News

Coach’s Uncertain Future at Cal Compounds Big Game Jitters: By MATTHEW ARTZ

Tuesday November 16, 2004

It’s Big Game week in Berkeley and Bear backers have never had so much reason to revel in their football team’s success or fear for its future. -more-


Alta Bates Center Threatened With Loss Of Accreditation As Unions Prepare Strike: By RICHARD BRENNEMAN

Tuesday November 16, 2004

Berkeley’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center faces the potential loss of the accreditation status needed to offer service to Medicare and Medicaid patients, following a scathing report from the Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). -more-


Peralta College District Contends WithDevelopment Questions at Campuses: By J. DOUGLAS ALLEN-TAYLOR

Tuesday November 16, 2004

Land use, and the development of a long range strategic plan to guide it, will likely be one of the major issues facing the new Peralta Community College District Board of Trustees when it convenes in January. -more-


Jubilee Grant, Goodbyes on City Council Agenda: By MATTHEW ARTZ

Tuesday November 16, 2004

There will likely be more cake than debate at Tuesday’s City Council meeting. -more-


Board Looks at Quality of School Materials: By J. DOUGLAS ALLEN-TAYLOR

Tuesday November 16, 2004

Teachers, parents, students, and other citizens who think Berkeley classrooms don’t have sufficient textbooks or instructional materials get the chance to put their concerns on the record when the Berkeley Unified School District’s (BUSD) Board of Education holds a public hearing on the matter this week. -more-


Hink’s Building Sold to Berkeley Man, Library Gardens Construction Begins: By RICHARD BRENNEMAN

Tuesday November 16, 2004

A major share in one of Berkeley’s most notable buildings, the Hink’s Building at 2200 Shattuck Ave., has been sold, said John DeClerq, senior vice president of TransAction Financial, which had owned the building until early last week. -more-


Police Blotter: By RICHARD BRENNEMAN

Tuesday November 16, 2004

Two Drivers Robbed, One Shot -more-


3 Fires Damage Apartment, Home: By RICHARD BRENNEMAN

Tuesday November 16, 2004

Three fires caused significant damage to Berkeley residences over last week, reports David Orth, Berkeley Deputy Fire Chief. -more-


Willie Brown Plays Contrary Roles in Richmond: By RICHARD BRENNEMAN

Tuesday November 16, 2004

One of California’s best-known Democrats has surfaced in leading roles as an advocate in three high-profile Richmond projects. -more-


Letters to the Editor

Tuesday November 16, 2004

AD HOMINEM CRAP -more-



A First-Hand Account Of 1957: By SUSAN PARKER

COLUMN
Tuesday November 16, 2004

In Anne Galjour’s Character Building Workshop at San Francisco State University, we were assigned to read Fences by August Wilson. In preparation for class discussion we researched pop culture, circa 1957, the year in which the play is set. For most of my fellow students, this was like studying ancient history. Even Ms. Gajour, a lively, talented playwright and instructor, doesn’t remember 1957. But I do. I was born in 1952 so I didn’t have to look the decade up on the Internet. I thought I deserved extra credit. -more-


We’re Still Waiting for the Berkeley Results: By HENRY NORR

COMMENTARY
Tuesday November 16, 2004

The Daily Planet’s Nov. 5 story on the problem of uncounted ballots (“Thousands of Ballots Still to Be Counted”) didn’t tell the half of it—or probably even a quarter of it. -more-


Morgan Shapes Symphony into East Bay Cultural Force: By IRA STEINGROOT

Special to the Planet
Tuesday November 16, 2004

In 1982, the Oakland Symphony seemed to be going in a promising direction. Under the baton of Calvin Simmons, the orchestra began to look like a world class aggregation, or at the least, a top regional orchestra, especially after it made the newly restored Paramount Theater its home base. -more-


Chinese Pistache Adds Autumn Hues To Berkeley Streets: By RON SULLIVAN

Special to the Planet
Tuesday November 16, 2004

We’re getting some domestic fall color lately from a couple of tree species on the streets of Berkeley. One of the brightest is a relative newcomer here, Chinese pistache, Pistacia chinensis. -more-


Berkeley This Week

Tuesday November 16, 2004

TUESDAY, NOV. 16 -more-


Protecting Possessions For City’s Homeless Strains Resources

By MATTHEW ARTZ
Friday November 12, 2004

Davida Coady welcomes just about anybody into her drug and alcohol rehabilitation program at the Berkeley Veterans’ Building, but she isn’t rolling out the red carpet for the building’s newest arrival. -more-


Council Opts to Create Creeks Task Force, Delays Foothill Bridge

By MATTHEW ARTZ
Friday November 12, 2004

The City Council approved a plan Tuesday to create a task force to review Berkeley’s Creeks Ordinance, leaving dozens of homeowners who packed the council’s chambers howling in disgust. -more-


Housing Boom Ending, Says Berkeley Planner

By RICHARD BRENNEMAN
Friday November 12, 2004

Berkeley’s seven-year housing boom may be going bust, and Planning Director Dan Marks wants the regional agency which has pushed for ever more units to ease off their demands for more. -more-


Developer Wins Pact to Build Point Molate Casino

By RICHARD BRENNEMAN
Friday November 12, 2004

Richmond City Councilmembers gave Berkeley developer James D. Levine the go-ahead Tuesday night for his plans to build a “world class” casino resort on the Point Molate shoreline. -more-


Southside Plan Critiques Sought By City Planners

By Richard Brenneman
Friday November 12, 2004

Berkeley residents will have their chance to weigh in on the proposed Southside Plan Monday night when the city Planning Department holds a scoping session in the North Berkeley Senior Center, 1901 Hearst Ave. -more-


Housing Commission Delays Vote For Scarce Affordable Housing Funds

By MATTHEW ARTZ
Friday November 12, 2004

A decision to delay the battle for the city’s scarce affordable housing funds and allow one developer to overhaul its financing scheme months after the deadline has raised eyebrows among developers and some city housing commissioners. -more-


Campus Bay Regulatory Handover Moves Ahead

By Richard Brenneman
Friday November 12, 2004

The transfer of toxic cleanup supervision at the Campus Bay site project in Richmond has been underway since Monday, a spokesperson for the state Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) in Berkeley said Thursday. -more-


Hancock Calls For Better Response to UC Hacking

By J. DOUGLAS ALLEN-TAYLOR
Friday November 12, 2004

Assemblymember Loni Hancock is criticizing the state response to a recent UC Berkeley computer hacking incident as too little and too late. -more-


Campanella Named New KPFA Chief

By Jakob Schiller
Friday November 12, 2004

After an exhaustive six-month search, KPFA has a new General Manager. -more-


Global Headlines: How the World Reads the Bush Victory

Pacific News Service
Friday November 12, 2004

NORTH KOREA -more-


Under Currents: Not Yet Time to Declare a Kerry Victory

By J. DOUGLAS ALLEN-TAYLOR
Friday November 12, 2004

Time for my Democratic friends, I think, to pause and take a breath. You’re beginning to freak me out, guys. -more-


Letters to the Editor

Friday November 12, 2004

CLEANUP DAY -more-


Commentary: Where Do We Go From Here?

By RANDY SHAW
Friday November 12, 2004

In the wake of Bush’s victory, the question is what to do next. The usual answer—keep pressuring Congress and the president—is problematic, as the Republican leadership appears immune to reason or the popular will. But activists must remain engaged, as the prospects for making a meaningful difference in people’s lives were not erased on Tuesday. -more-


Commentary: Campaign 2004: Democratic Values

By BOB BURNETT
Friday November 12, 2004

In the aftermath of the Republican victory on Nov. 2, Democrats are debating how the party should respond to the increasing political power of conservative Christians. Two alternative strategies have emerged: One is the “If you can’t beat them, then join them” position, which contends that Democrats should assert their own religiosity. The other is “retool the message,” which argues that Democrats lost because they weren’t clear, in general, on what they stand for—other than not wanting Bush to be president—and that, in specific, they did not offer a clear alternative to the Republican rant on “family values.” -more-


Commentary: Under the Guise Of Democracy

By RYAN MACY-HURLEY
Friday November 12, 2004

Enough already! The election was not rigged! I do not want to hear another conspiracy theory about what did or did not happen in Ohio or anyplace else. Conspiracy theories are about as useful at this juncture as holding another debate. -more-


Commentary: ‘Smart’ Duplicity

By MARTHA NICOLOFF
Friday November 12, 2004

I first heard of “Smart Growth” when Al Gore was campaigning in 2000. It was suggested then, that suburban cities should increase their share of density by reducing the size of building sites, (lots had become an acre and more in size), and by developing taller buildings in a more compact and concentrated town center. They claimed the goal was to preserve farm land and natural open space. That made sense didn’t it?! -more-


Commentary: Reasons for the Defeat of J, K, L and M

By ELLIOT COHEN
Friday November 12, 2004

In her commentary “Defeat of Tax Measures Favors Individual, Not Common Good,” (Daily Planet, Nov. 5-8) Nancy Feinstein argues voters who rejected Measures J, K, L and M were motivated primarily by a desire to minimize their own tax burden. But an examination of the facts indicates this assumption is incorrect. In fairness to Ms. Feinstein it must be acknowledged that some voters did reject the taxes out of a selfish desire to minimize their taxes, but we need also recognize that others, such as seniors on fixed incomes, rejected J, K, L and M simply because they can’t afford to pay more. But these two explanations leave out the issue that may well have been the key factor in rejecting the taxes. The reality is that 71 percent of Berkeley voters willingly increased taxes to fund the school district, exceeding by 20 percent the number of voters willing to fund city coffers by voting for Measures J, K, L and M. Less then 38 percent of Berkeley voters supported a utility tax of about five dollars a month, while over 65 percent of them supported state tax increases to fund mental health and children’s hospitals. These results indicate a large number of voters were not opposed to taxes per se, but were instead opposed to how Berkeley spends our tax money. -more-


Parchester Village Residents Fight to Preserve Breuner Marsh, Open Space

By TOMIO GERON Special to the Planet
Friday November 12, 2004

On a hill rising high above San Pablo Bay, Whitney Dotson stared out at an expanse of marshland along the eastern shore and could still see himself and his brother, Richard, as kids swimming in the grassy marsh channels in the early 1960s. -more-


Berkeley This Week

Friday November 12, 2004

FRIDAY, NOV. 12 -more-


Arts Calendar

Friday November 12, 2004

FRIDAY, NOV. 12 -more-


‘A Step Away’ Goes the Distance

By KEN BULLOCK Special to the Planet
Friday November 12, 2004

Dan: “I know I’m a bastard, but even bastards need friends.” -more-


Coward’s ‘Present Laughter’ Sparkles

By KEN BULLOCK Special to the Planet
Friday November 12, 2004

“There’s something awfully sad about happiness, isn’t there?” -more-


An English Ramble: Walking the North York Moors

By MARTA YAMAMOTO Special to the Planet
Friday November 12, 2004

Picture this: Walks across moorland hills, a rich tapestry of color and texture; along meandering streams that cross fertile valleys of rich, green fields and isolated stone farmhouses; undulating footpaths along coastal cliffs overlooking the North Sea and sheltered fishing villages tucked away in protected coves. Returning each day to an eighteenth century Georgian mansion, your bedroom overlooking the Esk Valley and North York Moors National Park. Congenial company, comfort, and invigorating hiking in a dramatic natural setting. -more-