busted up the gang, and now a police substation in the neighborhood keeps crime down. 

“Things have gotten a whole lot better,” Stanley said. 

Despite changes in the laws, other experts said racial bias in the courts and poverty in the cities will continue to lead to more prison time for minorities. 

Frank Mandanici, a public defender in New Haven, said that bias among juries affects verdicts and sentences for black defendants. 

“Racism permeates our society. It’s a cancer no one is willing to address,” he said. “There is no test on how to detect it and what to do with it.” 

Yale political science Professor Donald Green said the density and poverty of cities combined with law enforcement tactics have put more blacks in prison. 

“Drug use is similar in white and nonwhite populations, but the level of enforcement is very different among the two groups,” he said. “Violent crime is more associated with gang activity, associated with drug abuse in minorities, and enforcement is aimed overwhelmingly in that direction.” 

Also, Green said, poor people of all races turn to crime when there are no other opportunities. 


U.N. AIDS conference ends with global aid plan, minus gays

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

UNITED NATIONS — In the first global approach to battling a disease, the United Nations adopted an AIDS blueprint Wednesday setting tough targets for reducing infection rates and protecting the rights of people with the virus. 

Under pressure from Islamic countries, Western nations were forced to back away from specifically naming the most vulnerable populations, including homosexuals and prostitutes. But experts said Wednesday that the heart of the document was in the details of the plan, not the language. 

“It’s not a perfect text but it is a good text, action-oriented and practical,” said Australian Ambassador Penny Wensley, who co-chaired negotiations on the draft. 

With the rap of a gavel and a round of applause, the 16-page Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS was adopted by consensus by the 189-nation General Assembly.  

It calls for accelerating efforts to find a cure disease that has taken more than 22 million lives. 

“After today, we shall have a document setting out a clear battle plan for the war against HIV/AIDS, with clear goals and a clear timeline,” U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Wednesday.  

“It is a blueprint from which the whole of humanity can work in building a global response to a truly global challenge.” 

The three-day U.N. conference brought together over 3,000 health experts, scientists, lawmakers, aid workers and people living with the virus. 

First detected in homosexual men in the United States 20 years ago, the AIDS virus has exploded across the developing world, with more than 36 million people now infected.  

More than two-thirds of those afflicted are in Africa – most of them women. 

A last-minute compromise on the declaration came after Western nations reluctantly agreed to drop language specifically naming groups vulnerable to the disease – including homosexuals and prostitutes – because it was offensive to some Muslim nations.  

Instead the new language refers to those who are at risk due to “sexual practice” and “livelihood,” and prisoners as those made vulnerable through “institutional location.” 

Egyptian diplomat Amr Rashdy, who led the push to change the language, said his country could live with the final document. “The outcome is fair and we accept it,” he told The Associated Press. 

But others argued that the original language would have better served those most in need of protection. 

“For many, there is a reluctance to recognize groups affected by HIV/AIDS including men having sex with men; much of that reluctance is based on religion and on culture,” said Mary Robinson, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights.  

“A failure to recognize it means the numbers of those infected can only grow.” 

Annan, who has made fighting AIDS a personal priority, acknowledged that tackling the issue had exposed “painful differences” among nations. 

“Everyone has learned something here at this conference. In some countries maybe it will take a bit longer to recognize the reality and the need to respect the rights of every individual,” Annan said. 

 

 

Dr. Paul Delay, chief of the HIV/AIDS division at the U.S. Agency for International Development, said that despite the changes, “the targets have not been diluted.” 

Though not legally binding, the document calls on governments to create AIDS policies and programs to quickly reduce infection rates and protect those most at risk. 

It makes specific references to cooperation needed between public and private sectors. It also recognizes the need for greater access to affordable drugs. 

Drug companies have lowered prices but African leaders at the summit said prices are still too high for most in the developing world. 

Other targets set forth in the document include: 

— The development of national strategies and financing plans to combat HIV/AIDS by 2003. 

— The number of infants infected with HIV should be reduced by 20 percent by 2005 and by 50 percent by 2010 by providing treatment to expectant HIV-positive mothers. 

— By 2003, countries should develop national programs to increase the availability of drugs to treat HIV infections by addressing issues such as pricing, and by 2005 they should make progress in implementing comprehensive health care programs. 

Annan, who was nominated Wednesday by the Security Council for a second term as U.N. secretary-general, says $7-10 billion is needed annually to halt AIDS and reverse its effects. 

The AIDS document “supports the establishment on an urgent basis of a global HIV/AIDS and health fund to finance an urgent and expanded response to the epidemic,” he said. 

Both wealthy and impoverished nations announced contributions for AIDS totaling about $700 million. 

The United States has already pledged $200 million and leaders of a key U.S. congressional committee agreed Tuesday to push for more than $1.3 billion to a global campaign against AIDS. It is expected to receive full committee approval Wednesday. 


Feds do the expected and cut interest rates

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve cut interest rates for the sixth time this year on Wednesday, but by just a quarter-point, sending a signal that its most aggressive recession-fighting effort in nearly two decades may be coming to an end. 

Analysts said they still expected at least one more quarter-point move at the Fed’s August meeting, but they also said the country has probably seen the last of the bolder half-point rate reductions the Fed had been using to keep the record, 10-year economic expansion alive. 

“The Fed left the door open to doing whatever it needs to do to get the economy moving again, but the dosage will be smaller,” said Allen Sinai, chief economist at Decision Economics in New York. 

Wall Street investors, who had hoped for another half-point cut, took the smaller one in stride. The Dow Jones industrial average, which had been up about 25 points before the Fed’s mid-afternoon announcement, finished the day down 37.64 at 10,434.84. The Nasdaq composite index, however, rose a modest 10.12 to close at 2,074.74. 

The quarter-point rate cut pushed the Fed’s target for the federal funds rate, the interest that banks charge each other, to 3.75 percent, down from 6.5 percent where it stood before the Fed began cutting rates on Jan. 3. 

The Fed action was immediately followed by a quarter-point cut in commercial banks’ prime lending rate, sending the benchmark for millions of business and consumer loans down to 6.75 percent, the lowest level in seven years. 

Analysts suggested the Federal Reserve’s quarter-point rate cut represented a compromise between Fed officials still concerned that the economy could tumble into a recession and an opposing Fed camp that is growing worried about overdoing the rate relief and sowing the seeds of higher inflation next year. 

As evidence of the internal debate, analysts noted the Fed’s brief statement announcing its decision. The statement provided no explanation for why the central bank had decided to switch from a half-point cut to a quarter-point cut and instead dwelt on the continued threats to economic growth. 

“The patterns evident in recent months – declining profitability and business capital spending, weak expansion of consumption and slowing growth abroad – continue to weigh on the economy,” the statement said. 

“It looks like the Fed was split down the middle and the quarter-point rate cut was a compromise,” said David Jones, chief economist for Aubrey G. Lanston & Co. 

American manufacturers, who have been the hardest hit by the yearlong economic slowdown, expressed disappointment with the decision to move rates down by just a quarter-point. 

“Manufacturing has been in recession for nine months and production losses have been comparable to the recession of 1990-91,” said National Association of Manufacturing President Jerry Jasinowski. “There are still no clear signs of recovery.” 

However, many private economists expressed confidence that the 2.75 percentage point rate reduction that has occurred since the beginning of the year – the most rapid Fed credit easing since 1983 – should lay the foundation for a sustained economic recovery beginning later this year. 

They said such a favorable outcome would be helped by the first wave of the $1.35 trillion tax cut approved by Congress. Taxpayers will begin receiving checks of up to $600 next month. 

Analysts said more favorable economic statistics in recent days including higher consumer confidence readings and a rebound in factory orders probably helped the Fed opt for a smaller cut. 

“The Fed is saying the economy is weak, but not weak enough to justify another half-point rate cut,” said Sung Won Sohn, chief economist at Wells Fargo in Minneapolis. 

The Fed’s statement did note “continuing favorable trends” for long-term prospects including strong productivity growth. 

Before Wednesday’s move, the Fed, which began its credit-easing campaign on Jan. 3, had last cut the federal funds rate at a regular meeting on May 15. Two of the five half-point cuts occurred between meetings. 

As part of its action, the Federal Reserve also reduced its largely symbolic discount rate, the interest it charges banks on direct loans from the Fed, by a quarter-point to 3.25 percent. 

Many economists believe that the economy has grown at a barely discernible 0.5 percent annual rate in the current April-June quarter, down from the weak 1.3 percent rate of the first quarter. But they are forecasting slightly stronger growth of around 2 percent in the third quarter, rising to above 3 percent in the fourth quarter.


Suit against Microsoft expands

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

SANTA CLARA — A small technology company said Wednesday it was expanding its patent infringement lawsuit against Microsoft Corp. and would try to stop sales of the new Windows XP operating system. 

Microsoft said the suit was baseless and promised to fight it. 

The lawsuit by InterTrust Technologies Corp. concerns digital rights management, or antipiracy measures that are essential in putting music, movies and other copyright material on the Internet. Digital rights management technology is used to limit what users can do with copyright material. 

InterTrust first sued in April, claiming the digital rights management software in Microsoft’s Windows Media Player program and its operating systems violated a patent issued to InterTrust in February. That patent covers technology used in downloading digital content. 

On Tuesday, InterTrust said it had been granted another patent, this one governing its process for securing content that is copied from one device to another, such as from personal computers to MP3 players. 

 

The company said the new patent “substantially expands the implications for Microsoft’s current and future products” that also secure content being transferred between devices. Specifically, InterTrust cited Windows Media Player, and the Millennium Edition and upcoming XP version of the Windows operating system. 

InterTrust said it would ask a federal court to stop sales of any Microsoft products that infringe on the patents. 

“The underlying issue is Microsoft’s failure to respect InterTrust’s pioneering, inventive work,” said Ed Fish, president of the MetaTrust Utility, which is part of Santa Clara-based InterTrust. 

Microsoft spokesman Jim Cullinan said he could not discuss the details of Microsoft’s digital rights management technology. But he said the lawsuit was “without merit” and mostly aimed at generating public-relations benefits for InterTrust. 

“Microsoft respects intellectual property rights,” he said. “We just don’t believe these claims are valid.” 

InterTrust, founded in 1990, has licensing agreements and business partnerships with several companies that figure to play a large role in the future of digital content on the Internet, including AOL-Time Warner, Adobe Systems, Nokia, Universal Music Group and Blockbuster. 

Shares of InterTrust lost 3 cents to $1.19 on the Nasdaq Stock Market, where Microsoft shares gained $1 to $71.14. InterTrust stock is well off its 52-week high of $25.50 and the $100 price it achieved before the dot-com bust in 2000. 

——— 

On the Net: 

http://www.intertrust.com 

http://www.microsoft.com 


Briefs

— wire, staff reports
Thursday June 28, 2001

UC plans to spend  

$100 million for retrofit  

 

The University of California, Berkeley is planning a $100 million retrofit of a stadium that sits atop a major Bay area fault. 

Directly beneath the 75,000 seat Memorial Stadium lies the active Hayward Fault, which is about 70 miles long and runs through major East Bay cities. Some seismic experts say it is the one most likely to produce the next devastating U.S. quake. 

The stadium, which resembles a concrete version of the Roman Colosseum, is home to Cal’s football team. The only other campus building to sit on the fault was a dining hall – and that was torn down. 

The $100 million retrofit is an amount 100 times greater than the original cost of building the stadium in 1923. Much of the money will pay for non-earthquake related upgrades. 

The university will raise money for the upgrade through donations to the athletic program. The project will be completed in phases over seven years – without interruption to football games – said Vice Chancellor Edward Denton. 

 

North Berkeley family wins Cash for Trash contest 

 

On June 15, the Donikian family of north Berkeley awoke to a note on their front door placed by Dave Williamson, the Ecology Center Recycling Operations Manager. The note asked permission to check the family trash for recyclables. Zovig Donikian gave Williamson permission and he found zero recyclables.  

“We recycle because recyclables are not trash and should be put to good use,” Donikian said, according to an Ecology Center press statement. At the July 17 City Council meeting, Mayor Shirley Dean will be awarding the Donikians $750. 

Once a week trash from a randomly selected Berkeley household is checked for recyclables. If none are found the household wins $250 or more. If only a few are found they win $50 and the remainder is rolled over to the next week. If numerous recyclables are found the entire prize rolls over to the next week. In the last contest the prize grew to $4,000 before a winner was found. 

The Cash for Trash Contest is a recycling outreach project of the Ecology Center and the City of Berkeley funded by the Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board.  

Since February, $4,450 has been awarded to Berkeley residents for proper recycling and another $1,900 will be distributed before the contest ends on July 14. For a list of rules, recyclables accepted, and on-going contest status visit: www.ecologycenter.org or call the Ecology Center Recycling Hotline at 527-5555. 


District may begin crack down on truancy

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 27, 2001

After months of discussion with teachers, parents, students and the school board itself, Berkeley High Principal Frank Lynch proposed a new truancy policy for the school last week. 

The board won’t vote on the policy until later this summer, but Lynch said in an interview Tuesday that the policy could be a critical step toward reinstating strict enforcement of attendance at Berkeley High. 

Exact numbers on student absences during the school year just ended weren’t available Tuesday, but Lynch said the average attendance rate for Berkeley High’s 3,300 students is around 94 percent. In a 180-day school year, that’s enough unexcused absences to keep 200 students out of class all year long.  

That’s not exactly how absences accumulate, of course. Anecdotal information suggests a majority of Berkeley High students cut some classes during the year, and a small minority of students accumulate absences at a much higher rate. 

A recent study conducted by the staff of Berkeley High’s Rebound program found that a group of 50 students who are failing two or more classes accumulated 464 absences in just one class – and just 45 days – this spring. 

But even those students missing 50 classes or more in a semester face no clear consequences under Berkeley High’s current system, Lynch said. Attempts are made to contact the students’ parents by phone, he said. Sometimes staff meet with the student to try to identify the reasons behind their absences. But if such efforts fail to alter the student’s behavior, then there are no further steps in place to bring more pressure to bare. 

“Nada. Nothing,” Lynch said. 

This at a time when California’s state education code says a student can be declared a habitual truant after three full days of unexcused absences, clearing the way for the local district attorney’s office to prosecute his or her parents or guardian. 

In Monterey County, where Lynch once served as superintendent of a small school district, a local ordinance gives police authority to ticket and fine students found out of class between the hours of 8 a.m. and 3 p.m., Lynch said. The proceeds from the fines are used to pay school resource officers, he added. 

The proposed truancy policy for Berkeley High would require teachers to place a call to a student’s parents after three days of unexcused absences to discuss how missing class could impact the student’s grades. Teachers would also be encouraged to discuss other issues about the student’s performance with the parents at this time. Finally, the teacher would have to fill out a Truancy Intervention Form recording the time and date of the call. 

After five days of unexcused absences the teacher would have to fill out another form and submit it to the Truancy Intervention Coordinator, a new position being funded at Berkeley High next year with money from the Berkeley Public Schools Educational Excellence Project (BSEP) tax measure.  

Lynch said the Truancy Intervention Coordinator will be charged with making absolutely sure parents are contacted and made aware of their child’s absences, either by phone or other means (in the past, calls from teachers alone have often gone unanswered). The coordinator would also work to connect the student with a peer mentor and/or school guidance counselor, to help the student work through problems that could be keeping him or her out of class. 

Lynch said the idea of connecting habitual truant students with a peer mentor could hold particular promise, since it gives the whole truancy policy a little more validity in the eyes of the truant student. 

“If you get the students involved in it and they become part of the solution, then I think you’re going to see to see this really take off,” Lynch said. 

In terms of instituting accountability in a system that has long been criticized for its lack of this key ingredient, it will be the Truancy Intervention Coordinator’s job to draw up a “contract” with the truant student, parents and relevant teachers. This document would establish a clear plan for getting the student to class, including consequences for continued absences. The consequences could include an automatic failing grade in a class where the student has accumulated too many absences, Lynch said. 

If a student reaches seven or more days of unexcused absences, a Student Attendance Review Team consisting of the student, the parent or guardian, a school administrator, a counselor, a teacher and, where appropriate, a school psychologist, would be assembled. The SART would try one more time to change the student’s attendance patterns. Students who fail to respond to the SART’s recommendations would face more serious consequences.  

If it is found that they are not Berkeley residents, for example, they could be removed from the Berkeley school system altogether. In the case of those students who are Berkeley residents, they might be encouraged to transfer to another Berkeley program (i.e. independent study or a “continuation” program) or see their cases referred to the district attorney’s office, Lynch said.  

Lynch emphasized Tuesday that, while he feels it is important to have a truancy policy in place by next fall, he considers the proposed policy a work in progress, to be amended and improved in the years ahead.


Calendar of Events & Activities

Wednesday June 27, 2001


Wednesday, June 27

 

Conversations in Commedia 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

The series pairs radical theater “elders” to share memories of their years in Commedia. This week with former Mime Troupe actress Audrey Smith and Ladies Against Women character Selma Spector. $6 - $8. 849-2568 

 

Disaster Council 

7 p.m. 

Emergency Operations Center 

997 Cedar Street 

Update on Measure G. 

644-8736 

 

Socratic Circle Discussion 

5 p.m. 

Cafe Electica 

1309 Solano Avenue 

Gather for espresso and discussion at the “green” teen cafe. Open to all. Free. 527-2344 


Thursday, June 28

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at:  

quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley Opera performs pieces of Carmen. 

 

Pink Slip Party and Career  

Mixer 

6 - 9 p.m. 

Pyramid Brewery and Alehouse 

901 Gilman Street 

Meet with East Bay job seekers while listening to music by DJ and Emcee Marty Nemko. Also, cash bar, free hors d’oeurves, and prize giveaways. Free and open to the public. Call 251-1401. 

www.eastbaytechjobs.com/mixer/ 

 

Take the Terror Out  

of Talking! 

Noon to 1:30 p.m. 

California Dept. of Health Services 

2151 Berkeley Way 

Room 804 

Open house at State Health Toastmasters Club to celebrate its 40th anniversary. Free. 

649-7750 

 


Friday, June 29

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women: Arts, Herstory  

and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

3 p.m. 

Sather Gate 

UC Berkeley 

Telegraph at Bancroft 

Walking tour from Sather Gate to People’s Park entitled “Berkeley in the Sixties.” Led by Free Speech veterans and Berkeley residents Kate Coleman and Michael Rossman, the tour will include important locations and discussions of the Free Speech movement, the Vietnam Day Committee, the rise of affirmative action, and other events and movements. Free. 

486-04 11  


Saturday, June 30

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

First Annual Brower Day  

David Brower’s Environmental Legacy Celebrated 

Noon - 5 p.m. 

Martin Luther King Jr.  

Civic Center Park 

Outdoor festival celebrating the Earth and the late David Brower. Sustainable Crafts Market, organic and vegetarian food. Lee Stetson will perform “The Spirit of John Muir” in the Florence Schwimley Little Theater, 12:30 and 2 p.m., and at 3 p.m. a special screening of "In the Light of Reverence" by the Sacred Land Film Project. Julia Butterfly Hill will join filmmaker Toby McLeod for a special panel following the film. 415-788-3666 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 

925-830-2975  

 

Bonfire III: Stories and  

Songs By the Sea 

7:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Marina 

Spinnaker Way, near Olympic Circle Sailing Club 

Come for Havdala and share stories, sing and watch the flames dance. Bring food and drink to share, kosher s’mores provided. 

848-0237 

 

Know Your Rights 

11 - 2 p.m. 

2022 Blake St. 

Copwatch workshop: Learn what your rights are when dealing with the police. Special section on juvenile rights. 548-0425 

 

Bay Area Eco-Crones 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1066 Creston Road 

Networking, information sharing, project planning and ritual.  

Call ahead, 874-4935. 


Sunday, July 1

 

Buddhist Psychology 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Annette Anderson on “Insights from Buddhist Psychology.” Free. 

843-6812 

 

Jazz on the Pier 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Berkeley Pier  

The Christy Dana Quartet performs on the Berkeley Pier at the foot of University Ave. and Seawall Dr. The CDQ ensemble led by trumpeter and jazz educator Christy Dana with the Bay as a backdrop. AC Transit Bus 51M 649-3929 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Avenue 

Group meditation using instrumental music and devotional songs. Free. 496-3468 


Monday, July 2

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference titled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” 4 - 5:30 p.m. $15 - $25. 642-2754  

 

 

— compiled by Sabrina Forkish and Guy Poole


Letters to the Editor

Wednesday June 27, 2001

Trout in Codornices not a fish story 

Editor, 

Friends of Five Creeks feels it is important to correct the statement, in a letter from a 15-year neighbor of Codornices Creek, that the creek “is not now nor has it been home to large fish.” 

Significant numbers of rainbow trout or steelhead inhabit Codornices Creek from below San Pablo at least as far upstream as St. Mary's College High School. Our volunteers have observed these fish regularly since we began restoration work on the creek in the 1990s. They also have been observed in at least a half dozen "holes" by numerous neighbors as well as students and faculty at St. Mary's. The fishes' size range, from small “fingerlings” to more than 10 inches, and their persistence over years, indicates that they are reproducing in the creek.  

On March 16, 2000, with the help of Dr. Tom Dudley of UC Berkeley (who had the required permits), we briefly stunned one of the fish with mild electric current, photographed it, and identified it as Oncorynchus mykiss, steelhead or rainbow trout. (Steelhead and rainbow trout differ only in behavior. Those that go to sea become steelhead, growing quite large, while others remain in fresh water as smaller rainbow trout. Since large steelhead have been observed swimming upstream in the lower creek, the simplest explanation for the fish in Codornices Creek seems to be that at least in some years, steelhead, which explore new streams much more readily than salmon, make their way up Codornices Creek and successfully reproduce.) 

Neither the several culverts along the creek below St. Mary's nor the drops at their outfalls seems to pose an insuperable barrier. Our several years' monitoring of Codornices Creek indicates that the creek's temperature, pH, and general water quality is more than adequate for salmon or trout. We do not know exactly where these fish lay eggs. But it is no surprise that there apparently is suitable habitat in the deep, shady canyon in protected back yards of the many neighbors who care for the creek. We will learn more from the recent Proposition 13 grant to the Urban Creeks Council, to research and improve steelhead habitat in Codornices Creek. 

I write this letter with some concern that thoughtless people could destroy this urban treasure. So let me point out that steelhead are a federally protected endangered species. There are heavy penalties for disturbing them in any way, including fishing. 

It is a great gift and a responsibility to have a trout stream in a city. The fact that these fish seem to be thriving offers a bright future for keeping and restoring green threads in our urban fabric, where we can find solace and joy, and where some of the many species that share our world can continue to thrive. I hope we will make the most of this opportunity and obligation. 

Susan Schwartz 

President, Friends of Five Creeks, Berkeley 

Glad to be back 

Editor, 

Recently returned to our regular world of ups and downs and smooth and rough roads, I want to share some thoughts from my last six months of separateness and sadness. 

I am grateful that it lasted only six months as compared to a previous eighteen-month period. I am grateful that I had already learned the value of medication and did not resist too long the need for change. 

I benefited from the loving patience and concern of my family and a few close friends and from the professional and library resources of Kaiser Permanente Medical Center. I benefited from The Zen Path through Depression by Philip Martin, a gift from one of my sons. I benefited from a part time job which pays me to walk, that most healthy of physical activities. 

I know the City of Berkeley and Alta Bates Medical Center have Mental Health Services and the Berkeley Public Library has books on the subject. 

Even as I found myself increasingly unable to want to be with people, I clung tenuously to some kind of prayer life and some kind of worship. One of my ministers sent me the following poem by May Sarton. Consider it my “glad to be back” greeting to all of you. 

HOPEFUL GARDENERS 

Help us to be the always hopeful 

Gardeners of the spirit 

Who know that without darkness 

Nothing comes to birth 

As without light 

Nothing flowers 

Bill Trampleasure 

Berkeley 

Trash bins ugly 

Editor: 

We recently spent a week showing some out-of-town guests the sights around Berkeley. After engaging in various activities downtown our guests remarked that at some locations there were trash receptacles sitting out on the sidewalk all the time. In particular, there were rows of them on Shattuck Avenue between University Avenue and Addison Street and on Allston Way between Shattuck Avenue and Oxford Street. Some of them were overflowing with garbage and had maggots crawling around on the rims. Isn’t there an ordinance that requires businesses to keep trash receptacles off the sidewalks except on pick-up days? It looks terrible and is unsanitary. Why is this practice tolerated especially in light of the fact that the city is engaged in a program to beautify the downtown area? 

Walter Koni 

Berkeley 

Tritium facility worrisome  

Editor:  

The“Don’t worry - be happy” letter by Elmer Grossman (6/11) regarding Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s (LBNL) radioactive pollution from its Tritium Facility is a snowstorm of omissions, half-truths and wishful thinking. The presentation by Mr. Franke, Berkeley’s hired consultant, included evidence that the normal operations at the facility were significantly reduced for the last two years which is all he reported on. Local activists believe that procedures involving the dumping of deadly tritium waste were curtailed after researchers discovered alarming levels of contamination locked up in the vegetation, water and air at the site; including the air inside the Lawrence Hall of Science immediately downwind from the tritium stack. Found to be Super-Fund eligible, plus the presence of a huge underground radioactive plume, the Tritium Facility became vulnerable and this convinced LBNL to reduce activities about three years ago. Repeated requests to evaluate the high contamination levels and tens of thousands of curies of missing tritium inventory were ignored by Mr. Franke who said LBNL’s records were so funky that no sense could be made of them, something Mr. Grossman forgot to mention. Whether or not the reports were exaggerated, Mr. Franke stands by his conclusion that a catastrophic release of the facility’s entire storage due to earthquake, fire or accident, would subject the next-door children visitors to much more radiation than LBNL’s cooked calculations. 

Mr. Grossman plays that tired game of comparing one-time exposure to the very different reality of long-time radiation damage from an internal source like tritium which has been absorbed.  

The Straume report actually says that LBNL minimizes the danger from tritium and that tritium is more bio-effective (harmful) than gamma radiation. The other government -funded studies suffer from accepting LBNL’s data declarations uncritically, as when the McKone report uses the EPA’s stack model for stack emissions designed for flat terrain when anyone can see that the tritium stack sits below the Lawrence Museum and blows it’s rad waste upward engulfing it. Or when the source of the rad-waste is mysteriously moved from the stack to the building so as to be in Zone 2 with it’s lower calculations. The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances, which produced only a consultation instead of a study, later showed higher than expected breast cancer occurrence in a already high incidence area in the Panoramic Hill area. 

Mr. Grossman is well aware of the problems related to the tritium facility but has chosen instead to bamboozle the public and promote LBNL’s deceptions. There is nothing remotely normal about the Tritium Facility and it’s continuous dumping of long-lasting, disease causing rad-waste into our community and no snake-oil salesmen are going to change our concerns or our determination to close this disaster and clean up the site before it spreads any further. 

Mark McDonald  

Berkeley


Shotgun’s ‘Iphigenia’ is must-see theater

By John Angell Grant Daily Planet correspondent
Wednesday June 27, 2001

Shotgun Players opened their free summer outdoor theater program at north Berkeley’s John Hinkel Park on Sunday with a superb production of Euripides fifth century B.C. drama “Iphigenia in Aulis.”  

This story is a prequel to the “Oresteia” trilogy that Berkeley Rep staged early this year as the opening of that company’s new Roda Theater. If you’re interested in catching up on the disastrous, dysfunctional family story that led to the “Oresteia,” this is a rare and terrific opportunity to see a strong production of an infrequently performed play. 

The “Oresteia” dramatizes of murder of King Agamemnon by his wife Clytemnestra when he returns home after a decade of fighting the Trojan War. Clytemnestra’s action is revenge for Agamemnon having sacrificed their daughter Iphigenia to the gods 10 years earlier, which the gods demanded in exchange for creating the wind that would allow Greek troops to set sail for war. 

“Iphigenia in Aulis” backs the story up to that earlier time before the war, and recounts the circumstances that went in to Agamemnon’s decision to make the sacrifice. 

“Iphigenia in Aulis” is a play about choices – about the struggle Agamemnon goes through as the country’s top political figure, weighing his personal family needs against his unique responsibilities as the leader of a nation. 

The Shotgun production is an exciting, thoughtful and complex presentation of theater. In many ways, I preferred this lucid and uncluttered staging to the efforts of the Berkeley Rep earlier this year. 

To create a script with very modern-sounding dialogue, director Patrick Dooley and dramaturge Joan McBride have culled segments from three different English translations of the play (by Gamel, Vellacott and Terranova). 

Dooley has allowed the actors to personalize their characters in a modern way, while still managing to retain an overall heroic feel for the story. 

Seven actors perform “Iphigenia in Aulis.” Three of them double up in the roles of the seven principle characters, while four others play the chorus. All but one of the actors are female. 

All characters are partially masked, except for Agamemnon, Clytemnestra and Iphigenia – an effective technique with the multiple casting. 

Jeff Elam is strong as the manipulator and dealmaker Agamemnon, put-upon by politics, and nearly tapped out emotionally as his karmic house of cards teeters on the brink of collapse. 

It is a moving performance, and Elam manages to make the character and his dilemma sympathetic. Agamemnon’s fear of mutiny, betrayal and murder by the mass of troops waiting nearby to sail, forces his decision to sacrifice his daughter. 

Mary Eaton Fairchild is a riveting presence as nurturing but tough and clearheaded wife Clytemnestra, usually winning her debates with Agamemnon, but trapped by the political powerlessness of her gender. 

Fairchild also effectively doubles (wearing a mask) in the role of Agamemnon’s resentful younger brother Menelaus, whose cuckolding by Helen is what sets off the Trojan War in the first place. 

Elam himself doubles (also wearing a mask) as the comic relief character – jocular hotheaded warrior Achilles, insulted at being pulled into a marriage decoy by Agamemnon. Agamemnon tricks his wife into bringing his daughter to the camp for sacrifice on the pretext of marrying her to Achilles. 

Amaya Alonso Hallifax is solid as Iphigenia, and even more striking in her masked role as an old male slave who turns the plot at key points. 

A chorus of four (Valerie Weak, Joan Bernier, Hannah Evans and Naomi Stein) is a big part of the show – women of the community who gloss for the audience an ongoing historical and moral commentary on the action at hand. 

Andrea Weber effectively choreographs chorus’s versatile, stylized and sometimes dreamlike movements. At the top of the show, the warrior choreography they perform with seven-foot bamboo poles make exciting the long family and political history they tell. 

For music, there are drums and other percussion played by Weber, Daniel Bruno, and Joshua Pollock at the edge of the performance space, accompanying the chorus in its narrative, and elsewhere. Their subtle war beats work as effectively as a good movie soundtrack. 

Show dramaturge Joan McBride has written an amusing 15-minute comedic vaudeville play – “The Curse of the House of Atreus” – that opens the Shotgun performance, explaining some of Agamemnon’s family history leading up to “Iphigenia in Aulis.” It is a complex story of betrayal, murder, incest and cannibalism. 

This is a terrific show, and it’s free – although the lovely and persuasive Shotgun ticket ladies twist your arm for a contribution. The show starts at 5 p.m., and the weather cools off as it progresses. Take a picnic and some extra layers to wear. 

Planet theater reviewer John Angell Grant has written for “American Theatre,” “Backstage West,” “Callboard,” and many other publications. E-mail him at jagplays@yahoo.com.


BART unions authorize strike

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

OAKLAND — BART’s two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike if they’re unable to come to an agreement before their contracts expire at midnight Saturday. 

“Our members have worked hard to make BART a success, and we expect and deserve fair treatment at the bargaining table,” said Larry Hendel, the East Bay director for the Service Employees International Union Local 790. 

While the vote does not mean a strike is inevitable, it sets the stage for a walkout as the unions and Bay Area Rapid Transit management head into their first session with a mediator today. 

The Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555, which represents 806 station agents and train operators, voted unanimously in favor of a strike late Monday. The Service Employees International Union Local 790, which represents 1,737 maintenance, professional and clerical workers, also cast votes Monday, with 97 percent of members in favor of authorizing a strike. 

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 3993 already has authorized a strike. It represents 271 supervisors and professionals. 

BART employees walked off the job for six days in September 1997, triggering chaos on the highways as 275,000 daily commuters were forced to find another way to work. 

BART’s average weekday ridership has since soared to 335,000.


Hearing for sons of Reddy delayed

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 27, 2001

OAKLAND – Looking grim, the two Lakireddy brothers were back in U.S. District Court Tuesday for a brief hearing during which a prosecutor new to the case asked for time to familiarize himself with the proceedings. 

Vijay Kumar Lakireddy and Prasad Lakireddy, half-brothers and sons of convicted offender Lakireddy Bali Reddy, are charged with a number of federal offenses, including helping their father bring girls illegally to the United States for sex and cheap labor, visa fraud and witness tampering. 

The elder Reddy was sentenced last week to about eight years in prison for bringing girls illegally into the country for sex and cheap labor and for filing a false tax report. 

The younger Lakireddys are both free on bail and, according to Vijay Lakireddy’s attorney, George J Cotsirilos Jr., both continue to contend they are not guilty as charged and are planning to take the case to trial. The elder Reddy pleaded guilty as part of a plea bargain agreement. 

A delay in the pretrial process until July 10 was requested by Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen G. Corrigan, who will be prosecuting the Lakireddy brothers in the place of Assistant U.S. Attorney John W. Kennedy who has been appointed superior court judge in Contra Costa County. Corrigan will have thousands of pages of documents, 42 computer compact discs and dozens of audio taped interviews to sift through. 

According to documents filed with the court by the prosecution in April, the brothers are collectively charged with more than 20 counts of nine different sections of the U.S. Code. 

Both are accused of conspiring to bring foreigners, including minors, into the country illegally for the purpose of illicit sexual activity with an adult, employing them illegally and submitting fraudulent visa applications.  

Among specific allegations are that the brothers would “employ these aliens at various times without paying them the minimum wage or overtime premium as required by law.” 

Court documents describe the victims as “poor and destitute young Indian girls” and say they were procured “for the purposes of sexual relations with defendants Prasad Lakireddy and Vijay Kumar Lakireddy...among others.” 

The document goes on to allege the means by which the brothers and their father would hold sway over the girls. They controlled “where the girls lived, where they worked, where they ate meals, how much money they earned, whether they attended school, and when they were permitted to return to India,” it says. “They also did so by, among other things, scolding, belittling, threatening, beating and raping the victims.” 

The charging document also says that at least one of the victims was 11 years old when a visa was requested. 

Without giving the name or age of the alleged victims, the charges of rape against both brothers are specific: 

“In or about 1992, defendant Vijay Lakireddy had sexual intercourse with Victim No. 5 against her will. In or about 1993, defendant Vijay Lakireddy had sexual intercourse with Victim No. 6 against her will.” Similarly the younger brother is accused of having sex against the will of victims No. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7. 

Prasad Lakireddy also faces charges alleging that he had sexual intercourse with minors against their will, including victims No. 2, 3 and 4. 

Allegations are also specific regarding the pair’s role in illegal business practices. Vijay Lakireddy’s business, Active Tech Solutions, whose address was given at 2342 Shattuck Ave., was alleged to have filed statements saying he would employ various people as programmer/analysts “when in truth...as the defendant well knew, Active Tech Solutions had no intention to employ (five different persons) full-time at Active Tech Solutions...and that Active Tech Solutions did not earn a gross annual income of $120,000 and net income of $80,000.” 

Allegations also say that Active Tech Solution was, in fact, “a rented mail box.” 

Prasad Lakireddy is further accused of tampering with witnesses.  

 


Worker claims new hazard found at skate park project

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 27, 2001

Just when the Harrison Street Skate Park was back on track – the discovery of chromium 6 in ground water beneath the project had halted construction – a new violation of environmental standards is being charged. 

Stephen Thomas, a laborer who worked on the site during the excavation told the city’s Toxic Management Division that, a large container filled with “some kind of oil or something” was unearthed and accidentally ruptured, covering him with the substance.  

“It was some kind of tank that had pipes coming out of it,” Thomas said. “Then we were told to just cover it back up.” 

Gerald Morris, owner of G. Morris Construction, who performed the site excavation said there is no truth to the charges. “This allegation is fallacious, I personally conducted the excavation and there was no tank of any kind,” he said. “I’d be more than happy to cooperate with anyone from the DA’s office who might have questions as would any of the supervisors who worked on the site.” 

Thomas made a report to Hazardous Materials Supervisor Nabil Al-Hadithy who said the report was immediately turned over to the county district attorney who is investigating the charges.  

Deputy District Attorney Mike O’Connor, who is handling the case, was not available to comment on the status of the investigation. 

However staff counsel David Boyer of the State Water Quality Control Board, said that if Thomas’ allegations are true, the contractor could possibly face civil and criminal prosecution by the district attorney. 

A Stop Work Order was issued for the 18,000-square-foot skate park project in November when the carcinogen chromium 6 was discovered in groundwater that was exposed during excavation. The city has so far spent about $295,000 in cleanup and re-design fees, not including staff time, according to Parks and Waterfront Department staff. 

Formal documentation was completed in early June that outlined the city’s efforts to remove all environmental hazards from the site. The report said the site had been sufficiently cleaned up. 

According to Parks and Waterfront Director Lisa Caronna, the city is accepting bids from architects for a re-design of the skate park and the tentative plan is to begin construction anew this fall. 

Thomas, who currently resides at homeless shelter near the skate park site, said he was concerned the underground tank may have contained a substance that will have a harmful effect on his health. 

“I’m a little worried that when I get older I might have some ill effects from whatever that stuff was,” he said. “But I’m not so worried about me, I’ve already lived half my life, I’m more worried about the kids who will be playing there.” 

Morris said his crew found a lot of things below the surface of the skate park such as six concrete piers that once supported railroad tracks, as well as a large number of metal items, which were hauled away by a salvage company. “We had at least four 40-foot flatbed trucks loaded with salvaged metal hauled away,” he said. “But we didn’t find any tanks.”  

Morris said they did come across a two-inch pipe that contained a dried material that he said posed no environmental hazard. The pipe was also removed from the site, he said. 

“I never worked on a site that was more closely monitored that that one,” Morris said. “There were people from the city there on more than a daily basis.” 


BRIEFS

Staff
Wednesday June 27, 2001

Stipends available for teachers, care providers 

 

Stipends for eligible preschool teachers and child care providers are still available from the Alameda County Children and Families Commission and the Child Development Corps. 

Stipends range from $500 to $5,000 and are aimed at retaining qualified teachers.  

The lowest paid child care teachers in Alameda County average $14,000 annually with a turnover rate of 32 percent.  

The deadline to apply for a stipend is June 30. For eligibility requirements call 667-7451. 

 

West Berkeley debuting weekly market 

 

Beginning July 8 there will be a new weekly market held in West Berkeley on University Avenue, between Third and Fourth Streets.  

Held every Sunday through the end of October, at least 40 local artists, farmers and nonprofits will participate from 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sponsored by the non-profit West Berkeley Neighborhood Development Corporation, with start-up funding from the city, the West Berkeley Market will be a family-oriented venue.  

It will emphasize good quality and reasonably priced crafts, produce, specialty foods, and other products and services with an international and “green” theme, according to a West Berkeley Market press release. 

Four special events are already planned including an Opening Day Celebration on July 8, International Family Day on Aug. 19, Art Day on Sept. 16, and Spirit Day on Oct. 28. Vendors interested in the market can call 654-6346 ext. 6 for information and applications. Priority will be given to lower-income vendors from west and south Berkeley and those who offer products or services that they produce themselves. 

 

Host families needed  

for adult foreign students 

Language Studies International is looking for host families for its foreign adult students. The English school for foreign students has a homestay option to allow the students to experience life with American families during their program. Due in part to the housing crisis, the school has been unable to find hosts for all of the 800 - 1,000 students who attend each year, according to a letter from Steven Franklin, Registrar and Accommodations Coordinator for LSI. 

Hosts of all ages and backgrounds are encouraged to participate, including singles. Hosts are paid $182.50 per week to provide breakfast, dinner and a private room to a foreign student, and can choose a short-term (two – four weeks) or a yearlong stay.  

The host can live anywhere in the East Bay as long as the student can easily commute to downtown Berkeley. For more information or to apply to host a student for the peak period from mid-July through September, call LSI at 841-4695.


Panel says gene testing not ready for prime time

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

SAN DIEGO — Starting in August, expecting couples can walk into an obstetrician’s office and ask to be tested for any of 24 variations of the gene that causes cystic fibrosis. 

Until now, such tests have generally been used only for populations known to have a prevalence for certain diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia among blacks and Tay-Sachs disease among Ashkenazi jews.  

The new CF test will break that barrier, targeting all expecting couples. 

But instead of being excited, doctors said Tuesday that their feelings on genetic testing range from overwhelming confusion to frustration to depression. 

“I have a more pessimistic outlook,” said Stan Eisele, a Carlsbad doctor, after listening to a panel on the issue during this week’s BIO 2001 conference of biotechnology professionals in San Diego.  

“The industry wants it to go away. They don’t want to face it.” 

There are already hundreds of genetic tests that can do everything from diagnose CF to determine a higher risk for breast cancer.  

But the barriers keeping genetic testing from the mainstream are many and serious, the panelists said. Also: 

• Many insurers are balking at covering such screenings, which can cost as little as $100 or more than $1,500. 

• Most states – California being a notable exception – have no licensing programs for counselors in genetic testing. 

• Doctors, already pressured by health maintenance organizations to keep patient visits short and costs low, say they have no time to administer genetic tests or conduct counseling on them. 

• The doctors also remain woefully undereducated on what these tests can offer or how they work. 

“The education system is not providing much in the way of sophistication of the notion of genetic testing today,” said Reed Pyeritz, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.  

“It is totally inadequate for what is coming.” 

Already, about 400 tests can screen for single genes that cause specific diseases. Many such tests, such as the one for CF, are the only way to tell if a patient really has a certain condition, panelists said. 

Other tests merely indicate a higher risk for a disease.  

For example, one test can recalculate a woman’s odds of getting breast cancer from the typical 11 percent to a more frightening 60 to 80 percent. And still others are more specific, predicting Huntington’s Disease with near certainty, for example. 

Such tests aren’t as new as many might think. More primitive genetic tests for cystic fibrosis have been used since the mid-1980s, panelists said. The CF gene itself – not including its roughly 1,000 mutations – was isolated in 1989. 

Still, it will take until at least 2010 before genetic testing is widely accepted or even discussed, Pyeritz said. The main hurdle: acceptance by insurers. 

The Food and Drug Administration, which regulates such tests, typically takes 90 to 180 days to approve a new screen. But it can take an additional three to five years to convince insurers that such tests are necessary, said Michele Schoonmaker, director of medical reimbursement at Vysis Inc., which makes genetic testing products for cancer, prenatal disorders, and other diseases. 

The reason for the information gap is simple, said panelist Michael Watson, executive director of the College of Medical Genetics in Bethesda, Md. Before the race to map the human genome heated up, the public had little interest in genetics, and researchers kept themselves isolated. 

“It has been a very small group of people delivering genetic services and who have been involved in genetics research,” Watson said.  

“And that is one of the reasons why the regulatory agencies, the reimbursement agencies and most of the bodies that we have to deal with have very little knowledge of what we do.” 

But doctors and their patients will soon be barraged with more and more genetic testing options, panelists said. Researchers have already linked 11,000 diseases to specific genes. 

“This has caught the practitioners totally unaware,” Pyeritz said after the panel. “There needs to be more education for physicians, and more for patients and their partners.”


Trout planting begins despite frog fears

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

REDDING — Aerial trout planting has begun in some remote areas of Northern California, despite concerns the trout might be eating the tadpoles of a rare amphibian. 

Original plans called for up to three years of study before stocking was resumed, a decision that angered some anglers. They feared fishing would be seriously hampered if the plantings stopped. 

The state Department of Fish and Game reconsidered after a preliminary review of the Cascade frog population. 

“On first blush, it looked like the Cascade frog was doing pretty well,” said department spokesman Paul Wertz. 

Now the study will proceed simultaneously, as three-member crews begin surveying wilderness lakes next week looking for the frog, he said. 

The department began dropping trout by airplane Monday into the Coast Range, Siskiyou Mountains, Trinity Alps and Trinity Divide regions, and the Caribou, Marble Mountains, Salmon-Scott Mountains, Thousand Lakes Trinity Divide, Golden Russian and Yolla Bolly wilderness areas. 

By contrast, the department will take several more weeks to decide which lakes to stock in the Sierra Nevada, home of the yellow-legged frog and the Yosemite toad. Both amphibians are candidates for the endangered species list. 

“I would guess a large portion will be delayed and not planted this year,” said department spokesman Jack Edwards. 

Dry, hot conditions in Northern California also have prompted the department to halt trout releases at some regularly stocked lakes and waterways. 


Senate rejects proposed $101 billion state budget

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

SACRAMENTO — With Republicans sticking to their pledge to hold up a state budget they say ignores their priorities, the state Senate rejected a $101 billion spending plan by one vote Tuesday night. 

The 26-14 vote in favor fell one short of the two-thirds needed for passage. It took place strictly along party lines, with 26 Democrats voting in favor and 14 Republicans opposed. 

The failure, though expected, almost assures that a 2001-02 budget will not be approved before it is to go into effect Sunday. History shows that the state will not shut down if that occurs, however. 

Sen. Steve Peace, D-Chula Vista, called the budget “prudent, responsible and defensible from any political standpoint.” It increases education spending by more than 5 percent over last year and includes $2.2 billion for emergency reserves. 

Peace acknowledged, however, that the budget includes more spending than analysts predict the state will collect in revenues. 

He said Democrats are anticipating that Gov. Gray Davis will make further cuts to new spending proposals in the Legislature’s budget. 

Otherwise, he said, the state could face up to a $1.5 billion shortfall in two years because of sagging revenues from sales, capital gains and income taxes. 

Senate Republican Leader Jim Brulte, R-Rancho Cucamonga, said the budget “raises taxes to pay for pork and phantom employees.” 

He criticized $120 million slated for local projects in individual legislators’ districts and said the state could save millions on vacant government positions that are being funded. 

The state Assembly is scheduled to take up the budget Wednesday, where four out of 30 Republican votes there are required to send it to Davis. Assembly Republicans have said they, too, will hold back their votes. 

GOP lawmakers’ top issue is a quarter-cent sales tax cut that is automatically triggered when the state’s treasury is brimming and ceased during tight fiscal times. 

The 2001-02 budget proposal assumes the tax cut will end in January. But GOP lawmakers want the tax-cut preserved, and for cuts to be made in other new spending and growth in the budget. 

Republicans also want to place on a statewide ballot a constitutional amendment that would require gasoline tax revenues be spent for transportation projects in the future. 

Davis has signed the budget on time for the past two years since he took office, when the state was flush with money. 

But in the past two decades the budget has been signed 12 times after July 1, including in 1992 when Gov. Pete Wilson signed it on Sept. 2. 

 

On the Net: budget analyses available at www.lao.ca.gov


Officials will try to justify $9 billion in overcharges

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

California officials will attempt to justify their claim that energy providers overcharged the state by $9 billion when federal settlement talks over the West’s energy crisis resume Wednesday. 

California’s allegations of price-gouging during the last 13 months are expected to dominate the third day of confidential negotiations involving scores of entities who buy and sell power in California and 10 other Western states. 

A new analysis backs up the $9 billion figure, said Michael Kahn, chairman of the California Independent System Operator, which manages much of the state’s electricity grid. 

But that study, as well as an earlier analysis prepared by the grid operator, suggest that several billion dollars might lie beyond the reach of federal energy regulators. Last week, regulators ordered the talks as part of an effort to get a handle on Western energy prices. 

The commission’s order last week extended price controls in California and imposed them in the rest of the Western power grid, covering all sellers.  

It also gave the parties until July 9 to settle a host of issues, including $15 billion in alleged overcharges in California and elsewhere in the West, generators’ unpaid bills and additional long-term power contracts. 

Kahn said roughly $3 billion in alleged overcharges occurred before Oct. 1, which FERC has said marks the start of its authority to investigate pricing abuses. 

Another portion of the money California is seeking in refunds would come from municipal utilities and other power sellers that until now have not come under the energy commission’s jurisdiction. 

California will try to argue that neither of those factors should influence a settlement. 

“We respectfully disagree with FERC on the October situation,” Kahn said.  

“We think we suffered greatly last summer. It’s inexplicable to us that we would not be allowed to seek refunds for that period.” 

Kahn, the state’s chief representative at the Washington talks, will contend that the regulators’ expanded view of their authority also should apply retroactively. 

“We determined that if the plan had been in effect since May 2000, that the numbers were approximately $9 billion,” Kahn said. 

A negotiated settlement – rather than an order from regulators — also could allow power users and providers to reach agreement on issues that might not be in FERC’s domain. Those issues include whether generators would be protected from lawsuits over their prices, said Mark Cooper, research director for the Consumer Federation of America. 

“It’s one of the concerns we have, that we might not get a clear ruling and that we run the risk of losing our litigation rights,” Cooper said. 

Wholesale power costs in California were $7 billion in 1999, rose to $27 billion last year and could top $50 billion this year, according to state estimates. Federal regulators have on several occasions said the recently deregulated electricity market is dysfunctional. 

Power wholesalers have dismissed the state’s claim as grossly inflated. They say high prices have been justified by a shortage in natural gas, which fuels many power plants. 

The generators said they have yet to be paid billions of dollars for power that already has been supplied. 

“California for some reason feels that they’re entitled to free energy,” said Richard Wheatley, a spokesman for Houston-based Reliant Energy. “Reliant and other generators have been California’s energy bankers for some time.” 

Wheatley said Reliant is owed $337 million for past power sales. 

Generators probably would have to pay no more than $2.5 billion in refunds, said Curtis Wagner, who is FERC’s chief administrative law judge and is overseeing the negotiations. 

 

On the Net: 

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: http://www.ferc.gov


Democrats insist that patients be able to sue

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

WASHINGTON — The Democratic-controlled Senate voted Tuesday to leave the door open to lawsuits against employers in patients’ rights legislation, brushing aside predictions that the result would be canceled insurance coverage for millions. 

On a vote of 57-43, the Senate killed a Republican proposal to ban suits against businesses. At the same time, bipartisan negotiations continued toward a compromise that would sharply limit such legal action. 

The vote marked a victory for backers of the bill on the first key test of strength. The legislation, advanced by Sens. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., John Edwards, D-N.C., and John McCain, R-Ariz., was crafted in response to HMO horror stories of health care delayed or denied, often with disastrous results. 

The Senate acted as President Bush called key senators in what his spokesman described as an intensifying effort to reshape the measure to the president’s liking. Bush “thinks patients need and deserve protections” from their HMOs, said Ari Fleischer. 

But in words that recalled a formal veto threat issued last week, he added that “the president hopes that the Senate will put progress first and not ... participate in an exercise that leads to a bill that will go nowhere.” 

Democrats made patients’ rights legislation their top priority when they gained a Senate majority last month, and the debate, now in its second week, is unfolding against a backdrop of campaign-style public events and dueling public opinion polls. 

At one news conference on the Capitol grounds, an opponent paraded in a shark costume, complete with fins and huge teeth, designed to represent trial lawyers. 

Democrats circulated a survey during the day indicating that the bill’s supporters are on safe political ground. “HMOs and health insurance companies are almost as disliked as oil companies,” it said, with favorable ratings in the range of 22 to 34 percent. 

Democrats were offered “talking points” for public use, including, “HMOs should not have special protection from lawsuits like foreign diplomats. HMOs should be held accountable just like any other American business.” 

On the other side, a survey taken over several days for the American Association of Health Plans reported that, “By a large margin, voters continue to say trial lawyers will be the biggest beneficiaries of new lawsuits against health care plans and employers.” 

The liability issue has emerged as a leading point of contention, particularly since several years of fiercely political debate have produced broad agreement on the type of protections that patients should be offered. 

While the measure would leave employers open to suits in some circumstances, Senate Republicans offered a proposal to shut the door. 

“Many are concerned that the employers would be forced to drop their health insurance” if the provision stands, said Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, who proposed adding a provision found in Texas state law that prohibits employers from being sued in patients’ rights disputes. 

Edwards countered that Bush has said that employers who retain responsibility for final medical decisions should be subject to lawsuits. “The HMOs have had the law on their side for too long,” he said. 

Republicans argued that Democrats were saying one thing, and writing legislation to do another. 

 

Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., citing comments Edwards made in an interview earlier this month, said the North Carolina lawmaker had said “employers can’t be sued.” 

“But employers beware. If you read the bill, they can be sued,” Nickles said. 

Gramm’s amendment drew the support of 43 Republicans and the opposition of 50 Democrats, six Republicans and one independent. 

Even before the vote, senators were discussing a compromise on the issue. 

Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, said the emerging proposal would shield employers from lawsuits except in cases in which firms either insure or insure and administer their own plans and accept liability rather than appointing a “designated decision-maker” to do so. 

Fleischer’s remarks came a day after white House Chief of Staff Andrew Card, Bush’s political strategist Karl Rove and other aides traveled to the Capitol for a meeting in which the HMO bill and other issues were discussed. 

The spokesman said Bush had called Snowe and other lawmakers during the day, and the Maine Republican said the president had urged her to expand compromise efforts beyond the narrow question of employer liability. 

Bush and the White House have raised other objections to provisions in the bill related to lawsuits. They argue the bill permits patients to file suits before they complete an independent appeals process designed to rule on disputes with HMOs. They also oppose provisions that would open the way to lawsuits in state and federal courts, and to potentially huge punitive damage awards. 

The Senate grappled with the liability issue as House Republicans formally unveiled a measure that would open the door to suits against HMOs in state courts under limited circumstances. 

GOP leaders hope to attract enough support for the measure to prevent passage of legislation patterned after the bill pending in the Senate. 

No House action is expected until after Congress returns from a July 4 recess. 


Differences apparent for Bush, Sharon

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

WASHINGTON — President Bush pressed Ariel Sharon on Tuesday to move forward on a U.S.-backed Middle East peace plan, but the Israeli prime minister said violence must end first. “One should not compromise with terror,” Sharon said. 

The Oval Office meeting, a second for Sharon since Bush took office six months ago, highlighted their disagreement over how to proceed with a peace process amid continuing violence. It also reflected the administration’s stepped-up role in the Middle East after being accused of neglecting the region early in Bush’s term. 

A fragile cease-fire hung in the balance, with Sharon under pressure at home to respond with force to violence blamed on the Palestinians. Secretary of State Colin Powell headed to the region late Tuesday to meet with Israeli and Palestinian leaders, including Yasser Arafat. 

Sitting stiffly in straight-back chairs, Bush and Sharon struggled to praise each other for working toward peace without conceding their bottom lines: Bush wants the cease-fire to hold and progress to continue toward peace talks while Sharon insists that little can be done until there is a “full cessation of hostilities.” Despite the violence, Bush said he was optimistic the peace process could resume. “We’re gaining by inches,” he said. “Progress is in inches, not miles but nevertheless an inch is better than nothing.” 

An international commission headed by former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell urged both sides to begin with a cease-fire before entering into a “cooling-off period,” making gestures to each other and returning to negotiations. 

In advance of his meeting with Sharon, Bush advisers said the president intended to urge the Israeli to declare a cooling-off period regardless of whether violence has completely ceased. Afterward, advisers said Bush did not insist that Sharon take that next step toward peace, though he urged the Israeli to keep moving forward. 

Bush himself stopped just short of calling for a cooling-off period in a public session with reporters, but suggested that Israel may not have “a realistic assessment of what is possible on the ground.” He also said, “We’re going to talk to the prime minister about his attitudes.” 

Sharon was more blunt, saying peace can only be achieved if the parties are “very strict” with the Palestinians. “Israel will not negotiate under fire and under terror,” he said during the photo opportunity with Bush. 

Afterward, the prime minister said he wants 10 days of no violence before beginning the next stage, the cooling-off period. Previously, he had talked about a violence-free period but had not spelled out the 10-day concept. 

“One should not compromise with terror. And therefore, I believe that if we stick to what we have been saying for such a long time that it should be a full cessation of terror before we move to the other phase,” Sharon said. 

He also met with Powell, who was heading to the Middle East Tuesday evening under orders from Bush to urge Arafat to “take better control of his security forces.” 

Sharon was the first Middle East leader Bush invited to the White House after the U.S. election, and while several Arab leaders followed, Arafat has not been invited. There are no plans to invite him, a sign that the United States gives greater weight to Israeli positions. 

Arafat was a frequent visitor when Bill Clinton was president. Palestinians have complained that the Bush administration was favoring Israel. 

Both Bush and Sharon agreed that peace is possible, though they to differed on strategies. At times, Bush seemed to labor in his bid to inject Sharon with a sense of optimism. 

“Progress is being made,” Bush said. “I am here to tell the prime minister, I know there’s a level of frustration, but there is progress being made.” 

Pressed to explain why the administration wants to move to the next step in the Mitchell timeline before violence has ended — and, apparently, before Israel is ready to do so — Bush said, “Both parties will understand when the level of violence has gotten down to the point where there can be some progress. We just want to make sure that there’s a realistic assessment of what is possible on the ground. And we believe that at some point in time we can start the process of Mitchell.” 

Sharon’s reply was immediate: “The Israeli position is that we can negotiate only, and we would like to negotiate only when there will be a full cessation of hostilities, terror, violence and incitement. Otherwise, I don’t think we’ll be able to reach peace.” 


Feds likely to announce sixth interest rate cut

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

WASHINGTON — After cutting interest rates five times in six months, Federal Reserve policy-makers are pondering what more they need to do to restart the ailing economy. 

The Fed’s mid-afternoon announcement is widely expected to be that the central bank is cutting interest rates for a sixth time. But economists on Tuesday were split over whether the Fed will stick with the half-point moves it has been making so far this year or switch to a smaller quarter-point reduction. 

“We know they are going to cut rates, but it will be the closest call this year on just how much,” said David Jones, chief economist at Aubrey G. Lanston & Co. in New York. The Fed’s answer probably will depend on what carries greater weight – recent glimmers that the economy is starting to pull out of its yearlong economic funk or concerns that the recovery could still be derailed if Americans suddenly grow worried about their job prospects and stop spending. Three reports released Tuesday as the central bank began its deliberations all depicted an improving economy but were not enough to lift spirits on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average suffered its third straight losing session, falling 31.74 to close at 10,472.48.  

The Dow had lost more than 100 points on both Monday and Friday as investors fretted about a stream of company profit warnings and layoff announcements. 

The economic indicators were more favorable, however. Consumer confidence rose for a second straight month, orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods from cars to computers jumped by 2.9 percent in May, the biggest gain since February, while sales of new homes rose a solid 0.8 percent with all parts of the country enjoying increases. 

Some analysts said they believed these latest reports would convince the central bank that only a quarter-point cut in rates is needed to assure a solid rebound in the second half of this year, especially in light of recent comments by some Fed members of the potential danger of overdoing the credit easing and spawning inflation problems next year. 

“The Fed is trying to walk a fine line between those who still want more aggressive easing and those who think they may have already done too much,” said Bill Cheney, chief economist at John Hancock Financial Services in Boston.  

Beginning on Jan. 3, the Fed has cut interest rates five times in half-point moves that marked the central bank’s most aggressive credit easing in 19 years. 

Those cuts have pushed the federal funds rate, the interest that banks charge each other, from 6.5 percent down to 4 percent, a move that has been matched by commercial banks, which have lowered their prime lending rate, the benchmark for millions of consumer and business loans, from 9.5 percent down to a seven-year low of 7 percent. 

All those reductions were made in an attempt to jump start a sluggish economy, which has been posting sub-par growth rates for a year. 

Economists who are looking for a sixth half-point cut in rates on Wednesday said they believed the central bank is still not convinced it has done enough to prevent an outright recession, something the country last experienced in 1990-91, the only downturn during Federal Alan Greenspan’s 14 years as Fed chairman. 

“I don’t think Chairman Greenspan wants to take any chances of another recession,” said Sung Won Sohn, chief economist at Wells Fargo in Minneapolis. “He still wants to buy a sizable insurance policy.” 

While economists are split on the size of Wednesday’s rate cut, they are in general agreement that the rate reductions are drawing to a close. 

Jones said he was looking for two more quarter-point rate cuts at the Fed’s next regularly scheduled meetings in August and October, but other analysts said Wednesday’s move may be it for this easing cycle, particularly since consumers will start seeing their tax cut rebate checks next month. 

“The rate cut we see tomorrow could well be the last because the economy should in fact start to show signs of stabilizing during the next two months as the interest rate cuts and tax cuts take hold,” said Lynn Reaser, chief economist at Banc of America Capital Management. 

The Fed got the go-ahead Tuesday for further rate cuts from the International Monetary Fund, which issued its annual report card on the U.S. economy, saying that the Fed had the room to do more if necessary because inflationary pressures have remained well contained. 

The IMF did warn that the strong U.S. dollar could weaken significantly in coming months because of America’s high trade deficits.


Oracle takes on Microsoft with online small business service

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

REDWOOD SHORES — Oracle Corp. Tuesday unveiled a new online service that will lease its software to small businesses in a move designed to bolster the company’s Internet business and challenge archrival Microsoft Corp. 

Oracle, the second largest software company behind Microsoft, will charge $99 per month for online access to a suite of business software applications that will handle a variety of accounting, marketing and administrative chores. 

The service is aimed at companies with fewer than 100 employees — a market that has been largely ignored by Oracle because of the difficulty of making money selling its software to such small accounts. With the expansion, Oracle will be trespassing on territory already staked out by Microsoft, which is trying to sell a similar online package through a site called bCentral.com. BCentral.com has about 100,000 subscribers that pay an average subscription of $30 per month, said Nigel Burton, bCentral’s general manager of sales and marketing. 

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison described his latest foray as a “direct assault” on Microsoft and predicted his service would quickly establish itself as the industry leader. “BCentral is so bad that our biggest fear is that people will think online services won’t work,” Ellison said. 

Burton predicted Oracle’s online service won’t win many converts unless the company pours more research and development into the concept. “We are pleased to see them join us, but we think they are just kind of putting a foot in the water here. We don’t see them as much of a threat,” Burton said. Neither Oracle nor Microsoft is particularly well-equipped to sell software to small businesses, said industry analyst Lora Cecere of Gartner, a research firm. But Cecere thinks Microsoft put itself in a better position by buying the expertise of Great Plains Software for $1.1 billion in April. 

Fargo, N.D.-based Great Plains specializes in selling accounting software to small and medium-sized businesses. Oracle is relying on an Internet start-up called NetLedger to market its online service to small businesses. Ellison owns a majority stake in the privately held NetLedger and is the company’s primary “intellectual investor,” said NetLedger CEO Evan Goldberg. 

Oracle’s “message sounds appealing, but Oracle says a lot of things that the company doesn’t deliver on,” Cecere said. “They will find that this (small business) market doesn’t have a lot of patience if something doesn’t work right.” 

Oracle’s software applications have received mixed reviews from analysts, who say many big business customers are having trouble making the package work properly. Ellison insists Oracle’s e-business applications are running smoothly at major corporations such as Ford Motor, General Electric and Alcoa. 

The mini-showdown between the world’s two largest software companies comes at a time when Oracle and Microsoft are moving in opposite directions. 

Oracle is trying to reverse a recent sales slump that has contributed to a 37 percent decline in its stock so far this year. The company’s shares added 67 cents Tuesday to close at $18.44. 

Meanwhile, Microsoft is rebounding from an antitrust case that culminated last year in a court decision ordering the company’s break up. Investors appear more optimistic that the breakup order will be reversed in appeals court. Microsoft’s shares climbed $1.29 Tuesday to close at $70.14, leaving the stock with a 62 percent gain so far this year. 

——— 

On The Net: 

http://www.oracle.com 

http://www.microsoft.com 

http://www.bcentral.com 

http://www.netledger.com 


Council set to OK $449 million budget

By John Geluardi
Tuesday June 26, 2001

The city manager and the City Council will attempt to iron out differences in funding proposals this afternoon before approving Berkeley’s $449 million two-year budget at a special council meeting. 

The council is bound by the City Charter to adopt a budget prior to the June 30 close of the fiscal year. 

The proposed budget does not cut funding to any existing programs or departments except the Berkeley Housing Authority where reductions are required to address a budget deficit of $300,000. In fact, some programs, which were given priority status by the council, will receive increased funding. 

High on the council’s list of priorities were safety issues including police staffing, the Hills Fire Station construction and disaster preparedness. Other priorities include energy conservation, response to health disparities, the Live Oak Park Recreation Center and the Eastshore Park Plan. 

The proposed two-year budget is about $22 million more than the previous biennial budget. It is larger than projected revenues by about $5 million for fiscal year 2001-2002 and $18 million for the following year.  

Deputy City Manager Phil Kamlarz said the discrepancies are within normal ranges because the proposed budget cannot reflect some grants and funds carried over from previous years, which should make up the shortfalls in revenue projections. 

Mayor Shirley Dean and Councilmember Dona Spring have both submitted  

proposals that differ slightly from the city manager’s.  

“There’s not a lot of difference in the city manager’s budget and the proposals from the mayor and Councilmember Spring. We should be able to tweak it just enough to get agreement,” Kamlarz said. 

For example, the mayor proposed $48,000 for the Healthy Start Program at Rosa Parks school, while Spring proposed $34,000 for the program. The city manager put $48,000 for the program into his budget proposal. Dean proposed $143,000 for arts grants, while Spring proposed $70,000. The city manager wrote $100,000 into his proposed budget for arts grants. 

After receiving recommendations from councilmembers on June 12, and hearing requests from several organizations at a public budget hearing last Tuesday, the city manager made adjustments to his proposal on Monday.  

To help close the gap between proposals and requests from organizations, he added about $51,000 of funding for various nonprofit programs including the Tinkers’ Workshop, Through the Looking Glass and the Young Artists’ Workshop. 

The city manager’s budget includes one-time funding of $1.6 million for anticipated payouts of sick time to public safety personal who are expected to retire in the coming year under the newly negotiated 3 Percent at 50 Program, which allows police and fire personnel to retire at age 50 and collect 3 percent of their salary for every year they were employed by the city, according to Kamlarz.  

“About 40 percent of the police department will be eligible to retire in the coming year and we don’t know how many are going to take the option,” he said.  

An increase to a recurring program is $900,000 to the citywide response to the energy crisis and $400,000 for Fire Department overtime. 

Kamlarz said there has been extraordinary agreement between the councilmembers and the city manager this year. He said part of the reason is the early priority setting sessions that took place in March. 

“The last budget was the first time we used the priority setting process and this time it worked much better,” he said. “I think we learned a lot from our mistakes.” 

Councilmember Mim Hawley agreed. “This is my first budget, but from what I’m hearing this one is going relatively smoothly,” she said. “But of course we still have to get through tomorrow’s meeting.” 

Hawley said the budget is a good one that reflects the local character. “I’m considered fiscally responsible and I have to say there are an awful lot of good funding proposals for nonprofits in the arts and for programs that help seniors and the disabled,” she said. “This budget reflects the people of Berkeley.”


Forum

Tuesday June 26, 2001

Keep large vehicles off streets  

 

Editor: 

The tone of your 6-21 lead article "Pedestrian death…" is distressingly familiar. A vehicle inflicted death is countered with calls for pedestrian protection, sidewalk safety, etc. No apparent thought that the emphasis is skewed, that Jayne Ash was simply crossing a street, her safety supposedly assured by the traffic signal; that she suffered death for no greater fault than an insufficiently developed sense of traffic paranoia. How naïve; she actually seemed to think that cities are primarily for people, that a green light signaled her safety. 

The driver who hurled her into death simply rolled through the intersection, not even aware that he had snuffed the existence of a lovely, vibrant young woman. And we; how odd that we simply accept her death as though it had been inflicted by lightning strike or earthquake, rather than by a bumbling behemouth of commerce.  

Can we observe Jayne’s death by no more significant action than a rather mild request for improved safety, for some sort of assurance that we may negotiate our streets without fear of death? Why is there no anger, no rising outrage at such an incident? 

For several days after her death the corner outside Berkeley Espresso bore flowers; the pole that supports the (ineffectual) traffic signals carried messages of love and grief. The flowers faded, withered, were swept away. Will our bland, meek acceptance condemn her to a random, meaningless death? Is our love and grief so miniscule we can do no better than this? 

Why do we tolerate these juggernauts on our streets? How difficult would it be to implement a loading dock in the industrial sector of town to load and unload these freeway monsters, a fleet of shuttles to deliver to and from retailers? 

Ah but the cost, proclaim the politicos. Yes, the cost. The first installment might come from the funds already allocated for downtown parking.  

Supposedly still under discussion, we hear. Anyone doubt the outcome of that discussion. And if a hole is dug under the city park on MLK to store empty automobiles, history informs us that two years later the same cry will be raised: more parking is needed, or we will strangle our downtown merchants  

But the contemporary news from Florida and other east coast locales indicates excluding cars revitalizes business; not more but less parking seems the key to merchant health.  

Not to mention the health of the rest of us. We all want to travel in our private capsules, separated from our fellows by an aggregate of 3 tons of steel; we all want to abandon them at will, without endless prowling for parking. Could Jayne Ash’s death be telling us that we are all wrong? 

Could our politicians but hear my voice as clearly as they do the mercantile forces to which they seem endlessly subservient, we would exclude monster vehicles from the streets we send our children out to negotiate. There would be a terminal outside our residential areas, and it would be named the Jayne Ash Memorial Truck Transport Terminus. 

 

Donald Schweter 

Berkeley 

 

Pedestrian crossings: a daily drama 

 

Editor: 

Regarding your front page story of June 21, (vol.3 issue 62). Once again (c.f. March 28 vol. 2 issue 297) you have done a public service by keeping current on the deplorable lack of police acting to stop drivers who run red lights and who speed up when nearing pedestrian crossings to avoid having to stop for people crossing the street – if indeed they DO stop. 

If you are looking for excitement there is no need to go to some bloody shoot-em-in-the-face-etc.-movie, just sit near the pedestrian crossing between the French Hotel and the Post Office across the street on Shattuck Ave. and watch the hits and near misses of potential killer drivers. 

KEEP HOPE ALIVE ....that some day pedestrians will be safe in Berkeley, 

 

Max Stec 

Berkeley 

 

 

McVeigh shows there’s a moral crisis in U.S.  

 

Editor: 

Yes! He was a murderer, but he was also a decorated-for-bravery soldier who was trained to kill and he applied what he learned to do a terrible, inexcusable and unthinkable thing. 

But it was his ghastly, lethal way to respond to what he saw as inexcusable federal government violence in Waco, Texas and Ruby Ridge in Idaho against women, children and the elderly. 

Neither Timothy McVeigh nor anyone else saw or sees what the news starting on April 19, 1995, as a case of an American terrorist waging war against a rogue nation; a nation that sent 58,168 young American GI’s to fight and die in tiny Vietnam for what? A nation whose school children, it’s no exaggeration to point out, teach their teachers a lesson by shooting them between their eyes when confronted by a rule that’s not to their liking, or pair up to conduct a massacre that includes themselves as two did at Columbine High School in Colorado? 

One retired professor of social ethics and philosophy at a school of theology in Missouri writes that “most U.S. citizens accept their government’s view of ‘rogue states’ because the major news media parrot the Pentagon’s point of view.  

However, in nearly every case of suspected terrorism (in much of the world), the United States was in fact the original aggressor, using its own form of aggression to which the ‘rogue states’ were responding.” 

If we as a nation cannot now take Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s words seriously when he says, in New York’s Riverside Church in 1967.  

“The Americans are forcing even their friends into becoming their enemies. It is curious that they, who calculate so carefully on the possibilities of military victory, do not realize that in the process they are incurring deep psychological and political defeat.  

The image of America will never again be the image of violence and militarism,” and act on those words.  

The lesson to be learned from the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing will not have been heeded, and we’ll sadly be forced to say that the 168 lives of innocent children, women and men, and obviously, as well as bafflingly guilty Timothy McVeigh’s were lost in vain. 

Our Missouri theologian believes; “Everyone, including Americans, would benefit from a prosperous, peaceful world.” And to his question “is this likely to ever happen?” he says, “not until the citizens and government officials of the United States put aside our collective ego at being a ‘superpower’ and seek for others the goals and values we seek for ourselves”. 

Hear this from the Auxiliary Bishop of the archdiocese of Detroit, Thomas J. Gumbleton “the evil we are evoking is the end of the world and the loss of our souls. Confronting this is the greatest spiritual question of our time.”  

We need to seek, listen, speak out and act! We need to condemn President Bush’s condemnation of the ABM treaty and promise of a wider discredited missile shield. 

When 673 law professors from 137 law schools in the United States declare that the five U.S. Supreme Court justices who voted to stop the recount of votes in Florida last December intentionally acted as political proponents for candidate Bush, not as ethical judges, we need to be aware that there’s a moral crisis in the U.S.A. that needs to be addressed. 

 

Al Williams 

Oakland 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

653-4012 

 

 

Dear Editor, 

 

Recently returned to our regular world of ups and downs and smooth and rough roads, I want to share some thoughts from my last six months of separateness and sadness. 

I am grateful that it lasted only six months as compared to a previous eighteen month period. I am grateful that I had already learned the value of medication and did not resisnt too long the need for change. 

I benefited from the loving patience and concern of my family and a few close friends and from the professional and library resourses of Kaiser Permanente Mediacal Center. I benefited from The Zen Path through Depression by Philip Martin, a gift from one of my sons. I benefited from a part time job which pays me to walk, that most heathy of physical activities. 

I know the City of Berkeley and Alta Bates Mediacal Center have Mental Health Services and the Berkeley Public Library has books on the subject. 

Even as I found myself increasingly unable to want to be with people, I clung tenuously to some kind of prayer life and some kind of worship. One of my ministers sent me the following poem by May Sarton. Consider it my “glad to be back” greeting to all of you. 

HOPEFUL GARDENERS 

Help us to be the always hopeful 

Gardeners of the spirit 

Who know that without darkness 

Nothing comes to birth 

As without light 

Nothing flowers 

 

Bill Trampleasure 

Berkeley


Sabrina Forkish and Guy Poole
Tuesday June 26, 2001


Tuesday, June 26

 

Saranel Benjamin of  

Globalization 

7 p.m. 

Oakland YMCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Saranel Benjamin, trade unionist from South Africa, will discuss the impact of corporate globalization on South African workers. Sponsored by Berkeley’s Women of Color Resource Center. 

848-9272 

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

Redistricting Hearing 

7 - 9 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

Part of the last week of redistricting hearings for 2001. Hosted by Supervisor Keith Carson. 

272-6695 

 


Wednesday, June 27

 

Conversations in Commedia 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

The series pairs radical theater “elders” to share memories of their years in Commedia. This week with former Mime Troupe actress Audrey Smith and Ladies Against Women character Selma Spector. $6 - $8. 

849-2568 

 

Disaster Council 

7 p.m. 

Emergency Operations Center 

997 Cedar Street 

Update on Measure G. 

644-8736 

 

Socratic Circle Discussion 

5 p.m. 

Cafe Electica 

1309 Solano Avenue 

Gather for espresso and discussion at the “green” teen cafe. Open to all. Free. 

527-2344 

 


Thursday, June 28

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley Opera performs pieces of Carmen. 

 

Pink Slip Party  

and Career Mixer 

6 - 9 p.m. 

Pyramid Brewery and Alehouse 

901 Gilman Street 

Meet with East Bay job seekers while listening to music by DJ and Emcee Marty Nemko. Also, cash bar, free hors d’oeurves, and prize giveaways. Free and open to the public. Call 251-1401. 

www.eastbaytechjobs.com/mixer/ 

 

Take the Terror Out  

of Talking! 

Noon to 1:30 p.m. 

California Dept. of Health Services 

2151 Berkeley Way 

Room 804 

Open house at State Health Toastmasters Club to celebrate its 40th anniversary. Free. 649-7750 

 


Friday, June 29

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women: Arts, Herstory  

and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

3 p.m. 

Sather Gate 

UC Berkeley 

Telegraph at Bancroft 

Walking tour from Sather Gate to People’s Park entitled “Berkeley in the Sixties.” Led by Free Speech veterans and Berkeley residents Kate Coleman and Michael Rossman, the tour will include important locations and discussions of the Free Speech movement, the Vietnam Day Committee, the rise of affirmative action, and other events and movements. Free. 486-04 11  

 


Saturday, June 30

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 925-830-2975  

 

Bonfire III: Stories and  

Songs By the Sea 

7:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Marina 

Spinnaker Way, near Olympic Circle Sailing Club 

Come for Havdala and share stories, sing and watch the flames dance. Bring food and drink to share, kosher s’mores provided. 

848-0237 

 

Know Your Rights 

11 - 2 p.m. 

2022 Blake St. 

Copwatch workshop: Learn what your rights are when dealing with the police. Special section on juvenile rights. 548-0425 

 

Bay Area Eco-Crones 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1066 Creston Road 

Networking, information sharing, project planning and ritual.  

Call ahead, 874-4935. 

Sunday, July 1 

Buddhist Psychology 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Annette Anderson on “Insights from Buddhist Psychology.” Free. 

843-6812 

 

Jazz on the Pier 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Berkeley Pier  

The Christy Dana Quartet performs on the Berkeley Pier at the foot of University Ave. and Seawall Dr. The CDQ ensemble led by trumpeter and jazz educator Christy Dana with the Bay as a backdrop. Bring your folding chairs, sunblock and jackets. Free.  

AC Transit Bus 51M 

649-3929 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Avenue 

Group meditation using instrumental music and devotional songs. Free. 

496-3468 

 


Monday, July 2

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panels on Ulysses, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Finnegans Wake, and Joyce in the Classroom. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  

 


Tuesday, July 3

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3565 

 

James Joyce Conference 

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Clark Kerr Campus 

2601 Warring Street 

Part of a week-long conference entitled “Extreme Joyce/Readings On the Edge.” Today includes panel on Finnegans Wake as well as looking at issues such as Joyce and carnality, computers, border-crossings, and cinema. From 4 - 5:30 p.m. workshops and reading groups on Teaching Joyce. $15 - $25. 

642-2754  

 


Wednesday, July 4

 

Ice Cream Social 

Noon - 2 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Part of the Lawrence Hall of Science Wednesday FUN-days. Bring your own picnic, ice cream provided by LHS. Free museum admission today with a library card, regular admission $3 - $7. 

642-5132  

 

4th of July at the Berkeley Marina 

Noon - 10 p.m. 

Bring your family for an exciting day. Picnic on great international food, hit the beach, take a free sailboat ride, get your face painted or a massage. Decorate your bike at the Shorebird Nature Center and participate in the Decorated Bicycle Parade at 7 p.m. Visit Madame Ovary’s egg puppets and Adventure Playground all day or the Wacky Art Cars. Dance to Southbound or Zambombazo 2-5 p.m.; Bird Legg and the Tite Fit Blues Band 5-7 p.m.; Kollasuyo 5-7 p.m.; MotorDude Zydeco 7-9 p.m. Fireworks at dusk. No personal fireworks allowed. An alcohol-free event. Cars in by 7 p.m. when street closes to traffic, out only after 10 p.m. Free admission. Sponsored by the City of Berkeley. 

548-5335 

 

Berkeley Communicator Toastmasters Club 

7:15 a.m. 

Vault Cafe 

3250 Adeline 

Learn to speak with confidence. Ongoing first and third Wednesdays each month. 

527-2337 

 


’60s films shown in special screening

By Peter Crimmins
Tuesday June 26, 2001

This summer’s 40th anniversary of the Bay Area’s champion of avant-garde film art, the San Francisco Cinematheque, will be celebrated with screenings of selected favorite films at the San Francisco Art Institute and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. 

Joining in the anniversary will be the Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley, which will show a special program of experimental films, circa 1967. 

Tonight at 7:30, the PFA will screen films by Bruce Baillie (“Castro Street”), Stan Brakhage (“Songs 6,7,8 and 16”), Bruce Conner (“A Movie”), Robert Nelson (“Oh Dem Watermelons”), and Jud Talmut (“Turn Turn Turn”). This program is significant because it is a re-creation of a film program 34 years ago, at a pivotal time in S.F. Cinematheque history. 

First, we have to go back a few years further, to 1960. 

Bruce Baillie was an artist discovering film, living rent-free in a room in Canyon. “I had no occupation,” he said in a 1989 interview. “I couldn’t get a job anywhere. So, I thought, I’ll invent my own occupation.” He landed a job at Safeway to pay for a projector, set up an Army surplus screen in his backyard, and began to hold weekly screenings of his films, his friends’ films, and just about anything made of celluloid that he could thread through the projector. He called it “Canyon Cinema.”  

The screenings slowly became more popular, at a time when the avant-garde community became more and more at risk. This is the era when Michael McClure’s risqué stage production of “The Beard” was nightly raided by police in San Francisco’s North Beach, when Jack Smith’s campy romp film “Flaming Creatures” couldn’t be legally screened in New York City, and when Lenny Bruce’s obscenity battles began. The climate was frowning upon those on the fringe. 

“This was prerevolution times,” Baillie recalled. “Berkeley was quite conservative in the early ’60s. They just didn’t like the spirit of it.” With his partner Chick Strand he began holding screenings of local work and feature-length narrative films at a variety of places around the Bay Area, wherever a host would have them. 

As the community of filmmakers surrounding Baillie’s screenings grew and their energy gained momentum, they realized Canyon could evolve into a distribution organization. In 1966 Filmmaker Robert Nelson spearheaded an effort to found an organization modeled after a New York City distribution co-operative called Filmmaker’s Co-operative. The Canyon distribution co-op was designed to safely and cost-effectively get films into screening venues that would have them. “Your films are made of love,” Nelson wrote in the Canyon newsletter, “Cinemanews.” “Don’t put them into the hands of people who are in the business of selling love.” 

Which brings us to 1967, when Edith Kramer was hired as the manager of the Canyon Co-op. The organization had just moved into the basement offices of a desanctified church on Union Street in San Francisco and Kramer noticed the unused space above. She got the idea to exhibit films in the church.  

Tonight’s film program at the Pacific Film Archive represents the first film series – named “Canyon Cinematheque” – at the then-newly opened Intersection Theater. 

In the coming years, Canyon Cinematheque and the distribution co-op would split. Edith Kramer would eventually become the director of the Pacific Film Archive, and Canyon Cinematheque would become San Francisco Cinematheque. 

Kramer said she is proud to have been a part of Canyon. “Not much has survived from the ’60s,” she said of Canyon’s longevity. “It’s vital.” 

Tonight’s re-visiting of the 1967 program shows a body of work that attests to the serious technical and emotional intent of film artists. Bruce Baillie’s “Castro Street” was lauded in art and film circles as a tour de force of filmmaking virtuosity in the service of cinematic poetry. 

A 10-minute film of images gathered from a train-switching yard in Richmond (not the Castro Street of Gay Pride fame), “Castro Street” uses abstractions of overlapping and image matting to achieve a metaphysical consciousness. In Baillie’s words, “the strength or conflict of becoming.” 

Filmmaker Larry Booth wrote to Canyon’s Cinemanews in 1967: “Although most would deny it, many films are technique games, that is, the art of the technical. In the case of “Castro Street,” the images appear to be very carefully thought out and techniques used only as an instrument to bring them to the viewer. This is as it should be.”


District looks for way to maintain school diversity

By Ben Lumpkin
Tuesday June 26, 2001

“It’s show time. A decision must be made.” 

When U.S. District Judge William Orrick uttered these words in December 1999, demanding that the San Francisco school district stop taking race into consideration when it assigned students to schools, school board members in Berkeley took notice. 

The first public school system in the country to voluntarily desegregate in 1968, Berkeley Unified has long had policies in place to ensure that the racial diversity at each individual school site very nearly approximates the racial diversity of the district’s total enrollment; in other words, policies that take race “into consideration” when assigning students to schools. 

This is how it came to be, for example, that both Cragmont and Washington elementary schools – schools located in neighborhoods with very different demographics – had student bodies that were 28 percent white in the 1999-2000 school year. 

Or how Emerson Elementary school came to have, in that same year, an enrollment that was 42 percent African American and 27 percent white, despite being located at some distance from neighborhoods where African American households are numerous. 

Berkeley Unified’s latest desegregation policy, put in place in the mid-’90s, assigns students to schools so that the percentage of white, African American and “Other Ethnicity” students at each school comes within 5 percent of matching the districtwide percentages for these categories. 

It could be argued that such a policy is illegal. And the argument may be made sooner rather than later. 

Catherine James, associate superintendent of support services for the district, said at least one conservative legal group has made inquiries that could indicate it is considering bringing a case against the Berkeley district.“We are so outspoken about our desire to have a desegregated district,” James said. “We could be a likely target.” 

Adding to the district’s anxieties is the fact that they fall under the jurisdiction of the very U.S. district court where Orrick handed down his 1999 decision. There are differences between the San Francisco district and the Berkeley District of course, but still... 

Last spring, anticipating the day when a federal judge said to them: “It’s showtime,” the district moved to appoint representatives from each of its elementary and middle schools to a Student Assignment Advisory Committee. The committee was charged with beginning to look at alternative student assignment policies that do not take race “into consideration.” 

But after meeting several times and soliciting public input, the committee reported back to the district late last year with its conclusion: keep the current policy. The committee essentially determined that racial integration of schools is so popular in Berkeley that the district ought to be ready to take a stand in court before it considers changing the policy, James said. 

The board didn’t exactly agree. So, in a compromise of sorts, the committee has spent the last six months further exploring student assignment policies that could promote diverse schools without explicitly taking race into consideration, while it simultaneously looked at ways to make the district’s current policy more legally defensible.  

It presented its most recent findings at last week’s school board meeting.  

The board might base student assignment on student’s socio-economic status rather than on race, and achieve a similar diversifying effect, the committee argued. But it could also do so if it found that socio-economic diversity was desirable in and of itself. Any policy whose goal is to maintain racial diversity, whether it does so by use of “racial quotas” or not, is unlikely to stand up in court, according to Advisory Committee Co-chair Derick Miller, incoming president of Berkeley’s PTA Council.  

Furthermore, there are inherent difficulties in the socio-economic approach, Miller said, such as finding reliable ways to determine students’ household income. 

In terms of defending the district’s current policy, the committee presented statistical information to the board that could begin to make a compelling case that education resources are spread equally among Berkeley schools, and that the quality of education the schools provide is also largely equal.  

According to board Director Joaquin Rivera, there are some legal precedents that suggest public school districts can get away with using race in student assignment policies so long as no ethnic group can make the case that it is harmed by such a policy, as might be the case if the policy increased the likelihood that children of a particular ethnicity were assigned to an inferior school. 

“In Berkeley, no student in the district would be harmed if he’s assigned to ‘x’ school instead of ‘y’ school,” Rivera said. 

In the months ahead, the Student Advisory Assignment Committee will continue to compile statistics related to the “equity” of Berkeley schools, including statistics on student achievement, after school programs, and parent education levels. 

 


Thai community dedicates temple

By Matt Lorenz
Tuesday June 26, 2001

Sundays are usually pretty crowded at Wat Mongkolratanaram, Berkeley’s Thai Buddhist temple, but this Sunday there were more people than usual.  

After 25 years at 1911 Russell St. – where on Sundays Thai cooks donate and serve traditional food at affordable prices to raise money for the temple – the Thai community unveiled and dedicated its newly-renovated temple. 

“We’re celebrating our 25th year in the Bay Area,” said Doug Coffee, a temple volunteer who lives in Fairfax. “We bought an old Victorian home and got permission from the city to upgrade it. We have spent over $600,000 in renovating this house and making it the way it looks right now.” 

In January 1999, the city approved the temple’s petition to substantially renovate the building, so it could be made an authentic ubosoth, or Buddhist temple of worship. The renovations were completed this year.  

The house’s look from the outside is ornate with gold adornments that front the peaks of this Victorian, and are probably not what the original designer envisioned.  

But out on Russell Street – with people walking their dogs and toting their Sunday morning coffee, wondering what all the excitement is about and finding young, luminous Thai monks wrapped in bright or burnt orange saffron to tell them – somehow everything seems to fit. 

“You see a lot of people here today, all the parking out front’s gone, and it’s all for this celebration of the 25th year,” Coffee said. “We’ve got the high ambassador from Washington coming here today. The mayor of Berkeley will be here today. Members of the Thai embassy in L.A. will be here today.” 

Coffee estimated that there are more than 60,000 Thai people in the Bay Area. “At one time or another everybody comes to this temple,” Coffee said.  

Congregants and visitors filed into chairs set beneath a tent for the outdoor ceremony, and after the ribbon cutting. There was Thai classical dance, authentic traditional food and desserts, and lots of liveliness throughout the day.  

Alison McKleroy said she thought the day’s festivities were terrific, but not so unlike the other Sundays she’s come to the temple. 

“The place is always full and kind of magical,” McKleroy said. “I’ve been coming here for six or seven years. They have this every Sunday, and it’s the best Thai food in the Bay Area.” 

It’s usually a word of mouth sort of thing, McKleroy said.  

“It’s always fun to ask other people, ‘How did you hear about the Thai temple?’ You’re always introduced by a friend, and as soon as you come, you want to take all your friends and at the same time, keep it a secret.” 

There are other opportunities, Coffee said, for members of the public to gain something from what the temple offers.  

“They teach Thai every Sunday and they teach the children how to dance,” Coffee said. “We have classes going all year round, and the teachers are all volunteers.” 

Though most of the people you’d see at the Thai Buddhist temple on any given Sunday are volunteers or visitors, you’ll also find its modest leaders walking around quickly and gently, smiling. 

“The monks are the leaders of the temple,” Coffee said. 

The five monks who presently reside at the temple live in the small, garagelike buildings out behind it. Their stomachs are usually as bare as their heads, since their daily fast begins every day at noon and lasts until the next morning. 

Sunday is the day they lead the Thai Buddhist community in religious celebration. The feast every Sunday, to which all are invited, is a way of welcome. 


‘Golden rice’ remains years from reality

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

SAN DIEGO — “Golden rice” has come to represent all the hopes and fears about biotechnology, but despite all the controversy, not a single genetically engineered rice seed has been planted in the ground, its inventors said Monday. 

It will probably take another five to 10 years before poor subsistence farmers can begin growing the crop in large amounts, and that’s “if everything goes right,” said Ronald Cantrell, executive director of the International Rice Research Institute. 

Its many proponents see the rice, infused with two daffodil genes and a bacteria gene to add vitamin A, as a panacea for starving populations in developing nations where rice is a staple. 

Traditional rice lacks vitamin A, and as many as two million children die each year because of vitamin A deficiencies. Another 500,000 go blind.  

Biotechnology researchers say genetic engineering is the only practical way to fortify the rice. 

“It was clear from the beginning that biotech was needed instead of typical crop breeding,” Swiss plant cell professor Peter Beyer, one of the two inventors of golden rice, said Monday at the annual Biotechnology Industry Organization conference.  

“No rice anywhere has vitamin A.” 

Opponents call it science run amok. They say no plants should be genetically changed to include elements of other organisms, and particularly not rice. Once the plants are released into the environment, cross-pollination with traditional rice could have unpredictable long-term impacts on the food billions of people eat every day. 

“The purported benefits of golden rice are completely fabricated,” said Brian Tokar, a member of Biojustice, a group opposed to genetic engineering. 

Tokar dismissed the golden rice project as merely a public relations ploy to improve biotech’s media image. 

“The way to cure blindness and hunger should not come from big agribusiness,” he said. 

Still others praise the science but say the distribution system is flawed — that governments and nonprofit agencies are too big and bureaucratic to properly handle getting the seeds to poor farmers once the product is perfected. 

Villoo Morawala-Patel, who owns an India biotech start-up that works on the aroma of Indian rice, says golden rice’s keepers should turn to companies like hers to help distribute the seeds. 

Still, Beyer and other major supporters of the rice cautioned that years of fine-tuning must be done before poor subsistence farmers will be able to use it on a wide scale.  

Today, golden rice is grown only in a few greenhouses, including at the Rice Research Institute’s headquarters in the Philippines. 

“Golden rice is still in the developmental stages and a lot of work is still needed to get into the fields,” said Sivramiah Shantharam, a spokesman for Syngenta, which owns the commercial rights to the rice. 

First order of business: engineering the rice to survive in the tropical climates where it can benefit the most, such as Asia, which grows 500 million tons of traditional rice annually.  

Right now, the golden rice can only grow in temperate climates such as California’s.  

Cantrell said it will probably take three years for the research institute to develop a rice that can grow in the Philippines. 

Beyer and co-inventor Ingo Potrykus also are working on genetically fortifying the rice with iron and vitamin E. 

Critics argue that even vitamin-fortified rice will come nowhere close to easing the world’s hunger pains, and that people would need to eat dozens of pounds of golden rice a day to meet their daily vitamin needs. 

Consequently, the two European scientists are also having problems raising the needed capital to continue their work. Public funding in Europe also is dwindling in part because of the outcry there over genetically modified foods. 

“Elected officials are quite reluctant to fund us,” Beyer said. 

So Beyer has turned some of his attention to private companies, partnering recently with Syngenta, which agreed to allow governments and nonprofit agencies to freely distribute golden rice throughout the poorest countries.  

Syngenta hopes to generate its profits in industrialized countries such as the United States, if the rice meets regulatory approval. 

Beyer is meeting with other scientists this week to prepare a pitch for more research money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  

Currently, the Rockefeller Foundation funds Beyer’s work and has promised to do so for the next 18 months, he said. 

Outside the convention center Monday, police outnumbered protesters. The crowd of protesters listening to music, dancing and performing street theater numbered no more than 50 — at times even less. 

Elsewhere, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals staged a protest at a Burger King restaurant in the nearby city of Mira Mesa.  

Police there also outnumbered the 80 protesters who turned up. Two demonstrators were arrested after they stood on the counter and made speeches.


GOP issues could delay state budget vote

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Like triple-digit heat, a stalemate over the state budget is virtually an assured summer event at the state Capitol. 

And with shaky state finances and political tempers frayed by a statewide power crisis, the deadlock is about to begin again over a $101 billion state budget that is supposed to take effect Sunday. 

Senators are to debate the budget Tuesday evening. 

Republican lawmakers are demanding a handful of terms, including a constitutional amendment on transportation funding and a quarter-cent sales tax cut. 

Without those terms, they say, they will withhold the one Senate and four Assembly votes that place the fate of the budget of a Democrat-controlled state in the hands of the GOP minority. 

“We haven’t reached agreement on the priorities,” said Assembly Republican Leader Dave Cox, R-Fair Oaks. 

A special legislative budget committee approved a $101 billion spending plan early Saturday, after three weeks of intense negotiations among Democratic lawmakers and Gov. Gray Davis’ office. 

Senate President Pro Tem John Burton, D-San Francisco, said the Senate plans to take up the budget Tuesday night, followed by the Assembly on Wednesday. Department of Finance officials say they plan a bill signing by week’s end. 

Legislative leaders say at least one of the GOP issues – the transportation compromise – may be quickly resolved. 

Davis and a legislative budget committee agreed to defer for two years a plan to use gas tax revenues for transportation programs. Instead, $2.5 billion over the next two budget years would flow into the general fund to help make up for sagging revenues. 

Republicans say they will only agree to diverting the fund if Democrats agree to ask voters to require that the gasoline tax revenues be used for streets, highways and transit projects in the future. 

“That transportation issue could be worth discussing,” Burton said. 

More divisive, however, is the quarter-cent sales tax cut that is automatically triggered when the state’s treasury is full. 

GOP lawmakers said they will not vote for a budget that fails to preserve that quarter-cent sales tax cut, which went into effect in January.  

State law automatically triggers the cut if the reserves remain above 4 percent of the state budget for two years in a row. 

The budget approved by the committee assumes the quarter-cent cut will end in January and bring in $600 million to the state in the 2001-02 fiscal year. 

Another of the Republicans budget issues, the level of the state’s rainy-day fund, has been resolved. GOP lawmakers called for larger reserves than the $1.1 billion Davis called for in his May budget revision. 

Davis increased that request to $2.5 billion to $3 billion after analysts reported that the state could be strapped with billions in deficits in two years. 

In response, the committee trimmed new spending proposals in education, foster care and health programs to set aside $2.2 billion. 

On the Net: See various budget summaries at www.lao.ca.gov and www.dof.ca.gov


Billions at stake as power talks start

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

Efforts to settle claims from the California power crisis got under way Monday, as Western states accused power-generating companies of overcharging them by $15 billion in the past year. 

Michael Kahn, California’s chief negotiator, said the $9 billion in refunds his state claims it is owed should be the first order of business for Curtis L. Wagner, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s chief administrative law judge, who is serving as mediator for the talks. 

“We want our refunds. We want them now,” said Kahn, chairman of the California Independent System Operator, which manages the state’s power grid. 

Other Western states, mainly in the Pacific Northwest, said overcharges to them amount to $6 billion. 

The states claim that the companies unfairly drove up prices to take advantage of a power shortage. Prices frequently surpassed $300 a megawatt-hour, ten times what they were in 1999. One megawatt is enough to power about 750 homes. 

The power companies argue that the charges were justified.  

In some cases, older, more costly power plants were pressed into service to deal with the high demand and tight supply. 

Wagner, who has said that refunds in any settlement probably would not exceed $2.5 billion, urged all sides to be conciliatory.  

He said a brokered settlement should be preferable to a plan crafted by federal regulators. 

He said he was not discouraged by the states’ hard line in the early going. “Everybody has to stick to their guns for a while,” Wagner said after the first day of talks. 

More than 150 people representing about six dozen entities gathered in a government hearing room for negotiations.  

The talks were part of a federal order last week extending price controls on spot power sales in California and imposing limits in 10 other Western states. 

 

 

Wagner laid out several issues negotiators will have to tackle, including how much generators are owed for power they supplied to California without getting paid. 

The size of the refunds and the unpaid bills “must be, both ways, resolved at the outset to put everyone on the same playing field,” Wagner said. Any settlement probably would also have to answer whether the generators should have immunity from existing and future lawsuits, as well as prosecution, he said. 

Other issues on the table include: 

— Additional long-term power contracts, reducing the amount of power California would have to purchase on the volatile spot market. 

— Ensuring a credit-worthy party to pay for power. 

— Natural gas prices and pipeline capacity, particularly in Southern California. 

— The independence of the board that governs the Independent System Operator. 

— The bankruptcy of Pacific Gas & Electric. 

Wagner wore a gray business suit and sat among the parties, foregoing both his robes and his seat on the dais, to emphasize his role as a broker in the talks. 

Reporters sat in on Wagner’s opening statement and a marathon introduction in which some 150 people stated their names and their employers. 

“If we had known there would be so many people here, we would have sold tickets,” Wagner said. 

The attendees included representatives from California and a dozen city and county governments, investor-owned and municipal utilities, power generators and natural gas companies. 

After the introductions, Wagner closed the meeting to the public, ordering the participants not to talk to reporters during the negotiations. He even pledged to shred his copy of the notes that a court reporter will transcribe each day. 

FERC mandated that the talks last no more than 15 days. Wagner can request more time if he feels progress is being made. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: http://www.ferc.gov/ 


Neighborhood fights to keep coastal town alive

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

AVILA BEACH — A 12-year fight is over for a handful of residents bent on sparing this once-doomed 50-acre oasis on the central California coast from oblivion. 

In its heyday, the village of Avila Beach attracted beachgoers and tourists by the thousands with its Bohemian charm and sun-soaked sands. 

But lurking beneath the enclave was a spreading petroleum plume from damaged oil pipelines that threatened the health and safety of its 350 residents. 

The village had to be destroyed in 1999 to save it. 

Now, the three-block-long, three-block-wide town is rising from the goo — thanks to the perseverance of a handful of people who battled a stymied bureaucracy to get their town back. 

“Avila really got cleaned up because of about four or five people who were real tenacious,” said Peg Pinard, the San Luis Obispo County supervisor who deserves much of the credit for pinning down the bureaucrats. 

The entire commercial beachfront was demolished in 1999, a decade after it was learned that a 400,000-gallon petroleum plume bulged beneath the town. Before being decommissioned, the Unocal pipelines carried up to 2 million barrels of oil a month from hillside tanks to wharf tankers. 

After the discovery, it took a decade for Unocal to work out legal settlements with business owners and bureaucrats clearing the way for relocations and demolition. The $18 million agreement also paid for community service and recreation projects to benefit remaining residents. 

No one questioned the solution: The town had to go. 

“There was no other way to save it. They had to tear it down,” Pinard said. But many in the community weren’t interested in bidding farewell with a Unocal buyout. 

Dig down 30 feet, scoop away the contamination and replace it with clean sand and terra firma, they said. They wanted to rebuild and resume the role as a beach tourist destination 150 miles northwest of Los Angeles. 

“I knew that it needed help and I’m a fighter. I could see people weren’t being treated fairly,” said Pinard. Her brow still furls at the mention of state roadblocks that led to delay after delay after delay. 

The California Coastal Commission was the toughest. Battles centered on parking, road closures, the boardwalk, and apartments over stores on Front Street. 

Reconstruction was ready to begin, with businesses expecting to reopen this summer, when state fire authorities stalled it further because they wouldn’t sign off on building permits because there wasn’t enough water pressure to fight a fire. 

Then, the activists battled the state Department of Fish and Game over construction of a new water tank for fire suppression. 

Unocal eventually trucked away 300,000 cubic yards of contaminated dirt, spokesman Derek Aney said. 

The battles are now in the past. 

Archie McLaren was there from the beginning. 

“It was 12 years of excruciating and painful work,” said McLaren, who steers the Front Street Enhancement Committee. 

Beachgoers now sprawl thigh-to-thigh on bleach-white sand imported from the Santa Maria River bed and wander the palm-lined concrete boardwalk dividing the sand and what will be the Front Street business district. 

At the moment, there’s nowhere to get a burger, fries or a beer. The closest watering holes are The Olde Port Inn and Fat Cats, about a mile down the road in Port San Luis. 

But there is a park on the western edge of town and a 996-space parking lot is walking distance from the sand. 

“The weather is always nice here, nice and sunny,” said vacationing sun-worshipper Norma Conner of the San Bernardino County community of Mentone.  

She has migrated to Avila Beach for years and admits she doesn’t really miss the rustic Front Street shops. But she’s looking forward to the new structures rising from a pit nearby. 

The Avila Beach population of 350 is now about 119. 

“Two-thirds of the people took the (relocation) money and left,” said Seamus Slattery, chairman of the Avila Valley Advisory Committee. 

Although six to nine months late, sand has been broken on some businesses. 

The foundation for Beachcomber Bill’s is already in place and owner Bill Price expects to open next spring.  

The Sea Barn, Custom House and Mr. Rick’s Bar and Grill are returning to Front Street and the San Luis Yacht Club is now at the foot of the pier. A 53-room hotel is on the drawing board. 

“I think the town is going to develop in stages,” Pinard said. “I think we are going to end up with a beautiful little place here.” 

Some old-timers are concerned the rebirth could bring congestion with too many tourists overwhelming the place. 

“They are very anxious to get back in business and a businessman wants a steady business. But you want people to come in waves, not in tsunamis,” she said.  

“In the end, though, I think it is coming out OK.”


African leaders ask for AIDS help at U.N. conference

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

UNITED NATIONS — One after another, African leaders at the United Nations’ first global gathering on HIV/AIDS made emotional pleas for help Monday in ending the devastation wrought by the epidemic. Nigeria’s president warned that entire populations face extinction. 

Secretary-General Kofi Annan, seeking $7-10 billion for a global AIDS fund, said AIDS spending “in the developing world needs to rise to roughly five times its present level.” The Americans pledged to provide more aid, but did not say how much. 

Annan, a native of Ghana who has made the fight against AIDS his personal priority, opened the three-day special session by urging world leaders to set aside moral judgments and face the unpleasant facts of a disease that has killed 22 million people and ravaged many of the world’s poorest nations. 

Kenya and Nigeria are each home to more than 2 million HIV patients. In Botswana, more than 20 percent of the adult population is infected, and in South Africa, AIDS will knock off 17 years of life expectancy by 2005. 

“The future of our continent is bleak, to say the least,” Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo said. “The prospect of extinction of the entire population of a continent looms larger and larger.” 

Obasanjo and others called for “total cancellation of Africa’s debt,” which takes badly needed money away from health and social programs including the fight against AIDS. 

“The undeniable fact is that with the fragility of our economies, we simply lack the capacity to adequately respond to the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS epidemic,” the Nigerian leader said. 

Secretary of State Colin Powell, leading the U.S. delegation, said more money would come from the United States – which has already pledged $200 million in seed money – “as we learn where our support will be most effective.” 

“Our response to AIDS must be no less comprehensive, no less relentless, no less swift than the pandemic itself,” Powell told the General Assembly. 

Several speakers, including Powell, acknowledged that the global response to AIDS has been woefully late. Britain’s Clare Short, secretary for international development, went a step further by criticizing the very gathering she addressed. 

“We waste too much time and energy in U.N. conferences and special sessions. We use up enormous energy in arguing at great length over texts that provide few if any follow-up mechanisms or assurances that governments and U.N. agencies will carry forward the declarations that are agreed,” she said. 

Indeed, the Monday morning session ended in more than two hours of arguments over whether to exclude the U.S.-based International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission from the conference. Eleven unidentified countries wanted to keep the group out, but Canada led a successful vote in the assembly to include it. 

Elsewhere in the building, diplomats squabbled over a final conference document that will map out a global strategy to halt the disease and reverse its effects. Muslim countries and the United States object to language that specifically names vulnerable groups in need of protection, including men who have sex with men. 

Noting the weeks of infighting among delegates leading up the gathering, Annan told the 189-nation General Assembly: “We cannot deal with AIDS by making moral judgments or refusing to face unpleasant facts, and still less by stigmatizing those who are infected. We can only do it by speaking clearly and plainly, both about the ways that people become infected, and about what they can to avoid infection.” 

But expectations for a successful gathering remained high and varied for many of the 3,000 participants, including health experts, politicians, scientists, AIDS activists and patients working to find an end to the scourge. 

Three days of conferences and meetings touch on everything from drug prices to homosexuality, AIDS orphans and funding. Events on Monday included a round-table discussion on prevention and care, a look at how New York City has responded to the epidemic, gender issues relating to AIDS, challenges in rural Africa and the psychological impact of the disease. 

To allow some delegates to participate, the United States waived visa restrictions that prevent those with HIV or AIDS from visiting the country. 

U.N. radio and an online Webcast will broadcast many of the events around the world in the six official languages of the United Nations — Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish. 

Two dozen heads of state, mostly from Africa, are attending the General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS, though no wealthy nation sent a president or prime minister. Many used their time on the assembly floor to discuss the fund, which Annan expects will be operational by the end of the year. 

“It is important for the fund to have criteria that will ensure that resources are used to meet the needs of countries most affected by HIV/AIDS such as my own,” President Festus Mogae of Botswana said. 

Uganda, a rare success story among African nations battling the disease, became the first developing nation to give to a global AIDS fund Monday with a $2 million donation. Rates of infection in Uganda have declined by two-thirds since 1993. 

Canada added its contribution to those made earlier by the United States, Britain and France, for a total of some $600 million so far. 

A study published Friday in the journal Science said the world’s poorest countries will need $9.2 billion a year to deal with AIDS – $4.4 billion to treat people with the illness and $4.8 billion to prevent new infections. 


Supreme Court upholds campaign spending limits

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

WASHINGTON — A closely divided Supreme Court upheld Watergate-era spending limits on political parties Monday in a decision that supporters said could shore up broader campaign-finance restrictions now before Congress. 

The 5-4 ruling affects the money that state and national political parties spend for advertisements, mass mailings and other activities in support of specific candidates. 

The ruling does not directly affect the two central goals of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance overhaul: to ban “soft money,” the unregulated and unlimited donations that corporations, unions and individuals make to political parties and to put restrictions on the political adds that special interest groups run in the final days of an election. 

Still, the court’s reasoning cheered Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and others pressing for wider regulation of political money. 

“Clearly, this decision demonstrates that McCain-Feingold restrictions on campaign contributions are constitutional,” he said. 

The court rejected the Colorado Republican Party’s contention that government limits on such spending violate the First Amendment guarantee of free speech. 

Allowing political parties to spend whatever they pleased in support of candidates would open the door to corruption, Justice David Souter wrote for the majority. 

The court’s more liberal wing won the vote of center-right Justice Sandra Day O’Connor to prevail. O’Connor’s fellow swing voter, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, joined the three conservatives, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas in dissent. 

The court agreed with the Justice Department, which argued that the kind of regulated money at issue in this case, called coordinated expenditures, could be used to flout the federal limits on how much individuals may contribute to candidates. 

“Coordinated expenditures of money donated to a party are tailor-made to undermine contribution limits,” Souter wrote. 

The term refers to party spending done in concert with a particular campaign but kept separate from the candidate’s coffers. 

Largely eclipsed by unregulated soft money, coordinated expenditures are used less often now than when the case began with a dispute over radio ads in a 1986 Colorado Senate race. 

The dissenters rejected the majority’s finding that there is no real difference between this kind of party spending and direct contributions by individuals or political action committees. 

“I remain baffled that this court has extended the most generous First Amendment safeguards to filing lawsuits, wearing profane jackets and exhibiting drive-in movies with nudity but has offered only tepid protection to the core speech and associated rights that our founders sought to defend,” Thomas wrote. 

The ruling applies to party spending for House and Senate candidates, a category that totaled $427 million for Republicans and $265 million for Democrats in the 2000 elections. 

Republicans stood to benefit more directly from an end to party spending limits, because of the historical fund-raising advantage the party enjoys. 

GOP officials played down Monday’s ruling, noting that it preserves a status quo in place since the Watergate era. 

Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., one of the leading opponent of the McCain-Feingold overhaul, also discounted the ruling’s effect. 

“McCain-Feingold advocates can take no comfort in today’s decision,” because it dealt only with regulated “hard” money, McConnell said. 

The McCain-Feingold measure has passed the Senate and is awaiting action in the House next month. 

Senate opponents of the soft money ban and some others on both sides of the issue had predicted the court would rule the other way. 

Most of those predictions drew on the court’s earlier ruling in another part of the same Colorado dispute. In 1996, the court abolished limits on party independent spending on behalf of candidates, and the Colorado Republicans urged the court to adopt the same rationale here. 

The kind of spending at issue in Monday’s case is different, because the money is spent with such a specific intent to help candidates, Souter wrote for the majority. 

The cap on political party spending was passed as part of broad campaign money laws in 1974. 

The FEC limits national and state parties to spending $33,780 apiece to help elect a House candidate. Senate limits are based on population and range from $67,560 for races in the smallest states to $1.6 million for California. 

The case is Federal Election Commission v. Colorado Republican Federal Campaign Committee, 00-191. 

On the Net: 

Supreme Court: http://www.supremecourtus.gov 

For the appeals court ruling: http://www.uscourts.gov/links.html and click on 10th Circuit. 


Home ownership and prices up, equity down

By John Cunniff The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

NEW YORK — A fundamental change has occurred in the housing market over the past few years, and it is likely to play an increasing role in changing people’s lifestyles. 

It is already doing so. More Americans own their houses than ever before, thanks to low borrowing rates and variable mortgages to fit needs. Prices are rising. Unemployment is near postwar lows. Incomes are up. 

Most significantly, the market value of houses has outpaced inflation for the seventh straight year, rising 16 percent since 1993. As a national group, you might expect homeowners to be growing wealthier. 

They aren’t. 

Valuations are rising, but so is borrowing. Despite rising prices, equity has fallen sharply in the past decade, continuing a postwar decline only mildly interrupted during the 1970s and 1980s. 

Moreover, mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures are rising too, partly a result of the high level of borrowing, partly a consequence of buying with low down payments and resulting high monthly payments. 

The erosion of equity is one of the major issues in the latest “The State of the Nation’s Housing,” an annual analysis of the housing market by Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. 

The situation reflects not just a change in affordability levels (more difficult) but a vast change in consumer behavior. To take out a second mortgage once indicated necessity. Today it is a lifestyle choice. 

In short, the house is a bank from which money can be borrowed at low rates to finance other purchases, including vacations, cars and electronic gadgetry as well as tuition, often with a tax deduction to boot. 

This is a momentous change from the past, when the house was viewed as a sanctuary not to be violated by financial risk-taking, and the goal of owners was to achieve security by reducing or paying off the mortgage. 

The changing attitude by today’s borrowers involves growing confidence in the ability to hold onto a job and maintain a certain level of income, but also perhaps the desire for the rewards of wealth now,  

not later. 

The change raises risks, not just to households but to the general economy. With equity falling as a percentage of price, the consequences of job loss and recessions grow proportionately. 

Still another consequence, especially in cases of low down payments and heavy borrowing, may be to maintain selling prices at artificially high levels, barring low-income earners from joining the market. 

There may be risks to the future as well. Despite the importance of Individual Retirement Accounts, 401(k) plans and defined benefit plans, home equity remains the primary retirement fund for millions of Americans. 

In the past, the housing market has been an economic stabilizer in many ways. You can even argue that its recent strength has been the major factor in averting or moderating recession tendencies in other industries. 

In terms of macroeconomics, there’s a question today about its ability to play the same role in the future. 

John Cunniff is a business analyst for The Associated Press


Compaq favoring Intel’s Itanium

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

SAN JOSE — Intel Corp.’s quest to dominate the high-end server market got a major boost Monday as Compaq Computer Corp. said it plans to abandon its own Alpha processor in favor of Intel’s Itanium processor by 2004. It’s the latest sign that the server industry may be moving away from proprietary chips and toward standardization that marked the development, growth and flexibility of PCs. 

Compaq is the second maker of processors and servers – workhorse computers that power everything from corporate networks and Web sites to biotechnology research – to announce plans to eventually exit the chip business. 

Hewlett-Packard Co., which co-developed Itanium, also said it will consolidate its products behind the Intel processor. 

For Intel, the agreement represents not just another customer, but a major endorsement of Itanium, which was put into production this year after several delays and nearly a decade of development. 

“Itanium needed an imprimatur of legitimacy,” said Drew Peck, an analyst at SG Cowen Securities. “Compaq gave it to them. It’s a high-profile win.” 

High-end servers account for about half of the $54 billion total server market. Major players include International Business Machines Corp., Sun Microsystems Inc., HP and Compaq. 

So far, Sun is the only company that does not plan to incorporate the Itanium into any of its designs, instead relying on its proprietary processors. 

Shares of both Intel and Compaq closed higher Monday. Intel was up 97 cents to $28.58 on the Nasdaq Stock Market. Compaq’s stock price rose 40 cents, to $13.90 on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Intel also will acquire Compaq’s Alpha equipment and tools, as well as license its technology. Several hundred Compaq employees will be offered transfers, the companies said. 

Intel plans to use those engineers in future Itanium development, said Paul Otellini, executive vice president and general manager of Intel’s Architecture Group. 

“A real sweetener for Intel is access to all the engineers. You can’t shortchange that,” said Dan Scovel, an analyst at Needham & Co. “Getting hold of processor engineers these days is not an easy thing to do.” 

Houston-based Compaq acquired the Alpha chip technology through its $9.1 billion purchase of Digital Equipment Corp. in 1998. 

Compaq denied that it is backpedaling from the acquisition. The company will focus on developing improvements on components and software outside the processor. 

“What you’re seeing is a transition in where vendors believe they can add their value, and it’s not in proprietary microprocessors,” said Mike Winkler, executive vice president of Compaq’s Global Business Units. 

Compaq said it will support the Alpha architecture even after it consolidates its entire 64-bit server family on the Itanium architecture. 

The announcement comes as both Intel and Compaq are struggling to regain their footing as their PC-related businesses struggle. 

Compaq faces a brutal price war with other PC makers, including Dell Computer Corp. Intel also has seen its margins and market share erode amid increasing competition and the economic downturn. 

Compaq announced plans in April to cut more than 9,000 full-time and part-time jobs. In an internal memo this month, executives announced plans to reduce overhead costs by another $200 million per quarter. 

More than half of Compaq’s revenues now come from non-PC businesses, including its servers and services businesses, Winkler said. 

Intel has been diversifying beyond its 32-bit processors that are found in roughly 80 percent of personal computers around the world. Its targets are now on high-end server makers Sun Microsystems Inc. and IBM. 

The Itanium processes information in 64 bit chunks. It also can address more memory and transfer data more quickly, allowing for exponential improvements in performance. 

Itanium is Intel’s first move into the 64-bit arena. The Alpha, introduced by Digital Equipment Corp. in 1993, was the first. 

Intel is hoping big sales of Itanium will help offset the high development costs — something the developers of proprietary processors cannot do so easily, said Nathan Brookwood, an analyst at the research firm Insight 64. 

——— 

On the Net: 

http://www.compaq.com 

http://www.sun.com 

http://www.intel.com 

http://www.hp.com 


Alta Bates Summit workers sign contract

By Judith Scherr
Tuesday June 26, 2001

After one year of working without a contract, after going out on a series of one-to-three-day strikes, after endless hours at the negotiating table, hospital workers and Alta Bates Summit Medical Center management have agreed on a new contact.  

Service Employees International Union members voted to approve the contract on Friday. “We are very pleased that the members of SEIU Local 250 have ratified this new contract,” said Alta Bates Summit CEO Irwin Hansen in a press statement. “We will now continue with what the hospitals do best – servicing the health care needs of our community.” 

SEIU members called the contract “a big victory.” 

“I’m ecstatic, I’m excited,” said Deborah Covington, chief shop steward and a dietary aide at the Oakland campus of the newly-merged Alta Bates Summit Hospital. The three-campus Berkeley-Oakland hospital is part of the Sutter Health Care hospital group.  

Over the four-year contract, wages will rise 16 percent, but that wasn’t at the heart of the negotiations. 

“We got a voice in staffing,” Covington said. The union had negotiated long and hard in order to set up a labor management committee that would evaluate staffing needs and make recommendations to the hospital, Covington said. When there is disagreement, an independent third party will make the final staffing determination. 

The new contract also sets limits on mandatory overtime. 

Among those benefiting from the new contract will be licensed vocational nurses, dietary aides and housekeeping staff.  

An Alta Bates Summit spokesperson was not immediately available for comment.


Briefs

Staff
Tuesday June 26, 2001

Power outage lasts four hours  

for some residents 

A power outage early Monday morning left 3,000 South Berkeley and Oakland residents without electricity for two hours and another 500 without power for four hours. 

Staci Homrig, of Pacific Gas & Electric, said the outage was caused by a downed powerline and started at 6:30 a.m. Most people had their power restored by 8:30 a.m., but about 500 were left without power until 10:45 a.m. 

 

David Brower Day  

celebration Saturday 

 

The first annual David Brower Day will be celebrated Saturday, honoring the Berkeley native credited with making nature conservation a political issue. 

Sponsored by Earth Island Institute, the city, the Ecology Center, and KPFA Radio, an outdoor festival will take place from noon to 5 p.m. at Civic Center Park on Martin Luther King Jr. Way between Center Street and Allston Way. The free event will include an Eco-Restoration Decathlon, live music, story telling, an Environmental Action Fair, Sustainable Crafts Market, and organic and vegetarian food. 

At 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. Lee Stetson will perform The Spirit of John Muir in the Florence Schwimley Little Theater, just south of the park. A special screening of In the Light of Reverence by the Sacred Land Film Project will take place at 3:30 p.m. followed with a panel of speakers. 

Co-founder of the League of Conservation Voters and founder of Friends of the Earth and Earth Island Institute, Bower led campaigns that resulted in the creation of nine national parks and seashores. He has been credited with ensuring a Grand Canyon free of dams and many national forest preservations, and was an instrumental part of the Sierra Club in the 1950s and 1960s. 

 

 

Host families needed for adult foreign exchange students 

 

Language Studies International is looking for host families for its foreign adult students. The English school for foreign students has a homestay option to allow the students to experience life with American families during their program. 

Due in part to the housing crisis, the school has been unable to find hosts for all of the 800 - 1,000 students who attend each year, according to a letter from Steven Franklin, Registrar and Accommodations Coordinator for LSI. 

Hosts of all ages and backgrounds are encouraged to participate, including singles. Hosts are paid $182.50 per week to provide breakfast, dinner and a private room to a foreign student, and can choose a short-term (two - four weeks) or a yearlong stay.  

The host can live anywhere in the East Bay as long as the student can easily commute to downtown Berkeley. For more information or to apply to host a student for the peak period from mid-July through September, call LSI at 841-4695.


Police Briefs

Kenyatte Davis
Tuesday June 26, 2001

A 20 -year-old UC Berkeley student walking home on Channing Way was robbed at gunpoint at 1 a.m. Sunday.  

Lt. Russell Lopes, police spokesperson, said the woman was walking near Telegraph Avenue when a man approached her with a handgun and demanded money. Although she had no cash, she handed the attacker her wallet, Lopes said. The man took her wallet and ran off. The victim was unharmed. 

••• 

An Arco gas station was robbed at 3 a.m. Friday by a man who allegedly used only a hand in his pocket to simulate a gun. Lt. Lopes said the suspect walked into the cashier’s booth with his hand in his pocket to make it appear he had a gun and demanded money.  

The lone attendant handed the suspect several hundreds of dollars, and the suspect ran off. Lopes said there were no injuries and there have been no arrests made. The suspect is described as a black 27 year old, 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighing 200 pounds  

••• 

A verbal dispute turned violent when one of the men involved allegedly pulled a six-inch knife on the other at Golden Gate Fields at 6 a.m. Friday.  

Lt. Lopes said two horse groomers were arguing when one pulled a knife and attacked the other. The suspect allegedly attempted to stab the victim, but was only able to hit the victim with the butt of the knife causing a bump on the victim’s head. He was not taken to the hospital, The suspect was placed under arrest. 

••• 

A man with a knife got away with several hundred dollars from Café Elodie at 2110 Shattuck Ave. at 10:15 a.m. Wednesday. Lt. Lopes said the suspect entered the café while the lone employee was in a closet where only staff is allowed.  

The suspect allegedly walked into the closet and started a conversation with the worker asking if he remembered the suspect giving him an application.  

When the employee said he didn’t know what the suspect was talking about, the suspect pulled a hunting tool with a fixed four-inch blade and reached into the floor safe, Lopes said. The suspect ran off with a bag full of cash. No injuries were reported, and there have been no arrests. 

 


Summer Sports

Staff
Monday June 25, 2001


Camps

 

City of Berkeley Summer Fun Camps 

June 18-August 17 

Summer Fun Camps for children feature sports, games, arts and crafts and special events. Events and trips will be planned in and out of the Berkeley area. Supervised play and activities held Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for kids 5-12 year of age. Before and after care will be available at additional cost. Fees on a sliding scale. 

Sites: Frances Albrier, Southwest Berkeley – 644-8515; James Kenney, West Berkeley – 644-8511; Live Oak Park, North Berkeley – 644-8513; Willard Club House, Southeast Berkeley – 644-8517; MLK Youth Services Center, South Berkeley – 644-6226. 

 

P.A.L. Adventure Camp 

June 25-July 6 

Camp for graduating 4th and 5th graders only. Activities include rock climbing, nature hikes and whitewater rafting. $100, limited scholarships available. Call 845-7193 for more information. 

 

P.A.L. Adventure Camp 2 

July 9-27 

Camp for ages 11-17. Three-week camp teaches bicycle basics. Learn care and maintenance, changing flat tires, fixing the chain and cables. Daily rides designed to increase endurance for a final three-day, 122-mile ride to Coloma and a two-day rafting trip. $180, limited scholarships available. Call 845-7193 for more information. 

 

P.A.L. Adventure Camp 3 

August 6-24 

Camp for ages 11-17. Three week camp will provide skills for overnight and wilderness camping. First two weeks include instruction on cooking, first aid, cleanup and low impact camping. Rafting, ropes course and daily hikes. Week three is five days in a California wilderness area using newly-learned skills. $180, limited scholarships available. Call 845-7193 for more information. 

 

Berkeley Tennis Club Kids  

Camp 

Sessions begin June 25, July 9, July 23, August 6 

These camps are designed for the beginner to low advanced player aged 7-14. Each session is two weeks long. The first week emphasizes proper stroke and footwork techniques, conditioning and game play. The second week concentrates on competition on both an individual and team level. Students will be divided according to ability, so they progress at their own pace. Student-intructor ratio of 6/1. Clinics are 9 a.m. to noon. $250 for B.T.C. members, $300 for non-members. Call 841-9023 for information. 

 


Leagues

 

Youth Baseball 

Summer baseball program for boys and girls ages 5-15. The focus is on developing skills, sportsmanship and enjoyment rather than competitiveness. Leagues are structured to address both skill level and age group. Players are assigned to teams on a city-wide basis. Beginner teams (5-6 years) meet weekdays from noon to 2 p.m. All other teams meet from 3:30 to 7 p.m. weekdays or 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. All players must participate. Playoffs and awards will follow the regular season in older leagues. Fees: $34 ages 5-8 ($70 non-resident), $40 ages 9-15($86 non-resident). For more information call 981-5153. 

 

Adult softball 

Summer league starts July 2. 

Leagues available for men, women and co-rec. Three levels of competition. Games played weekday evenings, Saturday afternoons and evenings. 10 games plus playoffs. $561 per team. Call 981-5150 for more information. 

 

Tennis lessons 

Session IV begins June 25, three more sessions throughout summer. 

Youth and adult lessons available for beginner, advanced beginner and intermediate. 10 one-hour lessons. $45 for youth ages 8-15, $65 for adults. Call 981-5150 for more information. 

 

Twilight basketball 

July 13-August 25 

The City of Berkeley Twilight Basketball Program is an educational sports program which offers youths aged 11-18 the opportunity to play in the competitive league and be exposed to educational workshops. Subjects include tobacco prevention, HIV/STD prevention, domestic violence prevention, academic improvement and youth violence prevention. All participants must attend a one-hour workshop before each game in order to play. Free, players recieve a jersey. Ten game season with playoffs at MLK Youth Services Center. For more information call Ginsi Bryant at 644-6226. 

 

Adult basketball 

Summer league 

Open, competitive league with games on Monday and Wednesday evenings at the MLK Youth Services Center. All games officicated by certified referees. Awards for top three teams. Teams already formed for summer, but some have openings. Interested players should show up and talk to coaches about playing. 

 


Programs

 

City-Wide Playground  

Programs 

June 25-August 17 

Free supervised activities include arts and crafts, games, sports, special event days and local trips. Program hours are noon to 5 p.m. Proof of Berkeley residency required at registration. 

Sites: All Play Together – 981-5150; Rosa Parks – 981-5150; Malcolm X School – 644-6226. 

 

Summer Teen Program 

June 18-August 27 

Events include adventure trips, swimming, sports, games, cooking, educational workshops and special local events. Call your local center for details, registration and costs. Sliding scale. 

Sites: Frances Albrier, Southwest Berkeley – 644-8515; James Kenney, West Berkeley – 644-8511; Live Oak Park, North Berkeley – 644-8513; Willard Park Club House, Southeast Berkeley – 644-8517; MLK Youth Services Center, South Berkeley – 644-6226. 

 

Adventures in Sailing 

Overnight sails tour the San Francisco Bay. Visit the Bay Model, Angel Island, Treasure Island and Sausalito. Voyage dates: July 13-14 and 28-29, August 9-10, 16-17 and 23-24. $20 per voyage. Call 845-7193 for more information. 

 

Adult Tennis Workshops 

Sessions begin July 9 and July 23 

These four-day sessions are designed to five adults a chance to improve their game in just one concentrated week. Two levels offered – NTPR rating between 4.0-4.5 and 3.5-below. Both sessions will have a doubles strategy emphasis. $110 per session. Call 841-9023 for more details.


Arts & Entertainment

Monday June 25, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Space Weather Exhibit now - Sept. 2; now - Sept. 9 Science in Toyland; June 21: 6 a.m., Solar Eclipse Day Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

The UC Berkeley Art Museum is closed for renovations until the fall. 

 

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 29: Barfeeders, Pac-Men, Hell After Dark, A.K.A. Nothing, Maurice’s Little Bastards; June 30: The Cost, Pg. 99, Majority Rule, 7 Days of Samsara, Since by Man, Creation is Crucifixion; July 6: Victim’s Family, Fleshies, The Modern Machines, Once For Kicks, The Blottos; July 7: The Stitches, Real MacKenzies, The Briefs, The Eddie Haskells, The Spits 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m. unless noted otherwise. June 26: Mad & Eddie Duran Jazz Duo; June 28: Keni “El Lebrijano”; June 30: Larry Stefl Jazz Quartet; July 3: 9 p.m., pickPocket ensemble; July 4: Whiskey Brothers; July 5: Keni “El Lebrijano.” 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m. June 26: Tangria; June 27: Bob Schoen Jazz Quartet; June 28: ConFusion; June 29: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sally Hanna-Rhine; 10 p.m., Hideo Date; June 30: Anna and Susie Laraine and Peri Poston; 10 p.m., The Ducksan Distone. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 26: 9 p.m., DP & The Rhythem Riders; June 27: 8 p.m. June “Fling Ding” featuring Circle R Boys and Dark Hollow; June 28: 9 p.m., Monkey, Stiff Richards, Go Jimmy Go; June 29: 8:30 p.m., Fountain’s Muse CD release party and Musicians and Fine Artists for World Peace fundraiser, with Obeyjah and others; June 30: 9:30 p.m. Tropical Vibrations. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Berkeley Arts Festival  

June 25: The Just Friends Quinte; June 26: Donald Robinson Trio; June 28: Con Alma Vocal Jazz Sextet; June 30: 7:30 p.m. Marvin Sanders and Vera Berheda, plus Mozart, Beethoven, Hadyn and Fuare in the gallery; July 1: 11 a.m., “Free Jazz on the Pier” The Christy Dana Quartet (on the Berkeley Pier). All shows at 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted Donations requested 2200 Shattuck Avenue 665-9496 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 26; Freight 33rd Anniversary Revue; June 27: Dilema, Hookslide; June 28: Jim Campilongo; June 29: Don’t Look Back; June 30: Jim Hurst & Missy Raines, Due West; July 5: Druha Trava; July 6 and 7: Ferron. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org; 548-1761 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 26: Bruno Pelletier Trio; June 27: O Maya; June 28: Beatdown w/ DJ’s Delon, Yamu & Addi; June 29: Zoe Ellis Quartet; June 30: Go Van Gogh 2881 Shattuck Ave. 843-8277 

 

Julia Morgan Center for the Arts July 1: 1 & 2 p.m., “Kourosh Taghavi: The Beauty of Iranian Music and Stories of its Origins” $5 - $10. 2640 College Ave. 654-0100 

 

Live Oaks Concerts, Berkeley Art Center July 1: Matthew Owens; July 15: David Cheng, Marvin Sanders, Ari Hsu; July 27: Monica Norcia, Amy Likar, Jim Meredith. All shows at 7:30 unless otherwise noted Admission $10 (BACA members $8, students and seniors $9, children under 12 free) 

 

125 Records Release Party June 30: 9:45 p.m. Anton Barbeau and Belle De Gama will celebrate the release of their albums The Golden Boot: Antology 2 and Garden Abstract respectively. These are the first two albums released on the 125 Records label, founded by Joe Mallon with his winnings from his appearance on “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.” $5. Starry Plough 3101 Shattuck Avenue 841-2082  

 

Leopold’s Fancy July 2: 8 p.m., Traditional Irish music, part of “Extreme Joyce/Reading On the Edge,” a conference celebrating the works of James Joyce. Free. 2271 Shattuck Ave. 642-2754 

 

 

Dramatic Joyce July 3: 7:30 p.m. Dramatic interpretations of the works of James Joyce by local and international actors. Introduction by UC Berkeley Professor John Bishop with commentary by and conversation with the audience. Part of the week-long conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” Free. Krutch Theater, Clark Kerr Campus 2601 Warring Street 642-2754 

 

“Cuatro Maestros Touring Festival” July 4: 8 p.m. Music and dance performed by four elder folk artists and their young counterparts, accompanied by Los Cenzontles. $12 - $18. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Do You Hear What I Am Seeing?” July 5: 7:30 p.m. One man show by David Norris, a two-hour sampling of Joyce’s works with Norris’ insights. Part of the week-long conference “Extreme Joyce/Reading on the Edge.” $10. Julia Morgan Theater 2640 Collage Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“Romeo and Juliet” Through July 14, Thurs. - Sat. 8 p.m. Set in early 1930s just before the rise of Hitler in the Kit Kat Klub, Juliet is torn between ties to the Nazi party and Romeo’s Jewish heritage. $8 - $10. La Val’s Subterranean Theater 1834 Euclid 234-6046 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 22: Weds. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. (After July 8 no Wednesday performance, no Sunday matinee on July 22.) Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shepherd’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Iphegenia in Aulis” June 25 - August 12: Sat. and Sun. 5 p.m. No performances July 14 and 15, special dawn performance on August 12 at 7 a.m. A free park performance by the Shotgun Players of Euripides’ play about choices and priorities. With a masked chorus, singing, dancing, and live music. Feel free to bring food and something soft to sit on. John Hinkel Park, Southhampton Place at Arlington Avenue (different locations July 7 and 8). 655-0813 

 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 23: 7 & 9:10 p.m. I can’t Sleep; June 24: The Ruined Map 5:30 p.m. & Summer Soldiers 7:50 p.m.; June 26: 7:30 p.m. San Francisco Cinematheque: 40 Years in Focus; June 27 7:30 p.m. Nature vs. Nurture; June 28: 7:30 p.m. The Beginning of an Unknown Era; June 29: Molba 7:30, Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors 9:10; June 30: 7, 9:10 p.m. Nenette and Boni. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

 

Tyler James Hoare Sculpture and Collage Through June 27, call for hours. The Albatross Pub 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato Through June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Rachel Davis and Benicia Gantner Works on Paper Through July 14, Tues. - Sat., 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Watercolors by Davis, mixed-media by Gantner. Opening reception June 13, 6 - 8 p.m. Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Constitutional Shift Through July 13, Tuesdays - Fridays, noon - 5 p.m. Permanence and personal journey link Hee Jae Suh, Ursula Neubauer and Marci Tackett. Korean-born Suh explores an inner psychological world with a dramatic series of self-portraits. Neubauer explores self-portraiture as a travel map of identity with multiple points of view. Tackett explores Antarctica’s other-worldly landscape in a series of stunning digital photographs. Kala Art Institute 1060 Heinz Ave. 549-2977 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“The Trip to Here: Paintings and Ghosts by Marty Brooks” Through July 31, Tues. - Sun. 11 a.m. - 1 a.m. View Brooks’ first California show at Bison Brewing Company 2598 Telegraph Ave. 841-7734


Beth El followed every planning rule in proposed expansion

Monday June 25, 2001

Beth El followed every planning rule in proposed expansion 

 

Editor: 

 

Diane Tokugawa and Alan Gould, who live in the same house next to Congregation Beth El’s new building site, wrote separate letters to the Daily Planet on June 15 that filled almost the entire “Forum” section. 

They both re-raised issues that were thoroughly dealt with in the City’s Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and during many hours of hearings before the Zoning Adjustments Board (ZAB) and other official bodies. 

The EIR, probably the most extensive ever done for a project this size in Berkeley, concluded that the synagogue could be built without significant impacts. The ZAB approved a permit for Beth El after studying the issue for months.  

Yet Gould and Tokugawa write as if these official findings had never been made – as if the process that has gone on for several years was just beginning. 

They also chose to ignore the facts that Beth El is doing far more than anyone else has done to repair the badly neglected banks of Codornices Creek – and that changes made in Beth El’s plan at the Zoning Board will make it possible to open the underground part of the creek if funding is raised for this purpose. 

Of course any Berkeley citizen has the right to question decisions of city officials and outside experts, but it seems that no decision would satisfy Mr. Gould and Ms. Tokugawa, except not building a synagogue at all. 

That is an outcome that hundreds of other Berkeley citizens who have watched Beth El follow every rule and regulation in the city’s demanding permit process would find seriously unjust. 

 

Scott Spear 

Berkeley 

 

Please support reasonable Beth El expansion 

 

Editor: 

 

I’ve lived in Berkeley for 11 years, and in the East Bay for 20 years. I live in a neighborhood just north of the campus, in fact on a street that fills with parked cars on football days. Though the added traffic is a bit of a headache I do not resent the intrusion of cars and people on these days – in fact I enjoy the excitement, and I see this as a small price to pay to live in a city that benefits from the proximity to the university. I also live within four blocks of our current synagogue, the new building site, and four neighborhood churches. Again my experience as a resident is one of tolerating certain inconveniences – there are certainly days when churchgoers add to the traffic in my neighborhood – but this is Berkeley life. I’ve chosen to live here rather than in the quieter but as I would see it duller bedroom communities of the East Bay. I believe that the density of our community, with a university, churches and synagogues and commercial centers and residential streets all in rather close confines contributes to the excitement of living here in this wonderfully diverse community. 

I work in downtown Berkeley – as a psychiatrist providing care at times to some of the less fortunate members of our community. As I walk around downtown, there are days when I too rail against change – as it is disturbing to me to see big buildings going up, parking getting tighter, and the downtown area getting more crowded. But I recognize that though it is natural to fear change, constructive change also helps our city to thrive and makes it vibrant and alive. After all, what are some of those large buildings going up – an expanded library, a public safety building, a new theatre complex built in a developing arts center. These are changes for the good; changes to embrace. 

I worship in Berkeley, where my family has participated in the Beth El community over the past 13 years. My children have attended the Beth El sponsored day camp for 10 years, as have many hundreds of non-Jewish children. I worship in a synagogue that has no room to grow, that has no room to seat those of us who wish to sit in on religious discussions on Saturday mornings. The synagogue was designed and built for a congregation one-third to half its current size. There has been no new synagogue built in Berkeley in 50 years. It seems only reasonable to me that my tolerance and appreciation of the varied institutions that contribute to the strenghth of this city should be matched by others’ appreciation of the need my community has to be allowed to expand and grow – and to expand in a way that will beautify the neighborhood (Just examine carefully the decrepit condition of the current buildings and terrain at the Oxford site) and a plan Berkeley’s environmental consultants could find no major fault with. 

I live, work and worship here in our city – nd I ask others for their support of the new Beth El Synagogue. 

 

John Rosenberg 

Berkeley 

 

Reddy ruling and coverage puzzles reader 

 

Editor:  

 

Shame on the Berkeley Daily Planet for NOT ONCE mentioning in your reports today on the Reddy case that he caused the death of a young Indian woman!  

As a recent immigrant to the US, I do not understand some things about the American legal system, so I am left with several questions after having followed the Reddy case which ended in his sentencing yesterday (June 19).  

I attended his trial at Oakland's Federal Court which astounded me because of the weak-kneed stance of the prosecution, the cleverly devious methods of the defense, and the fact that the judge struck me as being overly considerate to a man who has perpetrated awful crimes against several women of his race.  

I understand what is involved in plea bargaining; nevertheless it seems to me an unfair practice since one who admits his guilt is given a better chance at a lesser sentence. Why should this be? A crime is a crime and deserves punishment.  

The court established that Reddy had, over many years, been illegally bringing to the US many women and men from his impoverished Indian village to make them work in his restaurant and apartments (most of these were young women whom he and his son raped at will). Since one woman died due to his negligence over a faulty heater, why was he not tried for her death? Why was DNA testing not done on the fetus found in the woman to determine paternity? 

Do Americans believe, as many Indians do, that female lives are not important?  

The U.S. democratic system is indeed one of the world's wonders because if Reddy lived in India and committed his crimes there, he might never even have been tried. But yesterday I found that justice was NOT done in America because it was almost farcical to see such such a light sentence (a mere 8 years) imposed on an immigrant who, because he has amassed great wealth and could pay for high-powered lawyers, will pay a mere pittance to only seven of his victims.  

 

Isabel T. Escoda 

Berkeley 

 

(Editor’s note: The death of the young woman was ruled accidental and was not part of the plea bargain.)


Out & About

Monday June 25, 2001


Monday, June 25

 

Tectonic Theater Project 

7 p.m. 

Berkeley Rep’s Roda Theater 

2015 Addison Street 

“Page to Stage: Surviving the Media” is a conversation with the Tectonic Theater Project and professor Douglas Foster. The Tectonic Theater Project traveled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard and wrote a play about the impact Shepard’s death, and the following media scrutiny, had upon the small community. The Laramie Project is running through July 8 at the Berkeley Rep.  

647-2900 

 

What You Need to Know  

Before You Build or Remodel 

7 - 9 p.m. 

The Building Education Center 

812 Page Street 

Free seminar by professional builder Glen Kitzenberger. 

525-7610 

 

NOW Meeting 

6:30 p.m. 

Mama Bears Book Store 

6537 Telegraph Avenue 

The general meeting of the National Organization for Women. 

 

Parks and Recreation  

Commission 

7 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Avenue 

Regular meeting, including the Civic Center Park Draft Environmental Impact Report and the Draft General Plan. Also, Director’s Update on Eastshore State Park Planning Process. 

981-6707 or 981-6903 (TDD) 

 


Tuesday, June 26

 

Saranel Benjamin of  

Globalization 

7 p.m. 

Oakland YMCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Saranel Benjamin, trade unionist from South Africa, will discuss the impact of corporate globalization on South African workers. Sponsored by Berkeley’s Women of Color Resource Center. 

848-9272 

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Don, 525-3567 


Wednesday, June 27

 

Conversations in Commedia 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

The series pairs radical theater “elders” to share memories of their years in Commedia. This week with former Mime Troupe actress Audrey Smith and Ladies Against Women character Selma Spector. $6 - $8. 

849-2568 

 

Disaster Council 

7 p.m. 

Emergency Operations Center 

997 Cedar Street 

Update on Measure G. 

644-8736 

 

Socratic Circle Discussion 

5 p.m. 

Cafe Electica 

1309 Solano Avenue 

Gather for espresso and discussion at the “green” teen cafe. Open to all. Free. 

527-2344 

 


Thursday, June 28

 

Quit Smoking Class 

6 - 8 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis Street 

A six week quit smoking class. Free to Berkeley residents and employees. 

Call 644-6422 or e-mail at: quitnow@ci.berkeley.ca.us 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley Opera performs pieces of Carmen. 

 

Pink Slip Party and Career  

Mixer 

6 - 9 p.m. 

Pyramid Brewery and Alehouse 

901 Gilman Street 

Meet with East Bay job seekers while listening to music by DJ and Emcee Marty Nemko. Also, cash bar, free hors d’oeurves, and prize giveaways. Free and open to the public. Call 251-1401. 

www.eastbaytechjobs.com/mixer/ 

 

Take the Terror Out of  

Talking! 

Noon to 1:30 p.m. 

California Dept. of Health Services 

2151 Berkeley Way 

Room 804 

Open house at State Health Toastmasters Club to celebrate its 40th anniversary. Free. 

649-7750 

 


Friday, June 29

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women: Arts, Herstory  

and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

3 p.m. 

Sather Gate 

UC Berkeley 

Telegraph at Bancroft 

Walking tour from Sather Gate to People’s Park entitled “Berkeley in the Sixties.” Led by Free Speech veterans and Berkeley residents Kate Coleman and Michael Rossman, the tour will include important locations and discussions of the Free Speech movement, the Vietnam Day Committee, the rise of affirmative action, and other events and movements. Free. 

486-04 11  

 

Saturday, June 30 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 

925-830-2975  

 

Bonfire III: Stories and  

Songs By the Sea 

7:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Marina 

Spinnaker Way, near Olympic Circle Sailing Club 

Come for Havdala and share stories, sing and watch the flames dance. Bring food and drink to share, kosher s’mores provided. 

848-0237 

 

Know Your Rights 

11 - 2 p.m. 

2022 Blake St. 

Copwatch workshop: Learn what your rights are when dealing with the police. Special section on juvenile rights.  

548-0425 

 

Bay Area Eco-Crones 

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1066 Creston Road 

Networking, information sharing, project planning and ritual.  

Call ahead, 874-4935. 

 


‘Still not done yet’

By Daniela Mohor Daily Planet staff
Monday June 25, 2001

Vice mayor celebrates 90 years  

 

A shining star, a link to the chain of history, a fighter. Those are some of the words Berkeley officials, activists, and residents used to describe Vice Mayor Maudelle Shirek, as they celebrated her 90th birthday at the North Berkeley Senior Center Saturday. 

Re-elected seven times to the City Council, Shirek is reportedly the oldest elected official in California. But she is mostly known for her extraordinary commitment to social causes both locally and internationally. 

“She changed the life of so many people,” said U.S Representative Barbara Lee, D-Alameda, a special guest to the event and an old friend of Shirek’s. “Every time I get ready to cast a very tough vote I think ‘What would Maudelle do?’” 


And the winners are...

Staff Report
Monday June 25, 2001

From a field of 68 boys and 37 girls, it all came down to two final matches on Saturday at the United States Tennis Association NorCal Sectional 18-and-under Tournament. The matches were played at the Berkeley Tennis Club. 

In the girls’ final, eighth-seeded Jenna Long of Fremont came back from losing the first set to upset top-seeded Alexandra Podkolzina of Concord, 5-7, 6-3, 6-3. 

In the boys’ final, No. 5 Pramod Dabir used a powerful serve and punishing groundstrokes to down fourth-seeded Darrin Cohen, 6-2, 6-4. Dabir, a Saratoga native, was only broken once in the match.


Teachers: Small school concept needs support

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Monday June 25, 2001

School board members and proponents of sweeping reforms for Berkeley High School found a lot to agree on last week, but they seemed to part company with considerable confusion and disagreement about the next step in the process. 

“If you’re willing to do something fundamental, something serious, instead of just tinkering with the current model and allowing the drift to continue, small schools is definitely the way to go,” Rick Ayers, the Berkeley High teacher charged with coordinating the reform planning process, told the school board at their regular meeting last Wednesday. 

Since the school district received a federal $50,000 grant last year to study how the “small learning community” model could be applied at Berkeley High School, Ayers has worked with an advisory committee of school staff and parents to compile research on the topic, and to lead weekly discussion groups.  

The group has also convened a number of larger community meetings to disseminate information on small schools and solicit input and how the model might work in Berkeley. 

Over the course of the last 15 years, a number of large urban high schools around the country have implemented some kind of small learning community model to combat problems with truancy, violence, low student achievement and high teacher turnover. Public schools can better meet the wildly varying needs of their students, the argument goes, by dividing “factory model” high schools into small learning communities of 500 students or less — each with dedicated teaching staff and a degree of governing autonomy. 

It simply creates “a scale where parents and staff become more engaged” and are able to give students the personal attention they need, Ayers argued Wednesday. 

Berkeley High itself has been implementing small learning communities over the last five years or so, but in a piecemeal way. Core groups of like minded teachers have bonded together to launch their “schools-within-a-school,” fighting the district bureaucracy every step of the way for the resources they need to do so. 

Dana Richards, director of Berkeley High’s “Common Grounds” program, a small learning community with an anticipated enrollment of 400 students next year, told the school board Wednesday


At-risk teens learn responsibility in city parks

By John Geluardi Daily Planet Staff
Monday June 25, 2001

The City Council will likely renew a long-standing contract with Berkeley Youth Alternative to continue the employment program which assists at-risk teenagers learn about work habits and gardening skills in the city’s parks. 

The recommendation will be considered by the council at Tuesday’s meeting. The $85,000 contract will allow for the continued employment of Berkeley teenagers to help maintain city parks while learning task-oriented responsibilities such as creek restoration and plant cultivation. The Youth Employment Training and Park Maintenance Project is one of three youth-oriented programs the Parks and Waterfront Department oversees. 

“This is mutually beneficial program that helps the kids learn about good work habits and helps maintain Berkeley’s parks in a way they couldn’t with just city staff alone.” said Parks and Waterfront Director Lisa Caronna. 

According to the recommendation, the program usually works with teenagers between 14 and 16 years old. They work an average of 10 hours a week for 26 weeks. Those that show progress will be asked to work beyond the initial 26 weeks and are offered assistance securing other jobs both within and outside the BYA program. 

In the last two years, over 62 percent of the teenagers who were involved in the program were placed in other jobs, according to the report. In 1999, 14 of the 20 teenagers who participated in the program went on to other jobs. 

The teenagers work at several city parks including Strawberry Creek Park, Grove Park and Thousand Oaks School Park and Blackberry Creek. 

They are supervised by a BYA employee and are supervised by city landscape gardeners, who determine proper tools and monitor the work performed.  

BYA operates more than 15 separate programs serving at-risk youth and their families in west Berkeley including an After School Center, a Crisis Counseling and a Sports and Fitness Center. In the last two years, BYA has worked with over 800 people ranging in age from three to 18 years of age, according to the recommendation’s report. 

 


Davis: $2 billion in rebates not good enough

The Associated Press
Monday June 25, 2001

SAN DIEGO – As an array of officials prepared to represent California in federally ordered talks with power companies, Gov. Gray Davis on Sunday discounted suggestions that the state will accept far less in electricity rebates than he believes it’s owed. 

“We’re going back to Washington with one goal, and that’s to get back $9 billion,” Davis said from San Diego in a telephone conference with reporters. 

California officials contend that power generators have overcharged the state and investor-owned utilities utilities $8.9 billion since last May. The companies argue that the charges, which have reached as high as $3,380 a megawatt hour, were justified. 

“Power providers have been taking advantage of our market; they gamed the system and ripped people off,” Davis said. 

On Monday, officials from the state, the utilities and the generators meet under orders from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to negotiate a settlement over the alleged overcharges. 

The talks will be overseen by Curtis Wagner Jr., FERC’s chief administrative law judge. Wagner said Friday that he was optimistic a settlement would be reached, but thought the amount would be closer to $2 billion or $2.5 billion. 

Davis said Michael Kahn, chairman of the California Independent System Operator, which manages the state’s power grid, will lead California’s negotiating team. Also taking part in the talks will be representatives of the Attorney General’s Office, the Public Utilities Commission and the Department of Water Resources. 

FERC has authority only over private power generators, but the state claims it also was overcharged by public entities — such as the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the trading arm of Canada’s BC Hydro. 

Davis senior adviser Nancy McFadden said a settlement with the private generators would give the state leverage with the others. “We need to use the forum that we’ve got available to us,” she said. 

Davis said the state will get a little more breathing room in the power grid over the next two and a half weeks, when three new power plants producing a total of nearly 1,400 megawatts are scheduled to go on line.  

A 320-megawatt plant near Bakersfield is set to begin operating Wednesday, and will be followed by a 500-megawatt plant near Yuba City and a 559-megawatt plant in Contra Costa County. 

The addition this summer of major power plants, smaller peaker plants and cleaner-burning “qualifying facilities” should add 4,000 megawatts to the state’s overburdened power grid by Sept. 30, Davis said. That expansion and ongoing conservation efforts will reduce the chances of rolling blackouts, he said. 

Davis also said that he will meet Monday with three former employees of one power generator, Duke Energy, who testified before a California Senate committee Friday. 

The former employees, who were laid off in April, say they were told to shut units down for unnecessary repairs in a scheme to drive up electricity prices. The company called the claims “baseless.” 

 

Developments in California’s energy crisis: 

SUNDAY: 

— Gov. Gray Davis discounted suggestions that California will end up agreeing to rebates that are a fraction of what the state contends it is owed by power generators. California officials contend that power generators have overcharged the state and investor-owned utilities utilities $8.9 billion since last May. A top official with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said Friday that he thought a settlement could mean $2 billion or $2.5 billion for the state. 

— Davis said three new power plants totalling almost 1,400 megawatts of electricity should be on line in the next two and a half weeks. The first is a 320-megawatt facility near Bakersfield set to go on line Wednesday. 

— No power alerts Sunday as electricity reserves stay above 7 percent. Track the state’s blackout warnings on the Web at www.caiso.com/SystemStatus.html. 

WHAT’S NEXT: 

— Two Federal Energy Regulatory Commission commissioners say they will attend a California Energy Commission meeting Monday. 

— Davis plans to meet Monday with three former Duke Energy employees who say the power generator ordered unnecessary repairs to one plant in a scheme to raise prices. 

— Greenpeace Executive Director John Passacantando says he will deliver Davis a plane ticket Monday to attend global warming talks in Bonn, Germany, next month, as part of the environmental group’s demand for cleaner energy alternatives to help solve the state’s energy crisis. The effort is part of a new drive with other conservation groups dubbed Clean Energy Now. See www.cleanenergynow.org. 

— The state Senate continues to hold hearings on the Edison rescue deal. 

— Senate Select Committee to Investigate Price Manipulation sets a Thursday deadline for power generators to comply with document subpoenas or face contempt citations. 

THE PROBLEM: 

High demand, high wholesale energy costs, transmission glitches and a tight supply worsened by scarce hydroelectric power in the Northwest and maintenance at aging California power plants are all factors in California’s electricity crisis. 

Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric say they’ve lost nearly $14 billion since June to high wholesale prices the state’s electricity deregulation law bars them from passing on to consumers. PG&E, saying it hasn’t received the help it needs from regulators or state lawmakers, filed for federal bankruptcy protection April 6. Electricity and natural gas suppliers, scared off by the companies’ poor credit ratings, are refusing to sell to them, leading the state in January to start buying power for the utilities’ nearly 9 million residential and business customers. The state is also buying power for a third investor-owned utility, San Diego Gas & Electric, which is in better financial shape than much larger Edison and PG&E but also struggling with high wholesale power costs. 

The Public Utilities Commission has approved average rate increases of 37 percent for the heaviest residential customers and 38 percent for commercial customers, and hikes of up to 49 percent for industrial customers and 15 percent or 20 percent for agricultural customers to help finance the state’s multibillion-dollar power buys. 


Internet poised to revolutionize voice communications

By Matthew Fordahl AP Technology Writer
Monday June 25, 2001

Data networks, telephone systems could converge to cause technology shift 

 

 

SAN JOSE – For a century, a labyrinthine network of switches and wires has connected voices around the world. Access is as easy as picking up a telephone and pressing a few buttons. 

More recently, separate networks have sprouted, not to carry conversations, but the electronic chatter of machines. These data networks now interconnect and span the globe. 

Though both networks can handle both voice and data, their complete convergence has long seemed a pipe dream. Phones are simple but limited in function and bandwidth. Data networks are flexible but complicated. 

Now, high-speed data networks have become so pervasive as to transform telephony. The global phone system is on the verge of its biggest technology shift since Alexander Graham Bell’s invention eclipsed the telegraph. 

Using data networks, telephone calls will no longer be made by completing circuits, a connection made by automated switches today and human operators long ago. Instead, voices will be broken down into packets of data and transmitted over the Internet just like e-mail, instant messages and other data. 

The technology not only makes phone calls cheaper, it also enables new services. 

“It’s not just about carrying voice,” said Rick Weston, senior vice president of Qwest Internet Solutions. “It’s about the features that we’re going to build on top of these networks.” 

Voice mail and e-mail, for instance, could be checked from a single program, either on a phone or a computer. New lines could be added without running extra copper wire. 

Employees’ telephones, assigned unique addresses, could be moved to another office or home with a few clicks of a mouse. Dial tone could be replaced with useful information, such as news or scheduled appointments. 

These technologies are happening now, and dozens of companies are scrambling to profit from the convergence of data and voice networks. 

Large corporations are already saving money by routing calls to satellite offices through their computer networks, bypassing the taxes and tolls of the traditional phone system and negating the need for a separate voice network. 

Companies report costs savings of up to 30 percent with such systems, according to the consulting firm InfoTech. 

Equipment makers such as Cisco Systems Inc. and 3Com Corp. sell specialized equipment that efficiently routes voice data over businesses’ local networks and connects it to the existing telephone system. The market is expected to grow to more than $3.3 billion in 2001 and $11.6 billion in 2004, the Telecommunications Industry Association says. 

Providers of high-speed Internet access are now testing the technology, hoping to cash in. 

Even established phone companies such as Qwest and SBC Communications see it as a way to add services without having to lay new cable. 

Yet none of the services have much value if the person on the other line can’t be heard. That, so far, has been the big challenge. 

Early Internet telephony, generally used to bypass long-distance and international charges, was awkward. A caller used a microphone and speakers attached to a computer. 

Now, actual phones are available, and they connect to data lines instead of phone wires. 

But the hardest part has been hearing the other person. Voice packets can get delayed or lost as they transit data networks. 

Unlike the phone system, which creates dedicated circuits for each call, data packets from an Internet call can take varied routes. Even with a fast connection, a conversation with a next-door neighbor can sound like a call from Chechnya. 

“You may get a perfectly good call if things are working fine,” said Alec Henderson of Cisco Systems Inc.’s voice technology center. “But if everyone is trying to download the Victoria’s Secret show, your call may not go through at all.” 

The key is giving voice packets priority over those containing e-mail and Web data. Companies can do this now only with close monitoring or avoiding altogether the public Internet. 

Despite these hurdles, the home market is growing as high-speed Internet access reach more residences. 

Companies that once offered choppy PC-to-PC service are introducing devices that link regular telephones to cable or digital modems. 

Net2Phone Inc. and Dialpad Communications Inc. run traffic over voice-optimized data networks that connect to the old phone system, allowing calls to be made to regular phone numbers, not just other PCs, for just a few cents a minute. 

Still, the quality is not quite on par with the phone network. Data still must pass over local lines and sometimes the public Internet to reach the private networks. Some calls are garbled and, occasionally, disconnected. 

Also, the services are mostly being marketed as low-cost second phone lines for teen-agers, and are not yet connected to the 911 emergency system or 411 directory assistance. 

DSL and cable providers, meanwhile, are trying to set up phone service on their own data lines. 

In one solution, voice packets travel only as far as the nearest switch onto the public telephone network. There, the data is turned back into voice and it joins regular telephone system traffic. 

In a nod to consumer friendliness, Jetstream Communications Inc. and Panasonic this month introduced a $500 system that includes all the necessary hardware in a single telephone. 

So far, only a handful of high-speed Internet service providers are testing the device, which requires special gateways to connect with the telephone network. 

Ultimately, new telephone services will have to offer more than just a reliable and cheap line, said David Neil, an analyst at Gartner. 

“Right now, there isn’t a tremendous amount of benefit to be gained from going with the new telephony,” he said. “We think two or three years down the road, you’re going to start to see power coming from voice and data convergence.”


California lags behind in managing growth

By Jim Wasserman Associated Press Writer
Monday June 25, 2001

SACRAMENTO – Despite some of the best minds in the nation and its creativity in movies and technology, California is nearly as renowned for what’s wrong: gridlocked freeways, marathon commutes, smog and stratospheric housing prices. 

While its films have happy endings and its computers get faster, the congested downside to the nation’s most populous state is only expected to get worse, say growth watchers inside the state and beyond. 

State governments elsewhere are experimenting with aggressive topdown solutions to their growth problems. But California, which turned cruising into pop culture and boasts more cars than registered drivers, lags in its customary role as trendsetter, say urban planning analysts. 

“If you work in this field, you can’t help but notice there’s not a lot of governmental action,” says Joel S. Hirschhorn, author of the National Governors Association report “Growing Pains.” 

“We’ve always been behind the curve in growth management,” adds Bill Fulton, Ventura author of “Reluctant Metropolis: The Politics of urban Growth in Los Angeles.” 

Tell it to the millions who endure grueling commutes on the state’s mid-20th Century freeway system. 

“It’s a frustrating miserable crawl,” says Albert Yanez, who spends four hours a day driving between Tracy and Palo Alto. Yanez, a plant operations manager with Southwall Technologies, trades a 65-mile drive he calls “horrid” for a house he can afford. 

Typical, too, is Greg Nelson, who drives three hours a day between Mission Viejo and downtown Los Angeles. 

“I condition myself to make it my Zen time,” says the chief deputy to Los Angeles City Councilman Joel Wachs. I really will not let that commute bother me.” 

San Diego social worker Carmen Diaz tells horror stories from friends about rent. 

“My friend is having a hard time finding something affordable,” she says. “There is nothing less than $800 a month.” 

Navy Corpsman Yvette Pryor recalls a futile house hunt last year in San Diego. She says, “I couldn’t find anything under $220,000 for a two-bedroom, one-bath house. There was no way I could afford $220,000.” 

For varying reasons, from the state’s size to its legacy of property rights and distrust for strong government, California lets local governments and increasingly, even voters set much of its growth agenda. Last November half the ballot issues in the United States dealing with local growth were in California. While many of these successfully slowed development, some analysts believe they worsen California’s problems. 

“That’s giving us policies that are restrictive on a local basis and make no sense regionally,” says Carol Whiteside, who has tracked growth as mayor of Modesto, an official in the Gov. Pete Wilson Administration and now as director of the Great Valley Center. 

As Californians wrestle with growth one shopping center at a time, Hirschhorn says innovators in growth management are smaller states such as Maryland, New Jersey, Oregon and Washington. He also cites Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee and Utah. 

Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening, facing a million newcomers within two decades in a state of 5.2 million people, once feared they’d consume as much open land as developed in the state’s history. Glendening uses state highway, water and sewer funds to drive development into existing cities. 

On July 1, his state planning chief, Harriet Tregoning, will become the nation’s first Cabinet-level Secretary of Smart Growth. 

“We’re incredibly committed to trying to change development patterns in Maryland,” says Tregoning. The governor’s aim is to change the idea of the “good life,” she says, so “the good life becomes something other than a large single-family detached home surrounded by acres of lawn.” 

But Maryland has fewer people than the San Francisco Bay Area. California, in the 1990s, grew by 4 million residents after adding 6 million during the 1980s. In April, the Texas Transportation Institute ranked Los Angeles and San Francisco-Oakland first and second for the country’s worst traffic. The state has much of the nation’s most polluted air and highest housing costs. A May poll of 2001 adults by the Public Policy Institute of California revealed growth as the biggest concern after the electricity crisis. 

Yet by a 3-1 margin the same Californians said state government should stay out of land-use decisions. 

Whiteside acknowledges that the state is “AWOL on leadership on growth issues. But she adds, “In fairness to this governor and the last one, who’s clamoring for it?” 

Fulton says no California governor since Jerry Brown, from 1975 to 1983, aggressively contended with growth. The state, he says is “big and it’s complicated and that’s part of the problem. To the extent you see interesting solutions, you will see it come from individual regions.” 

In Sacramento, Assemblyman Darrell Steinberg is borrowing from Minneapolis-St. Paul, where cities share sales taxes rather than fight over lucrative car dealerships and superstores. This year the Democrat introduced a bill to bring the same to metropolitan Sacramento, nearing 2 million people. 

Steinberg, an ex-Sacramento City Council member, says sales tax competition creates “sprawl and uncoordinated growth, and we already have among the worst air quality and traffic in the country in this region.” 

Last year 37 Assembly and Senate members formed a Smart Growth Caucus and introduced 25 bills. Caucus organizer and chairwoman Patricia Wiggins, D-Santa Rosa, argues that state government “should lay out an expectation and a blueprint for the way the state is going to grow and develop and not have it be willy nilly.” 

Hirschhorn says states increasingly see growth as a quality of life issue that can make or break their economies. 

“They’ve already started to lose some high-tech growth in San Jose,” he says. “Companies have already started going elsewhere. People who work for those companies don’t want to commute four hours a day.” 

On the road between Tracy and Palo Alto, commuter Yanez yearns for the bullet trains he’s seen in Japan. Nelson wonders when “enough is enough.” I’m in Orange County,” he says, “looking at possibilities of becoming another L.A.. That’s not an exciting thought.” 


Biotech researchers, protesters converge on San Diego

By Paul Elias AP Biotechnology Writer
Monday June 25, 2001

SAN DIEGO – There was a time, not so long ago, when biotech was such a clubby and chummy field that organizers of the industry’s annual conference welcomed protesters inside as amusing distractions. 

Carl Feldbaum, the nine-year president of the Biotechnology Industry Organization, fondly remembers inviting demonstrators dressed as fruits and vegetables onto the conference floor in Seattle in 1999. 

“They were very nice young people,” Feldbaum said. 

Biotechnology has since grown from a highbrow boutique for brainy molecular scientists to an industry that generated revenues of $22.3 billion last year. 

“Nice” is not a word anyone would use anymore to describe biotechnology’s relationship with its critics, who are converging by the thousands on San Diego for this year’s conference, running Sunday through Wednesday. 

The Washington, D.C.-based BIO trade group estimates that 1,280 biotech companies nationwide generated revenues of $22.3 billion last year. That’s much less than the $290 billion market capitalization of leading drug-maker Pfizer Inc. and the $500 billion market capitalization of the entire pharmaceutical industry, but rising fast nonetheless. 

Publicly owned biotech companies had a combined market capitalization of $35 billion, while $3.2 billion in venture capital investment flowed into biotech start-ups — both all-time highs, according to PriceWaterhouseCoopers. 

The financial strength of the nation’s 1,280 biotech companies still pales in comparison to the $500 billion market capitalization of the entire pharmaceutical industry, but it’s bulking up fast nonetheless. 

Thanks to the decoding of the human genome and the expectation that it will lead to revolutionary medical advances, biotech now has more money, people, and interest than ever before. A record 15,000 attendees are expected at the conference, touting progress toward cures for diseases, agricultural improvements and even help for deep-space exploration. 

Though the venture capital stream into startups has slowed this year, biotech — and genomics in particular — remains an active investment area. 

In the months since we were told by scientists that we possess an estimated 30,000 genes in each cells, dozens of companies have aggressively searched this genetic code for keys to therapies that can be patented and profited from. 

“Genomics has been extremely hot for investment,” PriceWaterhouseCoopers partner Jim Ingraham said. 

As the industry grows, so does the number and rancor of its critics — as many of 5,000 of which are expected to converge on the San Diego Conference Center. 

Even before the conference began, two protesters were arrested around noon Saturday for vandalizing a police car. Both were taken to jail. 

Most have focused their ire on genetically engineered “Frankenfoods,” increasing corporate control of the world’s food supply and xenotransplantation — the use of animal organs and tissue for treating human diseases. 

“Genetic engineering poses the biggest risks in history to our health and environment,” Greenpeace activist Ama Marston said Thursday outside an Albertson’s grocery store in San Diego, where members of her group ran through the baked goods aisle slapping warning stickers on the food. 

Abortion foes also will be out in force, protesting embryonic stem cell research. 

They fear scientists will create, clone and destroy embryos simply in the name of research. Proponents, though, argue that no other human cells offer as much promise for regenerating diseased tissue and attacking a host of diseases from Parkinson’s to cancers. 

The Bush administration on Wednesday said it would support a bill to ban the cloning of embryonic stem cells. Also pending is an administration decision on whether to block federal funds for the research. 

“Even at one cell, I can’t say that’s not a human being,” said Indiana State University cellular biologist David Prentice, an outspoken foe of embryonic stem research. 

But where protesters see biological nightmares, Feldbaum and other biotech industry leaders envision millions of lives saved and billions of dollars made. 

“Lives are at stake,” Feldbaum said. “We will defend our conference.”


Opinion

Editorials

PROPERTY TAXES FUEL CITY BUDGET

Staff
Saturday June 30, 2001

Approved by the City Council last Tuesday, the city’s budget is based on funding streams that include property taxes, parking fines and sales tax. 

The largest contributor to the city’s General Fund – which pays for most of the city’s basic services and the personnel that provide them – is property taxes at 22 percent. Over the next two years property taxes are expected to add $45 million to city coffers.  

The next largest contributor is sales tax, which city officials say will probably account for $19 million or 14 percent over the next two years. 

Taxes charged on utilities contribute 13 percent or $27 million.  

Funding streams in the 5-7 percent range include parking fines, which were raised from $22 to $23 to help pay for various programs in the new budget. That should bring in about $14 million. The hotel tax is expected to bring in $6.5 million. 

Enterprise Funds are kept separate from General-Fund taxes. They are generally raised for a single purpose such as the sewer fund which is financed through property taxes.  

The Sewer Fund, according to the municipal code and state law, is supposed to be spent only on programs related to the city’s sewers. Over the next two years the sewer fund will raise $18 million and will pay for the city’s multi-year project of updating the entire system of sewer lines.  

Other Enterprise Funds include the Permit Service Center Fund, Off Street Parking Fund and the Marina Operation Fund.  

In total, through various taxes and fees, the city is expected to bring in $517 million over the next two years.


Environmental group to sue EPA over arsenic standards

The Associated Press
Friday June 29, 2001

The Associated Press 

 

An environmental group is taking the Bush administration to court over its decision to suspend tighter arsenic standards for drinking water that had been adopted by former President Clinton. 

The Natural Resources Defense Council filed a lawsuit Thursday against the Environmental Protection Agency and its administrator, Christie Whitman, for ignoring a June 22 congressional deadline for having a new plan to reduce arsenic levels. 

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and several of her Democratic colleagues – including Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Charles Schumer of New York, Jon Corzine of New Jersey, Paul Wellstone of Minnesota and Harry Reid of Nevada – said they would file papers in support of the NRDC’s lawsuit. 

“When Congress sets a deadline, we don’t mean for it to be ignored,” Boxer said Thursday. “Clearly, what the Bush administration is doing is very harmful to the health of our people ... and they are turning their back on the law.” 

The goal is to force the EPA to revert to the Clinton standard that would allow no more than 10 parts per billion of arsenic in tap water. The current standard is 50 ppb. 

The twin actions, alleging the administration violated provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Administrative Procedures Act by suspending the Clinton standard, are to be filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. 

Erik D. Olson, a senior attorney with the NRDC, whose prior lawsuits have pushed the EPA to obey deadlines, said Bush’s action threatens the health of millions of Americans. 

“There is absolutely no scientific or legal excuse for delaying or weakening protection of the public from arsenic,” he said. “It’s clear that the Bush administration is simply thumbing its nose at Congress and at the law by suspending this important arsenic protection.” 

Last fall, Congress amended the 1974 Safe Water Drinking Act and ordered the EPA to adopt a new arsenic standard by this summer. 

Clinton announced the 10 ppb standard three days before leaving office in January. But the Bush administration suspended it until next February, leaving in place at least for the meantime the current 50 ppb arsenic standard established in 1942. 

The administration has said the EPA doesn’t have enough evidence to justify the $200 million annual cost to municipalities, states and industry of meeting the Clinton standard by 2006. 

Whitman spokeswoman Tina Kreisher said the EPA still will set a new arsenic standard for communities to comply with starting five years from now. 

“We are not missing the important deadlines,” she said. “The earliest compliance date is in 2006 and we will not miss that date. A new, lower standard than the 50 ppb will be in place.” 

Whitman has asked the National Academy of Sciences to study the risk factors involved in setting the standard at anywhere from 3 ppb to 20 ppb. She also has convened an EPA working group to study costs to local communities. 

On the Net: 

EPA Office of Water: http://www.epa.gov/ow 

Natural Resources Defense Council: http://www.nrdc.org 


GOP withholds votes, budget fails in Assembly

The Associated Press
Thursday June 28, 2001

SACRAMENTO — An estimated $101 billion state budget failed to win Assembly support Wednesday, with Republicans following their Senate counterparts and withholding their votes. 

The party-line vote was 50-28, four shy of the two-thirds approval needed to send a budget to Gov. Gray Davis. 

“There’s work to be done,” said Assemblyman George Runner, R-Lancaster, who sat on a legislative budget negotiating committee. 

For Republicans, that work involves a quarter-cent increase in the state sales tax that will automatically take effect next year because of declining state revenues. 

To pass, the budget needs votes from at least one Senate Republican and four in the Assembly.  

Tuesday night, all 14 Senate Republicans stuck together to oppose the budget. 

Democrats – who control both houses of the Legislature and the governor’s office – Wednesday accused GOP lawmakers of stalling for political reasons. 

The failed plan, Democrats said, boosts education spending, trims more than $1 billion in new spending proposed in January and includes a $2.2 billion reserve fund. 

The budget is “thoughtful and intelligently responds to the needs of Californians, given our current situation,” said Assembly Speaker Robert Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys.  

Analysts have said the state will face deficits in the next two years because of a sinking stock market and incomes  

tax revenues. 

A booming economy triggered a quarter-cent cut in the sales tax last Jan. 1.  

That was because of a sales tax adjustment included in a 1991 law introduced by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson. The tax is now 7 percent statewide but higher in some counties. 

Assemblywoman Sarah Reyes, D-Fresno, said the sales tax increase would amount to pennies a day for the average Californian. “Six pennies a day from Californians, that’s it,” she said. 

Now, as the budget process has reached the deadlock predicted by legislators of both parties, it’s time for the serious bargaining that accompanies most budget negotiations. 

Democratic leaders say they’ll look for Republicans in either chamber who may switch their votes in exchange for a specific deal.  

The final deals will likely be concluded in closed meetings involving five top elected officials, party leaders and Davis. 

The 2001-02 budget likely won’t be done before the Sunday deadline. However, previous court rulings and history show state government will not shutdown because of a late budget. 

Davis has signed the budget on time for the past two years since he took office, when the state was flush with money. 

But in the past two decades the budget has been signed 12 times after July 1, including the 1992 budget Wilson signed on Sept. 2. 

On the Net: 

Read about the budget at http://www.lao.ca.gov


Farmers eager to jump into ethanol industry

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 27, 2001

GRIDLEY — A handful of rice farmers are poised to capture part of California’s expectedly huge ethanol market now that the state must comply with a Bush Administration order to continue using gasoline additives to reduce air pollution. 

Since 1997, eight Butte County farmers have been quietly working with local government officials and a New England company to build a plant that would refine into ethanol the straw stalks left over after rice is harvested. 

If the project is successful, its backers say thousands of the state’s farmers, who have been struggling with disastrously low crop prices, will likely follow suit. Those farmers will have to race to get into the ethanol business before the well-established Midwestern processors divvy up California’s market among themselves. 

“It’s a new industry, and if California doesn’t get off its butt and get going with it, the Midwest is going to have the market,” said Butte County rice farmer Ken Collin, president of the Rice Straw Cooperative. 

The coop’s members will sell agricultural waste to the $100 million ethanol refinery near the small farm town of Gridley after its planned opening in early 2003. The city has agreed to help buy the land and build the refinery. It will also form a partnership with BC International Corp. of Dedham, Mass., to help run the facility, which will produce about 30 million gallons of ethanol a year, said Gridley energy commissioner Tom Sanford. 

Along with producing ethanol, the plant will generate about 20 megawatts of electricity, half of which will be used by the refinery and half sold to Gridley residents through the city-owned utility company, Sanford said. 

It’s not clear how much farmers will be paid for their rice straw, but they hope at least to cover the cost of bailing and trucking it to the Gridley plant. Because of a 1993 state law that bans the traditional method of rice straw disposal – field burning – farmers have paid about $40 an acre to plow the stubble under every fall. 

“It’s a chance for us to get back to revenue-neutral. About 35 to 40 percent of our profits every year are invested in getting rid of rice straw,” Collin said. 

Also, prices paid to rice farmers have been hovering at break-even or below for the last couple of years, and any money farmers can earn beyond their production costs for ethanol is welcome relief, Collin said. Gov. Gray Davis and the Legislature laid the foundation for California’s fledgling ethanol industry when they banned the use of the suspected carcinogenic water pollutant MTBE as a fuel additive by the end of 2002. MTBE and ethanol are oxygenates that help gas burn cleaner. Federal law requires that areas with severe smog problems use the additives to help keep pollution in check. 

Unless California delays its MTBE ban or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reverses itself and grants an exemption under the Clean Air Act, the state will have to add 580 million gallons of ethanol to its gas every year, said California Air Resources Board spokesman William Rukeyser. 

That will account for about a 20 percent increase in ethanol demand nationwide – a huge market expansion that may require more than a dozen new refineries, many of which California farm leaders hope to see built inside the state. 

“There’s a potential for producing 200 million gallons of ethanol in California,” said Bob Krauter, a spokesman with the California Farm Bureau Federation. While Midwestern ethanol is produced from corn, the West Coast product will likely be made from agricultural waste including orchard clippings, wood chips from lumber mills and lawn and garden trimmings from urban areas, Krauter said. 

“We think the EPA’s order is a good move. We do have a small ethanol industry in California, and we think with this decision, there is potential to more fully develop the industry within our borders,” Krauter said. 

There are two Southern California plants making ethanol, one using whey left over from cheese manufacturing and the other using waste from breweries and soft drink factories. Together they churn out between 5 million and 7 million gallons annually, Krauter said. 

There are other California projects in the works, including a plan to convert a bankrupt beet sugar refinery in Woodland into ethanol production and a plan to build a plant along side a lumber mill in Chester. 

But state energy officials are still considering ways to get around the EPA order to continue using oxygenates in its gas. Using Midwestern ethanzol could raise gas prices by 5 cents to as much as 50 cents a gallon, Rukeyser said. 

“Ethanol is traded on the spot market. If there are shortages or contaminated batches or logistical problems, that could translate into price spikes,” he said. 

To encourage California’s infant ethanol industry, a bill currently being debated in the Legislature would allow producers and local air quality districts to apply for state grants. Moreover, pending state legislation would provide a roughly 20-cent-per-gallon tax credit to ethanol producers, said Charles Lombard, president and CEO of Waste Energy Integrated Systems, a Palo Alto company working on the Woodland project. 

Also, a federal tax break cuts 5.4 cents from the sale of each gallon of gasoline containing the alcohol-based fuel additive. U.S. Department of Agriculture grants are available to help ethanol producers buy crops or farm waste, with the condition that the fuel is used to expand existing production capacity. 

“It’s possible that in the short term the traditional ethanol industry (in the Midwest) will supply California. But there’s also a great opportunity for California to develop its own ethanol industry,” said Roger Conway, director of the USDA Office of Energy Policy and New Uses. 


Court maintains Napster infringement

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 26, 2001

A federal appeals court has upheld its February decision that Napster contributes to copyright infringement and must remove protected works from its song-swapping service. 

In a Friday ruling made public Monday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said it would not revisit the three-judge decision with 11 judges. 

The court’s ruling leaves the U.S. Supreme Court as the remaining legal arena for Napster Inc. The Redwood City-based company, embroiled in litigation from the recording industry, acknowledged that chances were slim the circuit court would rehear the case. 

“We will review our legal options going forward,” said Jonathan Schwartz, Napster’s general counsel. 

In February, the three-judge circuit panel upheld a federal judge’s order demanding that Napster remove copyright works from its system. Napster argued that it was not facilitating copyright infringement, a position the appeals panel strongly rejected. 

Napster is now removing songs from its service, an undertaking that is proving difficult as users continue to resurrect songs killed from the system. 

“As far as we are able to tell, a lot of our stuff is available on Napster in some shape, form or the other,” said Russell Frackman, an attorney for the recording industry. 

But as finding songs on the service gets more difficult, fans are abandoning the service.  

A recent analysis by the Internet research firm Webnoize found that Napster use has plunged 41 percent since the online company added song-screening technology to begin complying with orders to remove copyright works. 

Frackman said the Recording Industry Association of America is still pursuing a federal court trial in the case and will seek an unknown amount of damages for copyright infringement from Napster. Also Monday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which awards Oscars once a year to movie standouts, filed a federal copyright infringement lawsuit against Napster. 

The lawsuit accused Napster of allowing its users to download live, copyrighted music performed on the March 25 broadcast of the awards show. Artists who performed include Garth Brooks, Bob Dylan, Faith Hill and Sting. 

That suit is nearly identical to one filed in March against Napster by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, which produces the music industry’s Grammy Awards. 

Despite Monday’s legal developments, Napster is moving toward legitimacy. Three weeks ago, the former music industry bad boy said it struck a distribution deal with three record labels that are expected soon to launch an online music subscription service. 

The recording industry case is A&M Records Inc. v. Napster Inc. 00-16401. The case filed Monday is Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences v. Napster Inc., C012483. 

On the Net: 

http://www.napster.com 

http://www.riaa.com 

htt://www.oscars.org


Single winning ticket sold for record lottery jackpot

By Karen A. Davis Associated Press Writer
Monday June 25, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO – The largest single-state jackpot in U.S. history has a winner. 

A single ticket was sold with all six winning numbers — three, 22, 43, 44 and 45 and Mega number eight. That ticket was bought at Union Avenue Liquors in San Jose, Calif., lottery officials said. The winner has 180 days to claim the record jackpot. 

Liquor store owner Alex Wang, 56, will receive about $705,000 — or one-half of one percent of the total jackpot — if the winning ticket is confirmed, said lottery spokesman Sid Ramirez. 

“I couldn’t believe it, but it looks like it’s true,” Wang said. Wang, who moved to the U.S. from Taiwan in 1970, has owned the liquor store for 27 years. 

He has no immediate plans for the money he won for selling the winning ticket at his store, although he said he may buy a new home. 

“First, I’ll probably put it in the bank.” 

Ramirez and other lottery officials were at Wang’s store Sunday to tie up some legal loose ends. 

“As part of our security system that’s been in place ever since the lottery began, we take the (lottery ticket) machine to make sure there has been no tampering or malfunctions of sorts,” Ramirez said. 

He said lottery officials will return to Wang’s store in three to four weeks with his check. Officials will then give Wang special banners to hang at his store saying “this store made a million dollar winner.” 

By 7 p.m. Saturday, ticket sales boomed and the record prize grew to $141 million. Sales were about $43 million Saturday alone, with 84,000 tickets sold every minute in the last hours before the 7:58 p.m. drawing — this despite the fact that the chance of winning was one in 41 million. 

The huge prize built up during the past month as nine drawings came and went without a winner. 

The largest previous single-state lottery prize before the current record jackpot was $118.8 million in 1991, that also in California. The jackpot has exceeded $100 million only three times in the entire history of lotto. 

Ramirez said this winning jackpot raised $80 million for public schools in the state. 

If no one comes forward to claim the record-breaking jackpot, that money will also be handed over to public education.