Full Text

 

News

St. Mary’s Guy has high hopes for himself, team

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Friday May 18, 2001

Two years ago, Halihl Guy showed up for his first workout with the St. Mary’s track coaches. A junior transfer from Berkeley High, Guy wasn’t quite used to the workload the Panthers demanded. 

“Halihl would do great for the first third of the workout, but he would die really quickly,” says St. Mary’s head coach Jay Lawson. “It was a challenge for him to mentally adjust to the amount of work we wanted from him.” 

Flash forward to this year, and you’d never know it was the same Guy. The senior is one of the hardest workers at St. Mary’s, and that has translated into stellar performances in four events at nearly every meet. Guy, 17, runs both hurdles races, and is a member of the Panthers’ outstanding 4x100-meter and 4x400-meter relay squads, and has turned into one of the team’s leaders both on and off the track. 

Guy, who lives in Hercules, will run all four races at Saturday’s North Coast Section meet at Diablo Valley College in Stockton. He is expected to qualify in both hurdles races for the California Interscholastic Federation state championship meet two weeks later, as are the relay teams. And once he gets there, Guy could rip off his fastest times yet. After all, he set a personal best at last year’s state meet in the 300-meter hurdles with a mark of 37.95 seconds, good for fourth at that meet and still his best time in the event. 

“We build all year towards the state meet; our coaches do that on purpose,” Guy says. “I want to win both hurdles at state. The only thing that can keep that from happening is me.” 

That confidence came slowly for Guy, who spent his first two years of high school training only sporadically before coming into the vaunted St. Mary’s program, which has won three straight boys NCS titles. 

“He would only train two or three days a week before he got here,” Lawson says. “He wasn’t used to the kind of things we do here.” 

But it didn’t take long for Guy to adjust, and he spent the last part of the season improving his times every week, culminating in his surprise finish at the state meet. 

“I think that month he finally started believing in the program, and he put up some times he didn’t think he could,” Lawson says. 

In addition to a tougher training regiment, Guy says better teammates have pushed him farther than he could go by himself. His main training partners are his relay teammates, Asokah Muhammed, Chris Dunbar and Courtney Brown. 

“When we practice, we all push each other, and that makes us all better,” he says. “We can feed off of each other’s success.” 

But while Guy works hard to be a key link in the relay teams, his main goal is to improve on the hurdles, which are the key to getting a scholarship for college. 

“I’m a hurdler first; the relays are just fun for all of us,” he says. “But the hurdles are what the college coaches want to see.” 

Guy is mulling offers from Washington State, Arizona State, Kansas and Cal. He says he would like to decide before the state meet, but wants to improve his times before making a decision. 

“It’s like trying to get a job: the more references you have, the better job you’ll get,” he says. “They’re going to wait as long as possible, so I need to impress them.” 

Guy isn’t all about individual accomplishments, however. He admits that even if he wins the hurdles at state, he won’t be satisfied unless the Panthers take the team title. 

“If I do good but the team does bad, no one else is happy, and that’s no fun,” he says. 

One key to that team title will be a showdown with the 4x100-meter relay team from Taft High (Woodland Hills). Taft put up the best time in the state in that event early in the season at 41.30 seconds, and the Panthers tied the mark at the Meet of Champions in Sacramento two weeks ago. Although the Taft team dropped the baton at their league meet and failed to qualify for sectionals, they were given a special spot and are expected to make the state meet. 

“I’m not happy that they got into it after they lost, but they’ll just make us run faster to win,” Guy says. “They can just run fast for second or third place.”


Friday May 18, 2001

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 18: Ensign, All Bets Off, Playing Enemy, Association Area, Blessing the Hogs; May 19: Punk Prom and benefit for India quake victims features Pansy Division, Plus Ones, Dave Hill, Iron Ass; May 25: Controlling Hand, Wormwood, Goats Blood, American Waste, Quick to Blame; May 26: Honor System, Divit, Enemy You, Eleventeen, Tragedy Andy; June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2 El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 18: 9:30 p.m. Reggae Angels with Mystic Roots; May 19: 9:30 Kotoja; May 20: 8:30 p.m. Jude Taylor and His Burning Flames 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 18: Todd Snider; May 19: Oak, Ash and Thorn; May 20: KALW’s 60th Anniversary Concert featuring Paul Pena, Orla and the Gasmen, Kennelly Irish Dancers, Kathy Kallick and Nina Gerber. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Rhythm Doctors; May 29: The Lost Trio; May 30: Zambambazo 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Pena Cultural Center May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane; May 20: 6 p.m. Venezuelan Music Recital 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fund-raiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21, 2001. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

“En Mouvement/In Motion” May 18, 19 7 p.m., May 19, 20 2 p.m. This production is a collection of works by student dancers/ $15. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 843-4689  

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“The Laramie Project” May 18 - July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members travelled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard. The play is about the community and the impact Shepard’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Sister, My Sister” May 20, 5 p.m. Poetry, photography and dramatic readings which give voice to women and children caught in homelessness. Admission is free, donations welcome. Live Oak Park Theatre1301 Shattuck Ave. 528-8198 

 

Pacific Film Archive May 18: 7:30 The Cloud-Capped Star; May 19: 3:30 Starewicz Puppet Films; May 20: 5:30 The New Gulliver Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

“Scapes/Escapes” Ink, Acrylic, Mixed Media by Evelyn Glaubman Through June 1 Tuesday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 2:45 p.m. Gallery of the Center for Psychological Studies 1398 Solano Ave. Albany 524-0291 

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse Meet the artists May 18, 19, 20 (call for times). Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Opening reception May 3, 4 - 6 p.m. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts & Paintings Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the past, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Tropical Visions: Images of AfroCaribbean Women in the Quilt Tapestries of Cherrymae Golston” Through May 28, Tu-Th, 1-7 p.m., Sat 12-4 p.m. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 18: Oscar London, M.D. copes with “From Voodoo to Viagra: The Magic of Medicine”; May 21: Ariel Dorfman reads “Blakes Therapy”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or www.bookpride.com  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”; May 29, 7 - 9 p.m.: Travel Photo Workshop with Joan Bobkoff. $15 registration fee  

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo; May 31: Connie Post with host Louis Cuneo Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

Adan David Miller and JoJo Doig May 20, 7 p.m. Poetry and spoken word. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo 548-3333 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 


Forum

Friday May 18, 2001

West Bank, Gaza settlements illegal 

Editor, 

I was raised as a Zionist, and still consider myself to be one. But such drivel as sprouted from Carol Shivel (Forum, 16 May 2001) I have never heard or read in any of the basic sources of Zionist history. The basic legal document governing the existence of the State of Israel is not, as Ms. Shivel states the League of Nations Mandate of 1921, nor does that document give the Jewish Agency and its successors the power or right to govern. First, the legal documents that are pertinent are the United Nations resolution of 29 Nov. 1947 which divided the British Mandate in Palestine into a Jewish State and an Arab State, and the Israeli Declaration of independence of 14 May 1948. 

The League of Nations Mandate was a ratification of the Sykes-Picot agreement between Great Britain and France on the disposition of the Ottoman Empire dissolved by the Allied in World War Two. It gave Great Britain control of what we know today as Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, Jordan and Iraq. The French got Lebanon and Syria. As to that mandate giving the Jewish Agency any say, is ludicrous. (In 1922, Britain split the greater part of the mandate and created the hashimaite Kingdom of Trans-Jordan.) The remaining territory was ruled by a High Commissioner appointed by the home Office Office in London and all legislation was legislated in London, not in Jerusalem or Tel Aviv, or anywhere else in the territory of the Mandate. 

As to what the Mandate actually said: it ratified the language of the Balfour Declaration at the end of the First World War recognizing a right for a Jewish Homeland in Palestine; it does not speak of a Jewish state, nor does it a priori allow for Jewish settlement in all of Palestine. At the time of the creation of the Mandate, the Jewish Agency did not yet exist. 

Yes, the Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza are illegal and if successive American administrations have said so; they just haven't felt compelled to insist on Israel's dismantling of said settlements, or used the power of the American purse (aid to Israel) to force a cessation to such settlements. They are illegal because they entail the transfer of Israel's citizens onto land which was seized in war and have the internationally recognized status of militarily “occupied territories.” This, like much of what we have been so clearly seeing in the past seven months, is a violation of the Geneva Conventions covering the conduct of war and the treatment of civilians in war. 

Israel and Israelis have no right to the land on which Palestinians live and depend upon for their existence. No abuse of history, no mis-reading of the documents will justify the unjustifiable. 

So, Ms. Shivel, let's stop trying to justify what the vast majority of Israelis know is unjustifiable except by the power of superior arms. I am an Israeli, and never in the last 31 years of Israel's occupation of these territories and its people have i felt so disgusted with what purports to be my government. 

E. Arnon 

Berkeley 

Cement industry role in energy crisis 

Editor: 

Do We Want the Cement Mafia Making Our Energy Decisions? Meet the Cement Mafia: 7 out of ten of the biggest electricity users in California are cement manufacturers. Like other large industrial customers, they have always paid a lot less than residential customers pay for electricity – and they made sure Governor Davis and the Public Utilities Commission kept it that way. 

Before the rate hike, residential ratepayers paid more than 14 cents per kilowatt hour, while big industrial users paid about 8 cents. Now, residential customers will pay 22 cents per kilowatt hour while large industries will pay only 12 cents! Agriculture will pay 14 cents, commercial 15 cents and small business nearly 17 cents. 

Davis said rate hikes should be equal - but that really means keeping rates totally unequal, so the cement companies, giant construction companies and other big industries continue to get a reward for using a lot of electricity. 

The big industrial users brought us deregulation in the first place. They had cheap rates already, but they wanted cheaper rates. Before deregulation, California utilities charged 50 percent more than utilities in the rest of the country, so these companies wanted to buy electricity from somebody else. They were sure that deregulated companies would offer cheaper power, so they pushed for deregulation. Boy were they wrong! 

Why were power costs so high back then? Because the nuclear power plants cost so much to build. Guess who made the money building them? Cement and construction companies! Cement companies made a fortune pouring eight-foot thick cement walls to “contain” deadly radiation. 

Nukes cost even more in California because Bechtel made so many mistakes building Diablo Canyon. Then the Public Utilities Commission made ratepayers pay the cost of California nukes, instead of making utility shareholders eat the overruns. 

Of course the Cement Mafia thought nuclear reactors would be great because the nuclear industry claimed they would produce power “too cheap to meter.” Wrong! The industry claims nuclear power is cheap today, but it appears that way because deregulation forced us to pay $20 billion to bail the utilities out of debt! 

Governor Davis just put six construction companies, headed by Bechtel, in charge of “expediting” power plant construction in California. Isn’t it interesting that the construction companies and President Bush and Davis are all screaming that we have to build big new power plants and new transmission lines all over California and the U.S.? Wrong again! We don’t need this obsolete, expensive technology. We need energy efficiency, solar panels on our rooftops, windmills and fuel cells located near the homes and businesses they serve. And we need honesty and fairness in our electricity rates. Innovative, inexpensive, locally based public power will give us all those things. 

Let’s give road builders a summer vacation. And give us time to think: do we really want the Cement Mafia making energy decisions for us any more?  

Barbara George 

Women’s Energy Matters 

Sacramento 

Keep safety officers 

(To the school board): 

Board President Terry Doran said he believed the budget you passed is “cautious and prudent.” While I sympathize with the difficulties of preparing a budget based on inadequate state funding, it is neither cautious nor prudent to cut school safety officers at Longfellow and Willard. The Healthy Start coordinator from Willard spoke to this point during the public comment session. Two parents from Longfellow would have spoken to this point, if their cards had been called. Given the serious public safety problems that have occurred at Berkeley middle schools this year, this is obviously an important point, yet none of the board members justified these cuts. 

When the shooting occurred on Ward Street as Longfellow students were coming to school earlier this year, it was one of our school safety officers who got the students to drop to the ground and led them into the building. There are only two school safety officers at Longfellow. If we have only one, what happens if that one is on the wrong side of the campus the next time an emergency occurs? 

In the two years I have been involved in analyzing the School Site Council family and student surveys at Longfellow, inadequate supervision of yards and hallways has been one of the few things about the Longfellow learning environment that has drawn a lot of criticism. Our principal, vice principal, and school safety officers work very hard, but as it is there are not enough of them. What is going to happen if there is only one school safety officer?  

Everyone I have spoken to at Longfellow has been horrified when they heard that one of our school safety officer positions has been cut. While all the budgets cuts under consideration are difficult, when you are cutting positions that provide direct service it is important that the people who will feel the brunt of this be informed, and that board members listen to what they have to say about it. I hope you reconsider this point. If we are being cautious and prudent, the risk of reducing the contingency fund by this $80,500 line item is less than the risk of leaving middle school students without adequate supervision in emergencies. 

Susan Dickey 

7th grade parent, Longfellow


Calendar of Events & Activities

Friday May 18, 2001


Friday, May 18

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 


Saturday, May 19

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Annual strawberry tasting 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 548-3333 

 

Get to Know Your Plants 

1 - 4 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn what to look for and what and how to record it to more intimately know your plants. 548-2220 

 

“Be Your Own Boss” 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

YWCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Second Saturday of a two day workshop on starting up small businesses (see May 12). 

415-541-8580 

 

Community Summit on  

Smaller Learning  

Communities 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Alternative High School  

MLK Jr. Way (at Derby)  

All teachers, students, administrators, parents, and community members are encouraged to attend this meeting on smaller learning communities at Berkeley High. Translation, childcare, and food will be provided.  

540-1252 to RSVP for services 

 

Campaign for Equality Benefit  

7:30 - 10 p.m. 

Montclair Women’s Cultural Arts Club  

1650 Mountain Blvd.  

Oakland 

A comedy benefit with performances by Karen Ripley, Julia Jackson, Pippi Lovestocking, Darrick Richardson, and Nick Leonard. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the International Lesbian Gay Association Scholarship Fund for the 2001 ILGA Summit in Oakland. $15 - $20 466-5050 

 

Finish Carpentry 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Carpenter/contractor Kevin Stamm leads workshop. $95. 

525-7610 

 

Earthquake Retrofitting 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Seminar taught by structural engineer Tony DeMascole and seismic contractor Jim Gillett. $75. 

525-7610 

 

How to Prevent Home Owner Nightmares 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Dispute prevention and early resolution seminar taught by contractor/mediator Ron Kelly. $75. 

525-7610 

 

Puppet Shows 

1:30 and 2:30 p.m. 

Hall of Health (Lower Level) 

2230 Shattuck Ave. 

Program on physical and mental differences. Promotes acceptance and understanding. Free. 

549-1564  

 


Sunday, May 20

 

Reimagining Pacific Cities  

6 - 8:30 p.m. 

New Pacific Studio  

1523 Hearst Ave.  

“How are Pacific cities reshaping their cultural and environmental institutions to better serve the needs and enhance the present and future quality of life of all segments of their societies?” A series of ten seminars linking the Bay Area, Seattle, Portland, and other pacific cities.  

$10 per meeting 849-0217 

 

Working with Awareness,  

Concentration, Energy 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Nyingma members discuss meditative awareness in everyday life. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Salsa Lesson & Dance Party  

7 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Kick up your heels and move your hips with professional instructors Mati Mizrachi and Ron Louie. Plus Israeli food provided by the Holy Land Restaurant. Novices encouraged to attend and no partners are required.  

$12  

RSVP: 237-9874 

 

Mediterranean Herbs 

1:30 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Tour of herbs. Learn myths and legends, ideas for planting in home gardens. 

643-1924 

 

Jazz on 4th Street Festival 

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

4th St. between Hearst and Virginia 

Performances by Berkeley High Jazz Ensemble and two Berkeley High Jazz Combos, among others. Also 4th St. merchants, raffle prizes, arts and crafts. Free admission. Proceeds benefit Berkeley High Performing Arts.  

526-6294 

 


Monday, May 21

 

Creation conversation 

7:30 - 10 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish  

Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Rabbi Yaacov Deyo, founder of L.A.’s SpeedDating, will review creation from the reference point of physics and compare this to the description classical Jewish sources have given for our universe and its creation.  

$10 848-0237 x127 

Tuesday, May 22 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Strawberry tasting 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street  

548-3333 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time  

548-8283 www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Second day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continued from Thursday May 17. $70 for both days. 525-7610 

 


Wednesday, May 23

 

Healthful Building Materials  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St. 

Seminar conducted by environmental consultant Darrel DeBoer.  

$35 per person 525-7610 

 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

 

Regional Tranportation Talk 

1:30 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Rebecca Kaplan of the Bay Area Transportation and Land Use Coalition will talk about the Metropolitan Transportation Commision’s 25-year Regional Transportation Plan at the regular meeting of the Berkeley Gray Panthers. Open to the public. 

548-9696 

 


Thursday, May 24

 

Paddling Adventures  

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Dan Crandell, member of the U.S. National Kayak Surf Team and owner of Current Adventures Kayak School, will introduce attendees to all aspects of kayaking. Free  

527-4140 

 


Friday, May 25

 

Strong Women - Writers & 

Heroes of Literature 

1 - 3 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 


School Board slashes district’s budget

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Friday May 18, 2001

Despite grave concerns of two of its members, the Board of Education voted unanimously Wednesday to make more than $4 million in cuts to balance its budget of about $65 million by June. 

“This has not been an easy decision,” said Board President Terry Doran.  

While he acknowledged the board’s decision last year to make higher pay for teachers a top priority contributed to the need for cuts this spring, Doran placed most of the blame squarely on Sacramento and what he called the state government’s failure to support public education “in an adequate way.” 

Board members Joaquin Rivera and Ted Schultz reiterated their objections to a piece of the plan that will cut the high school teaching staff by the equivalent of 3.6 full-time teachers next year. 

“This is going to add to our lack of credibility because of the support for (small) class size in the community,” Rivera said in an interview Thursday, referring to the fact that Berkeley taxpayers have repeatedly voted to tax themselves in order to keep K-12 class sizes small. 

Director John Selawsky said in an interview that he felt comfortable voting  

for the high school cuts because  

Berkeley High Principal Frank Lynch had indicated that the loss of teachers would not significantly impact class size at the 3,200-student school. 

Doran said the cuts amount to less than 2 percent of the total funding for teaching staff at the high school, a relatively modest cut given “the grave financial situation we’re in right now.” 

Carol Wilkins, a Berkeley High parent and a member of a budget advisory committee for the school district, said during the public comment period Wednesday that she was “deeply disturbed about the action this board has decided to take.” 

“The trust of the voters is one of the most precious commodities that this board has to rely on,” Wilkins said. A vote for fewer teachers at the high school two years in a row jeopardizes that trust, Wilkins added, pointing to the fact that some remedial classes at the high school already have 38 students apiece. 

The class-size reduction tax measure approved by Berkeley voters originally called for classes in grades seven through 12 to have no more than 27 students. 

The cuts approved Wednesday include: the elimination of two middle school safety officers; the elimination of the plant operations manager, attendance clerk and on-campus suspension manager at Berkeley High; the elimination of a half-time campus monitor at the alternative high school; and numerous cuts in administrative costs, ranging from legal expenses to travel expenses. 

The board is now creating a priority list of where to put money back into the budget next year should the district end up with more spending money than it anticipates. Rivera and Selawsky said they would reinstate the teaching positions cut from the high school first, should funding become available. Selawsky said Thursday that a decision to go ahead and fund these positions can still be made as late as September. The cut school safety officers could be added back at any time during the coming school year, he said. 

••• 

In other school board news Wednesday, several parents accused the high school of discriminating against Chicano and Latino students by relegating them to an English Language Learner program whose allegedly inferior curriculum they said fails to prepare students for college. 

“There is unequal treatment but, more important, there is the perception of unequal treatment,” said Berkeley High parent Frederico Chavez. 

Chavez described a situation where the parent of a student who was part Puerto Rican had to fight to get her son into an algebra course that is part of the required curriculum for students who want to be eligible for the University of California system. 

“These are the kinds of things Berkeley High is doing to Latino students,” Chavez said. “It doesn’t challenge them.” 

Several board members directed Interim Superintendent Stephen Goldstone to look into the situation. Rivera said Thursday he wants to review the procedure for placing students in the ELL program, which is intended for students with limited English. 

 


Bears shut out Huskies in NCAA first round

Daily Planet Wire Services
Friday May 18, 2001

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - The second-seeded California Golden Bears got a fine pitching performance from junior Jocelyn Forest and senior Nicole DiSalvio to defeat the fifth-seeded Connecticut Huskies, 2-0, to advance to the winners bracket of the NCAA Regional. The Bears moved on to face Florida Atlantic, which defeated Florida, 3-0, in the second round. With the win, Cal improves to 50-15 on the year, just one win shy of tying its most wins in school history. The Huskies fall to 35-22 with the loss.  

The Bears jumped out to an early one-run lead in the second inning. After a fly out by sophomore Veronica Nelson, Cal sophomore Eryn Manahan singled for the first hit in the game. Sophomore Courtney Scott then reached first on a fielder’s choice followed by a single by senior Amber Phillips, sending Scott to second. Sophomore Mikella Pedretti then broke the scoreless tie with a single to right-center field, scoring Scott from second.  

Cal added to its lead in the fourth with an unearned run. With two outs and Phillips and Scott on second and third, sophomore Kristen Morley grounded to the shortstop, who mishandled the ball, allowing Scott to score the second Bear run.  

Forest started for Cal and went the first 3.1 innings (two hits and three strikeouts) before leaving the game with soreness in her back. DiSalvio closed the game out to earn the win and improve to 19-7 on the year. She allowed just two hits with a strikeout.  

Barb Cook went the distance for the Huskies in the circle and takes the loss to fall to 18-11. She allowed just two runs and six hits.  

Phillips had two hits on the day to lead the Bears offensive attack.  

The Bears return today for the 5:30 second-round game against Florida Atlantic.


Two-wheel valet parking

Daily Planet staff
Friday May 18, 2001

Jen Collins parks bikes for a living and loves it.  

She was in her element at the downtown Berkeley BART bike station on Thursday, dubbed bike-to-work day by groups trying to promote bicycle transit.  

It was lunchtime and 75 people had already left their two-wheelers at the 18-month old secure valet parking Collins helps to manage. Usually there are 75 or so bikes signed in (and out) of the facility by the end of the day, she said.  

The valet parking is free, funded by the city and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, among others. It is run through a contract with BART by the Bicycle Friendly Berkeley Coalition.  

The secure parking operates between 6 a.m. and 9:30 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturdays. It is closed Sunday.  

“It’s an awesome job,” Collins said. “Everyone here is a dedicated cyclist.”


Council deals with commissioner conflict

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Friday May 18, 2001

The City Council adopted an ordinance Tuesday that spells out exactly when some city commissioners have a conflict of interest due to outside employment and how to remedy the situation. 

The new section of the Berkeley Municipal Code states that all commissioners who are employed by any governmental entity, which includes UC Berkeley’s 20,000 employees and 3,000 employees at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will have to recuse themselves only on agenda items that directly affect their specific job responsibilities.  

A state law covers commission and board incompatibility issues as they relate to private employers but does not include government employees.  

The council approved the ordinance by a 5-4 vote with Vice Mayor Maudelle Shirek and Councilmembers Dona Spring, Kriss Worthington and Margaret Breland voting in opposition.  

Spring made a substitute motion to create a broader ordinance that would require all government employees who serve on city commissions to abstain from voting on items that would affect their employers. That motion failed by a similar 5-4 vote. 

While Spring’s motion would have impacted a wider range of commissioners, those affected would have had to abstain only from voting on issues related to their employers. That means they could still offer their opinions and participate in discussions on related issues.  

Under the adopted ordinance, commissioners who may have a conflict of interest will have to recuse themselves from any commission discussion whatsoever. 

The ordinance was the result of an ongoing controversy with the Community Environmental Advisory Commission that began in January when City Attorney Manuela Albuquerque issued an opinion that CEAC Commissioner Gordon Wozniak’s employment was incompatible with his duties on the commission. 

Wozniak is a senior scientist at LBNL.  

Wozniak disagreed with Albuquerque and refused to disqualify himself or recuse or abstain from any commission action related to his employer. And the city had no legal recourse to remove him from the commission. 

At the time the CEAC was embroiled in a controversy over possible radioactive tritium leaks from LBNL. Tritium opponents were outraged that Wozniak, who does not work directly with the LBNL tritium facility, ignored Albuquerque’s opinion and the commission became deeply divided. The conflict resulted in the sudden adjournment of two CEAC meetings after several frustrated commissioners left the meetings. 

Under the new ordinance, Wozniak would not have to recuse himself on any tritium-related items before the CEAC commission. 

Councilmember Polly Armstrong, who appointed Wozniak, said the new ordinance was a good one. “This will allow employees of two huge employers of brilliant people (UC Berkeley and LBNL) to participate on city commissions and I think it just makes sense,” she said. 

Spring, on the other hand, said it’s just a way to allow the university and the laboratory to have influence over city policy. “Under this ordinance you could have five LBNL employees on the CEAC and they would not have to recuse themselves if they work in a different department of the same division,” she said. “They could all answer to the same boss, which is just going to erode public confidence because you would have the fox guarding the hen house.” 

Wozniak said he is happy with the council’s action and that he looks forward to continued work with the commission. “I think the ordinance is fair and will avoid the appearance of conflict of interest,” he said. “I hope we can handle the issues on our agenda in a timely manner without any further disruptions over this issue.” 

The new ordinance excludes the seven (out of 45) city commissions that award permits or recommend contracts – the Homeless Commission, Housing Advisory Commission, Human Welfare and Community Action Commission, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Planning Commission, Police Review Commission and the Zoning Adjustments Board. Members of these commissions who work directly or indirectly for the government, including UC Berkeley, would have to recuse themselves from participating on all issues related to their employers, whether the issue was directly related to their specific work or not. 

 


Community can tackle global warming woes

By Tracy Chocholousek, Special to the Daily Planet
Friday May 18, 2001

Two problems, the energy crisis and global warming, have a singular solution: turn off the lights, use public transit, save energy.  

Doing that will reduce carbon dioxide and other harmful gases emitted into the atmosphere and reduce global warming, said a group of experts speaking to some 40 people Tuesday evening gathered at the Redwood Garden Senior Housing Complex. 

Even if global warming were not a problem, it still pays to conserve energy, said UC Berkeley Energy and Resources Professor John Harte.  

“Indeed carbon dioxide levels are going up. As that happens we’re going to see warming. When and where? These details are difficult to predict,” Harte said.  

Although scientists don’t have all the answers concerning global warming, global temperatures have undeniably risen over the last century. 

“We’ve seen a 30 percent increase in the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere since the Industrial Revolution,” Harte said. 

Carbon dioxide is the largest contributor to global warming. It is emitted through the burning of un-renewable fossil fuels used in cars, energy plants, and household appliances.  

Dr. Robert Gould, of Physicians for Social Responsibility, said the potential problems that may arise from global warming are tremendous. A significant increase in temperatures could cause disruptions in crop and livestock production, the thawing of the polar ice caps, and increases in air pollution, spore release, and mosquitoes. Such disasters could result in rising sea levels, starvation, and widespread respiratory, infectious and water born diseases, he said. These are only some of the potential risks.  

“There’s an inequitable distribution of the impacts of climate change. Global warming is a moral issue, affecting mostly low income people. We must demand a moral response from our government,” said Anja Miller of Redefining Progress.  

“We’ll all be paying . . . in one way or another by the damage we’re doing to our environment.”  

As the release of dangerous gases continues and temperatures rise, activists boost their efforts to raise community awareness and work toward future solutions by putting pressure on local governments. 

“We just don’t have any choice, so we’ve got to start doing something,” said Commissioner Susan Ode of the Berkeley Energy Commission.  

Ode is also the outreach coordinator for the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives. Berkeley is one of nearly 100 cities nationwide participating in ICLEI’s Cities for Climate Protection Campaign. As participants in the campaign, the cities involved have made a commitment to reduce greenhouse gases throughout the local economy.  

“Cities are consumers themselves, therefore they emit a lot of fossil fuels into the environment,” Ode said.  

By implementing citywide programs to increase energy efficient systems and reduce fossil fuel emissions, money can be saved, then used in other areas.  

In Berkeley last year, greenhouse gas emissions were reduced by 375 tons, Ode said. 

There are many ways in which Berkeley has increased energy efficiency and reduced harmful emissions, according to Ode.  

Berkeley has begun replacing traffic lights with light emitting diodes, or LED’s. These energy efficient mechanisms are comparable to the difference between florescent and incandescent light bulbs. They use far less energy and heat to maintain the same functions.  

Berkeley parking enforcement officers drive electric cars.  

There are also two local ordinances, the Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance and the Commercial Energy Conservation Ordinance in effect to ensure such properties maintain certain environmental requirements when sold. 

“If you sell a home in Berkeley, you must bring it up to energy efficient standards. It’s the same for commercial property,” Ode said.  

As with most man-made environmental problems, within the global warming predicament there are man-made solutions.  

“We’re embedded in nature. The ways to resolve the problems in nature are within us,” said forum moderator Claire Greensfelder. “If there’s any place where innovative new ideas start, it’s here in Berkeley.”  

Greensfelder is on the board of directors at Plutonium Free Future, an international campaign designed to alert citizens to the dangers of plutonium associated with nuclear power. 

Forums such as Tuesday’s are just one way that local groups participate in doing everything they can to resolve such issues by raising community awareness. 

At the forum, Ecology Center Information Services Manager Steve Evans encouraged Power Down Days, a program to boycott energy use altogether during the first weekend of every month.  

“Go as far as you can, turn off your refrigerator, don’t drive,” Evans said.  

The Ecology Center’s curbside recycling program actively participates in the hands-on reduction of fossil fuels by using plant-based bio-diesel in their recycling trucks.  

While forums are held and activists and local governments work to enforce a shift in residential and commercial energy consumption, the community continues to function.  

“In the meantime, people are leaving their lights on,” Ode said. 

“It’s important that (individuals) be very aggressive about reducing our own fossil fuel use, and also that we raise consciousness.”  

The climate change forum was hosted by Women for Peace and co-sponsored by other groups including the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, the Ecology Center, Plutonium Free Future, American Friends Service Committee, and Physicians for Social Responsibility.  


Resident gets cash for trash

Daily Planet Staff
Friday May 18, 2001

 

The money – $2,700 – fell from the sky for southwest Berkeley resident Romy Falck. 

Well, not exactly from the sky – it came from the hands of recyclers at the Ecology Center. Falck won this week’s Cash for Trash Contest on Thursday for having no items in her garbage that could have been otherwise recycled. 

“That’s so cool,” said Falck, a psychotherapist at Alta Bates Hospital. People from the Ecology Center came by Falck’s house and took her garbage, with her permission, early Thursday morning, then told her later that she was a winner. She had been randomly selected. 

Falck said she had heard about the contest, into which the Ecology Center deposits $250 each week, but she said she made no special recycling efforts because of it. “I recycle everything,” she said. “I’ve been in that habit as long as I’ve lived in Berkeley.” 

The Ecology Center puts $250 weekly into a fund and goes through a randomly- selected person’s garbage once each week. The kitty grows when there are no winners. 

The Cash for Trash Contest is an outreach project of the Ecology Center and the city of Berkeley and funded by the Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board. Since February, $3,650 has been awarded to Berkeley residents for recycling well. Another $2,850 will be distributed before the contest ends in mid-July.


Court overturns ruling on nonunion workers’ obligations

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Nonunion workers should not be required to pay union organizing fees, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday, overturning an earlier decision by the National Labor Relations Board. 

“We hold that organizational activity is not necessary for the union’s performance of its duties as the exclusive representative of the employees,” the unanimous three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said. “To require nonmember employees to fund such activity is not authorized.” 

Thousands of labor contracts require workers who choose not to join the union representing them to pay fees similar to what union members pay in dues. 

However, in a 1988 ruling the U.S. Supreme Court said that unions may not use money from nonunion workers for any purpose other than collective bargaining. 

In that case, 20 employees of AT&T in Maryland sued the Communications Workers of America, contending they should have the right to withhold a portion of their nonmember fees to avoid subsidizing union political goals they didn’t agree with. 

In the latest case, three supermarket and meat processing workers in Michigan, Colorado and California who quit the food workers union in 1989 complained they continued to be charged nonmember fees that helped pay for union organizing activities. 

Becky McReynolds, one of the suit’s original plaintiffs, worked as a cashier at a Colorado grocery store in 1989 and paid about $40 a month in union fees. 

“I felt that the union wasn’t doing a lot for our store,” she said Thursday from her home in Glenwood Springs, Colo. “I didn’t feel that we should have to belong to the union if we didn’t want to, and we shouldn’t have to pay these dues.” 

The NLRB, which acts as an out-of-court referee of labor-management disputes, ruled in October 1999 they should have to pay, saying that recruiting new members indirectly bolsters a union’s bargaining clout to the benefit of members, as well as nonmembers. 

But the appeals court took a dim view of that argument. 

“The Board does not have a free hand to interpret a statute when the Supreme Court has already interpreted the statute, ” the court said. 

David Rosenfeld, who represented United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1036 in Camarillo, said everyone benefits from organizing efforts because when unions have more members, everyone’s wages stay higher. 

“It’s an unfortunate decision,” he said. “But it won’t have a great impact. There’s so few people who take this position because they recognize the value the union serves to them.” 

The National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, which opposes compulsory dues, praised the court’s decision — saying it would impact 7.8 million workers across the country who are forced to pay union fees as a condition of their employment. 

“The notoriously biased NLRB has again been caught red-handed fabricating its own vision for labor relations favoring union officials, even when it violates clear Supreme Court precedent,” said Stefan Gleason, vice president of the foundation. 

The NLRB did not immediately return a call seeking comment. 


Teens protest slaughter of cow

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

 

BREA — Teen protesters rallied against the slaughter of a steer on a Christian school campus Thursday, but school officials said the demonstration showed a key part of farm life. 

Anjali Heble, 15, led a group of about a dozen teens who tried to form a “human chain” to keep the butcher from entering the Carbon Canyon Christian School campus.  

Two officers from the Brea Police Department, however, told the protesters, who did not attend the school, that they could not block access to the private campus. 

Heble, a sophomore at a nearby public school, said a friend who attends the K-12 Christian school told her a few days ago about the slaughter. 

“Everyone was just shocked that this was going on,” Heble said.  

“They were killing this cow in front of children who don’t have the ability to understand it. ... There were 4-year-olds watching this. They don’t know how to handle this. They can’t understand.” 

Christine Lay, a school secretary, said the slaughter of the animal was a valuable learning experience for the students. 

The cow, named T-bone, was raised on campus and was about 2 years old. 

“They were wide-eyed and amazed,” Lay said. “They said, ‘Wow! This is where hamburger comes from.’ Some said, ’I can handle this. I can be a doctor.’ It was a very positive farm-type experience.” 

The school hired a professional who slaughtered the cow and told students about the process from slaughter to market. 

The butcher used a stun gun to kill the animal instantly and then skinned it and took out the organs. 

“It’s a natural process,” Lay said. “For city people, it’s probably a little shocking. But in America’s heritage, it’s not unusual. A lot of times kids don’t get to see the processes of life.” 

Lacey Levitt, of Los Angeles-based Last Chance for Animals, criticized the school for killing the animal in front of children. 

“Studies have shown that when children view violence against animals, it desensitizes them to animal cruelty and makes them more aggressive,” Levitt said.


SLA lawyer pleads innocent

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Lawyers for former SLA fugitive Sara Jane Olson went to court Thursday to defend themselves on criminal charges and later told a judge they may have to be removed from Olson’s trial. 

J. Tony Serra and Shawn Chapman said they have been forced into a situation where “there is a conflict of interest between us and our client.” 

Serra said he will file a motion asking to remove not only himself and Chapman but also the two prosecutors and the entire Los Angeles Superior Court bench from involvement in Olson’s attempted-murder case. 

“We are deeply aggrieved,” he said, referring to the latest developments as “a horrible mess.” 

The two lawyers, who were arraigned earlier on misdemeanor charges related to the release of witness information, said they were handed a list of potential prosecution witnesses in their case which included Olson, the two case prosecutors and a judge who formerly presided over the Olson case. 

Deputy District Attorney Michael Latin told Superior Court Judge Larry Fidler he would quickly answer Serra’s motion. 

“We welcome the opportunity to flesh out some of these issues early on,” he said. “This is a subject of very large proportions.” 

Fidler ordered the motion filed by May 29, the response by May 31 and set a hearing for June 4. 

Among the issues, Serra said, is whether he could be required to testify about confidential communications with his client. 

“There are so many issues there will be no recourse but to start all over again in the Sara Jane Olson case,” he said. “I think the whole Sara Jane Olson case could be put off another two years.... It’s my worst nightmare.” 

Serra earlier entered an innocent plea before a court commissioner to charges that he improperly released the addresses and phone numbers of police witnesses. 

Chapman did not enter a plea and said she expects the charges against her to be dismissed. 

Superior Court Commissioner Jeffrey M. Harkavy set a hearing for May 25 and said Serra would be granted a trial within 45 days unless he seeks a continuance. 

Serra said he wanted the matter resolved as quickly as possible. 

Outside court, Chapman said a previous judge in Olson’s case had determined she was not responsible for the release of information. She said the city attorney’s office, which charged her, was unaware of those proceedings and is now studying the transcripts to see if a dismissal  

is warranted. 

Both lawyers told reporters they believe the charges are an effort by prosecutors to cause a conflict of interest between them and Olson, who is awaiting trial on charges of attempting to murder police officers with pipe bombs. 

“This is not an attack on the lawyers,” said Serra. “It’s an attack on Sara Jane Olson. It’s their attempt to separate us from this case.” 

He and Chapman said the timing of the charges was suspicious, coming as the start of the trial neared. It has since been postponed. 

“They thought that we would be in jury selection and this would taint her with the public,” Serra said. 

City attorney’s spokesman Mike Qualls said he could not comment on Chapman’s claim that her charges were under review and he denied there was anything suspicious about the timing. 

“We don’t comment on the out-of-court comments of defendants in criminal cases, but as far as trying to taint jury selection, that’s ridiculous,” Qualls said. 

Chapman said that the defense team’s research has shown they are the only people to be prosecuted under a penal code section barring release of witness addresses and phone numbers by attorneys. 

The charges involve the posting of names and addresses of police witnesses James Bryant and John Hall on an Olson defense committee Web site. They have said they feared for their lives. 

Olson’s lawyers say the information was posted inadvertently by Olson supporters without knowledge of the legal team. It was removed following complaints. 

Olson, 54, is accused of putting pipe bombs under police cars in 1975 in retaliation for the deaths of six Symbionese Liberation Army members in a fiery shootout in 1974. The bombs did not explode. 

Indicted in 1976 under her former name, Kathleen Soliah, she was a fugitive until her 1999 capture in Minnesota, where she had taken on her new name and was living as a doctor’s wife, mother and active community member. She has said she is innocent and that she never belonged to the SLA.


Feds get one more chance to keep cattle off reserved land

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

A judge spared federal officials a contempt of court charge Thursday, but implied he might be less understanding if they don’t follow through on a deal keeping cattle off land reserved for the threatened desert tortoise. 

The Center for Biological Diversity and other environmental groups asked the U.S. District Court for Northern California to hold the Bureau of Land Management in contempt for not meeting a March 1 deadline to stop grazing on more than 500,000 acres of public land. 

Judge William Alsup praised the BLM for developing a plan to meet a Sept. 7, 2001, deadline to comply with a consent decree reached in January, and told officials they must do what they can to reach it. 

“You have to come up with a plan to meet the dates you imposed on yourself,” he said. “I don’t want you to go away thinking the judge has modified the consent decree, and you don’t have to meet the Sept. 7 deadline, that you just have to try.” 

The judge had blasted the agency at a hearing earlier this month, saying its delay was politically motivated. He said it was trying to go back on the deal because it is more sympathetic to ranchers under the Bush administration. 

The BLM said the delay was a misunderstanding and resulted in part from the time it took to do a study on the land. 

The consent decree required the BLM to stop ranchers from allowing their cattle to graze on 10 public land grazing allotments in Kern, San Bernardino and Inyo counties from March 1 to June 15 and from Sept. 7 to Nov. 15, when the tortoise is in its mating and foraging periods. 

The problem with the grazing is that the cattle eat the plants that the tortoise feeds on and they often crush the tortoises’ burrows, said Daniel Patterson, a desert ecologist with the CBD. 

The tortoise has 3.4 million acres of land designated as critical habitat. 

The BLM missed its first deadline, and grazing has not been stopped on the high desert land. BLM spokeswoman Jan Bedrosian said the delay for implementing the ban is a result of a study of the land that the BLM did to determine the threat to the tortoise. 

The study was done to see if the BLM should remove the cattle on an emergency basis, or if it should follow its normal process of giving the public a chance to appeal. 

“We made the determination there was no threat to the resources and there was no emergency,” Bedrosian said. 

Now, the public will have 30 days – until June 15 – to appeal the recommendation to close the land to grazing. Interior Secretary Gale Norton has taken the step of ensuring a speedy decision on the issues, which will be heard by an administrative law judge. The judge will rule on them by Aug. 24, and any decision will be final. The removal of the cattle, if that’s what the judge decides, will take place two weeks later on Sept. 7. 

“There’s really no reason this couldn’t have happened in March,” said Patterson, of the CBD. ”(But) it looks like the tortoise will get some rest this fall.” 

Alsup scheduled a status hearing for June 14. 


Protesters prepare to upstage biotech industry gathering

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

 

 

DULZURA — Past the cardboard sign that reads “Ruckus,” at the end of a dirt road high in the Jamul mountains, protesters are training this week to take to the streets of San Diego during an upcoming biotech industry convention. 

The industry insists it is pioneering new technologies that benefit humanity by fighting disease and other health risks, increasing crop yields and eliminating pests. 

Opponents, however, are convinced that biotech companies are introducing potentially harmful, genetically engineered products into homes and farms, placing profits above people. 

In the past, the Ruckus Society has trained activists who have disrupted global trade meetings and political conventions. Now it’s preparing for the annual convention of the Biotechnology Industry Organization, or BIO, to be held June 24-27 in San Diego. 

San Diego police are anticipating that thousands of protesters will hit the streets next month. 

“We’re planning for the worst-case scenario: That is, thousands of demonstrators, some of whom plan on being violent or destructive,” Assistant Chief of Police John Welter said. “We will not tolerate violations of the law, and we will arrest and prosecute. But if they come here to demonstrate lawfully and peacefully, we want to work with them.” 

Han Shan, a spokesman for the Berkeley-based Ruckus Society, said he did not know how many people would protest in San Diego. But he hoped the turnout would surpass the turnout at the 2000 BIO convention in Boston, where police counted 2,500 demonstrators. 

The Ruckus Society believes violence is not the way to build support for its cause and distanced itself from the anarchists linked to chaos at the 1999 World Trade Organization protests in Seattle and other cities, according to Shan. 

“You want to talk about those folks, you should find some because you’re in the wrong place,” he said. “I’m not out there making enemies. I’m out there to change the debate.” 

More than 12,000 industry leaders and executives are expected to attend what BIO expects will be its biggest convention ever. The conventions have drawn large but peaceful demonstrations in other cities over the past three years. 

About 90 percent of the researchers and executives who plan to attend the San Diego convention are working on cures for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions, according to BIO officials. 

But people training at the Ruckus Society’s BioJustice Action Camp east of San Diego believe profit-centered biotech firms are also unleashing genetically modified “frankenfoods” and other potentially devastating technologies on the unwitting public. 

“We think there is another agenda,” said 31-year-old Simon Harris of Berkeley, who attended the camp. “And that is control.” 

At past BIO conventions, activists have called for an end to the sale of genetically engineered products and tougher regulation of the industry.  

They have also singled out the practices of individual companies. 

Harris said his goal at the upcoming protests will be to “bring some sunshine on the biotech industry and make them more accountable for what they’ve been doing.” 

The 150 people attending the camp on the grounds of the Madre Grande Monastery explored the basics of nonviolent protest: forming blockades, climbing buildings to hang banners, political theater and tips on how best to deal with tear gas fumes.  

Actor Woody Harrelson, a veteran of California protests, was expected to drop by the camp by Saturday. 

San Diego police aren’t disclosing details of their plan involving the convention, but Welter said enforcement costs could reach $1 million. 

“We have to make sure we don’t overreact or underreact,” he said.  

“If you overreact, you look like you’re limiting freedom of speech. If you underreact, people say ’where were the cops?”’ BIO officials said they were prepared for the protests, which have had little impact on past meetings, according to Carl Feldbaum, the organization’s president. 

“The introduction of a technology into a raucous democracy is going to create controversies, and that’s something we have to expect.” 

 

 

“I wish some of the demonstrators would talk to their parents about what kind of diseases and conditions the biotech industry has already addressed,” he said. 

 

On the Net: 

Ruckus Society, www.ruckus.org 

BIO, www.bio.org 

Alternate “Biodevastation” convention, www.biodev.org


Panel keeps prospects of high-speed rail funding alive

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

SACRAMENTO — A state Senate panel kept California’s high-speed rail project alive Thursday by approving $1 million for environmental studies for the 700-mile system. 

The action by the one of the Senate’s budget subcommittees means money for the environmental reviews is likely to be on the table when lawmakers negotiate a new state budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. 

The state’s economic and energy woes have put funding for the project at risk. 

The current budget includes $5 million for the first of three years of environmental studies that will be needed before the state can begin building the $26 billion system. The California High-Speed Rail Authority requested another $14 million for the second year of the studies, but Gov. Gray Davis didn’t include the money in his budget proposals. 

The Assembly’s transportation budget subcommittee didn’t approve any more money for the studies, but its Senate counterpart agreed to add $1 million. 

Assuming the $1 million remains in the Senate’s version of the budget, funding for the studies will be an issue when a two-house conference committee begins budget negotiations later this month or in June. 

Medhi Morshed, the authority’s executive director, said the $1 million by itself wouldn’t do much to further the environmental work. “The best we could do would be to get some of the work to a logical conclusion and preserved for the future,” he said. 

He said he didn’t know how much less than the $14 million he would need to continue the studies on a meaningful level. “A lot of these environmental issues are perishable,” he said. “The work doesn’t have a long shelf life. We’d have to go back and see what we can do that has a longer shelf life and what we can put aside.” 

He said some of the consulting firms that are taking part in the studies may not be willing to continue working at a substantially reduced level. 

“Each contractor has made a commitment of assigning their key people to this project,” Morshed said. “If we’re not going to utilize them then obviously they want to put them somewhere else.” 

The subcommittee chairman, Sen. Byron Sher, D-Stanford, said it would be difficult to find additional state money for the studies but he said high-speed rail supporters plan to try to get some federal funding. The high-speed system would link Sacramento, the Bay Area, Los Angeles and San Diego with trains running at top speeds of 220 mph. Supporters say it will be needed to help relieve highway and air traffic congestion created by rapid population growth in the next few decades.


Hospital paying out $10 million

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

SACRAMENTO — The largest Catholic hospital system in the Western states has settled allegations that its Sacramento hospital made false Medicare and Medi-Cal claims and agreed to pay the federal government $10.25 million. 

U.S. Attorney John Vincent announced the terms of the deal Wednesday. San Francisco-based Catholic Healthcare West and Mercy Healthcare Sacramento admit no wrongdoing. 

“We are committed to complying with all applicable government rules and regulations,” said William J. Hunt, CHW’s chief operating officer for the Sacramento area. 

The most critical words came from Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Hirst, who handled the matter with Assistant U.S. Attorney Adisa Abudu-Davis. 

“This is a case of systematic submissions of false claims,” Hirst said.  

“The evidence showed a deliberate choice, made at the highest levels, not to disclose” Medicare overpayments. 

The allegations were made by whistle-blower George Baca, who will receive nearly $2 million as his share of the settlement in accordance with the federal False Claims Act. 

 

 

mong the false billings alleged and covered by the settlement are: 

• Claims for nonreimbursable annual physical exams. 

• Claims that describe routine physician referrals as more expensive consultations. 

• Claims for undocumented lab work and other services. 


Cancer-striken man sues Philip Morris Inc

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

LOS ANGELES — The rugged men portrayed in Marlboro cigarette ads became the identity of a cancer-stricken smoker suing tobacco giant Philip Morris Inc., his attorney told a Superior Court jury in closing arguments Thursday. 

Unfolding a lengthytimeline chart peppered with the advertisements, attorney Michael Piuze said that his client, Richard Boeken, 56, even tried to emulate the tough-guy persona by joining the Navy and getting a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. 

“This was him,” the attorney said as he pointed to the Marlboro ads. “This grabbed him. This was his identity. He bought into it hook, line and sinker.” 

The attorney showed the jury a montage of Boeken’s Marlboro role models. 

“He saw cowboys, he saw tough guys, he saw people who said independence, cool,” Piuze said. 

The lawsuit seeks unspecified damages for allegations that include negligence, conspiracy and deceit, among others. 

Philip Morris lawyers, who were scheduled to begin their closing arguments Friday, claim Boeken knew the risks of smoking and stopped smoking in 1999 when he was diagnosed with lung cancer, only to take it up again a year later. 

Boeken, of Topanga, testified he believed advertising that said smoking was good. He contends he became addicted to cigarettes when he started smoking at age 13, and the Philip Morris brand Marlboro became his favorite during 40 years of smoking. 

Piuze showed the jury videotapes of 1994 congressional tobacco hearings and decades-old Philip Morris memos in arguing that the company knew, but publicly denied, that tobacco was addictive and causes cancer. 

Piuze said it was not until last year that Philip Morris publicly agreed, on its Web site, that tobacco was addictive. 

He replayed a portion of the 1994 hearing in which then-Philip Morris President William Campbell told senators, “I believe nicotine is not addictive,” as did six other tobacco executives. On the contrary, Piuze said, Philip Morris is “the world’s biggest drug dealer, something that puts the Colombian drug cartels to shame.” 

Piuze said tobacco companies alarmed by rising health concerns in 1954 began a 43-year public relations campaign rather than investigating the problems. 

Only in the 1990s did they begin studies to find cancer-causing agents in cigarettes, Piuze said, after running “probably the largest human experiment in the history of the world.” 

Boeken began smoking “to be cool” adult and sophisticated, the lawyer said. 

 

Piuze conceded Boeken knew smoking was harmful but said he never believed it would cause serious illness or death because of an industry “disinformation” campaign. 

Piuze said a defense expert testified that Boeken was addicted to cigarettes. The attorney noted that Boeken tried numerous times to quit smoking, including undergoing hypnosis therapy, but returned each time. 


Bush warns of ‘darker future’ if energy plan rejected

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

 

WASHINGTON — President Bush braced Americans on Thursday for a summer of blackouts, layoffs, business closings and skyrocketing fuel costs and warned of “a darker future” without his aggressive plans to drill for more oil and gas and rejuvenate nuclear power. 

“If we fail to act, Americans will face more and more widespread blackouts. If we fail to act, our country will become more reliant on foreign crude oil, putting our national energy security into the hands of foreign nations,” the president said in releasing a 163-page energy task force report in St. Paul, Minn. 

Seeking to dampen demand for fossil fuels and to appeal to conservation-minded citizens, Bush also offered tax incentives for people using alternative energy sources such as solar and wind power. 

“If we fail to act, this great country could face a darker future,” he said. 

Democrats and environmental groups raised a chorus of objections, promising a pitched battle over Bush’s regulatory and legislative initiative. 

“It focuses on drilling and production at the expense of our environment and conservation,” House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt, D-Mo., said. “And it does nothing to help people who need relief right now.” 

Even Republican lawmakers acknowledged the plan was filled with provisions that would be hard for some of their constituents to swallow. “Everybody understands there are a lot of ... problems out there,” said House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill. 

Bush, on the road in the Midwest, was hoping to build support for long-term solutions while many people are complaining about short-term energy woes. 

California Gov. Gray Davis, a Democrat, accused Bush of turning a blind eye to the state and tied the former Texas governor to the oil industry. “We are literally in a war with energy companies, many of which reside in Texas,” Davis said. 

Of the dozens of recommendations stuffed between the report’s glossy, blue covers, none offers immediate relief. 

“Unfortunately,” the report says, “there are no short-term solutions to long-term neglect.” 

In the report developed by Vice President Dick Cheney, Bush seeks to increase energy supplies by easing restrictions on oil and gas development on public lands, including a wildlife refuge in Alaska. He also will order agencies to expedite permits for energy-related projects. 

Bush also wants to give the federal government power to seize private property for the use of transmission lines. That “eminent domain” initiative was greeted coolly by lawmakers, including some Republicans. 

The report tables for further study some of the thorniest issues, such as fuel efficiency standards for automobiles and reusing spent nuclear reactor fuel. 

“We must work to build a new harmony between our energy needs and our environmental concerns,” Bush said. “The truth is, energy production and environmental protection are not competing priorities.” 

Many Republicans are worried that they will be punished by voters in the 2002 congressional elections if Bush doesn’t act quickly to bring down fuel costs. 

Some GOP lawmakers, including allies like Rep. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., are pushing for a reduction in the 18 cents-a-gallon federal gasoline tax over Bush’s public objections. 

They’re worried about voters like retiree James McCorkle, who voiced doubts about an energy plan proposed by two former oilmen, Bush and Cheney. 

“He should be trying to bring down the gas price,” said the 75-year-old St. Louis resident. 

“Doesn’t Bush want to give us a tax break so we can turn even more money over to the oil companies?” said salesman Hank Rogers, 37, of Chicopee, Mass. 

Recognizing the political risks, Bush and his advisers cast the nation’s energy picture in the most dire terms to prepare Americans for any sacrifices they’ll face this summer and the tough, long-term solutions Bush is proposing. 

The report says U.S. reliance on foreign oil is growing and shortages will only get worse without major changes: Energy supplies in 2020 will be 50 percent below demand without importing more energy, increasing efficiency or developing more domestic supplies. 

To make the point, Bush punctuated five sentences with the refrain “If we fail to act” – predicting higher energy prices, more blackouts, a dangerous reliance on imported oil and environmental damage unless his agenda is adopted. 

Breaking the bad news into regions, the report argues that energy shortages this summer will hurt Americans in almost every conceivable way. 

Farmers in the Midwest will pay more for fertilizer. 

Landlords in Illinois will charge more for rent. 

Businesses are closing in Washington state. Employees are being laid off in Arkansas. Brownouts are a threat in Connecticut. 

California is mentioned repeatedly, a measure of its political importance as well as the magnitude of its electricity shortages. 

The report compares today’s energy problems to the 1970s energy crisis, when fuel rationing and long lines at gasoline stations were the norm. 

Former President Carter, politically damaged by the 1970s crisis, accused Bush in a Washington Post article of using scare tactics to promote drilling on federal lands and other “environmental atrocities.” 

Urging opponents to tone down their rhetoric, Bush said, “We’ve yelled at each other enough. Now it’s time to listen to each other and to act.” 


Census shows single-father homes on the rise

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

WASHINGTON — More fathers are going solo in raising kids. 

It’s a change that single fathers say shows greater acceptance by American families and courts that sometimes the best place for children is with Dad. 

The 2000 census found: 

• In 2.2 million households, fathers raise their children without a mother. That’s about one household in 45. 

• The number of single-father households rose 62 percent in 10 years. 

• The portion of the country’s total 105.5 million households that were headed by single fathers with children living there doubled in a decade, to 2 percent. 

Single fathers say the numbers help tear down a long-standing conception that single fathers tend to abandon their kids, or at least not take as good care of them as single moms, said Vince Regan, an Internet consultant from Grand Rapids, Mich., who is raising five kids on his own. 

“In time, it goes a long way to helping society think that single fathers do help their kids and want to be part of their lives,” he said. 

Thomas Coleman, executive director of the American Association for Single People, attributed the rise in single dads to a variety of reasons, including more judges awarding custody to fathers in divorce cases and more women choosing their jobs over family life. 

The percentage increase in single-father households far outpaced other living arrangements. The “Ozzie and Harriett” household, where both parents raise the children like on the old TV show, increased by 6 percent, and single-mother homes were up by 25 percent. Father-headed households are still only a small percentage. Married couples with children make up 24 percent of all households – whether family or non-family. They were 39 percent of all homes in 1970. Single-mother homes made up 7 percent of all households in 2000, up from 5 percent over 30 years ago. 

Looked at another way, single father homes made up 3 percent of the country’s 71 million family households in 2000. Family households are those in which one or more people are related to the householder. 

Single fathers “need help just as much as single mothers,” said Darryl Pure, a psychologist from Chicago who has had sole custody of his three children for four years, but they have a harder time asking. 

“There’s often a fear among single fathers that if the mother steps in, she’ll regain custody, so single, custodial fathers don’t go after child support as much as single mothers do, and I know a lot of fathers that are really impoverished,” Pure said. 

The Census Bureau counts single fathers in a category that could allow other adults, such as the child’s grandparents, to be present, but bureau analysts said research shows that most of the men in the category are raising a child alone. 

The bureau released basic figures for 21 states and the District of Columbia this week on topics ranging from age to home ownership. Other states are scheduled to be released later this month. 

According to 2000 census data being released Friday, some of the biggest increase in single-father households occurred in southern and western states: up 126 percent in Nevada, and 74 percent in Delaware. 

On the Net: 

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/ 

Responsible Single Fathers: http://www.singlefather.org/ 

Family Research Council: http://www.frc.org/


Cancer drug tests stopped over toxicity findings

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

BOSTON — Two national studies of a widely used drug for colorectal cancer were suspended for new patients because the drug turned out to be more toxic than expected. 

Some doctors have viewed the five-year-old drug irinotecan, also known by the brand name Camptosar, as the most useful drug against advanced colorectal cancer in years.  

It is recommended as standard therapy in combination with other drugs. 

However, almost three times as many patients died taking the standard drug combination in the latest studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. 

The researchers reported their findings in a letter to the editor of The New England Journal of Medicine. Prompted by the urgency of the findings, the journal released the letter Thursday, although it is scheduled for publication June 21. 

In one study of 841 patients, the investigators tested irinotecan, as it is now approved for use, on advanced patients whose cancer has spread to other organs. In the other study of 1,263 so-called stage III patients, it had not yet spread.  

The patients came from across the United States and Canada. 

In each study, 14 patients died after they were given a standard drug combination with irinotecan. Just five died with other drug combinations in each study. 

Some of the dead patients had blood clots, blood poisoning, dehydrating diarrhea, or a drop in white blood cells.  

The investigators said it is not yet clear why certain patients suffered such effects. The researchers will review their findings in coming months for clues. 

The study of the advanced patients may resume within weeks with new patients on lower doses. The other study was reaching its target number of patients just as the toxicity data arose, so it won’t reopen. 

One of the study chairmen, Dr. Michael O’Connell, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recommended that doctors in the field reduce the drug’s dose and watch more carefully for signs of toxicity. 

However, he and others said earlier studies prove the drug can prolong life in advanced cases – though for a limited time.  

“Irinotecan remains an important drug,” said the lead investigator of the stage III study, Dr. Leonard Saltz, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. 

Colorectal cancer – cancer of the colon and rectum – is America’s No. 2 cancer killer after lung cancer, claiming about 56,000 lives annually. 

About 15,000 patients with advanced colorectal cancer have been treated with the drug since it was approved as a first-line treatment last year, according to maker Pharmacia & Upjohn. Previously, it was used as a last resort. 

The manufacturer sent letters last week to cancer doctors around the country to advise them of the latest findings.  

Company Vice President Ivan Horak said it should remain a standard therapy for advanced colorectal cancer. 

The drug works by blocking the ability of fast-multiplying cancer cells to copy their genetic material and divide. Doctors advise people 50 and older to get regular checkups for colorectal cancer.


Simple ways to fix a leaky faucet

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

Q: I have a leaky bathroom faucet. Can you tell me some simple instructions to fix it? Please include specific tools, and parts needed. 

A: It sounds as though you might have a faulty gasket. Changing a faucet gasket is easy. But remember, if it is leaking from the valve housing it is the packing gasket or washer, and if it is leaking from the tip of the faucet it is the valve gasket. Please understand the previous terms before proceeding. Check out the Web site www.onthehouse.com and type valve gasket into the search engine. There you will find 800 words or so and a picture that will help walk you through the repair. By the way, the parts for the repair are under a dollar for two handle faucets and about $5 for single handle. 

Q: We own a 90-plus-year-old house. In the last nine months our hot water pressure has dropped to half of what our cold water pressure is. Our gas water heater is about six years old and we use city water. The pressure for the cold water seems normal at all faucets. We do not have soft water, and lime deposits killed our previous electric water heater after 10 years of use. Is the water heater bad again? 

A: The sudden drop in hot water pressure is often due to corroded nipples at the top of your water heater. Most of the time this is an easy do-it-yourself repair. First, turn off the water-supply valve to the water heater. Next, remove both supply pipes (usually flexible corrugated copper). Now you will have to remove the short piece of pipe at each of the openings. You’ll need a pipe wrench for these and supply lines. 

Here’s the glitch. Sometimes these pipes are so corroded they fall apart. Here is where you will either need to know about easy outs or where a call to the plumber is in order. In either case, once the old pipes are out, you will want to replace them with new Teflon-coated nipples. With these special nipples the corrosion won’t come back and your hot water will again be free to run at full force. 

By the way, you might want to take the extra time to replace your cathodic anode. It will extend the life of your water heater many times over.  

The nipples should cost about $5 and the anode about $15. If you want a good book on water heater maintenance, check out our Web site at www.onthehouse.com. Go to the bookstore and pick up a copy of “The Water Heater Workbook.” 

 


European automakers make the grade

The Associated Press
Friday May 18, 2001

Asian manufacturers still No.1, but quality gap closing 

 

DETROIT — Asian automakers still lead the way on overall vehicle quality but Europeans showed the greatest improvement in the past year, according to the latest study by J.D. Power and Associates. 

European automakers have all but closed the quality gap with Asian automakers, who averaged 140 problems per 100 vehicles in this year’s study. 

The Europeans averaged 141 problems per 100 vehicles, after averaging 156 last year. Domestic automakers averaged 153 problems per 100 vehicles, the study says. 

Among the Europeans, Jaguar showed a 21 percent improvement over last year with 108 problems per 100 vehicles, or just more than one problem per vehicle – 21 fewer problems per vehicle than last year. 

Jaguar began a long, steady climb toward general quality improvement after being taken over by Ford Motor Co. in 1989, said Joe Ivers, executive director of quality and consumer satisfaction at J.D. Powers. 

Volkswagen AG also showed marked quality improvement, with an average of 159 problems per 100 vehicles, 30 fewer than in last year’s study. 

All three U.S.-based automakers – General Motors Corp., Ford and the Chrysler division of DaimlerChrysler AG – had top-ranked vehicles in the study, including the GMC Sonoma compact pickup truck, Ford Expedition full-size SUV, Chrysler Concorde and the Chevrolet Corvette. 

“We believe the J.D. and Associates results show that GM’s quality initiatives are having a positive and lasting effect on our products and customers,” Ronald Zarrella, GM’s president of North American operations, said in a statement. 

Vehicles built by Ford averaged 162 problems per 100 vehicles, the highest among domestic automakers and four more than last year. GM had 146, while DaimlerChrysler averaged 154. 

“Obviously we have lots of work ahead of us. We are accelerating all our efforts to improve. We’re not happy,” said Ford spokeswoman Marcy Evans. 

Vehicles produced by Toyota, including its luxury Lexus division, led in seven categories, by far the most of any automaker. 

Winners included Toyota’s Corolla in the compact car division, Lexus LS 430 in the premium luxury car category and Tundra among full-size pickups. 

Two of Toyota’s North American plants also took top honors in this year’s study. None of the domestic automakers’ plants scored in the top three in North America, but a Ford-owned Jaguar plant in England won second place in Europe. A BMW plant in Munich, Germany, was first. 

J.D. Powers’ Ivers said the secret to Toyota’s success in maintaining quality is its practice of “taking variation out of vehicle production,” which leads to consistency. 

The 2001 Initial Quality Study is based on survey responses from more than 54,000 new-vehicle owners and lessees after 90 days of ownership. This is the study’s 15th year.


’Jackets drop third straight; title hopes gone

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Thursday May 17, 2001

 

 

The Berkeley High baseball team went into Wednesday’s showdown at Encinal still clinging to league title hopes. But after a 6-3 loss, the team’s third in a row, the ’Jackets are now just hoping to hang onto a North Coast Section playoff spot. 

The loss dropped Berkeley (16-7 overall, 7-4 ACCAL) out of the ACCAL championship picture, while Encinal (9-3 ACCAL) clinched at least a share of the title. Cory Dunlap went the distance for the Jets, giving up 10 hits but walking none for his seventh win of the year. Three of Berkeley’s hits didn’t leave the infield, and Dunlap managed to shut down the top of the ’Jacket order. The top three Berkeley hitters, Lee Franklin, DeAndre Miller and Clinton Calhoun, were just 2-for-12 at the plate. 

That lack of production really hurt when Matt Toma started banging the ball around the park. Toma made solid contact off of Dunlap in all four of his at-bats, including a towering home run in the second inning and an RBI double in the third. Toma got three hits in the game, all to the opposite field. 

“He was throwing me outside pitches, so today was the day to go to right for me,” Toma said. “We’re getting hits, but we’re just not stringing them together right now.” 

Berkeley head coach Tim Moellering complimented his slugger after the game. 

“Matt’s been a great hitter all year,” he said. “It was just our failure to get on base ahead of him that was the problem today.” 

Toma’s homer in the second tied the game at 1-1, but Dunlap said he wasn’t fazed by the shot. 

“I wasn’t really worried,” Dunlap said. “I know this is a hitters’ ballpark, so I don’t let the homers stress me out. I know those would just be doubles in other places.” 

But other than Toma’s power, the ’Jackets just couldn’t score. Meanwhile, an uncharacteristically wild Sean Souders struggled on the mound. The Jets scored a run in each of the first two innings, and the sophomore walked five batters before being lifted in the middle of the fourth with two more runs already in and men on first and second. Reliever Cole Stipovich wasn’t able to stop the bleeding before two more hits turned into two more Encinal runs. 

The ’Jackets had one last gasp left in them in their final at-bats. With one out in the seventh, Miller and Calhoun both hit singles. Toma hit another shot to right, but it was right at Encinal’s Eugene Smith, who snagged it for the second out. Catcher Paco Flores managed to drive in Miller with a single, and Berkeley had designated hitter Jeremy LeBeau at the plate representing the tying run. LeBeau put a charge into the ball, but it was right at Dunlap, who smothered the ball and threw to first to end the game. 

“We’re obviously not a high-powered offensive machine,” Moellering said. “Even in most of our big wins, we’ve only scored two or three runs.” 

Berkeley finishes the regular season at home against El Cerrito on Friday, then Moellering will have to attend the NCS meeting on Sunday to apply for a spot in the playoffs. 

“We just have to win our game Friday, then hope for an at-large bid,” Moellering said. “We can’t do anything else; it’s up to the committee.”


Arts & Entertainment

Thursday May 17, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels like an earthworm, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins, and become little “dump” workers. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” Through May 2002 An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum “Joe Brainard: A Retrospective,” Through May 27. The selections include 150 collages, assemblages, paintings, drawings, and book covers. Brainard’s art is characterized by its humor and exuberant color, and by its combinations of media and subject matter. “Ricky Swallow/Matrix 191,” Including new sculptures and drawings; Through May 27 $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history.“Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing.This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge.“Within the Human Brain” Ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “T. Rex on Trial,” Through May 28 Where was T. Rex at the time of the crime? Learn how paleontologists decipher clues to dinosaur behavior. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 18: Ensign, All Bets Off, Playing Enemy, Association Area, Blessing the Hogs; May 19: Punk Prom and benefit for India quake victims features Pansy Division, Plus Ones, Dave Hill, Iron Ass; May 25: Controlling Hand, Wormwood, Goats Blood, American Waste, Quick to Blame; May 26: Honor System, Divit, Enemy You, Eleventeen, Tragedy Andy; June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2 El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 17: 10 p.m. Dead DJ Night with Digital Dave; May 18: 9:30 p.m. Reggae Angels with Mystic Roots; May 19: 9:30 Kotoja; May 20: 8:30 p.m. Jude Taylor and His Burning Flames 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 17: The Rincon Ramblers; May 18: Todd Snider; May 19: Oak, Ash and Thorn; May 20: KALW’s 60th Anniversary Concert featuring Paul Pena, Orla and the Gasmen, Kennelly Irish Dancers, Kathy Kallick and Nina Gerber. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 17: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Rythm Doctors; ; 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Peña Cultural Center May 17, 8 p.m.: Tribu; May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane; May 20: 6 p.m. Venezuelan Music Recital 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

Tribu May 17, 8 p.m. Direct from Mexico, Tribu plays a concert of ancestral music of the Mayan, Aztec, Olmec, Zapotec, Purerpecha, Chichimec, Otomi, and Toltec. Tribu have reconstructed and rescued some of the oldest music in the Americas. $12 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Jazz Singers Collective May 17, 8 p.m. Anna’s Bistro 1801 University Ave. 849-2662 

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fund-raiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

“En Mouvement/In Motion” May 18, 19 7 p.m., May 19, 20 2 p.m. Part of the Berkeley Ballet Theater Spring Showcase, this production is a collection of works by student dancers/ $15. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 843-4689  

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“The Laramie Project” May 18 - July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members travelled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard. The play is about the community and the impact Shepard’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Sister, My Sister” May 20, 5 p.m. Poetry, photography and dramatic readings which give voice to women and children cuaght in homelessness. Admission is free, donations welcome. Live Oak Park Theatre1301 Shattuck Ave. 528-8198 

 

Pacific Film Archive May 18: 7:30 The Cloud-Capped Star; May 19: 3:30 Starewicz Puppet Films; May 20: 5:30 The New Gulliver Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“Drowning in a Sea of Plastics” Video and Discussion Night May 16, 7 p.m. Join the Ecology Center’s Plastic Task Force for a viewing of “Trade Secrets” and “Synthetic Sea.” Free. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo Ave. 548-2220 ext. 233 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 17: Lalita Tademy reads “Cane River”; May 18: Oscar London, M.D. copes with “From Voodoo to Viagra: The Magic of Medicine” 

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. 559-9500 All events at 7 p.m., unless noted May 17: Jean Shinoda Bolen talks about “Goddesses In Older Women: Archetypes in Women Over Fifty”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”; May 29, 7 - 9 p.m.: Travel Photo Workshop with Joan Bobkoff. $15 registration fee  

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 17: Gregory Listach Gayle with host Mark States; May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo; Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

Adan David Miller and JoJo Doig May 20, 7 p.m. Poetry and spoken word. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo 548-3333 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 


Letters to the Editor

Thursday May 17, 2001

Correcting the record on Beth El 

Editor: 

A May 11 letter to the Berkeley Daily Planet from Juliet Lamont and Phil Price opposing Congregation Beth El’s building plans is riddled with misstatements. It raises false images of Beth El, its programs and the conclusions of the extensive EIR conducted on the project. Here are a few of the real facts: 

• Beth El does not rent its sanctuary and social hall. It does not hold conferences or "cocktail parties."  

• Sound standards will not be exceeded “every day of the week” as claimed. The Environmental Impact Report on the project indicated that use of the parking lot during an eight- week summer camp could exceed the Berkeley noise ordinance by ONE DECIBEL, but only if people drop off twice as many kids as traffic engineers observed them dropping off in the actual situation. According to the EIR, no other Beth El activity is likely to generate even that much noise. 

• The highest point the roof of the planned sanctuary will be almost 35 feet, and the average height of the building, significantly less. Does 35 feet “dominate the landscape?” No, it is lower than several nearby houses and within the height limits of Berkeley’s zoning ordinance. 

• Is parking scarce in the neighborhood? There are no parking restrictions and no resident parking permits in the area, which are the usual signs of tight parking. Most importantly, several parking surveys have indicated many available parking spaces during all hours of the week. 

• Beth El moved its planned parking spaces away from the land over the underground part of the creek in response to opponents’ requests. That change did move parking closer to the path, a trade-off Zoning Board members approved. 

But truth and tradeoffs do not seem to be in the vocabulary of the opponents of this project. They twist the "facts" to suit their needs. Even worse, they demand total capitulation to a conflicting and constantly shifting list of demands, something that is not only unreasonable, but also impossible. 

 

Alex Bergtraun 

Berkeley 

 

State senator condemns medical pot ruling 

 

Editor: 

“I am appalled and infuriated by the truly awful decision of the United States Supreme Court effectively limiting the rights of Californians (and all Americans), to obtain and utilize upon advice of their personal physicians, marijuana to assist in prolonging life by making food more palatable, alleviating pain and assisting in their effective treatment. 

What a shame! 

This decision is: 

• Contrary to science; 

• Contrary to the will of the People of California and several other states where voters have passed initiatives legalizing the medical use of marijuana; 

• Contrary to the tenet of personal freedom on which our Constitution is based; and 

• Contrary to the doctrine of states’ rights on which our nation was founded. 

What a shame! 

The Supreme Court’s decision is especially obnoxious for its blind adherence to the findings of the United States Congress (way back in 1970) with respect to the medicinal efficacy of marijuana. There is a much higher authority whose experience–based knowledge I find far more trustworthy. Ask the patients whose pain and lives are at stake. Ask the physicians who treat them. Marijuana truly is effective in alleviating pain and providing relief for patients with AIDS, cancer and other lesser ailments. 

What a shame! 

This decision has been meted out by the same five (IN)Justices who otherwise routinely overrule that same Congress with respect to states’ rights on matters of much broader import. They have ruled recently, for example, that Congress cannot infringe on state’s rights to provide access laws as they see fit for the disabled–are not these patients’ needs every bit as legitimate for states to address? This ruling can only serve to drive patients yearning for relief towards the criminal underworld 

What a shame! 

Who can fail to note that it is the same five (IN)Justices who used our once proud United States Supreme Court politically to determine the outcome of the 2000 Presidential election? Now they extend their political operation to select amongst Congressional Acts and hence deny patients (and those doctors and others who would serve their needs) what they need to keep themselves healthy, even alive! 

What a shame! 

I hereby recommit myself to engage in every conceivable action in support of the cause of re-establishing the freedom of individuals and the rights of states to govern our own affairs – especially with respect to the medical uses of marijuana. 

I urge every Californian to register – in every non–violent way possible – her/his anger with and dissent from this court and this decision, and join me in a crusade to bring freedom and justice back to the judicial system and back to the people of California and the entire United States.” 

 

Sen. John Vasconcellos, 

D-San Jose 

 

Kids are born with spiritual roots 

Editor:  

Included in your article on raising children with religion (Interfaith Marriages, May 10), David Sauer boldly states that couples who do not choose “religious guidelines” for their children are somehow damaging them because they have “no spiritual roots.” In reality, every child has spiritual roots and can realize them without religious indoctrination when the parents are truly committed to spiritual values.  

Traditional peoples were able to offer their children an appreciation of their spiritual foundation since the beginning of time, without religion.  

They understood the value of freedom of thought as a first step to spiritual understanding . The authoritarian approach, as expressed by Mr. Sauer and Ms. Littman, is precisely why so many have turned their backs on religion long ago. 

 

Michael Bauce 

Berkeley


Calendar of Events & Activities

Thursday May 17, 2001


Thursday, May 17

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month. 869-2547 

 

“What is Queer Spirituality?” 

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 

1798 Scenic Ave.  

Mudd Bldg., Room 100 

Bill Glenn, PSR alumni and leader of Spirit Group, will lead a panel discussion on the dynamic shape of queer spirituality today.  

849-8206 

 

Simplicity Forum 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Library 

Claremont Branch  

2940 Benveue Ave.  

Facilitated by Cecile Andrews, author of “Circles of Simplicity,” learn about this movement whose philosophy is “the examined life richly lived.” Work less, consume less, rush less, and build community with friends and family.  

Call 549-3509  

www.seedsofsimplicity.org  

 

Free Smoking Cessation Class  

5:30 - 7:30 p.m.  

Six Thursday classes through May 17.  

Call 644-6422 to register and for location  

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meeting is the spring barbecue.  

654-5486 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

First day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continues Tuesday May 22. $70 for both days. 

525-7610 

 

John Muir May Fair 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

John Muir Elementary School 

2955 Claremont Ave 

Cake walk, face painting, games, food and student performances, quilt raffle. Free. 

644-6410 

 


Friday, May 18

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 


Saturday, May 19

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Annual strawberry tasting 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Get to Know Your Plants 

1 - 4 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn what to look for and what and how to record it to more intimately know your plants.  

548-2220 

 

“Be Your Own Boss” 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

YWCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Second Saturday of a two day workshop on starting up small businesses (see May 12). 

415-541-8580 

 

Community Summit on  

Smaller Learning  

Communities 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Alternative High School  

MLK Jr. Way (at Derby)  

All teachers, students, administrators, parents, and community members are encouraged to attend this meeting on smaller learning communities at Berkeley High. Translation, childcare, and food will be provided.  

540-1252 to RSVP for services 

 

Campaign for Equality Benefit  

7:30 - 10 p.m. 

Montclair Women’s Cultural Arts Club  

1650 Mountain Blvd.  

Oakland 

A comedy benefit with performances by Karen Ripley, Julia Jackson, Pippi Lovestocking, Darrick Richardson, and Nick Leonard. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the International Lesbian Gay Association Scholarship Fund for the 2001 ILGA Summit in Oakland.  

$15 - $20  

466-5050 

 

Finish Carpentry 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Carpenter/contractor Kevin Stamm leads workshop. $95. 525-7610 

 

Earthquake Retrofitting 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Seminar taught by structural engineer Tony DeMascole and seismic contractor Jim Gillett. $75. 

525-7610 

 

How to Prevent Home Owner Nightmares 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Dispute prevention and early resolution seminar taught by contractor/mediator Ron Kelly. $75. 

525-7610 

Puppet Shows 

1:30 and 2:30 p.m. 

Hall of Health (Lower Level) 

2230 Shattuck Ave. 

Program on physical and mental differences. Promotes acceptance and understanding. Free. 

549-1564  

 


Sunday, May 20

 

Reimagining Pacific Cities  

6 - 8:30 p.m. 

New Pacific Studio  

1523 Hearst Ave.  

“How are Pacific cities reshaping their cultural and environmental institutions to better serve the needs and enhance the present and future quality of life of all segments of their societies?” A series of ten seminars linking the Bay Area, Seattle, Portland, and other pacific cities.  

$10 per meeting  

Call 849-0217 

 

 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

 

 

Working with Awareness,  

Concentration, Energy 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Nyingma members discuss meditative awareness in everyday life. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Salsa Lesson & Dance Party  

7 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Kick up your heels and move your hips with professional instructors Mati Mizrachi and Ron Louie. Plus Israeli food provided by the Holy Land Restaurant. Novices encouraged to attend and no partners are required.  

$12  

RSVP: 237-9874 

 

Mediterranean Herbs 

1:30 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Tour of herbs. Learn myths and legends, ideas for planting in home gardens. 

643-1924 

 

Jazz on 4th Street Festival 

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

4th St. between Hearst and Virginia 

Performances by Berkeley High Jazz Ensemble and two Berkeley High Jazz Combos, among others. Also 4th St. merchants, raffle prizes, arts and crafts. Free admission. Proceeds benefit Berkeley High Performing Arts.  

526-6294 

 

 


Monday, May 21

 

7:30 - 10 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Rabbi Yaacov Deyo, founder of L.A.’s SpeedDating will review creation from the reference point of physics and compare this to the description classical Jewish sources have given for our universe and its creation.  

$10  

848-0237 x127 

 

Tuesday, May 22 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Strawberry tasting 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Second day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continued from Thursday May 17. $70 for both days. 

525-7610 

 

Wednesday, May 23  

Healthful Building Materials  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St. 

Seminar conducted by environmental consultant Darrel DeBoer.  

$35 per person  

525-7610 

 

Regional Tranportation Talk 

1:30 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Ave. 

Rebecca Kaplan of the Bay Area Transportation and Land Use Coalition will talk about the Metropolitan Transportation Commision’s 25-year Regional Transportation Plan at the regular meeting of the Berkeley Gray Panthers. Open to the public. 

548-9696 

 

Thursday, May 24  

Paddling Adventures  

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Dan Crandell, member of the U.S. National Kayak Surf Team and owner of Current Adventures Kayak School, will introduce attendees to all aspects of kayaking. Free  

527-4140 

 

Friday, May 25  

Strong Women - Writers & 

Heroes of Literature 

1 - 3 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Saturday, May 26 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Himalayan Fair 

10 a.m. - 7 p.m.  

Live Oak Park  

1300 Shattuck Ave.  

The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects.  

$5 donation 

869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

Chocolate and Chalk Art Festival 

9 a.m. 

Registration at Peralta Park 

1561 Solano Ave. 

Areas of sidewalk will be assigned to participants to create their own sidewalk art. People who find all five of the chocolate kisses chalked onto Solano Ave. can enter raffle for cash prize. Chocolate Menu available listing various items for various chocolate items for sale from Solano businesses. Dog fashion show at Solano Ave. and Key Route in Albany at 2 p.m. Free. 

527-5358 

 

Sunday, May 27  

Himalayan Fair 

10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.  

Live Oak Park  

1300 Shattuck Ave.  

The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects.  

$5 donation 

869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net 

 

Getting Calm; Staying Clear 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Discussion of meditation and analysis. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812  

 

Inside Interior Design  

10 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St. 

Seminar led by certified interior designer and artist Lori Inman.  

$35 per person  

525-7610  

 

Tuesday, May 29 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Wednesday, May 30  

Dream Home for a Song  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St. 

Seminar conducted by author/contractor/owner-builder David Cook.  

$35 per person  

525-7610  

 

Thursday, May 31  

Backpacking in Northern CA.  

7 p.m. 

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Outdoors Unlimited’s director, Ari Derfel, will give a slide presentation on some of his favorite destinations for three-to-four-day backpacking vacations. Free  

527-4140 

 

Attic Conversions  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St. 

Seminar conducted by architect/builder Andus Brandt.  

$35 per person  

525-7610  

 

League of Women Voters’ Dinner and Meeting 

5:30 - 9 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church 

941 The Alameda 

Featuring speaker Brenda Harbin-Forte, presiding judge of the Alameda County Juvenile Court on “What’s happening with Alameda County children in the juvenile justice system after Prop. 21?” $10 to reserve buffet supper. May bring own meal or come only for meeting/speaker. 

843-8824  

 

 


UC Regents drop system’s ban on affirmative action

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Thursday May 17, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO – In a move affirmative action supporters hailed as a major victory, the University of California Board of Regents voted unanimously to drop its controversial 1995 ban on race-based admissions Wednesday.  

The vote does nothing to reinstate the use of racial preferences, a practice outlawed by Proposition 209. But supporters said it sends a message that the University of California system welcomes minority students. 

“I believe it is important for the Board of Regents to come together and send a message that we share a commitment to a diverse student body,” said Regent Judith Hopkinson, who introduced the resolution rescinding the affirmative action ban. 

Regent William Bagley, an outspoken opponent of the ban for the last six years, said Wednesday’s vote was about “repairing the reputation of the university.” 

“It’s more than symbolic,” Bagley said, after the vote. “It sends a message to the academic community of the world that we are no longer the sponsors of a national movement.” 

Many have credited the University of California with helping to launch a national movement to roll back affirmative action when it voted for the affirmative action ban. 

UC Berkeley student Alma Hernandez, a member of the California Statewide Affirmative Action Coalition (CSAAC) said Wednesday’s vote will make UC schools more inviting to minorities everywhere. 

“When you do recruiting...people will tell you, ‘I don’t want to go to UC Berkeley.’” said Hernandez, a graduating senior. “In terms of recruiting and retaining students, it does a lot for those efforts.” 

If not for last minute changes to the language of the regents’ proposed resolution, the political rhetoric surrounding Wednesday’s vote might have been quite different. 

More than 300 students from various University of California campuses came prepared to protest the vote Wednesday because they felt the proposed resolution was weakly worded and largely insignificant. 

“It’s just them washing their hands saying, you know, don’t bother us anymore,” said UC Berkeley freshman Gabriela Santizo, a CSAAC spokesperson. 

Members of the state legislature came prepared to denounce the Board of regents Wednesday for introducing a resolution which, they claimed, did not go far enough to disavow the affirmative action ban.  

In an interview Wednesday, Assemblymember Dion Aroner, D-Berkeley, also criticized the proposed resolution for failing to give assurances that the board would consider real changes in admissions policy aimed at increasing the numbers of underrepresented minorities admitted to the UC system. 

But, in negotiations that lasted right up until the moment the resolution was introduced Wednesday, a number of changes were put in place to mollify the politicians and win the support of all the regents.  

Language tending to praise the affirmative action ban was removed (for example, the following paragraph: “Since the adoption of (the affirmative action ban), some students at the University have expressed pride in knowing that they were admitted based on their own accomplishments.”) 

A letter written by board President Richard Atkinson in conjunction with the resolution was amended to include a promise that he would bring recommendations for reforming the admissions process to the Board of Regents within the next year. 

The practical impact of Wednesday’s vote could be quite limited. The approved resolution turned over the question of how the current admissions process can be reformed to admit more underrepresented minorities to the University of California’s Academic Senate, made up of professors, with the expectation that this body will bring its recommendations to the Board of Regents by the end of the year. 

What those recommendation will be and whether they have any impact on the number of minorities admitted to UC campuses, remains to be seen. 

The Academic Senate will decide, for example, whether to keep a current practice which says half of all students admitted to the UC system must be admitted based solely on “academic criteria,” which are based on the student’s grade point average and Scholastic Aptitude Test score. If it opts for a more “comprehensive” evaluation process for all students, the numbers of minorities admitted to the system could greatly increase, Aroner and others said Wednesday. 

The Academic Senate could also opt to drop the SATI test from the admissions process altogether, a move that Student Regent Justin Fong said would be a step towards equity in the admissions process since minorities historically perform worse than whites on the test. 

State Assemblymember Jerome Horton may have described the situation best when he addressed the regents at the Wednesday meeting: “It appears as though the door is cracking...Progress will depend on our ability to implement change, which will take some time.” 


Eight individuals, one team named to Cal Hall of Fame

Daily Planet Wire Services
Thursday May 17, 2001

Eight different sports and seven different decades are represented in the 2001 class selected for induction in the University of California Athletic Hall of Fame, the school announced this week.  

The eight individuals and one team induction group include a .400 hitter in baseball, the first one-handed shooter on the West Coast in the sport of basketball, a three-time Olympic water polo star and a five-time track and field All-American.  

The group will be formally inducted on Friday, Nov. 2, at the annual Hall of Fame banquet at Hs Lordships restaurant located on the Berkeley Marina. They will also be honored at halftime on Nov. 3, during the Bears home football game against Arizona.  

The class of ‘01 brings the total number of athletes enshrined in Cal’s Hall of Fame to 173 individuals and five crews, each of whom represent the best of Cal’s rich athletic heritage. The Cal Hall of Fame was inaugurated in 1986 and this year’s group represents the 16th class of inductees.  

• An outstanding outfielder who earned All-America honors in 1953, Tom Keough was a superior hitter who had a career batting average of .398, which remains No. 1 in Cal history. Keough hit .400 in 1952 and .396 in 1953, and then went on to play for the Boston Red Sox for several seasons. He was a versatile athlete who also played three years under Pappy Waldorf on the Bears football team, having the distinction of playing in the 1951 Rose Bowl.  

• The first player on the West Coast to use a one-handed shot to any extent, Joe Kintana earned All-Coast honors and was a first team All-America selection by the Helms Athletic Foundation as a senior in 1932. Kintana also led Cal to the conference title in 1932 and started as a junior in 1931, earning All-Coast honors that season as well.  

• One of the finest water polo players this country has ever produced, Chris Humbert earned All-America honors four straight seasons at Cal and led the Golden Bears to three NCAA Championships (1988, ‘90 and ‘91) during his career. Humbert was the NCAA Player of the Year as both a junior and senior and has been a starter on the U.S. Olympic team at the 1992, ‘96 and 2000 Olympic Games. 

• A five-time All-American middle distance star at Cal, Forrest Beaty helped the Bears to an NCAA Championship mile relay in both 1964 and ‘65. Beaty finished second in the NCAA 440 in 1965 and was on Cal’s national runner-up mile relay team in 1966. He won both the Pac-8 220 and the 440 in 1965, while also helping the Bears to first place finishes in the 440 relay and the mile relay. 

• Steve Rivera held Cal’s all-time leading receiving mark with 138 receptions in his three-year career from 1973-75 for 16 years (until the record was broken by Brian Treggs in 1991). Rivera earned consensus All-America honors in 1975 when he hauled in 57 catches, the most ever by a Cal player in a single-season. His 205 yards in receptions against Stanford in 1974 ranked as the second best single-game total in Cal history. 

• One of the great point guards in Cal history, Gene Ransom was only 5-9, but was extremely athletic. He ranks as the Bears 14th leading career scorer with 1,185 points in three years, a 14.8 average. Ransom led Cal in assists all three years he played and averaged 17.0 points a game during 1977-78 season. He ranks fifth on Cal’s career assist chart with 356 and led the Bears in steals with 2.3 per game in ‘77-78.  

• The 1980 Cal women’s crew captured the Bears first women’s team championship in any sport. Under first-year coach Pat Sweeney, a 1976 Olympic silver medalist from Great Britain, Cal dominated the National Championship, putting together possibly the finest regatta ever in the history of women’s collegiate rowing.  

• Chuck Thompson was one of the world’s best tumblers during his era and placed first in the NCAA tumbling competition in both 1948 and ‘49. Thompson also captured the Southern Pacific Division tumbling title in ‘48 and ‘49, won the NAAU Championship in 1947 and finished second in both ‘48 and ‘49.  

• Gene Smith played three seasons of tennis at Cal and was undefeated in conference singles matches at home during that time. He was a member of Cal’s 1933 conference championship team and, as a senior in 1934, defeated UCLA’s Jack Tidball, who had won the NCAA singles title the previous year.


Council squabbles over task force

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Thursday May 17, 2001

A City Council task force, working to increase transit ridership and reduce fares, was derailed Tuesday because of bickering between progressive and moderate council factions. 

“Just another night in the sand box,” quipped Councilmember Polly Armstrong in response to arguments she deemed petty.  

The nine-member council is dominated by the five-member progressive faction. The opposing sides have a history of bitter disagreements over issues that include parking, development and homelessness.  

Some council watchers say the most acrimonious battles appear to occur between moderate Mayor Shirley Dean and progressive Councilmember Kriss Worthington. Both were key players in the collapse of the Transit Task Force during Tuesday’s meeting. 

A confrontation erupted over a recommendation by Worthington that would have ended the term of the Transit Task Force whose goal was to put together a citywide transit pass. 

The task force was created by the council in September 2000 after six months of wrangling. The citywide pass for Berkeley residents and workers might have been patterned on the UC Berkeley Class Pass program, for which students pay a fixed $18 fee twice a year, pick up a pass and ride buses free. The program has greatly increased bus ridership among students. 

The three-person task force, which has had only two meetings since it was created, consisted of Dean, Armstrong, both moderates, and Councilmember Linda Maio, the only progressive.  

Worthington said his recommendation to terminate the task force was due to the fact that it was mandated to “exist for a short duration of a few weeks.” 

Paradoxically, Worthington argued that he and moderate Councilmember Miriam Hawley, a former director with AC Transit, should be allowed to participate on the task force because both had been involved in transit issues.  

Maio then offered a compromise. She would resign and another seat would be created on the task force. That way, both Worthington and Hawley would be members.  

Worthington was agreeable to the compromise if Hawley was made chair, which would unseat Dean, the current chairperson. Hawley refused. 

“I just think we needed the mayor’s leadership on the issues we were dealing with to make it all come together,” Hawley said on Wednesday. 

Maio then suggested that Worthington and Dean co-chair the task force. Dean refused.  

“I’m declining to share the seat because I think it would be confusing and I think it’s insulting,” said Dean, who was clearly upset by the attempted coup de main. “I have some role to play on this council whether some people like it or not.” 

Progressive Councilmember Dona Spring made another motion: to make Worthington chair of the task force. Spring’s motion passed by a 5-4 vote, right along party lines.  

The result was that the councilmember who had recommended the task force be terminated because it had outlived its mandate, was suddenly the chair of that same task force. 

Worthington was chair for only moments before Armstrong resigned, quickly followed by Dean and Hawley. 

Armstrong said she resigned for two reasons. She didn’t think the complex project would move ahead without Dean’s leadership. “She has a reputation of working hard on things and seeing them through,” she said.  

“And the other reason is that I was ashamed of the councilmembers who, I felt, were publicly humiliating the mayor, when all she was doing was trying to move the city towards an ecological transit pass.” 

Hawley said she was amazed at the political infighting over a task force that is largely non-controversial. She said both the progressives and moderates want to increase transit use. “It’s a very tricky issue and we were just beginning to tease out the details to get an idea what the cost would be,” she said. “The fact that everything has come to a halt is a great loss for the city.” 

Worthington argued the conflict between the progressives and moderates was of substance. “There are very sharp differences of opinion about who is going to pay administrative costs for the transit pass program,” he said. “Mayor Dean won’t be so inclined to have businesses pitch in. I think businesses should pay their fare share.” 

Hawley disagreed with Worthington. “Who was going to foot the bill was not even on the table yet,” she said. “We were simply exploring our options.” 

Worthington also said that if he were the only progressive on the task force and Dean were chair, he would not be able to effectively participate. 

Spring agreed that Worthington would be “out gunned” if Dean remained as chair. 

Hawley said at the end of the meeting that the task force was worth saving and that she would try to come back to the council with another compromise.


Bike-to-work day is every day for some

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Thursday May 17, 2001

Today’s the annual bike-to-work day and a number of city officials will bolt their cars in their garages and teeter tentatively from Channing Way and Milvia Street, three blocks north to city hall. 

There are a number of city workers, however, who bike to work regularly. One’s Detective Ed Spiller. “I try to (bike) as much as I can,” says the officer who rides five miles from home to the downtown Public Safety Building. 

Why does he bike? “I can use all the exercise I can get,” he said. “Health-wise, it’s the best thing.” 

It also beats walking 10 blocks. When he drives, he has to park his car outside the residential two-hour zone, then hustle to  

the office.  

And biking beats paying for gas. 

Spiller says his trek, much of it under the BART tracks in Albany, is fairly safe, which is why he admits to not wearing a helmet (though his wife says he should.) He’s had only one bad experience: A car pulled out of its parking space and knocked him over. But he wasn’t hurt, he said.  

“You’ve always got to watch for (car) doors opening,” he said. 

The officer owns a couple of bikes, one with a headlight and one without. Sometimes Spiller rides home in the dark without a light and says it’s dangerous because he can’t be seen. 

The Public Safety Building has no official bike parking, but the bike patrol officers share their locker space with the cops who ride their bikes to work, he said. 

Spiller said he’d like the city to provide an incentive program for its employees who bike to work, such as they have in the city of Alameda. 

In Alameda, they “do encourage workers to bike or take public transit,” said Kadeane Rowan, a clerk-typist who answered the phone in the Alameda city manager’s office. “They give them $2.50 per day” if the workers take transit or bike round trip.  

In Palo Alto, the city also offers its employees incentives to bike, said Joe Kott, who’s been transportation manager for about a month, but who’s returning to his old job in Palo Alto. (The traffic manager before Kott served about six months.)  

Palo Alto gives coupons redeemable in bike shops to city employees who are regular bike commuters, he said. With the coupons they can purchase items such as helmets or bike tools. “It worked there very well,” Kott said, noting that Berkeley is considering doing something similar. 

“Every bike means one less car (on the road),” said Kott, who, while working in Berkeley, rode his bike to work, essentially along the same route that Officer Spiller follows. He points out that when he turns east to ride up Hearst Avenue, he’s going uphill, but when he gets to Milvia, the ride is downhill. “It’s exhilarating to reach work on the downhill,” Kott said. “I’m oxygenated.”  

He said he was happy not to have to deal with traffic congestion, parking and that he could make a “little contribution” to a more healthy environment. When he returns to his old job in Palo Alto, he’ll continue to live in Albany, where his daughter attends school, he said and he’ll continue to avoid automobile use. He’ll bike to the North Berkeley BART station, BART to San Francisco, then take CalTrain to work. 

Over in economic development, Dave Fogarty, project manager, and his boss Bill Lambert both ride bikes. Fogarty doesn’t own a car and can be seen on his bike rain or shine.  

“When the sun shines, I ride three days a week,” said Lambert, a 15-year city employee. 

“It’s fun, good exercise and just as fast as taking my car,” he said. “It’s cheap. It’s free.” 

Lambert parks his bike in the free Center Street Garage bike racks. Soon there will be a secure place for employee bikes at the newly remodeled Civic Center Building, said Councilmember Kriss Worthington, who bikes to work daily. 

While there are no programs encouraging city staff to ride bikes, Lambert said they do get occasional e-mails, aimed at motivating them in that direction.  

Bike-to-work day may be symbolic for some, but it can be the beginning of a regular bike ride to work, say member of Berkeley Friendly Bicycle Coalition, organizers of today’s bike-to-work day. 

In a press statement, Mayor Shirley Dean said as much: “The City of Berkeley is committed to making Berkeley a better place to live by ensuring that bicycling is a safe, simple and healthy alternative to driving. I hope that bike to work day will inspire more people in Berkeley to choose cycling.” 

BFBC is providing six “energizer” stations in honor of bike-to-work day, where there with be free bike-to-work shoulder bags, food, drinks, sun screen and other treats. The bike stations are located at Milvia and Channing, at the downtown BART station’s valet bike-parking area, at the Missing Link Bicycle Cooperative on Shattuck Avenue near University Avenue, at Hearst and Euclid avenues, Bowditch Street and Dwight Way and Telegraph Avenue and Russell Street. For information call 549-RIDE (7433).


SLA trial lawyer wants quick trial for himself

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

LOS ANGELES — One of Sara Jane Olson’s defense lawyers plans to demand a quick trial – for himself – when he appears for arraignment on misdemeanor criminal charges related to the case of the former Symbionese Liberation Army fugitive. 

J. Tony Serra, who is charged with improperly disclosing the addresses and phone numbers of witnesses, was scheduled for arraignment Thursday along with his co-counsel, Shawn Chapman. 

After the hearing, both lawyers were to appear in Olson’s case where the judge will set a schedule for hearing pretrial motions. Chapman and Serra may claim that they are too distracted by defending themselves to proceed with the Olson matter. 

Chapman said Wednesday she hopes the case against her will be dismissed because a judge in Olson’s case previously found that she had nothing to do with the alleged violation. 

She said that Serra, a San Francisco lawyer, will demand a trial within 45 days. 

“He’s very concerned because he didn’t do anything wrong,” she said. “It’s outrageous.... We may be the only two people who have ever been charged under this statute.” 

Two police witnesses, James Bryant and John Hall, complained that a court document containing their names and addresses was posted on an Olson defense committee Web site. They said they feared for their lives. 

Olson’s lawyers said the information was posted inadvertently by Olson supporters without knowledge of the legal team. It was removed following complaints. 

Olson, 54, is accused of attempting to murder Los Angeles police officers by planting bombs under police cars in 1975 in retaliation for the deaths of six SLA members in a fiery shootout in 1974. The bombs did not explode. 

Indicted in 1976 under her former name, Kathleen Soliah, she remained a fugitive until her 1999 capture in Minnesota, where she had taken on her new name and was living as a doctor’s wife, mother and active community member. She has said she is innocent and that she never belonged to the SLA.


Governor signs bill creating state power authority

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

SACRAMENTO — California will no longer be held captive by energy suppliers charging high prices for power, Gov. Gray Davis said Wednesday as he officially put California into the electricity wholesale business. 

Davis approved a bill creating the California Consumer Power and Conservation Financing Authority – a new state agency that can issue up to $5 billion in revenue bonds to build, purchase, lease or operate power plants. 

Authority-financed plants will provide cost-based electricity to California consumers, Davis said, which will stabilize the state’s volatile energy market. 

The power authority is modeled after one in New York, which has 10 power plants, 1,400 miles of transmission lines and produces about 25 percent of the state’s power. Nebraska also has a power authority, which created a market in which residents pay 22 percent less than the national average, said Senate Leader John Burton, a San Francisco Democrat and the bill’s author. 

A higher-than-usual number of power plants under repair this year shows companies are manipulating the power market to drive up prices, Davis said, something the new authority fights by building more plants. 

Having a public power authority will “supplement not supplant” private energy sources, Davis said. 

“In a deregulated world, the only way you can guarantee reliable affordable power is to build it yourself if private companies won’t do it,” he said. 

The bill allows the authority to seize power plants, but Burton said if the state does so, he would prefer it happen through the governor’s emergency power, which is faster. 

“Sooner or later the state has got to let these buccaneers know that we’re not going to tolerate what they’re doing to us,” Burton said.  

“The only thing these exploiters understand is possibly a little counterterrorism.” 

Few Republicans in the Legislature supported the bill, saying the state shouldn’t get further into the power business.  

They also warned that it could discourage private companies from building plants. 

“It’s just $5 billion more in bonds borne by ratepayers to do something the private sector would gladly do, if we would get out of the way,” said Assemblyman Dave Cox, R-Fair Oaks. 

The bill was sponsored by state treasurer Philip Angelides, who conceded that it won’t save California from blackouts this summer but will help stabilize the energy markets as more generators are built. 

With the authority, Angelides said, California will not be held hostage “by an unregulated private energy market run amok.” The authority is the “beginning of the end for deregulation ... which has proven to be a disaster.” 

Angelides repeatedly blamed the crisis on out-of-state power generators. 

“There is a tremendous drain on California because of generators’ prices,” he said.  

“And that drain is heading straight to the heart of Texas,” which is opening its energy markets. 

Severin Borenstein, director of University of California, Berkeley’s energy institute, said better ways exist to solve the state’s energy crisis, such as signing long-term contracts for power. 

The problem, he said, didn’t come from not enough public power plants but because “there are companies that have market power and there’s a real shortage and we didn’t hedge against that.” 

 

Private companies may not want to build plants in California if it looks like the state could be overbuilt and “there are pretty good reasons to believe that the government won’t be the most efficient builder and operator of power facilities,” Borenstein said. 

Also Wednesday, several key lawmakers urged Davis to join with the governors of Washington and Oregon to set a limit on the price the states would pay for power this summer, creating a “buyers’ cartel.” 

The states should set their own price ceiling on electricity in light of federal regulators’ refusal to set region-wide caps, said Fred Keeley, D-Boulder Creek, the Assembly’s point man on energy. 

The states would refuse to pay, under any circumstances, more than a predetermined price that would give electricity generators a “reasonable” profit, under a resolution sponsored by the nine Democrats. 

If generators refused to lower their prices, that would mean almost certain blackouts in California this summer, said Assemblyman Paul Koretz, D-West Hollywood, the measure’s author. 

But those will happen anyway, by all accounts, and the price cap would let the state better predict and manage the outages, he said. 

The resolution proposes that caps be installed for two years, until enough power plants can be built to allow the market to function naturally. 

The state has been buying power for the customers of three major utilities since mid-January. The utilities’ credit was cut off after they amassed debts of more than $14 billion dollars due to high wholesale electricity prices that they were unable to pass on to customers. 


Alien hunt signs up 3 millionth volunteer

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

PASADENA — A two-year-old project that harnesses spare computer time to hunt for signals from alien civilizations has signed up its 3 millionth volunteer, officials said Wednesday. 

The SETI(at)home project uses idle computers scattered among 226 countries to scan signals collected by the world’s largest radio telescope for traces of transmissions from extraterrestrials. 

Bernd Ziegler, a German physicist who first learned of the project a month ago, became on May 7 the 3 millionth person to download the free software used to crunch the radio data. 

“Is this a hoax?” he wrote in response to an e-mail telling him of the honor. 

So far, users of the program have contributed the equivalent of 664,000 years of donated computing time to the project, which has yet to find conclusive evidence of an alien transmission. About 550,000 computer users regularly participate. 

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence project, run out of the University of California, Berkeley, is co-sponsored by the Planetary Society and Cosmos Studios. 

Ziegler will receive a lifetime membership to the Planetary Society, a copy of Carl Sagan’s COSMOS series on DVD and a SETI poster signed by the project’s chief scientist and project director. 

——— 

On the Net: http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/ 


Californians cut back on gas usage

SThe Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Where’s all the outrage? 

California motorists are paying some of the highest gasoline prices in the nation, averaging $2 per gallon for regular unleaded, according to a report released this week by the Automobile Club of Southern California. 

But they aren’t deluging consumer groups or politicians with complaints as they have in past years. 

Only about 15 people joined a protest Wednesday outside a gas station in South Central Los Angeles, where a grass-roots group called on President Bush and Gov. Gray Davis to temporarily suspend state and federal gasoline taxes. 

“That is breaking my pocket every day. I can’t even afford to give my kids money like I used to,” said Arlena Atkins, a mother of six who works as a security guard.  

“I don’t have no other choice but to go and pay for the gas.” 

“Why tax senior citizens? Why tax the poor?” said Lowe Barry, co-chairman of Citizens Against Higher Prices, estimating the taxes add 40 cents to 65 cents to the price of a gallon of gas. 

Elsewhere, motorists preferred conservation to controversy. 

The price has hurt “my fast-food lifestyle,” said Wayne Sanford, pumping $37.96 worth of gas into his battered Jeep Cherokee at a Los Angeles station. “I just stopped eating out.” 

A fill-up costs him $10 more than it used to, he said. 

Why aren’t more people outraged? 

“The economy’s better. People can actually afford it,” he said, but added jokingly: “I think I’ll be on the bus once it gets to two-fifty.” 

Prices have jumped 40 cents since mid-February. Some officials have predicted they will begin dropping again around Memorial Day, the traditional kickoff to the summer driving season. Jeffrey Spring of the Auto Club noted that prices have yo-yoed in recent years. 

“I think people are taking a wait-and-see attitude,” he said. “We haven’t seen any major changes in how people are planning their (summer) travel.” 

But daily sales are down about 25 percent at Malibu Texaco on the Pacific Coast Highway, which charges $2.09 for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline. 

“When your rent is $13,000 a month, 600 gallons a day counts,” owner Hans Shahidi said. 

Customers “complain constantly,” he added. 

As for summer, “I’m looking at hopefully warmer weather. I don’t have anything else to look forward to,” he said. “It’s out of everybody’s hands and we are not the ones who can change anything, you know?” 

In Blythe, a desert town on the way to the Colorado River, the price at one Chevron station was $2.15 per gallon, among the highest in the state. 

Sales have fallen 15 percent to 25 percent in the past month, said a manager who only identified himself as Michael. 

“Right now, I have no cars on my islands. You could fire a cannon across here,” he said by telephone. 

His customers are grumpier, too. 

“We are ground zero. We get all the complaints: ’It’s highway robbery. You guys should be ashamed of yourself.’ Like I’m sitting here making a ton of money.” 

Although experts blame many factors for contributing to price hikes, the gas station manager said he believes it is a deliberate ploy of oil companies. 

“They’re gonna hike it up to probably $2.50 and then they’re gonna come down to $2.25 and we’ll all be pleased.” 

Don’t expect consumers to rise up and demand change, said Harry Snyder, a senior advocate for the West Coast office of Consumers Union in San Francisco. 

“The public is not outraged about this at the present time,” he said. “I think people have just gotten used to the fact that greed is going to dominate the marketplace.” 

California’s car-centered culture plays a role, too. 

”’I don’t go anywhere my wheels don’t go. The cost is just a pain ... but so what?’ That’s the mentality.” 

“Basically, you can’t lead a boycott. People need to drive their cars to work,” he added. 

But Harvey Rosenfield, president of the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights in Los Angeles, sees a backlash coming. 

“I think the public is in a state of sticker shock over skyrocketing energy prices, whether it’s natural gas, electricity or motor vehicle fuel,” he said.  

“I think it’s going to take a couple weeks for this to sink in, and then I think we’ll have a ratepayer revolt in the streets this summer.” 


State receives string of dreary economic news

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

SACRAMENTO — For two years, California enjoyed a bulging state budget and soaring economy, but no more. 

Not only has the state been pummeled by a continuing and increasingly expensive power crisis, but it has also been stung by bleak economic news for three straight days. All of it has state officials struggling to cope with near-daily forecasts of a grim economic future. 

“We are being hit with these reduced financial estimates just when we are facing a critical need for more resources to get us through the power supply problems this summer,” said Tom Leiser, senior economist for the UCLA Anderson Forecast. “The timing is pretty bad.” 

Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill added to the bad news Wednesday, as she predicted the state will face a $4 billion budget shortfall in 2002-03 unless legislators cut more deeply than Gov. Gray Davis proposed in his revised budget Monday. 

Davis reacted to the slowing economy Monday by saying he’ll cut almost $3.2 billion in new programs, tax cuts and spending increases he proposed in January. The planned $102.9 billion state budget also cuts the state’s reserves to $1 billion, down from the $6 billion in reserves included in the 2000-01 budget. 

In doing so, Davis blamed the slowing economy, not the crushing power crisis. No longer does California benefit from high revenues from taxes on stock options and capital gains. 

The power crisis, however, will have a greater influence on future budgets, forecasters said, when the increased electricity rates passed by the state Public Utilities Commission Tuesday reach customers. 

Hill said Davis’ revised budget doesn’t put the state in position to reach a balanced budget in a future that includes a slowing economy. Instead, she said, it makes too many one-time cuts and the chief analyst for the Legislature urged lawmakers to go deeper than Davis as they draft a final budget plan. 

“It will be much more difficult to correct a $4 billion problem (in fiscal year 2002-03) if they don’t start today,” Hill said. 

The Assembly and Senate still must approve a final budget for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. 

They’ll do so under the eyes of the financial world, which has reacted against the state’s economic condition in recent weeks. More evidence of that came Tuesday when Moody’s Investors Service downgraded California’s credit and cited the energy crisis’ stubborn drain on the state’s finances. In April, Standard & Poors also downgraded California’s credit, putting it near the bottom of all 50 states. 

Part of Wall Street’s concern comes from the state’s inability to approve the sale of $13.4 billion in revenue bonds to repay the state for the billions of dollars it’s spent to buy power for three troubled investor-owned utilities. 

Those bonds may not be sold until August, traditionally a slow time for bond sales nationwide, and also a time in which the state may find itself in a cash crunch. 

Davis’ budget assumes the state will be repaid by mid-August for at least $6.7 billion in power buys. Davis signed a bill last week authorizing the sale of revenue bonds to repay the general fund for the power buys. 

However, no one outside of the Davis administration knows how much the state is paying for power, and if the prices go too high, California could run out of money before the bond revenues can replenish the treasury. 

The lack of that money, combined with the effects of higher electricity rates could create a larger problem for state finances, analysts said. 

Despite the string of bleak economic announcements, California still is in far better financial shape than it was during the recession of the early 1990s when then-Gov. Pete Wilson was scraping to make up for a $14 billion budget shortfall. 

Sandy Harrison, spokesman for the state Department of Finance, said this year’s budget also suffers in comparison to those of the two previous years. “We’ve simply seen the end of a boom that was created by a soaring stock market.” 

Hill’s $4 billion shortfall estimate is “very high,” Harrison said, adding that Davis made one-time cuts because he made one-time budget additions when times were good. 

If the economy continues to struggle, Davis believes there could be a shortfall, Harrison said. 

Either way, Davis faces an increasingly aggressive cadre of Republican legislators who said Wednesday he fobbed off all the tough budget choices to legislators. 

Davis, said Assemblyman George Runner, the Lancaster Republican walking point for the GOP budget efforts in the Assembly, has “abdicated his responsibility to produce a responsible budget.” 

—— 

On the Net: Find a copy of the governor’s budget revise at www.dof.ca.gov 


No agreement for fishermen, environmentalists

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

SANTA BARBARA — Two years of consensus-building and compromise among fishermen and environmentalists failed Wednesday to produce a plan to establish the nation’s biggest marine reserve off California. 

Federal and state officials had been looking to the Marine Reserve Working Group to develop a community-based consensus on a reserve plan around the five islands that make up Channel Islands National Park. 

Talks broke down Wednesday as the economic concerns of fishermen in the group butted heads with the environmental worries of other panelists. 

“Right now I can’t, as a representative of an industry that’s already struggling, ... give up what you want us to give up,” Robert Fletcher, a panelist representing the Sport Fishing Association of California, told environmentalists. 

Group members and the people they represent said they were disappointed they couldn’t reach consensus, adding that it would have given locals the ability to direct a marine reserve process that will now enter the state’s hands.  

But they were proud of the unprecedented amount of information gathered about where fish live and where fisherman catch them. 

“There would have been a lot of benefit in actually being able to walk arm-in-arm to the Fish and Game Commission,” said commercial diver Bruce Steele.  

“If you can achieve consensus in this day and age, there’s huge power in it.” 

Without that consensus, state officials will create their own plan for no-fishing zones along the California coast subject to federal approval. The deadline for a proposal already has been extended six months. 

Fishermen on the 17-member panel stressed that they had agreed to give up many fishing areas in the process and wanted their concessions forwarded to the state and federal officials who will decide the issue. 

“I feel a little bit like we were in a plane accident today, but we all survived,” said Dale Glantz, a kelp harvester who lived through a plane crash six years ago. 

The panel agreed to give the group that created it, the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, the map that illustrated the divide between fishermen and environmentalists. 

The map showed the 12 percent of the 1,200 square-mile sanctuary that all sides could agree on, as well as the 28 percent environmentalists argued were needed to make the fishery sustainable. 

Both numbers fall short of the 30 to 50 percent a science panel recommended for the working group.  

Fishing interests criticized the guideline, saying the science panel relied too much on modeling rather than data. 

Environmentalists said the panel’s report needed to make clear that the areas of agreement fell well short of what they consider necessary for a sustainable fishery. 

“I don’t want to vote and say here it is, I like it and it’s good,” said Greg Helms, a panelist representing the Center for Marine Conservation. “Where we are is not consensus, it’s the lowest common denominator.”


Former trucker sought in family killings

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

STOCKTON — With his mother’s ex-boyfriend opening fire behind him, a 10-year-old boy “ran like hell” as the gunman fatally shot the boy’s grandmother and killed his little sister and two cousins. 

The boy’s mother was seeking a restraining order Tuesday afternoon when Roger Leroy Johnson showed up at the rural house with a semiautomatic handgun and a knife, investigators said. 

Corey Burks told officers he saw a big gun when his grandmother, Pearl Burks, 48, opened the door to let Johnson in. When the shooting began, Corey “ran like hell” to a neighbor’s house for help, said Joe Herrera, a deputy San Joaquin County sheriff. 

Johnson, 48, shot Pearl Burks and slashed her neck with a knife, then turned his attention to the other children, investigators said. One child was found dead in the house and two others were found in the back yard, where tricycles, a swingset and a slide clutter the lawn. 

Corey Burks’ sister, Mikhala, 5, was killed, along with a cousin, Bobby Burks, 4. Another cousin, Ashley Burks, 6, was stabbed to death in the backyard. Investigators did not immediately have the causes of death of the two younger children. 

“Pretty gruesome” is the way Herrera described it. He said it was the worst killing in the county since the 1970s, when seven members of a family were killed. 

Johnson, a former trucker who is missing four fingers, was still on the run Wednesday, last seen driving from the neighborhood in a Chevy pickup truck. 

Rhonda Burks recently had received a threatening letter from ex-boyfriend Johnson, according to Jimmy Cook, whose grandson, Joey Cook, is dating Burks. 

“He told her ’until death do us part,”’ Jimmy Cook said Wednesday as he stopped by the house to view the scene. 

Jimmy Cook said that Rhonda Burks discussed the letter Sunday at a Mother’s Day barbecue. That same day, someone torched his grandson’s car in Burks’ driveway. 

Rhonda Burks and Joey Cook at first told investigators they believed a juvenile had burned the car, but later they said they thought it was Johnson. 

“He basically didn’t want to end the relationship,” Herrera said. “He wouldn’t take ‘no’ for an answer.” 

The charred car was sitting in Burks’ driveway Wednesday, but no one was home. Two dogs barked in the backyard and a man patrolling the neighborhood in his pickup truck told reporters to keep away. 

At Pearl Burks’ house on the outskirts of this city 85 miles east of San Francisco, the neighborhood also was quiet – save for a rumbling train, crowing roosters and construction workers pouring concrete in a nearby lot. 

Inside the house, children’s toys were scattered and videos, including “Pinocchio,” were stacked neatly on a shelf. Children’s fishing rods were visible in a window and three little pairs of shoes were outside the front door. 

What Corey Burks saw was not completely clear. His voice is difficult to discern on a 911 tape as his neighbor, Linda Baldwin, relays information from the boy to operators. 

Baldwin said she heard a burst of gunfire, a “boom, boom, boom real quick,” but thought nothing of it until the boy showed up at her house. 

“We live out in the country, so I paid no attention,” Baldwin told a 911 operator. “I didn’t hear any screaming or nothing.” 

Rhonda Burks called home from court to check on her children, Herrera said. When no one answered the phone, she didn’t follow through with her request for a restraining order and headed home to check on her children. 

By the time she got there, police tape was blocking the road. 

Rhonda Burks was in seclusion Wednesday and did not speak with reporters. 


Bush presses to increase oil production

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

WASHINGTON — President Bush, in his much-awaited energy plan, will warn on Thursday that the United States faces “the most serious energy shortage since the oil embargo of the 1970s.” He will order federal agencies to dismantle regulatory barriers that slow gas, electrical, coal and nuclear power production and propose opening federal lands for oil drilling. 

He also will encourage conservation, setting aside most of the $5 billion in new tax incentives for people who buy energy-efficient cars or use alternative energies.  

The 163-page policy, developed by a task force headed by Vice President Dick Cheney, also orders review of fuel economy standards with an eye toward possibly requiring them to be more fuel efficient. 

“A fundamental imbalance between supply and demand defines our nation’s energy crisis,” says the report, a portion of which was released Wednesday night by the White House.  

“This imbalance, if allowed to continue, will inevitably undermine our economy, our standard of living, and our national security.” 

While Bush compared today’s problems to the 1970s, energy experts have noted that there are plenty of supplies of crude oil and gasoline. In the 1970s, a disruption of oil imports caused long gas lines and fuel rationing. 

The White House was releasing the report Thursday in connection with Bush’s speech on the topic in St. Paul, Minn. 

To sell his plan, Bush must navigate among hundreds of issue groups, governors and local officials with competing concerns. 

Even before it was released, Democrats said the policy would endanger the environment and do nothing to lower prices now. Some Republicans demanded quick fixes not found in the report, fearing the public will blame them in 2002 congressional elections if energy prices soar. 

Bush and Cheney are especially vulnerable to criticism because they made fortunes in the oil business. 

Feeling the heat, Bush promised on Wednesday that federal regulators will ensure that “nobody in America gets illegally overcharged” for energy. His advisers said for the first time his policy might offer some short-term relief, but only if the promise of future supplies drives down prices among investors who speculate in oil trends. 

“We’re going to solve this problem,” Bush said, previewing a report he said would be an honest, hard look at the reasons for the nation’s energy shortages. “This isn’t just a report that’s going to gather dust.” 

Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott said he hoped to get the energy package approved and ready for Bush’s signature by July 4. He conceded, however, that some recommendations, such as expanded drilling on federal land and taking private land for power lines, “will be hotly debated” by Congress. 

As if to make Lott’s point, House Minority Leader Dick Gephard, D-Mo., said, “The president has no program for the short term, telling people they are on their own. At a time when consumers are paying record prices, at a moment when energy companies are making record profits, we have an obligation to the American people to address their concerns.” 

The half-inch thick report, complete with glossy pictures and pie charts, contains 105 recommendations – some of which will go to Congress and others that will be carried out by executive order. Many table a sticky issue for further study by  

federal agencies. 

The White House rhetoric is focused on poll-tested conservation initiatives, with aides noting that 42 of the recommendations offer incentives for people and businesses to curb their fuel demands. But the president’s focus is on strategies to make the United States less reliant on foreign oil and less susceptible to aging electrical transmission systems. 

The report says Bush will sign an executive order this week that directs all agencies to include in any regulatory action that could “significantly and adversely affect energy supplies” a detailed statement on the rules’ impact. 

A second order would require agencies to expedite permits for all energy-related projects, in effect nationalizing the policy that allows electricity-strapped California to set aside some clean-air regulations and build power plants. 

Bush asks the Interior Department to study the “impediments” to drilling for oil and gas on public lands.  

He specifically calls for development of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. 

He would spend $2 billion over 10 years to pay for clean-coal technology. 

On nuclear power, Bush asked federal agencies to examine whether spent fuel from nuclear reactors can be reprocessed for the production of electricity.  

The technology, abandoned in the United States but used elsewhere, produces weapons-grade plutonium that can lead to national security risks. 

Bush also is asking agencies to study whether nuclear plants undergoing facility improvement need federal reviews, as currently required. The Justice Department will be asked to study lawsuits pending over the so-called new source reviews. 

The report calls for the “safe expansion” of nuclear energy by establishing a national repository for nuclear waste, but does not take a position on the controversial site in Nevada called Yucca Mountain. 

The report details $10 billion in tax credits over 10 years, most of which go to conservation and projections involving renewable energies such as wind and solar power.  

Half the money is already in Bush’s budget. About $1.5 billion will help facilitate the sale of nuclear power plants. 

The biggest chunk of the $10 billion is a $4 billion tax credit for the purchase of hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. 

The report directs the Transportation Department to review vehicle fuel economy standards, but said no changes would be made until the completion of a National Academy of Sciences study this summer.  

Bush advisers signaled that they might raise the standard for sports utility vehicles and small trucks, which under current rules are allowed less-stringent fuel requirement. 

Automobile manufacturers are opposed to raising the standards. 

On the Net: 

The White House: http://whitehouse.gov 

Energy Information Administration: http://www.eia.doe.gov 

North American Electric Reliability Council: http://www.nerc.com


Colin Powell trying to arrange new Mideast talks

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Colin Powell wants to meet this month with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat in a newly energized U.S. drive to end violence, help the Palestinian economy and find a way back to the negotiating table with Israel. 

In his diplomacy, Powell is using as a launch pad a report by a fact-finding commission that recommended a halt to construction of Jewish settlements on the West Bank and Gaza and acceptance by both sides of a cease-fire proposed by Jordan and Egypt. 

The main purpose of a Powell meeting with Arafat would be to try to end months of violence that has sidetracked peace efforts and brought death and injury to hundreds of Palestinians and Israelis. 

Powell already appealed repeatedly to Arafat to state publicly, in unambiguous Arabic, that his people should stop attacking Israelis. 

“We have not identified a time, a date or a place for this meeting,” State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Wednesday. 

Powell is flying Monday to Africa for a four-nation tour, then will go to Hungary. A meeting with Arafat would be added to that trip, the spokesman said. 

The secretary of state discussed an Arafat meeting, which would be their second, at the State Department on Tuesday with Mahmoud Abbas, top deputy to the Palestinian leader. 

Powell also is looking to use the report by a fact-finding commission, headed by former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, as the basis of a new effort to curb violence and restart negotiations. 

Israel objects to the commission’s proposal that all construction activity in Jewish settlements on the West Bank and Gaza be halted. Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has promised not to start new settlements but has said expansion for natural growth would be continued. 

Stopping construction, then closing down all or most of the Jewish outposts, is a long-sought Arafat goal. 

Boucher said the Mitchell commission produced a “very fine report,” but he declined to say whether it had more than the administration’s “general endorsement.” 

Powell has said he also wants to use the joint proposal by Egypt and Jordan that would separate Israeli and Palestinian forces as a means of ending the violence. 

Early in the Bush administration, its plans were to keep its distance from the Arab-Israeli conflict, which it characterized as one of many difficult issues in the region. 

The pervasive violence, and a drumbeat of demands from Arab and other nations that the United States assume the kind of role undertaken by past administrations, combined to produce stepped-up U.S. diplomatic activity. 

This has included efforts to bring Israel and the Palestinians into accord on security measures. 

Boucher said the Bush administration had been consistent in saying it would be engaged in the Middle East. 

“We are engaged. We are active. You’ve seen all the secretary’s phone calls, all the president’s meetings, all the diplomatic activity from our ambassador and our consul general and other representatives in the region,” he said. 

On a trip to the Middle East in February, Powell met with Arafat in Ramallah on the West Bank. 

The Palestinian leader has not been invited to the White House, but Sharon was the first Middle East leader to visit the new president. He was followed by several Arab leaders including President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and King Abdullah II of Jordan. 

Top Arafat aides are fanning out across the United States to promote the idea of restarting peace talks even as regional violence continues. Their efforts center on getting the Bush administration to embrace the Mitchell commission report. 

Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres said on a visit to Washington this month, and again in Israel on Wednesday, that his government opposes a halt in settlement construction.  

But Peres, a longtime dove who set in motion territorial concessions to Arafat, said differences on the issue can be resolved and suggested the Mitchell report could be used as a springboard for peace talks. 

The Palestinians largely have accepted the report, which followed an investigation into the violence, although the document is critical of their attacks on Israel. 

 

“The real test is how the Americans are going to handle the report,” senior Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat said Tuesday in New York. 

On the Net: State Department Near East desk: http://www.state.gov/p/nea/ 


FBI finds more evidence in Timothy McVeigh case

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

WASHINGTON — FBI agents this week have found still more Oklahoma City bombing documents that may not have been turned over to Timothy McVeigh’s attorneys, FBI Director Louis Freeh said Wednesday. 

He told Congress his agency was guilty of “serious error” in dealing with documents in the case. 

Freeh’s comments on Wednesday, the day McVeigh had been scheduled for execution, came less than a week after the revelation that more than 3,000 pages of documents were withheld from McVeigh’s lawyers before his trial. That discovery led Attorney General John Ashcroft to postpone McVeigh’s execution for the bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building. 

Freeh said he did not think the documents found this week or last week would change McVeigh’s conviction or sentence for the April 1995 federal building bombing that killed 168 people. 

“Although I fully support the attorney general’s decision to postpone the execution – fairness and justice, of course, demand that – I do not believe this belated disclosure of documents will affect the outcome,” he said. 

McVeigh’s lawyers met with him at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Ind., and said he was taking an active role in deciding what to do. McVeigh had declined to pursue further appeals, allowing his execution date to be set, but attorney Nathan Chambers said Wednesday that the inmate was “willing to consider all options that are available to him.” 

Freeh, in his first public statements about the FBI mishap, told a House Appropriations subcommittee he would be adding “a world-class records expert” and creating a separate office of records management and policy to ensure that documents aren’t mishandled in the future. 

He said he also will increase records training for agents and order the FBI to take time to review proper procedures for handling important documents. 

The McVeigh documents “should have been located and released during discovery,” Freeh said in one of his last appearances before Congress. “As director, I’m accountable and responsible for that failure, and I accept that responsibility.” 

Freeh recently announced he was retiring in June, two years before completion of his 10-year term. 

Only Rep. David Obey, D-Wis., was openly critical, calling the FBI “something close to a failed agency” and saying “the litany of troubles with the agency are truly astounding and regrettable.” 

“I just think this is a pitiful performance, which is feeding the paranoia of large sections of this country, and that’s the last thing that we can afford these days,” Obey said. 

Other lawmakers said the situation had been blown out of proportion. 

“You had 28,000 interviews, and you had tons of material that were turned over. And what we’re talking about here is really insignificant, irrelevant documents that have no bearing on the case,” said Rep. David Rogers, R-Ky. “Is that a fair statement?” 

“That is my understanding,” Freeh said. 

Freeh said agents were reminded constantly to send their material to the Oklahoma City field office. In 1995 and 1996, he said, field offices were told 11 times to send the documents. 

When it appeared that not all materials had been sent, Freeh said he sent a priority teletype to all field offices in November 1996 directing all materials be sent promptly. 

“As we now know, there were still many offices that had failed to comply fully or precisely with the instructions given,” Freeh said. 

FBI agents first realized they had documents that might not have been turned over to McVeigh in March when archivists started to store the documents, Freeh said. By the time they were sure that the documents hadn’t been shared, it was May, he said. The FBI turned the documents over to the prosecutors on May 8, who gave the documents to McVeigh’s lawyers on the same day. 

Freeh said he didn’t learn about the documents until May 10. He said more documents showed up this week, and they were discovered only after he ordered all of his deputies worldwide on Friday to do one last “shakedown” for any documents and warned them he would hold them personally responsible if all weren’t retrieved. 

“This latest scrubbing has produced additional documents which are currently being reviewed to determine whether they were covered by the discovery agreement and, if so, whether they have been produced,” Freeh said. 

Freeh said he suspects there won’t be one single answer to why all the documents in the case weren’t turned over earlier. 

“For example, some offices wrongly concluded that the information was so extraneous that it was not covered by the request related to these prosecutions,” Freeh said. “Some offices forwarded summary results of investigation but not the underlying documents. Some offices forwarded copies of originals. Some offices turned investigative inserts into 302s and forwarded only the 302s.  

ome offices overlooked material when culling out responsive documents. Finally, some offices believed they sent the material but, in some cases, not in a form that could be uploaded into our existing system.” 


Senators propose help for Cuban dissidents

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

WASHINGTON — Drawing on Reagan-era successes in undermining communism in Eastern Europe, a group of senators introduced legislation Wednesday to promote democracy in Cuba by providing dissidents cash, fax machines, telephones and other items. 

Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said the proposed package of $100 million in aid over four years is “a blueprint for a more vigorous U.S. policy to liberate the enslaved island of Cuba.” 

He said the program would supplement the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba, the centerpiece of U.S. policy toward the island for 39 years. 

The legislation was endorsed by the Cuban-American National Foundation, the largest and most influential of the anti-communist Cuban exile groups. The bipartisan initiative has the support of 10 other senators, and companion legislation in the House is backed by more than 90 members. 

The Bush administration withheld immediate comment. 

Helms’ remarks on the Senate floor, and those of supporters at a news conference, were reminiscent of the Reagan administration’s support for pro-democracy groups in Poland. That effort helped bring down decades of communist rule there in 1989. 

In Poland, the opposition rallied around Solidarnosc, the Solidarity labor union. The legislation introduced Wednesday is the Cuban Solidarity Act of 2001. 

“The investment we made in the liberation of Eastern Europe has yielded immeasurable benefits,” Helms said. 

He said the legislation would give the president a mandate to increase all forms of U.S. support for pro-democracy and human rights activists in Cuba. In addition to office machines, he said it could also include food, medicines, books, educational material and financial support. 

Recipients may include political prisoners and family members, persecuted dissidents or repatriated persons, workers’ rights activists, economists, journalists, environmentalists and others. 

Activities may include support for independent libraries or agricultural cooperatives, support for microenterprise development by self-employed Cubans, U.S.-based exchange programs and nongovernmental charities. 

Cuba has been highly successful in preventing dissident groups from flourishing. Criticism of the government is permitted, but efforts toward political organization by dissidents usually are quashed through intimidation and other means. President Fidel Castro has been especially scornful of dissidents who receive support from the United States. 

In January, Cuban authorities arrested two Czechs – one a parliamentarian – and alleged they had planned to deliver a portable computer, diskettes and CD-ROMs to dissidents with the help of Freedom House, a New York-based human rights group. The Czechs were held for 25 days and released only after they admitted breaking the law by meeting with dissidents. 

Jorge Mas Santos, chairman of the Cuban-American National Foundation, said the prospect that some Cuban dissidents might be imprisoned as a result of receiving U.S. help “should not be a reason for us not to do the right thing.” 

He said dissidents are imprisoned in Cuba irrespective of whether they receive outside help. 

Joining Mas at a news conference was Sen. Joseph Lieberman, D-Conn., last year’s Democratic nominee for vice president. 

“Our foreign policy is at its best when it is based on values,” Lieberman said in endorsing the Solidarity legislation. 

Sen. George Allen, R-Va., added a bilingual touch, saying in both Spanish and English: “Help is on the way.” 

Sen. Bob Graham, D-Fla., said the legislation would add a new dimension to U.S. policy toward the nearby island. Once it is enacted, Graham said, “U.S. policy will no longer be simply to isolate the Castro regime but to support those working to bring about change inside Cuba.” 

On the Net: Sen. Jesse Helms: http://helms.senate.gov/ 

Other senators: http://www.senate.gov/senators/index.cfm 

CIA profile of Cuba: http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/cu.html 

Library of Congress profile of Poland: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/pltoc.html


U.S. aid won’t go to groups advocating abortion rights

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

WASHINGTON — The House voted Wednesday to preserve President Bush’s policy prohibiting $425 million in U.S. aid for global population assistance from going to groups that advocate abortion rights. 

The provision, which passed 218-210, was attached to an $8.2 billion State Department reauthorization bill, approved 352-73 late Wednesday evening. Thirty-two Democrats joined Republican supporters in passing the abortion provision. 

The House also passed a controversial amendment sponsored by Democratic Rep. Tom Lantos of California that would withhold about $625,000 in aid to Lebanon until that country secures its borders near Israel. The measure, which passed 216-210, also would direct the president to develop a plan for terminating millions of dollars in other aid if the Lebanese do not comply within six months. 

The abortion provision prompted the most intense debate on the bill. 

Bush signaled his support for abortion foes early on, implementing the aid ban by executive order during his first week in office. But Democrats on the House International Relations Committee included a provision overturning the president’s order in the committee’s version of the bill. Wednesday’s amendment removed that from the bill. 

The National Organization for Women said women in the United States and around the world “stand to lose access to critical health services at the hands of this Congress and this president.” Democrats attacked the policy as detrimental to international family planning efforts and dubbed it a “global gag rule” that assaulted the free speech rights of organizations abroad. Republicans argued that abortion does not belong in the family planning discussion. 

“I think it is important we not be hypocrites in dealing with this legislation,” said Lantos, who also serves as the ranking Democrat on the International Relations Committee. “It is not enough to talk about human rights and democracy. It is important we practice what we preach.” 

Democratic leader Dick Gephardt of Missouri said the issue was simple. “Do we empower women and families across the globe with the ability to plan for the number of children they will have? Or do we pull the rug out from under these important efforts?” 

Democrats pointed out that a 1973 federal law already prevented foreign organizations from using U.S. taxpayer money to pay for abortions. But GOP leaders accused foreign organizations of shifting money around to fund abortion efforts. 

“Nobody is being gagged,” said Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., and chairman of the International Relations Committee. “If you want to talk about abortions, talk away. But not on our dime.” 

“Abortion is not family planning,” said Hyde, a longtime leader of anti-abortion efforts in the House. “Family planning is helping you get pregnant or keeping you from getting pregnant. It is not killing an unborn child after you become pregnant.” 

President Bush had threatened a veto if lawmakers overturned his policy. Spokesman Ari Fleischer indicated Wednesday that the president could support the overall bill now that the abortion issue is resolved. “Unless there’s something else in there, the president will be supportive,” Fleischer said. 

Wednesday’s action drew dozens of lawmakers to the floor for an emotional debate. At one point, leaders extended the debate to accommodate the numerous members who wanted to speak. 

It was just the latest effort by House Republicans, buoyed by White House support, to push through abortion-related legislation. Last month, the House voted to make it illegal to harm a fetus while committing a crime against a pregnant woman. 

The evenly divided Senate has yet to take up any of the abortion measures. 

Overall, the bill authorizes dozens of State Department programs for the 2002 and 2003 fiscal years. 

In the Lebanese aid amendment, supporters said securing the border was essential to securing Middle East peace. They expressed worries about attacks on Israel by the guerrilla group Hezbollah, which operates out of Lebanon but is supported by Syria. Just Monday, the terrorist group fired two anti-tank missiles at an Israeli army outpost. 

“If we are to treat Lebanon as a sovereign nation it must fulfill its obligations,” said Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va. 

Still, opponents said the measure unfairly penalized the Lebanese. 

“It drives the Lebanese into the arms of the extremists and the terrorists,” said Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich. “Is that what we want?” 

Said Rep. Ray LaHood, R-Ill., “This amendment doesn’t help anyone. It doesn’t send the signal you want it to send.” 

Last week, the House voted to withhold $244 million in overdue payments to the United Nations until the United States is restored to the U.N. Human Rights Commission. Lawmakers have expressed outrage that the United States was ejected from the seat it has held since the panel’s creation in 1947. 

——— 

The State Department bill, H.R. 1646, can be found at http://thomas.loc.gov 


Arrest unveils draft-dodging scandal

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

SEOUL, South Korea — After a three-year manhunt, military detectives found Sgt. Maj. Park No-hang sprawled on the floor of a high-rise apartment just one mile from the Defense Ministry, a skin-care mask over his face. 

The 50-year-old alleged mastermind of South Korea’s largest draft-dodging scam sat straight up after a dozen agents slipped through the door or clambered off fire ladders into the windows. 

“Yes Sir,” a shaggy-haired Park said, military-style, when they called his name. 

Investigators filmed the April 25 raid and national television broadcast the footage, heightening public fascination with a crime long associated with South Korea’s political and business elite. Local media call it “Draftgate.” 

Park’s peaceful surrender could help authorities unravel the latest subterfuge to hit the draft, the linchpin of South Korean defense ever since the 1950-53 Korean War against the communist North. 

But there is concern that the government will not aggressively pursue prosecutions in a case believed to involve dozens of wealthy draft-dodgers and their parents, as well as military corruption. 

“I hope the investigation won’t resemble earlier ones that ended with a few arrests of sports stars and TV celebrities, apparently for publicity’s sake,” said Ahn Tae-sung of Transparency International Korea, a private anti-corruption group. 

“What worries us is the high violation rate among the people with power and money,” The Korea Herald, an English-language daily, said in an editorial. 

Park was indicted in a military court Monday on charges of receiving $240,000 for helping 21 people evade military service or win cushy posts.  

The military promised a thorough investigation. 

Park is suspected of influence-peddling in at least 100 more cases of alleged draft-dodging in the late 1990s.  

A military investigator for 28 years, he could face at least a decade in jail if convicted. 

Since Park’s arrest, a television actress and four others were arrested for allegedly bribing him to have their sons exempted. Thirty others, mostly parents, were temporarily banned from traveling abroad. 

Military prosecutors detained two warrant officers accused of helping hide Park, who received food and clothing from his sister.  

A former two-star general who led the hunt for Park in 1998 is under investigation. 

Citing investigators, local media said Park bribed military doctors to alter medical records or swap X-ray films to make draftees appear sick. 

All healthy South Korean men must serve in the 680,000-member military for 26 months, with many assigned to the tense inter-Korean border.  

There is widespread suspicion that politicians and business leaders often arrange waivers for their sons, but evidence is scant. 

Some South Koreans refer to the privileged few who skip the draft as “shin eui adeul,” or “sons of gods.” The majority who serve are “odoom eui jasik,” or “sons of darkness.” 

Military service in South Korea, once a source of honor and popular fodder for bar talk, is increasingly viewed by college graduates as an obstacle to a fast career track in business or some other  

civilian venture. 

“If I could, I would bribe someone like Park to save my precious time,” said Lee Jin-yong, a 20-year-old student who has yet to serve.  

“If you don’t serve, you get a two-year head-start.” 

About 2.4 percent of 400,000 potential draftees were exempted last year, but there are no estimates of how many cases were illegal. 

English-speakers covet liaison work on the bases of the 37,000 U.S. troops stationed in South Korea. The well-equipped U.S. facilities are the envy of South Korean conscripts, who often complain about harsh, overbearing commanders in their own military. 

Park went into hiding in 1998 after the arrest of a recruiting officer who allegedly brokered his cases.  

The government sentenced the accomplice, Won Yong-soo, to eight years in jail and indicted about 160 people, mostly parents. 

Some received suspended prison terms and some cases are pending.  

Their sons were ordered to serve in the military. 

Life is tougher for conscripts in poor, totalitarian North Korea, where many in the 1.1 million-strong military must serve at least a decade.


Truancy forum lets students speak out

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Wednesday May 16, 2001

At a forum Monday, Berkeley High School students said their new principal’s proposals for dealing with truancy will harm the kids most in need of help. 

“We need to come up with some service-based solutions, even before enforcement,” said Niles Xi’an Lichtenstein, student director on the Berkeley Board of Education, and a coordinator for the student group Youth Together, which sponsored the forum. 

Principal Frank Lynch said the school had to put something in place by next year to impact a truancy problem that’s costing the school district nearly $1 million a year in state education dollars forfeited due to lack of attendance. 

“If it’s love that will do it, wonderful. If it’s fear that will do it, wonderful, for right now,” Lynch said. 

In an interview Tuesday, Lynch said the school’s budget is based largely on state funding, which is determined by the average daily attendance rate. That rate currently stands at 94 percent at Berkeley High, Lynch said.  

In other words, the money the state gives the Berkeley Unified School District assumes a high school enrollment of roughly 3,000, when the school’s actual enrollment is 3,200. 

Lynch said Monday the problem is that the district hires teachers, buys education materials and so forth based on the 3,200 number. 

Lynch has proposed that students with nine unexcused absences in any one class be dropped from the class with an automatic “F.” After six unexcused absence, the students’ parents would be called in for a conference with the teacher, who would work to create a “plan of action” to get the student to attend class. 

Lynch has said repeatedly that he is not wedded to the number of unexcused absences that trigger intervention or a failing grade, just so long as the school puts a formal system in place to guarantee consequences for students who miss class frequently. 

“We’re in a position right now where we’ve got students hanging around just doing absolutely nothing,” Lynch said Tuesday. “We’ll do something. We just have to. It’s a big problem.” 

But several students at the forum said a crack down on attendance of the type proposed by Lynch fails to address the root causes of the problem. 

“If we’re not in school, then there is something that is missing in this education,” said Berkeley High student Eddy James. 

“If you’re going to hold the students accountable for being in class, you need to hold the teacher accountable for teaching,” said student Amani Carey-Simms, who alleged that one of his math teachers spends class time simply reading from the text book. 

Merle Fajans, a Berkeley High parent for six years up until this year, said both parents and teachers have complained about the quality of certain Berkeley High teachers for years to no avail. 

While her kids were at Berkeley High, Fajans said, they would come home some days and explain that they had not been in class that day because there was a substitute teacher who didn’t “know what they (were) doing,” or perhaps no substitute teacher at all on a day the teacher was absent.  

Fajans said some teachers were absent for more than a month of out of the 180-day school year. 

In a poll of 317 Berkeley High students conducted by Youth Together earlier this month, 82 percent of those surveyed disagreed with the statement: “The proposed truancy policy addresses the root causes of why students are not in class.” 

Seventy-two percent said the proposed policy would not encourage students to stay in class and improve their grades. “The root causes are going to be there still,” said student Maliah Coye Monday. “Kids are not going to go to class...making them get an ‘F.’” 

At the very least, students said, the school should not crack down on attendance until it has created some sort of alternative educational program for those students who will inevitably fail numerous classes under such a system. That way, instead of just being branded as failures and then left to their own devices, the students could be directed to specialized classes where they might feel more engaged. 

“Failure should never be an option,” said James. “How is failing somebody going to be for the better of their character?” 

The students also proposed the creation of a Peer Advocacy Program, where a group of Berkeley High students would be trained to act as intermediaries between the administration and their peers.  

The Peer Advocates could intervene with students before their absences become a discipline issue, the students suggested, showing them how to take advantage of tutoring, mentoring and health services available at the school and steering them into the “good classes” with “good teachers”. 

Lynch said Tuesday that he welcomes the idea of a peer advocacy type program as one component of any new policy for dealing with truancy, just so long as he has a specific proposal to take to the school board by next month. 

His own proposal, he said, calls for the creation of a School Attendance Review Team (SART), made up of students, teachers and staff. The SART would determine effective ways to intervene with frequently absent students.  

Lynch has also called for hiring a full-time truancy officer to track absent students and make sure the new truancy measures are being universally enforced. Many have criticized Berkeley High in the past for failing to address inconsistencies in the way different teachers enforce attendance. 


Calendar of Events & Activities

Wednesday May 16, 2001


Wednesday, May 16

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets. 644-6226 


Thursday, May 17

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

“What is Queer Spirituality?” 

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 

1798 Scenic Ave.  

Mudd Bldg., Room 100 

Bill Glenn, PSR alumni and leader of Spirit Group, will lead a panel discussion on the dynamic shape of queer spirituality today.  

849-8206 

 

Simplicity Forum 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Library 

Claremont Branch  

2940 Benveue Ave.  

Facilitated by Cecile Andrews, author of “Circles of Simplicity,” learn about this movement whose philosophy is “the examined life richly lived.” Work less, consume less, rush less, and build community with friends and family.  

Call 549-3509 or visit www.seedsofsimplicity.org  

 

Free Smoking Cessation Class  

5:30 - 7:30 p.m.  

Six Thursday classes through May 17.  

Call 644-6422 to register and for location  

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meeting is the spring barbecue. 654-5486 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

First day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continues Tuesday May 22. $70 for both days. 525-7610 

 

John Muir May Fair 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

John Muir Elementary School 

2955 Claremont Ave 

Cake walk, face painting, games, food and student performances, quilt raffle. Free. 

644-6410 


Friday, May 18

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 


Saturday, May 19

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Annual strawberry tasting 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

Get to Know Your Plants 

1 - 4 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn what to look for and what and how to record it to more intimately know your plants.  

548-2220 

 

“Be Your Own Boss” 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

YWCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Second Saturday of a two day workshop on starting up small businesses (see May 12). 

415-541-8580 

 

Community Summit on  

Smaller Learning  

Communities 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Alternative High School  

MLK Jr. Way (at Derby)  

All teachers, students, administrators, parents, and community members are encouraged to attend this meeting on smaller learning communities at Berkeley High. Translation, childcare, and food will be provided.  

540-1252 to RSVP for services 

 

Campaign for Equality Benefit  

7:30 - 10 p.m. 

Montclair Women’s Cultural Arts Club  

1650 Mountain Blvd.  

Oakland 

A comedy benefit with performances by Karen Ripley, Julia Jackson, Pippi Lovestocking, Darrick Richardson, and Nick Leonard. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the International Lesbian Gay Association Scholarship Fund for the 2001 ILGA Summit in Oakland.  

$15 - $20  

466-5050 

 

 

Finish Carpentry 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Carpenter/contractor Kevin Stamm leads workshop. $95. 

525-7610 

Earthquake Retrofitting 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Seminar taught by structural engineer Tony DeMascole and seismic contractor Jim Gillett. $75. 

525-7610 

 

How to Prevent Home Owner Nightmares 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Dispute prevention and early resolution seminar taught by contractor/mediator Ron Kelly. $75. 

525-7610 

 

Puppet Shows 

1:30 and 2:30 p.m. 

Hall of Health (Lower Level) 

2230 Shattuck Ave. 

Program on physical and mental differences. Promotes acceptance and understanding. Free. 

549-1564  


Sunday, May 20

 

Reimagining Pacific Cities  

6 - 8:30 p.m. 

New Pacific Studio  

1523 Hearst Ave.  

“How are Pacific cities reshaping their cultural and environmental institutions to better serve the needs and enhance the present and future quality of life of all segments of their societies?” A series of ten seminars linking the Bay Area, Seattle, Portland, and other pacific cities.  

$10 per meeting  

Call 849-0217 

 

Working with Awareness,  

Concentration, Energy 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Nyingma members discuss meditative awareness in everyday life. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Salsa Lesson & Dance Party  

7 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Kick up your heels and move your hips with professional instructors Mati Mizrachi and Ron Louie. Plus Israeli food provided by the Holy Land Restaurant. Novices encouraged to attend and no partners are required.  

$12  

RSVP: 237-9874 

 

Mediterranean Herbs 

1:30 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Tour of herbs. Learn myths and legends, ideas for planting in home gardens. 

643-1924 

 

 

—compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

 

Jazz on 4th Street Festival 

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

4th St. between Hearst and Virginia 

Performances by Berkeley High Jazz Ensemble and two Berkeley High Jazz Combos, among others. Also 4th St. merchants, raffle prizes, arts and crafts. Free admission. Proceeds benefit Berkeley High Performing Arts.  

526-6294 


Letters to the Editor

Wednesday May 16, 2001

Jewish rights to Israel ‘pre-existing’ 

Editor: 

I write in response to a letter in the Friday, May 4 issue of The Berkeley Daily Planet, calling Israel’s settlements “immoral and illegal.” Even supporters of Israel often miss the point that the basic legal document governing the disposition of the territories in the League of Nations Mandate of 1921, which obliges the Jewish Agency or its successor, which today is Israel, to not only govern the land but to settle it. 

All other resolutions and agreements are not binding under International law. That is why, by the way, the United States calls the settlements nasty things at times, but it NEVER calls them illegal: it cannot. 

The Mandate did not “grant” the Jewish people the right to the Land of Palestine, as the British called it, it “recognized” the Jewish people’s ancient rights, meaning that Jewish rights are considered “pre-existing” rather than newly created. 

I have more detail concerning this subject, but though interesting and important, it may seem a little obscure to the general reader or the reader bent on attacking Israel. 

 

Carol Shivel 

Berkeley 

 

Parking minus ‘ing’ = transit 

Editor: 

What do you et if you take the “ing” out of Parking? You get a park. Does Berkeley need more parks or parking?  

At least a third of downtown Berkeley is paved in asphalt. Another 5/6 is committed to concrete. The last sliver is green. We can't afford to lose more land to automobiles. The BHS tennis courts were recently paved over for parking. Sounds like Martin Luther King Park is being considered for the next parking lot. Lovely. 

Downtown has enormous transit resources which could be better marketed, and marked. Though the bus schedules, which serve Berkeley, are the biggest mysteries in the universe, the busses actually run. The No. 51, for example, runs every ten minutes on weekdays. Amazing. There are a dozen more bus lines serving the downtown. 

If the political will in this community focused on public transit instead of automobiles, you'd have what's called a “win-win” situation.  

Deborah Green 

Berkeley  

 

Thanks for  

good works 

Editor,  

On behalf of Berkeley Youth Alternatives we would like thank Congregation Beth El for all the time and dedication that went into planning and carrying out the “Sukkot in April” project. They painted our building and it looks wonderful! We know how much work goes into putting together such an awesome community-building event, and we really appreciate all that they did in order to make it so successful.  

Our friends, families and children have all commented on how much more welcoming and brighter BYA looks. The effort and care that they put into helping BYA was a true Mitzvah! 

 

Niculia Williams, 

Executive Director, Berkeley Youth Alternatives 

 

New film brings out more than ‘mistrust’ 

Editor: 

That was an interesting article in the Monday Berkeley Daily Planet's Bay Briefs, “Asian Americans wary of movie's influence,” reporting on the apprehension of Bay Area Asian Americans over the new movie “Pearl Harbor.” However, the use of the sanitized word “mistrust” in describing the imprisonment of Japanese-Americans in “relocation camps” during World War II was disturbing. I think the correct word is racism. 

Asian Americans have every reason to be apprehensive of this latest glorification of past wars in preparation of future ones. Just look at the kneejerk anti-Chinese racism that spewed forth in so much of the American media after the recent U.S. spy plane incident, including the notorious Oliphant cartoon that revived anti-Asian stereotypes that one would have hoped had ended when World War II did.  

 

Steve Wagner 

Oakland 

 

 

FBI withholding evidence not uncommon as seen in Peltier case 

Editor: 

The withholding of evidence and obstruction of justice appear to be habitual FBI practices. In recent months, this pattern has become frightfully clear. 

Revelations of FBI misconduct in Boston are appalling. The FBI manufactured evidence, which put two innocent men in prison, while the real murderer were protected and allowed to kill with impunity. 

Evidence about FBI misconduct in the Birmingham bombings is no less disturbing. For years the FBI did nothing to pursue the racist murderers of the four young girls, all the while knowing who the culprits were. And now it has been revealed that the FBI illegally withheld evidence relating to the Oklahoma bombing. Somehow, the news comes as no surprise. 

Equally troublesome is the case of Leonard Peltier, the Indigenous rights activist considered by Amnesty International a “political prisoner” who should be “immediately and unconditionally released.” The FBI is also withholding evidence in his case. 

Peltier was convicted of killing two FBI agents after the FBI coerced witnesses, utilized false testimony, and intentionally withheld a ballistic test reflecting his innocence at trial. The ballistic test was later released through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit and it prompted the U.S. Prosecutor to admit, “we can’t prove who shot those agents.”  

Yet, Peltier has remained in prison for over 25 years and the FBI refuses to release the 6,000 documents still held in secret files today. 

Before another victim is allowed to languish one more year in prison, Congress should hold investigations into the FBI’s handling of the Peltier case and subpoena the remaining 6,000 documents. 

When the most powerful law enforcement agency in the country considers itself above the law, each of us becomes a potential victim of injustice. 

 

Marco Barrantes 

Berkeley 

 

Try transit first  

Editor: 

Each day I walk my dog. I often fiddle. Many times a week I am in Civic Center Park. I shop at the Saturday Farmers’ Market and participate in many festivals held in the Park. I am dismayed to hear and am opposed to the park being torn up and its many festivals and the Saturday Farmers’ Market being unavailable to us while the Park is dug up to create an underground parking garage. 

I don’t want to lose my park, even temporarily. Don’t dig up Civic Center Park. 

Building such a garage will not help my street (one block from Civic Center Park) as everyone who parks up street while working or shopping nearby will continue to park on the street where it’s free! If the Civic Center Garage is free too these cars might move off my street, but I’m sure the city would not give free parking when the spaces cost so much to build ($22 million is $45,000. for each space). 

Before we even think about whether or not to build a garage, we should offer employees and shoppers transit incentives (discounts) to use alternate transportation first. It’s so much cheaper to let someone have a transit pass discount than it is to build that person a parking space. Even UCB did the class pass.  

Can’t the City of Berkeley be the leader we claim to be and take the lead? It might turn out that we don’t need a garage at all if enough people use transit once in a while. Let’s be the transit first Berkeley we’ve been saying we are.  

Morgan Fichter 

Berkeley


Arts & Entertainment

Wednesday May 16, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels like an earthworm, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins, and become little “dump” workers. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” Through May 2002 An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum “Joe Brainard: A Retrospective,” Through May 27. The selections include 150 collages, assemblages, paintings, drawings, and book covers. Brainard’s art is characterized by its humor and exhuberant color, and by its combinations of media and subject matter. “Ricky Swallow/Matrix 191,” Including new sculptures and drawings; Through May 27 $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history.“Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing.This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge.“Within the Human Brain” Ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “T. Rex on Trial,” Through May 28 Where was T. Rex at the time of the crime? Learn how paleontologists decipher clues to dinosaur behavior. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 18: Ensign, All Bets Off, Playing Enemy, Association Area, Blessing the Hogs; May 19: Punk Prom and benifit for India quake victims features Pansy Division, Plus Ones, Dave Hill, Iron Ass; May 25: Controlling Hand, Wormwood, Goats Blood, American Waste, Quick to Blame; May 26: Honor System, Divit, Enemy You, Eleventeen, Tragedy Andy; June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2 El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 16: 9 p.m. Creole Belles; May 17: 10 p.m. Dead DJ Night with Digital Dave; May 18: 9:30 p.m. Reggae Angels with Mystic Roots; May 19: 9:30 Kotoja; May 20: 8:30 p.m. Jude Taylor and His Burning Flames 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 17: The Rincon Ramblers; May 18: Todd Snider; May 19: Oak, Ash and Thorn; May 20: KALW’s 60th Anniversary Concert featuring Paul Pena, Orla and the Gasmen, Kennelly Irish Dancers, Kathy Kallick and Nina Gerber. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 16: Spank; May 17: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Rythm Doctors; May 29: The Lost Trio; May 30: Zambambazo 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Peña Cultural Center May 17, 8 p.m.: Tribu; May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane; May 20: 6 p.m. Venezuelan Music Recital 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

The Crowden School Annual Spring Concert May 16, 7:30 p.m. $5-$10 St. John’s Presbytarian Church at College and Garber 559-6910 

 

Tribu May 17, 8 p.m. Direct from Mexico, Tribu plays a concert of ancestral music of the Mayan, Aztec, Olmec, Zapotec, Purerpecha, Chichimec, Otomi, and Toltec. Tribu have reconstructed and rescued some of the oldest music in the Americas. $12 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Jazz Singers Collective May 17, 8 p.m. Anna’s Bistro 1801 University Ave. 849-2662 

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fundraiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21, 2001. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

“En Mouvement/In Motion” May 18, 19 7 p.m., May 19, 20 2 p.m. Part of the Berkeley Ballet Theater Spring Showcase, this production is a collection of works by student dancers/ $15. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 843-4689  

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“The Laramie Project” May 18 - July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members travelled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard. The play is about the community and the impact Shepard’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Sister, My Sister” May 20, 5 p.m. Poetry, photography and dramatic readings which give voice to women and children cuaght in homelessness. Admission is free, donations welcome. Live Oak Park Theatre1301 Shattuck Ave. 528-8198 

 

Pacific Film Archive May 18: 7:30 The Cloud-Capped Star; May 19: 3:30 Starewicz Puppet Films; May 20: 5:30 The New Gulliver Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“Drowning in a Sea of Plastics” Video and Discussion Night May 16, 7 p.m. Join the Ecology Center’s Plastic Task Force for a viewing of “Trade Secrets” and “Synthetic Sea.” Free. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo Ave. 548-2220 ext. 233 

 

“Scapes/Escapes” Ink, Acrylic, Mixed Media by Evelyn Glaubman Through June 1 Tuesday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 2:45 p.m. Gallery of the Center for Psychological Studies 1398 Solano Ave. Albany 524-0291 

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse Meet the artists May 18, 19, 20 (call for times). Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Opening reception May 3, 4 - 6 p.m. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts & Paintings Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Tropical Visions: Images of AfroCaribbean Women in the Quilt Tapestries of Cherrymae Golston” Through May 28, Tu-Th, 1-7 p.m., Sat 12-4 p.m. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 16: Tim Flannery describes “The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples”; May 17: Lalita Tademy reads “Cane River”; May 18: Oscar London, M.D. copes with “From Voodoo to Viagra: The Magic of Medicine”; May 21: Ariel Dorfman reads “Blakes Therapy”  

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. 559-9500 All events at 7 p.m., unless noted May 17: Jean Shinoda Bolen talks about “Goddesses In Older Women: Archetypes in Women Over Fifty”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or www.bookpride.com  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”; May 29, 7 - 9 p.m.: Travel Photo Workshop with Joan Bobkoff. $15 registration fee  

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 17: Gregory Listach Gayle with host Mark States; May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo; May 31: Connie Post with host Louis Cuneo Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

Adan David Miller and JoJo Doig May 20, 7 p.m. Poetry and spoken word. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo 548-3333 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 


Attendant shortage alarms the disabled community

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Wednesday May 16, 2001

Two nights a week about 11 p.m., UC Berkeley student Mike Barnes drops whatever he’s doing and walks the eight blocks from his fraternity to his second job. 

The job is simple. It rarely takes longer than an hour. In fact, much of his work time is spent watching the 11 o’clock news or discussing current events, new software programs, girlfriends. Though the job is simple, if Barnes doesn’t show up, it would drastically affect one  

person’s life. 

Barnes, a second-year political economy major, works as an attendant for Berkeley resident Scott Lupkin, a quadriplegic. After the two have socialized for a half-hour or so, Barnes prepares Lupkin for sleep. He helps Lupkin undress and then transfers him from his electric-powered wheelchair to bed. Barnes then plugs in the chair so it will be recharged the following day and heads back to Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. 

Barnes chose the fraternity in the fall of 1999 specifically because of its commitment to assist people with disabilities. Besides working as attendants, fraternity members raise over $300,000 each year through its coast-to-coast Journey of Hope Bike Ride. 

“When I heard that, the deal was sealed for me,” said Barnes, who also works 20 hours a week at the campus Recreational Sports Facility. “I was worried at first because it’s a big commitment but it has really helped to shape me as a person.” 

In addition to gaining satisfaction from helping someone, Barnes earns an extra $100 for the eight hours he works for Lupkin each month. “It’s very rewarding to meet an interesting person,” Barnes said. “And it makes you feel good to help someone.” 

Attendant work seems like it would be the ideal part-time job. It requires little or no experience. The hours are flexible and the work can be both financially and personally rewarding. But despite these advantages, Berkeley’s disabled community is having an increasingly difficult time finding attendants.  

According to Sean Reidy, the Personal Assistant Coordinator at the Center for Independent Living, fewer people are submitting applications for attendant work. “Two years ago we were getting about 25 applications a month, from which we would end up with four or five decent attendants,” Reidy said. “Now we get an average of four applications a month.” 

The attendant shortage became so bad last year that the Personal Assistant Crisis Team was formed. PACT is a collection of organizations and private individuals that includes the Center for Independent Living, Easy Does It, a provider of emergency services for the disabled, and the Disabled Students Union. PACT has designed an information campaign, called the Frequently Asked Questions About Attendant Work program, aimed at students and others who can benefit from attendant work.  

Lupkin, an individual PACT member, said there are a number of reasons why there are fewer attendants. One is the strong economy that has created plenty of high-paying jobs. Another is there is a lot of misinformation about attendant work.  

One misconception is an idea that the tasks attendants perform require training or experience. According to the FAQs information sheet “most disabled employers can teach a new attendant what they need to know.” 

Another misconception is that attendants are required to perform highly personal tasks such as assisting with bodily functions.  

“Each disabled person is different in the kinds of tasks which he or she needs done. The tasks can range from running errands, to light housekeeping, to cooking, to more personal care like dressing or grooming,” the FAQs sheet reads. 

The sheet goes on to say that most people who are thinking about attendant work usually start by doing simple tasks and take on additional responsibility if they feel comfortable. 

Barnes discounts the fear of performing personal tasks. “If you can’t help someone undress by the time you’re in college… I mean most people in college should have that capacity,” he said. 

Barnes said any preconceptions or nervousness he had prior to helping Lupkin disappeared by his third shift with the disabled man. “It just goes away because you’re helping someone,” he said.  

Barnes, who is from Thousand Oaks in southern California, said he was introduced to working with the disabled by his mother when he was very young. His mother worked with disabled children as an adaptive physical education teacher.  

“I would visit her at a very young age and have always been very comfortable with disabled people,” he said. “It’s really not a big deal at all, they just want to be treated like everybody else.” 

For more information about attendant work go to www.cilberkeley.org/attendant-faq.html or call the Center for Independent Living at 841-4776. 


Pacifica under scrutiny on Hill

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Wednesday May 16, 2001

Activists in the movement to save listener-sponsored radio took their message to the halls of Congress Tuesday, when “dissident” Pacifica Foundation board members, fired staffers and banned volunteers spoke to members of the Progressive Caucus, in an informal hearing. 

Opening the hearings which he had called, Rep. Major Owens, D-Brooklyn (N.Y.), told caucus members that the Pacifica stations “fill a community gap for a significant number of citizens who...are poorly served by the mass media.” He also pointed out that the stations are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission and the Internal Revenue Service, and therefore ought to work “in accordance with their original government-approved purpose.” 

Those speaking out at the hearings, co-sponsored by  

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, alleged that the Pacifica  

Governing Board was no longer faithful to it’s stated mission. 

Pacifica radio, founded in Berkeley by pacifist Lew Hill in 1949, is a grouping of five listener-sponsored stations. Its governing board holds the stations’ licenses. Conflicts between Berkeley station KPFA and the board grew heated in March 1999 when Pacifica’s executive director terminated a popular station manager – activists alleged because she asked too many questions about finances – then fired or banned programmers who talked about the termination on the air. The board eventually shut down the Berkeley station, to which activists reacted with daily demonstrations, one as large as 10,000 people. 

At Christmas time, several staff at New York’s WBAI were similarly fired without warning; a number of other programmers and volunteers have since been banned from the New York station and a gag order has been enforced to varying degrees, prohibiting the staff from speaking about the situation. 

Pacifica spokesperson Angela Jones did not return calls. 

Owens had a personal reason for sponsoring the informal hearings: There was a March 5 incident at WBAI in which Owens, invited to participate in a WBAI talk show, had his microphone turned off by the station manager. 

In the following days, on the floor of Congress, Owens talked about the “weird and frightening experience of being gagged by a radio station manager in my own home city of New York.”  

Pacifica boardmembers had been asked to attend the session, but instead sent a person to read a brief statement. She was not authorized to respond to questions. Signed by Executive Director Bessie Wash, the statement asserted that the Pacifica Governing Board alone manages the stations. “It is ultimately responsible for essential station functions,” and not the Local Advisory Boards or local station personnel. 

Much of the impassioned testimony, broadcast over KPFA but not over any of the other Pacifica stations, got to the heart of the conflict within the governing board. 

Rob Robinson, board member from Washington, D.C.,’s station WPFW, asserted that the terms of Board Chair David Acosta and Vice Chair John Murdock expired and that the executive director has not been evaluated, even when she “permits harassment and incivilities occur to members of Congress.” 

Thomas Moran, who represents KPFA on the board, told the caucus that he had been unable to get Pacifica’s financial statements since October. And where he has seen the statements, he said he has been unable to get clarity on what the line items mean.  

“Money has been spent outside of Paciifca’s mission,” he said, naming “spin doctors, lawyers and armed guards.” 

Similarly, banned WBAI volunteer programmer Mimi Rosenberg talked about the Local Advisory Board’s attempt to find out how the station’s money was spent. “There was an infusion of capital from a trust of $2 million,” she said, but the board did not know from where the money had come. Further, it did not know where the station has invested its funds. “There’s not a line by line breakdown,” she said. 

Fired WBAI Program Director Bernard White talked about the numerous staff people who had been fired and the volunteer programmers who had been banned from the station. “Not only the people who work at the station have been victimized, so have the listeners,” he said. Calling on the caucus members, he said: “I hope you will raise your voice in opposition to this hostile takeover.” 

There was also a representative from the Houston Station who had once done a show geared to Native Americans, but had been taken off the air, along with other programmers whose shows were directed to the growing minority populations in Houston.  

Lee said the comments had shown her that the conflict between the governing board was not isolated to KPFA. “This is happening nation wide,” she said. 

Similarly programmer Larry Bensky, who now volunteers after having been fired from his paid public affairs post, agreed that taking the hearings to the national level was critical. 

In a phone interview, after his on-air anchoring of the hearings, Bensky pointed to the cumulative effect of several events: these hearings, the hearings last year before the State Joint Audit Committee and subsequent rulings by the Attorney General’s office permitting a lawsuit naming the Pacifica Foundation to move forward. 

“It’s not the end; (the Progressive Caucus) intends to investigate,” he said.  

 

 


Board member resigns

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Wednesday May 16, 2001

Pacifica Foundation Board member Michael Palmer resigned Monday. Local KPFA staff and supporters showed no regrets. 

An e-mail Palmer accidentally sent to a KPFA activist during the summer of 1999, intended for a fellow board member, discussed the possible sale of Pacifica stations KPFA and WBAI and heightened the tensions already at boiling point between the board, and the staff and volunteers at the stations. 

“I’m sorry that his tenure has caused so much damage,” said Local Advisory Board Chair Sherry Gendelman. “I’m happy that he has taken this course of action.” 

In his resignation letter to Board Chair David Acosta, Palmer wrote: “I also offer encouragement to other board members to protect themselves from the tactics employed by a small number of individuals and groups in opposition to the progressive message of the Pacifica Foundation.” 

The real estate offices where Palmer works have been the target of pickets who oppose his role on the board. 

In his resignation letter, Palmer praised the board for its work: “Early results indicate that the foundation is on the cusp of financial health and that the listening audience is growing enough to fully fund all operations. I commend the stewardship of yourself (Acosta) and your predecessor (Mary Francis Berry).” 

Gendelman said she hoped the resignation signaled further departures from the board by those who had acted “contrary to the mission of Pacifica.” 

 


POLICE BRIEFS

Staff
Wednesday May 16, 2001

A alleged prostitute working on the 2800 block of San Pablo Avenue just after midnight Thursday was attacked and robbed by a suspected former pimp, police said. 

Berkeley Police Lt. Russell Lopes said a man driving a white Cadillac pulled up beside the alleged prostitute Thursday, got out of the car and began demanding that the woman turn over all her cash. The woman, who claimed to have been assaulted by the man before, took off running across San Pablo Avenue, Lopes said. 

But the alleged pimp caught her on the median dividing San Pablo’s southbound and northbound traffic, Lopes said. As he beat the woman, another woman came running from the Cadillac to help search the victim for money, Lopes said. 

Police responded to a cell phone call from someone who witnessed the attack while driving past on San Pablo. Minutes after the attack, they found the Cadillac driving west on University Avenue, Lopes said. 

Both suspects were charged with robbery and assault, Lopes said. 

••• 

A man released from San Quentin prison Friday morning was back in jail that evening after fighting with a parole officer and attempting to seize the officer’s gun, police said. 

About 3 p.m. Friday a man entered the Berkeley Parole Office on the 1900 block of University Avenue demanding to see a certain parole officer, Lt. Lopes said. 

The officer in questions was not in the office, but another officer, noticing that the suspect had a heavy scent of alcohol on his breath, asked him to remain in the office. The suspect shouted obscenities before running out of the office, Lopes said. 

When the parole officer attempted to detain the man in front of the parole office, a struggle ensued. The suspect allegedly reached for the parole officer’s pistol, concealed underneath his jacket, before other parole officers managed to pull the two apart. 

The suspect was charged with attempted robbery, resisting arrest and violation of parole, Lopes said.  

••• 

An angry SUV driver allegedly attempted to run a man down in his car after a verbal altercation at a gas station Friday. 

About 4:30 p.m. Friday a man filling up at the ARCO station at 833 University Avenue was startled by the sound of a large white SUV crunching into his car’s bumper. 

The driver of the SUV got out of his car and began to berate the man whose car he had damaged, accusing him of having parked incorrectly by the gas pump, Lt. Lopes said. 

An argument ensued, Lopes said, until the SUV driver allegedly grabbed the other man by the neck and punched him in the face, knocking him to the ground.  

“I’m gonna run your white ass over,” the man allegedly said, as the victim lay sprawled on the ground. 

The assailant returned to his car, did a hasty U-turn, and attempted to run down his victim, Lopes said. But the victim had managed to climb to his feet and leapt out of the way of the SUV, Lopes said. 

Police investigators are still searching for the SUV and its driver, Lopes said. The victim was not seriously injured and declined medical attention at the scene.


San Diego State changing image of Aztec mascot

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

SAN DIEGO — “Monty Montezuma,” San Diego State’s red-faced, spear-throwing mascot, got the heave-ho Tuesday by the university president, who wants a more dignified portrayal of the Aztec leader. 

The most significant change announced by President Stephen Weber is eliminating Montezuma as a cheerleading mascot and using him as a historically accurate “ambassador.” 

So, gone are the days of Monty wearing a loincloth and headdress, emerging from a shroud of smoke, dancing around and flinging a flaming spear into the turf moments before kickoff of football games at Qualcomm Stadium. 

And the school plans to gradually phase out the logo of a red-faced, glaring Indian that adorns stationery, literature, uniforms and the basketball court at Cox Arena.  

The changes are expected to be completed by fall 2003. 

“If we are to employ the symbols of another culture, and portray a particular historical figure within that culture, we have an obligation to do so in an accurate and respectful way,” Weber said at a news conference. 

Monty’s performance at football games, for instance, doesn’t quite meet that standard, Weber said. 

“The Aztecs considered fire sacred. In a broad sense, I think what well-intended people inadvertently did was drift a little bit north toward Hollywood.  

“And I think we’re going to drift back down to Mesoamerica, where we belong.” 

The name “Monty” also will disappear in official references and campus business establishments using the name will be renamed, Weber said.  

The only exception will be an alumni association award named The Monty. 

Weber said the school plans to have the new Montezuma at sporting events, but it’s yet to be determined what he’ll do and look like. Experts on Aztec culture will have a say in the process, Weber said. 

“Remember, this is a person who was the head of state, the head of the religion and the head of the military.  

“If you’re going to take on that portrayal, you have to do it with behaviors that are appropriate to a person of that stature,” Weber said. 

Montezuma also will have broader responsibilities for educating the public on Aztec culture, Weber said. 

Times have changed since Monty made his debut in 1941 when, during a homecoming game, he emerged from a teepee and chased young coeds. 

The representation evolved over the years.  

In 1983, he sat atop a pyramid among his attendants on the sidelines at football games.  

The next season, he returned to his role of firing up the players and fans. 

American Indian and Latino students long have complained the Aztec identity is racist and disrespectful. 

In September, the Associated Students Council called on Weber to retire the Montezuma mascot.  

It later organized a student referendum in which 86 percent of voters opted to keep the current logos and Monty depictions. 

Recently, a panel of 20 students, faculty, alumni and community members, recommended the school keep its Aztec identity but do away with inaccurate depictions of the 16th-century ruler. 

Weber’s announcement Tuesday failed to please Ron Gochez, a leader of the Chicano student group MEChA, because Montezuma still will be used to represent the university. 

“We’re not going to stand for it,” he said. “We were calling for the abolishment of any human figure.” 

Freshman Randall Mack, however, said the school should have honored the student vote. 

“It’s not like it’s making fun of Indians or American Indians or anything. It’s just a mascot representing the school,” Mack said. “It’s something to proud of. It’s nothing to be ashamed of.” 

On the Net: 

http://www.sdsu.edu/identity/


State PUC OKs plan allocating record rate hike

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

State power regulators finally decided Tuesday how to spread the pain of the biggest electric rate hikes in California history, boosting rates by as much as 80 percent for residential customers who use the most power. 

More than half of the residential ratepayers served by the state’s two largest utilities will see no increase at all in their rates if they don’t increase their use. 

But Pacific Gas and Electric Co. customers who consume the most will see their rates jump from 14.3 cents per kilowatt hour to 25.8 cents per kilowatt hour, which translates into an average increase of $85 per month for electricity. 

The plan, approved 3-2 by the state Public Utilities Commission, affects about 9 million customers of PG&E and Southern California Edison Co. 

Even after the vote, there was confusion within the PUC over the new rates. The commission released three sets of figures throughout the day, each with dramatically different rate hikes. Spokesmen for both PG&E and Edison said it will take at least a day of number crunching to know precisely how the rate hikes will affect the dozens of different customer classes. 

The new rates, which will appear on June bills, were approved nearly seven weeks after the PUC mandated a $5 billion rate hike. The split vote came after a week of intense lobbying by industrial, commercial, agricultural and residential groups – all hoping to shift more of the increases onto each other. 

“This is probably the worst economic calamity the state has ever seen,” said David Marshall, chief financial officer at Gregg Industries, a 400-person iron foundry in El Monte. “It has got ramifications well beyond anything that we can begin to understand.” 

Gregg already has switched its production cycle from during the day to a night shift to save electricity, Marshall said, but he expects the rate hike plan approved Tuesday to cost Gregg at least $1 million this year. 

Paul Clanon, director of the PUC’s energy division, said rate hikes on industrial customers would be capped at 49 percent. Rate hikes for agricultural customers are capped at 25 to 30 percent. Rate hikes for commercial ratepayers, such as banks, hospitals and restaurants, were not immediately clear due to conflicting numbers. 

Commissioner Richard Bilas said too high a percent of the hikes had been shifted onto commercial ratepayers. 

“While something has been done to tone down the impact on industrial customers, it appears to have been done at the expense of small and medium businesses, which make up the majority of businesses in this state,” Bilas said as he urged his fellow commissioners to vote against the proposal. 

The 80 percent figure for the biggest electricity users came from a chart released by Clanon after the vote. 

Under state law, a portion of every residential customer’s electric use – called baseline, a percentage of the average amount of electricity use in an area based on climate, geography and season – is shielded from rate hikes. 

The PUC could only raise rates on power use beyond 130 percent of baseline. Clanon’s chart shows an average 60 percent rate hike on all electricity use that exceeds 130 percent of baseline. 

The biggest losers are the biggest users. 

Residential power use is divided into five tiers, and electricity used within PG&E’s top tier will jump by 80 percent. About 9 percent of PG&E’s households fall in that top tier. 

Those hikes for the top tier translate into an average increase of $85 – from $232 to $317 – on monthly bills for such customers. 

For Edison’s heaviest residential users, the rate hike in the top tier is 71 percent – or an average increase from $194 to $265 on monthly bills. 

Even top-tier customers will not pay more for electricity use that falls within that first 130 percent of baseline. 

However, commercial, industrial and agricultural customers will have to pay their rate hikes on every kilowatt. 

Steve Strong, a plum and nectarine grower in Visalia, was optimistic the rate hikes won’t bruise his business. But with unstable weather, fluctuating costs and now the potential for blackouts that could hit refrigerated packing houses and shut down water pumps, agriculture is becoming an even riskier business. 

“I don’t have to go to Vegas or Tahoe, I’ve got enough gambling going on here,” he said. 

The rate hikes, which will begin appearing on June bills, will be retroactive to March 27 – the day the record rate hikes were approved – though those retroactive charges will be spread over a 12-month period. 

Commissioners were forced to shout their votes over the din of jeering protesters, who wore tombstone-shaped placards that read: “R.I.P. Affordable Energy.” 

PUC Commissioner Jeff Brown bellowed back at protesters: “We cannot walk away from it. We cannot pretend that this is some sort of problem that we can walk away from.” 

The final rates were a revised version of a proposal released by PUC President Loretta Lynch last week. Lynch postponed a scheduled Monday vote to rework her plan after a massive outcry from businesses proclaiming the proposed rate hikes would doom California’s economy, a critical statement from Gov. Gray Davis and pressure from fellow commissioners to lessen the impact on businesses. 

Since it unanimously approved the rate hikes in March, the PUC has crammed a year’s worth of work into six weeks, struggling to fashion rates that simultaneously recoup the $5.2 billion the state has spent buying power for the customers of the state’s two largest utilities and trigger enough conservation to help fend off some of this summer’s expected rolling blackouts. 

Customers of San Diego Gas and Electric Co. and those who buy electricity directly from energy wholesalers, such as the California university system, are shielded from rate hikes. 

 

WHAT’S NEXT 

• No power alerts Tuesday as electricity reserves stay above 7 percent. 

• A major credit agency downgrades California’s credit, citing the energy crisis’ increasing drain on the state’s finances. Moody’s Investors Services dropped the credit rating on the state’s general obligation bonds from Aa3 to Aa2. The credit change comes a day after Gov. Gray Davis’ release of a revised budget that trims $3.2 billion from his January proposal. 

• The North American Electric Reliability Council releases a report estimating that California could have 260 hours of rolling blackouts this summer. The report says the Northwest should have enough power to meet its needs this summer, but won’t have any excess to send to California. NERC also warns that transmission problems in other regions, such as New England and New York, could surface this summer. The report says Texas should be closely watched when it opens its market to full retail access. 

• State power regulators finally decided Tuesday, after a flurry of changing proposals, how to spread the pain of the biggest electric rate hikes in California history. Residential customers who use the most power could see their bills jump by 80 percent according to Paul Clanon, director of the PUC energy division. More than half of residential ratepayers served by the state’s two largest utilities will see no increase at all on their bills. Clanon said rate hikes for industrial customers are capped at 49 percent. Rate hikes for commercial users and farmers were not immediately clear due to conflicting numbers. 

——— 

On the Net: 

California Public Utilities Commission: http://www.cpuc.ca.gov 

Gov. Gray Davis: http://www.governor.ca.gov 


Public transportation usage rises

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

LOS ANGELES — The rising cost of gas appears to be prompting many Southern California motorists to find alternative ways of getting around. 

Subway ridership rose 5 percent last month, with the number of passengers on the Red Line subway in Los Angeles jumping from 119,000 in March to 125,000 in April. 

“While we’ve been seeing increases of one or two thousand per month, an increase of) 6,000 people on a daily basis is significant,” said Ed Scannell, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. “It’s clear that a significant portion of that ridership was due to those gas prices.” 

Since March 23, the average price of regular self-serve gasoline has gone from $1.58 to $1.90 cents per gallon in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, analyst Trilby Lundberg said. 

The MTA also has seen an increase in bus ridership. 

Ridership increased from 1,161,490 in March to 1,196,042 in April. However, Scannell is less inclined to attribute most of that increase to the cost of gas. 

“A significant number of our bus riders are dependent on us because they don’t have cars, and while many of those who ride the rails also do not have cars, there are more people who have a choice,” he said.  

“There are more discretionary riders on the Red Line.” 

On Monday, the MTA unveiled a proposed $2.7 billion budget that would put more buses on the streets and more rail cars on the tracks. The spending package calls for adding 117 more buses along with more cars along the Blue and Green light-rail lines. 

The new budget would increase MTA spending by 6.7 percent, or $183 million a year. It anticipates that significant numbers of commuters will continue to move from cars to trains or buses. 

This summer, the Blue Line between downtown and Long Beach will increase the length of each train to three cars. Plans also call for the Green Line, which now runs one-car trains between Norwalk and El Segundo, to add an extra car. 

Rising fuel prices are also included. In the new budget, the transit agency’s bill for fuel is expected to jump 169 percent — or $17.5 million. 

Still, MTA officials believe they can stay within the budget without increasing fares. 


Dalai Lama projects hope for peaceful 21st century

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

The Dalai Lama expressed hope for a more peaceful 21st century Tuesday night, saying humanity seems to have learned something from the bloody and violent one that just ended. 

“In the 20th century, there was more bloodshed, more pain and suffering,” he told a sold-out crowd of about 10,000 at Memorial Coliseum, capping his three-day visit to Portland. He leaves for San Jose today. 

As technology advanced, he said, so did destructive power. “Material development did not make us more humane. What was lacking was human compassion. Humanity is actually too much mechanized.” 

The Dalai Lama, 65, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate and leader of Tibet’s exiled government, is on a three-week American visit. His audience paid from $25 to $100 to attend the lecture titled “Ethics for a new Millennium.” A portion of the ticket price will go toward construction of a Buddhist cultural center in Portland. 

In wars of the past, he said, heroes used their strength, swords and spears. “At least it was an honest war,” he lamented. 

Now, he said, with modern warfare, one side can’t see the suffering it imposes on others. “Mechanized war is much more serious, much more dangerous,” he said. 

“If we combine our brilliant brain with a warm heart, human beings will have the potential to overcome their problems,” he said. “I think there are many signs of hope because of our past experiences.” 

He cited South Africa’s progress, Mahatma Gandhi of India and Martin Luther King Jr. 

In both World Wars, he said, people supported the government without question. During Vietnam, they not only questioned policy but demonstrated against it. 

While the talk was mostly serious, the Buddhist leader also displayed his gentle sense of humor. He said people attending the lecture with great expectations would be disappointed. Some, he said, believed that he had healing powers. 

“I want to show you my skin problem here,” he said 

The red-and-saffron-robed Dalai Lama, the 14th, is considered the reincarnation of his predecessor. He fled to India as a teenager in 1959 after a failed uprising against the Chinese occupation of Tibet. 

He decried the wide gap between rich and poor. Too much emphasis on material wealth is immoral, he said, when hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive. 

“We must think to reduce this gap,” he said. “We have to develop a more civil, more contented way of life.” 

He urged self-discipline and the foregoing of short-term pleasures for long-term results. “If I take a drug I may get satisfaction, but eventually it will ruin the body,” he said as an example. 

He said man’s intellect gives him access to all processes and emotions, but it also gets him into trouble. 

If we want peace, he said, “no disturbances, a trouble-free world, all human beings should go to heaven. There should be no human beings on this planet.” 

But he said that while humanity can be a troublemaker, it is uniquely capable of absolute altruism. “We have great potential,” he said. 

He urged his audience to implement some of what he said, if they found it of some interest. 

“If you feel these points are not of much interest, then forget it!” he said to close the speech.


Cal OSHA investigates accident at Marine World

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

VALLEJO — Cal OSHA is investigating an accident at Marine World this weekend in which a woman fell off a ride and had to be hospitalized. 

It happened Saturday afternoon on the park’s Starfish. Marine World spokesman Jeff Jouett said the woman suffered a two to three-inch cut to the back of her head after falling about six feet. 

She was airlifted to John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek where she was kept overnight for observation. Jouett said her injuries appear to be not serious. 

He said the ride was closed after the 4 p.m. accident Saturday and it won’t be reopened “until everyone is satisfied that it’s safe.” 

How the woman was injured isn’t clear. Safety lap restraints on the ride lock automatically and the ride won’t function if one of the restraints isn’t locked, Jouett said. 

“At this point, it’s not known whether it was mechanical design or passenger related, or a combination of those,” he said. 

In addition to Cal OSHA investigators, park engineers have inspected the ride. The ride is manufactured by Chance Rides in Kansas and a representative of that company is scheduled to be at the park Tuesday. 

Rides at the park are inspected on a daily basis, Jouett said. 

“And if there’s any cause for concern during the day, they’re reinspected.” 

The Starfish has been in the park since 1998 and Jouett said he doesn’t know of another accident involving the ride. 

The Starfish is a disc-shaped ride that goes in circles while tilting back and forth, much like a spinning plate. 


High-speed rail project suffers from budget cuts

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Supporters of California’s proposed high-speed rail system hope lawmakers will provide some money to keep the project on track despite Gov. Gray Davis’ decision to cut off most funding. 

“I’m optimistic that we will be able to get something back in the budget, but it certainly will not be a very aggressive expansion in the next year or two,” Richard Silver, executive director of the Train Riders Association of California, said Tuesday. 

The current state budget includes $5 million to begin the three years of environmental reviews that are needed before the state could begin building the 700-mile, $26 billion system. 

High-speed rail planners had asked the governor for another $14 million to continue the studies during the fiscal year that starts July 1. 

But Davis included no money for the studies in the revised budget plan he unveiled Monday, although he left in place about $1 million to run the High-Speed Rail Authority, the agency overseeing the studies. 

The governor said a slowing economy had forced him to cut almost $3.2 billion in tax cuts and spending increases from the budget plan he initially proposed in January. 

“We were looking for areas to reduce rather than areas to expand,” said Sandy Harrison, a spokesman for Davis’ Department of Finance. 

Silver, whose group supports high-speed rail, said California has to develop the system to cope with population growth and that postponing the studies would cost the state more in the long run. 

By delaying the studies, the greater the chance the previous work will lose its value and force planners to start over again, Silver said. 

He said he hoped to convince lawmakers to add $5 million or $6 million to the budget to at least continue the environmental reviews on the route between Bakersfield and Los Angeles. 

“That’s probably the single most important development in high-speed rail,” he said.  

“It would benefit freight and passengers. If we can move forward on that there is some value to it.” 

The system would link Sacramento, the Bay Area, Los Angeles and San Diego with trains running at speeds of up to 220 mph.  

Advocates say it could be built in stages, with the Los Angeles-to-Bakersfield stretch as an obvious starting point. 

There’s no direct passenger train service between the two cities now, and freight trains are forced to take a long, slow route over the mountains between the San Joaquin Valley and Los Angeles Basin. 

Medhi Morshed, the authority’s executive director, cut short a stay at a high-speed rail conference in Milwaukee and was hurrying back to Sacramento on Tuesday after learning of Davis’ decision. 

He said he was surprised the governor didn’t include any study funding in his revised budget plan. 

“They’ve known all along that the environmental work would cost (a total of) $25 million,” Morshed said. “We could have avoided spending $5 million for no good reason.” 

He said he didn’t have enough information to predict if lawmakers would include any money for the studies in the budget bill they will send to Davis this summer. 

The governor could veto or reduce whatever lawmakers appropriate. 

On the Net: Read the plan at www.cahighspeedrail


Democrats lose bid to hire thousands of school teachers

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

WASHINGTON — A Democratic proposal to finance the hiring of thousands of public school teachers went down to narrow defeat in the Senate as the administration and its Republican allies sought to assert control over debate on President Bush’s education bill. 

Tuesday’s vote was 50-48 against an amendment by Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and marked the first time in several fitful weeks of debate that the Senate rejected a move to add spending to the legislation or to tighten federal controls over its use. 

Murray, a former school board member, said her amendment was designed to reduce class size in public schools nationwide. The head of the Democratic senatorial campaign committee, she also said Republicans “will find their opponents talking about this in the next election.” 

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, a Republican whose name will be on the ballot next year, voted against the proposal. “I want to give school districts local flexibility for spending the money,” she said. To set classroom size as the “only priority, when schools have different needs depending on where they are, strikes me as a mistake.” 

At the same time, conservatives and GOP leaders said they intend to seek removal of some earlier spending add-ons when it comes time to negotiate a House-Senate compromise. 

“I think it’s getting financially irresponsible, but hopefully we will get it cleaned up,” said Sen. Don Nickles of Oklahoma, the Senate GOP whip. 

The developments came as the Senate plodded through another day of debate over Bush’s top legislative priority. The measure would mandate annual state-run testing of all students in grades three through eight in math and reading. Schools where test scores fall short of standards would receive additional federal support to improve, and after three years, students would be allowed to use federal money for tutoring or transportation to different public schools. 

A companion measure is scheduled for a vote in the House this week, and sponsors have been scrambling to shore up the support of conservatives unhappy with changes voted in committee. 

“We need to do a better job” of promoting the legislation to the GOP rank and file, said White House education adviser Sandy Kress. The White House issued a formal statement of support, coupled with recommendations for changes to restore elements of the president’s program that were taken out in committee. 

As part of the effort to reassure conservatives, the House Education Committee has issued a steady stream of material in recent days, including a letter of support from the Home School Legal Defense Association, an organization that supports home schooling. 

In addition, though, the White House and GOP leaders are crafting amendments designed to placate conservatives, including one to restore Bush’s plan for private school vouchers for students in failing schools. For their part, some conservative and liberal lawmakers may offer an amendment to remove the annual testing provision from the bill. 

“Too many teachers are spending time on crowd control instead of spending time on curriculum,” said Murray as she advanced her amendment. She said it would allow continuation of former President Clinton’s proposal to hire 100,000 new teachers, rather than combine that program with one that pays for teacher training, as Bush favors. Her measure also would have called for an additional $2.4 billion above what is in the bill. 

The amendment failed on a party-line vote, as all 50 Republicans voting against it. All 48 votes in favor came from Democrats. 

Education consistently ranks high in importance with the public in polling, and the debate is unfolding in a changing political atmosphere. 

The issue has long favored Democrats in congressional and presidential elections, but recent polls have shown parity or even a slight GOP advantage. Bush stressed the issue heavily in his bid for the White House, and congressional Republicans abandoned their effort to abolish the Education Department. 

Murray’s amendment was in a series that Democrats have offered in an attempt to maneuver Republicans into voting against politically attractive measures as they labor to approve legislation in line with Bush’s request. Also expected to come to a vote is a proposal to increase money for school construction. 

In recent days, the Senate has voted to add hundreds of billions of dollars to the education bill, much of it targeted at helping disabled children or poor students. Some amendments included actual funding, and some specified that financing would depend on future voting. Some of the proposal were merely advisory. 

Some or most probably will be jettisoned in the attempt to forge a compromise between the House and Senate. 

 

On the Net: Web sites for House members, committees: http://www.house.gov/


Top-secret agency breaks code of silence for dollars

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

FORT MEADE, Md. — Once, the National Security Agency insignia, a bald eagle perched on a skeleton key, surveyed a barren terrain of top-secret letterhead, its forbidding stare known only to a privileged few. 

Now, it spreads its wings over teddy bears, tie-dye shirts and nail-trimmers sold to tourists, part of an effort to let Americans get a glimpse of what the nation’s premier eavesdropping agency does. 

Competing with a dozen other agencies for intelligence dollars, the largest and most secretive of them wants to spread the word about itself. 

Most of its work is still plenty hush-hush. 

Its openness around the edges is a departure for the 49-year-old organization jokingly called “No Such Agency” and perhaps best known for efforts not to be known at all. 

“It’s changed all right,” said author James Bamford. Twenty years ago he faced threats of prosecution for publishing NSA-related documents; recently he faced a crowd of agents at his book launch on the NSA campus. 

“Instead of putting me in jail,” he said, “they’re throwing me a book party.” 

The NSA’s director, Lt. Gen. Michael Hayden, accelerated the change after his 1999 appointment, perhaps most dramatically by making public two lacerating reports on agency deficiencies. 

“There are some things that we can say, that we ought to say,” he commented in an unusual interview with the History Channel. 

The end of the Cold War led some to question the need for a national eavesdropper and subjected intelligence budgets generally to a harder look. 

“Like everyone else in the intelligence community, the NSA is being forced to reveal more than it wants to about itself,” said Norman Polmar, who wrote “Spy Plane: The U2 History,” an NSA-related exploit gone wrong. 

The internal NSA reports released by Hayden said that “ineffective leadership” and “our insular, somewhat arrogant culture and position” had led Congress to cut money to the agency, which gets the largest share of the $30 billion intelligence budget. 

Openness only goes so far. A European Union team angrily left the United States last week when NSA and CIA officials refused to meet with its members. The team is investigating whether the United States engages in economic espionage. 

NSA agents were once what snoops called “top secret famous” – nameless shadows celebrated only among the select few in the intelligence community. 

Their coups were legion: Agency eavesdropping allowed President Kennedy to learn Soviet bluff lines during the Cuban missile crisis, and the NSA’s Berber linguists linked Libyan agents to the 1986 bombing of a German discotheque that killed a U.S. soldier. 

In recent years, the progenitor of information technology in the 1950s has been lagging behind Silicon Valley. 

In January 2000, the NSA’s overtasked computers shut down for three days. 

Hayden slashed staff and hired outside contractors. Last year, Congress increased intelligence funding by 7 percent. 

To be sure, sleight-of-hand tics persist at the NSA. Gift shop purchases appear on credit card statements credited to a mysterious Civilian Welfare Fund. 

The NSA museum, vaunted as the hallmark of its new openness, concentrates on World War II codebreaking. 

“It’s an outstanding tool in helping people understand what the NSA is about without getting into some of the problematic issues,” said agency historian Patrick Weadon. 

“It’s too much about war,” complained Sandro Dallaturca, a Belgian banking encryptologist who had been looking forward to learning about encoding techniques. 

Missy Spiegl, 15, whose father works for the NSA, thought the museum might give her some family insights. 

“I’ve been trying for years to get out of my dad what he does, but I can’t,” she said. 

Inside the agency, change has been palpable. 

The NSA has farmed out some research, allowed an ex-agent to publish an account of how he redesigned an internal communications system and cooperated on Bamford’s book, a largely sympathetic history of the agency by an author who favors more spending on intelligence technology. 

That may have been an astute move on the NSA director’s part, Polmar said. “Honey catches more than a fly swatter.” 

Spreading suburbs have brought neighbors close to the agency’s long-isolated campus. After a few mishaps, the NSA reached out to the community. 

“They are the hidden powerhouse of the county,” said Janet Owens, Anne Arundel County leader. She’s thrilled the NSA recently enticed General Dynamics to build a local plant. 

Staffers once forbidden to say where they worked now lead one of the nation’s largest blood drives. NSA firemen train local volunteers in how to contain a chemical attack. 

There’s the after-school tutoring: Linguists monitor drug traffickers by day and teach Spanish by night; code-cracking mathematicians walk teens through logarithms. 

And there’s a 4-year-old park commemorating the 152 people who have died in service to the agency and country. 

“I am military intelligence and I am always out front ... always,” reads the plaque. 

——— 

On the Net: 

NSA website: http://www.nsa.gov 


Expert predicts Memorial Day gas pump prices relief

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

WASHINGTON — The record-high prices at the nation’s gas pumps should start going down around Memorial Day – even in especially hard-hit California and the Midwest, a top federal energy official said Tuesday. 

Prices may rise another nickel a gallon over the next two weeks, but unless new problems develop, they will begin falling, John Cook, director of the Energy Information Administration’s petroleum division, told a House Energy subcommittee. 

Refineries are winding up maintenance and increasing production, allowing supplies to creep up. Wholesale prices have dropped in the last two weeks, foreshadowing retail drops that lag two to four weeks behind, Cook said. 

The news comes just as Americans are about to kick off the summer driving and vacationing season. 

Gas prices hit a record high Tuesday, averaging $1.72 a gallon nationwide, according to AAA. Drivers in the Midwest – especially Chicago – are getting the worst of it, followed closely by those in California. The average price in Chicago on Tuesday was $2.08 a gallon. 

The cycle appears similar to last year, when gas went well above $2 a gallon in June in Midwestern cities like Chicago, Milwaukee and Detroit, then dropped. 

Cook dismissed recent talk of possible $3-a-gallon gas. Even if everything goes wrong in the nation’s gasoline supply and distribution system this summer, prices won’t go that high, he said. 

“We aren’t going to see $3-a-gallon gasoline anywhere this year,” he said. 

The factors to blame for this year’s increases are familiar, Cook said. They include a tight crude oil market, lower gas inventories than last year, a patchwork of different, cleaner-burning gasoline blends required in many smoggy cities, and limits on refining capacity. 

The problem is especially acute in the Midwest and West because of special requirements placed on “reformulated” gasoline sold there in summer. 

In addition, recent fires at Tosco refineries in Los Angeles and Wood River, Ill., threatened supplies and helped prices surge. The Chicago market has been further squeezed by the closing of the Premcor Inc. refinery in Blue Island. 

Cook emphasized that inventories remain tighter than normal for this time of year, leaving the nation vulnerable if a refinery goes down or a pipeline breaks. “Today little cushion exists to absorb changing conditions,” he said. 

Midwestern inventories are particularly low, ending last week 10 percent below their five-year average, he said. 

Various energy users – a national retailer, a farm fertilizer manufacturer, the American Association of Retired Persons and others – told lawmakers they are hurting from high fuel costs, for electricity and natural gas as well as gasoline. The situation is cutting into business profitability, contributing to higher product prices for consumers and endangering farmers, they said. 

“Motorists by the millions are suffering massive sticker shock every time they pull in to fill up,” said Lon Anderson, public affairs director for AAA Mid-Atlantic.  

“We all know that over the long term, high fuel prices will literally fuel higher costs for virtually everything else from food to clothes to services and thus, fuel inflation.” The hearing was held as Democrats and Republicans debate how to chart the nation’s energy future. Congressional Democrats unveiled an energy blueprint Tuesday meant to draw a contrast with a plan expected to be released Thursday by the White House. 

On the Net: 

Energy Information Administration: http://www.eia.doe.gov 

AAA: http://aaa.com/news12/prmain.html 


WALL STREET ROUNDUP

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

NEW YORK — Wall Street got the interest rate cut it had been hoping for Tuesday, but that wasn’t enough to put investors in a buying mood. 

Instead, the market ended the session virtually unchanged, with blue chips falling slightly and tech issues managing a small gain. Analysts attributed the lukewarm reaction to the fact the reduction was expected, as well as broader concerns about still-weak business conditions. 

“The market got what is was expecting, so this is basically a non-event,” said Matt Brown, head of equity management at Wilmington Trust. “The good news is that with five interest rate cuts in four-and-a-half months, we’ve now got the wind at our back. The second quarter should still be weak but we’re very confident the economy will start to improve this fall.” 

The Fed indicated its decision Tuesday to lower interest rates by a half point was due to concerns about various drags on the economy, including a decline in business investment in new equipment. 

But the rate reduction failed to spark a strong rally on Wall Street, as many previous announcements have done. Although the major stock indexes did advance on the Fed’s move, those gains faded as the session wore on. In the technology sector, Microsoft fell 45 cents to $68.27, while Texas Instruments rose 24 cents to $37.03 after reiterating a second-quarter outlook that includes double-digit revenue losses. 

Retailing, manufacturing and other non-technology issues were also mixed. Wal-Mart slipped $2.35 to $52 after meeting previously reduced expectations for its first quarter but warning that double-digit growth won’t return until the second half of its fiscal year. 

The Fed’s move was closely watched because, in the absence of strong profits or other encouraging news, Wall Street has been increasingly looking to interest rate cuts as a catalyst on which to rally. As a result, the markets traded in a narrow range for much of the week leading up to the Fed’s announcement. Investors were also unnerved by speculation that the Fed would cut rates by less than a half percentage point. Now the market must look for other good news to advance on, but analysts say that might not come along for a while. 

— The Associated Press 

 

 

Pre-announcements for second-quarter results, which are expected to be weak, will start rolling in next month. And no one knows whether the Fed will cut rates again, although the statement issued Tuesday suggests that the action is not out of the question. 

The tone of and level of concern in the statement caught many off guard. 

“I thought their statement was surprisingly aggressive. They said that they may lower rates again if conditions continue to deteriorate,” said Bill Barker, investment strategy consultant at Dain Rauscher. “But we’ve got six weeks until their next meeting with the unlikely prospect of an intra-meeting cut before then.” 

Advancing issues led decliners 3 to 2 on the New York Stock Exchange. Consolidated volume came to 1.28 billion shares, compared with 1.02 billion Monday. 

The Russell 2000 index rose 2.99 to 489.63. 

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei stock average rose 1.3 percent. Germany’s DAX index advanced nearly 0.1 percent, Britain’s FT-SE 100 was up 2.7 percent, and France’s CAC-40 gained 1.0 percent.  

 


Survey shows big money pressures for kids

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

WASHINGTON — Zach Landau, 13, gets a weekly allowance of $6.50. He spends some on crickets and fleas as food for his menagerie of lizards, salamanders, tree frogs and other creatures. Some of it he saves. 

His parents don’t plan to give him or his siblings credit cards despite peer pressure. 

Nationwide, too many parents don’t make that decision, according to a survey of American parents.  

Drowning in credit card debt themselves, they set bad examples and fail to teach their children how to manage and save money, the survey said. 

Zach came with his father from Oak Hill, Va., to appear at a news conference where the survey results were released. The boy said he likes the idea of putting aside some of his allowance but admitted his approval is not total. 

By saving the money, Zach said, “You don’t really get the immediate gratification you’d like.” 

The survey by the American Savings Education Council and the Employee Benefit Research Institute released showed that 51 percent of parents believe they understand financial matters very well. 

Yet 55 percent said they carry over credit card debt from month to month, which often inspires the same behavior in their children, said Dallas Salisbury, the savings council’s chairman. 

“You’re setting them up for a lifetime of distress,” he said. 

Young people are bombarded by tempting products and messages urging them to buy now and worry later. 

At the same time, the average savings rate of Americans has plunged to the lowest levels since the Depression, hitting minus 1.3 percent in February.  

The EBRI-ASEC “Choose to Save” coalition, the banking industry and other groups are trying to get through to children early about the importance of saving. 

An overwhelming number of young people say they turn to their parents for financial education and guidance. 

What are they receiving? According to the survey, 61 percent of parents include their children in discussions about family finances; 29 percent have provided educational materials to help teach their kids about financial responsibility; 52 percent have taught them how to make budgets; and 61 percent have shown them how to set financial goals. 

All those are recommended by the EBRI-ASEC coalition as ways parents can teach their children about good money management. 

The survey, conducted Jan. 4 through 30, covered 1,000 adults around the country with one or more children age 6-17. Its margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points. 

Also at Thursday’s news conference were Lucinia Mundy and her daughter, Opal, a 10-year-old from Brandywine, Md., whose weekly allowance is $5. About half of that goes in the bank, and the other half is spent on video games and other goodies, she said. 

Before spending, “I think long and hard about it,” Opal said.  

“I need to know what is more important to me.” 

Lucinia Mundy said she requires her daughter to save at least 20 percent of her allowance and cash gifts she receives from relatives. 

Besides the other EBRI-ASEC recommendations, the coalition also suggests that parents encourage their children to learn from mass media about saving and handling of money.  

They also should explain about employment and pension and saving plans, the coalition says. 

On the Net: Survey at American Savings Education Council Web site: http://www.asec.org


Applied Materials misses expectations

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

SANTA CLARA — Applied Materials Inc., the world’s largest manufacturer of chip-making equipment, reported Tuesday a “severe decline” in earnings during the second quarter and missed Wall Street expectations by a penny. 

For the three months ended April 29, the company’s net income was $269 million, or 32 cents per diluted share, excluding one-time items. That’s down 41 percent from $459 million, or 53 cents per share, for the same period a year ago. 

Analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial/First Call predicted earnings of 33 cents per share. 

In the first quarter, the Santa Clara-based company warned it was being pinched as the U.S. economic downturn hurt its customers.  

As part of a cost-cutting effort, the company said it would offer severance packages to up to 1,000 employees, reduce its temporary work force, defer raises and shut down for five days in the second quarter. 

“Our business continued to experience a severe decline during the second quarter as decreased demand for electronic goods resulted in reduced capital equipment investment by semiconductor manufacturers,” said James C. Morgan, Applied’s chairman and chief executive. 

Net sales were $1.91 billion, down 30 percent from $2.73 billion in the same period a year ago, the company said. 

Applied Materials closed Tuesday at $49.89, up 20 cents, on the Nasdaq Stock Market. It was at $49.95 in after-hours trading. 

http://www.appliedmaterials.com 


Tuesday May 15, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels like an earthworm, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins, and become little “dump” workers. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” Through May 2002 An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum “Joe Brainard: A Retrospective,” Through May 27. The selections include 150 collages, assemblages, paintings, drawings, and book covers. Brainard’s art is characterized by its humor and exuberant color, and by its combinations of media and subject matter. “Ricky Swallow/Matrix 191,” Including new sculptures and drawings; Through May 27 $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history.“Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing.This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge.“Within the Human Brain” Ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “T. Rex on Trial,” Through May 28 Where was T. Rex at the time of the crime? Learn how paleontologists decipher clues to dinosaur behavior. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 18: Ensign, All Bets Off, Playing Enemy, Association Area, Blessing the Hogs; May 19: Punk Prom and benefit for India quake victims features Pansy Division, Plus Ones, Dave Hill, Iron Ass; May 25: Controlling Hand, Wormwood, Goats Blood, American Waste, Quick to Blame; May 26: Honor System, Divit, Enemy You, Eleventeen, Tragedy Andy; June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2 El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 15: 8 p.m. Edessa and Cascada de Flores; May 16: 9 p.m. Creole Belles; May 17: 10 p.m. Dead DJ Night with Digital Dave; May 18: 9:30 p.m. Reggae Angels with Mystic Roots; May 19: 9:30 Kotoja; May 20: 8:30 p.m. Jude Taylor and His Burning Flames 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 17: The Rincon Ramblers; May 18: Todd Snider; May 19: Oak, Ash and Thorn; May 20: KALW’s 60th Anniversary Concert featuring Paul Pena, Orla and the Gasmen, Kennelly Irish Dancers, Kathy Kallick and Nina Gerber. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 15: Chris Shot Group; May 16: Spank; May 17: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Rythm Doctors; May 29: The Lost Trio; 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Peña Cultural Center May 17, 8 p.m.: Tribu; May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane; May 20: 6 p.m. Venezuelan Music Recital 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

The Crowden School Annual Spring Concert May 16, 7:30 p.m. $5-$10 St. John’s Presbytarian Church at College and Garber 559-6910 

 

Tribu May 17, 8 p.m. Direct from Mexico, Tribu plays a concert of ancestral music of the Mayan, Aztec, Olmec, Zapotec, Purerpecha, Chichimec, Otomi, and Toltec. Tribu have reconstructed and rescued some of the oldest music in the Americas. $12 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

Jazz Singers Collective May 17, 8 p.m. Anna’s Bistro 1801 University Ave. 849-2662 

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fundraiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

“En Mouvement/In Motion” May 18, 19 7 p.m., May 19, 20 2 p.m. Part of the Berkeley Ballet Theater Spring Showcase, this production is a collection of works by student dancers/ $15. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 843-4689  

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“The Laramie Project” May 18 - July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members travelled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard. The play is about the community and the impact Shepard’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Sister, My Sister” May 20, 5 p.m. Poetry, photography and dramatic readings which give voice to women and children cuaght in homelessness. Admission is free, donations welcome. Live Oak Park Theatre1301 Shattuck Ave. 528-8198 

 

Pacific Film Archive May 18: 7:30 The Cloud-Capped Star; May 19: 3:30 Starewicz Puppet Films; May 20: 5:30 The New Gulliver Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“Drowning in a Sea of Plastics” Video and Discussion Night May 16, 7 p.m. Join the Ecology Center’s Plastic Task Force for a viewing of “Trade Secrets” and “Synthetic Sea.” Free. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo Ave. 548-2220 ext. 233 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 15: Kathleen Norris discusses “The Virgin of Bennington”; May 16: Tim Flannery describes “The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples”; May 17: Lalita Tademy reads “Cane River”; May 18: Oscar London, M.D. copes with “From Voodoo to Viagra: The Magic of Medicine” 

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. 559-9500 All events at 7 p.m., unless noted May 17: Jean Shinoda Bolen talks about “Goddesses In Older Women: Archetypes in Women Over Fifty”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or www.bookpride.com  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”;  

 

“Strong Women – Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 17: Gregory Listach Gayle with host Mark States; May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

Adan David Miller and JoJo Doig May 20, 7 p.m. Poetry and spoken word. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo 548-3333 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 


Letters to the Editor

Tuesday May 15, 2001

Are you happy now that we’ll be in the dark? 

 

Editor: 

 

Is everybody happy? Aren’t you glad your electric bill is going up? Aren’t you glad your gas bill is going up? Aren’t you glad to be paying more for gasoline than ever before? Aren’t you glad your stores and restaurants and elevators may soon be shut down by rolling blackouts? 

Aren’t you glad to see bus fares and airline tickets going up, up, and away because their fuel costs are increasing? Aren’t you glad to see your standard of living going down? Aren’t you glad to see homelessness, hunger, crime and violence increasing? 

Aren’t you glad you live under a system of production for profit, instead of a system of production for use? Aren’t you glad you live in a the “free world,” and enjoy a “market economy,” with “free enterprise,” under what is sometimes called “democracy?” Aren’t you glad you voted for those clever politicians of both parties who unanimously voted for deregulation and told us it would bring electricity prices down? 

Why would anyone choose to eat a nice hot meal when they can simply open up cold beans? 

Isn’t it nice to just lie in the sun and not have to worry about politics? 

 

Marion Syrek 

Oakland 

 

California is too late to save for our hero George  

 

Editor: 

 

George W. Bush — You Are the greatest! 

We Appreciate You President George W. Bush.  

If Gore had won, America would be on a fast track down the tubes.  

Thank God for George W.! We want you to win again in 2004. 

Here is my advice, don’t waiver on the threats from the environmental extremists. They and Clinton-Gore have set us back by at least 20 years. We need water, roads, oil, coal, and natural gas.  

We need these critical human necessities. We need them now. We have an over abundance of species habitat here in California and a minimum of human habitat. 

The environmental extremists are preaching their religious dogma, which is nothing but socialist lies. Our water, air, ecosystems, forests, etc. are just fine. 

My state of California is too late to save. The eco-extremists have devastated us. Don’t waste your time out here. These voters would vote for a monkey if there was a “D” after his or her name. 

My advice to you is write off California, New York, Massachusetts, and Hawaii and don’t spend a minute or one penny in these 4 states seeking re-election. It is a waste of time. You will never get any votes out here and we want you again in 2004.  

Please use all your effort in the other 46 states. We need you.  

 

Ella Jensen 

El Cerrito 

 

Down with the city council,  

up with cars! 

 

Editor: 

 

Michael Bauce (May 9) should be hunting for a time machine to take him back 100 years or so to a happier, pre-auto, pre-Mayor Shirley Dean Berkeley.  

His myopic rant against autos and parking in Berkeley really burned me up when I read it in the Daily Cal and the Planet. Mr. Bauce should realize that he and his particular views are in the very tiny minority (probably 3 percent) of what Berkeley REALLY wants for their city in the twenty-first century.  

The so-called “progressive” ding bats on the city council have, over the years, made Berkeley a living hell for the residents just trying to get around to go shopping, go to the movies, run errands, etc. These misguided miscreants and their anti-auto attitudes are the reason why there is no parking, concrete barriers everywhere, untimed signals, residential parking stickers and all the rest that drivers suffer through unnecessarily by living here.  

Wake up people! Times have changed! People want different things now than they wanted 20 or 30 years ago. The anti-auto council members should give up on their crusade to ban cars in town and realize that the horseless carriage is here to stay. None of us enjoy the abundance of cars (and people) around here, but we must cope with it or move away to rural Oregon.  

Berkeley must vote out ALL of the current council members when their terms are up (the good ones and bad ones) and start over with the best, living in the present, reasonable people, that we can elect. 

I look forward especially to seeing sub-moron Kriss Worthington voted out this fall. Look at the millions of tax payer dollars he was responsible for wasting on his worthless bicycle bridge over the freeway so a few bicyclists can peddle down to the Marina and get mugged. The guy is a first class cuckoo and really gives the city a bad name.  

I support Mayor Dean and applaud her for the great job she’s done in this difficult environment. (Much like Clinton trying to get things accomplished with a Republican congress and senate.)  

So, Mr. Bauce, if you don’t like Berkeley like it’s going to be in the near future, I suggest that you start looking around up north soon for a place to pitch your teepee. 

 

B. K. Wolfe 

Berkeley 

 

Beth El is not a supermarket, it’s a public asset  

 

Editor: 

 

It’s time to put to rest the repeated argument, raised once again in a letter to the Voice on May 4-5, that Congregation Beth El’s proposed new synagogue is “outsized” for its neighborhood. 

The truth is that this facility would occupy less of its site than homes in the area. And less of its site than virtually any other church in Berkeley. 

The synagogue is designed to match the style and height of buildings in the neighborhood. It fits within Berkeley’s demanding zoning regulations and requires NO “variances” or exceptions to the rules. 

Beth El is also not a supermarket with a steady stream of customers coming and going daily. It is a religious institution that is used on most weekdays only by children in a small nursery school and by children in after-school religious education. Adult committee meetings or classes involving small numbers of people occur on some week-day evenings. 

The larger gatherings at Beth El take place on weekends and religious holidays, and a series of expert studies has shown that there is adequate space and parking for these activities. 

If you want to observe an “outsized” facility for its neighborhood checkout Cragmont School, across the street from my home.  

What’s interesting about that project is that the neighbors treated its development with grace and acceptance. We did this because we recognized the public good that our schools do for our children. Why can't the opponents of the Beth El project have the good sense to do the same? 

 

David Tabb 

Berkeley


Calendar of Events & Activities

compiled by Sabrina Forkish
Tuesday May 15, 2001


Tuesday, May 15

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion will be about the effect of the media on our lives. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Fibromyalgia Support Group  

Noon - 2 p.m.  

Alta Bates Medical Center 

Maffly Auditorium, Herrick Campus  

2001 Dwight Way  

Dr. Kathryn Williams, former chairman for the department of rehabilitation, Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, will discuss the current understanding of fibromyalgia.  

601-0550 

Business of Seeds 

7 - 9 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

How seeds became a commodity and their journey from the fields to the lab to wall street and a discussion of our potential role as urban seed stewards in the global system.  

548-2220 

 

Basic Electrical Theory and  

National Electric Code  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St.  

Instructed by author/retired City of Oakland building inspector Redwood Kardon.  

$35 

 

Silent Vigil Against Death  

Penalty 

8 - 9 a.m. 

Federal Building 

1301 Clay St, Oakland 

Sponsered by East Bay Women Against the Death Penalty is sponsoring a silent vigil in protest of the execution of Timothy McVeigh, the first federal execution in 38 years. Wear black, bring signs. 841-1896 

 

Bicycling Get Together 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Wesley Foundation 

2398 Bancroft Way 

Special presentation on bicycling in Germany. 

597-1235 

 


Wednesday, May 16

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 


Thursday, May 17

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month. 869-2547 

 

“What is Queer Spirituality?” 

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 

1798 Scenic Ave.  

Mudd Bldg., Room 100 

Bill Glenn, PSR alumni and leader of Spirit Group, will lead a panel discussion on the dynamic shape of queer spirituality today.  

849-8206 

 

Simplicity Forum 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Library 

Claremont Branch  

2940 Benveue Ave.  

Facilitated by Cecile Andrews, author of “Circles of Simplicity,” learn about this movement whose philosophy is “the examined life richly lived.” Work less, consume less, rush less, and build community with friends and family.  

Call 549-3509 or visit www.seedsofsimplicity.org  

 

Free Smoking Cessation Class  

5:30 - 7:30 p.m.  

Six Thursday classes through May 17.  

Call 644-6422 to register and for location  

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meeting is the spring barbecue.  

654-5486 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

First day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continues Tuesday May 22. $70 for both days. 

525-7610 

 

John Muir May Fair 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

John Muir Elementary School 

2955 Claremont Ave 

Cake walk, face painting, games, food and student performances, quilt raffle. Free. 

644-6410 

 


Friday, May 18

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 


Saturday, May 19

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Annual strawberry tasting 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 548-3333 

 

Get to Know Your Plants 

1 - 4 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn what to look for and what and how to record it to more intimately know your plants. 548-2220 

 

 

“Be Your Own Boss” 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

YWCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Second Saturday of a two day workshop on starting up small businesses (see May 12). 

415-541-8580 

 

Community Summit on  

Smaller Learning  

Communities 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Alternative High School  

MLK Jr. Way (at Derby)  

All teachers, students, administrators, parents, and community members are encouraged to attend this meeting on smaller learning communities at Berkeley High. Translation, childcare, and food will be provided.  

540-1252 to RSVP for services 

 

Campaign for Equality Benefit  

7:30 - 10 p.m. 

Montclair Women’s Cultural Arts Club  

1650 Mountain Blvd.  

Oakland 

A comedy benefit with performances by Karen Ripley, Julia Jackson, Pippi Lovestocking, Darrick Richardson, and Nick Leonard. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the International Lesbian Gay Association Scholarship Fund for the 2001 ILGA Summit in Oakland.  

$15 - $20  

466-5050 

 

Finish Carpentry 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Carpenter/contractor Kevin Stamm leads workshop. $95. 

525-7610 

 

Earthquake Retrofitting 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Seminar taught by structural engineer Tony DeMascole and seismic contractor Jim Gillett. $75. 

525-7610 

 

How to Prevent Home Owner Nightmares 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Dispute prevention and early resolution seminar taught by contractor/mediator Ron Kelly. $75. 

525-7610 

 

Puppet Shows 

1:30 and 2:30 p.m. 

Hall of Health (Lower Level) 

2230 Shattuck Ave. 

Program on physical and mental differences. Promotes acceptance and understanding. Free. 

549-1564  

 


Sunday, May 20

 

Reimagining Pacific Cities  

6 - 8:30 p.m. 

New Pacific Studio  

1523 Hearst Ave.  

“How are Pacific cities reshaping their cultural and environmental institutions to better serve the needs and enhance the present and future quality of life of all segments of their societies?” A series of ten seminars linking the Bay Area, Seattle, Portland, and other pacific cities.  

$10 per meeting  

Call 849-0217 

 

Working with Awareness,  

Concentration, Energy 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Nyingma members discuss meditative awareness in everyday life. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Salsa Lesson & Dance Party  

7 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Kick up your heels and move your hips with professional instructors Mati Mizrachi and Ron Louie. Plus Israeli food provided by the Holy Land Restaurant. Novices encouraged to attend and no partners are required.  

$12  

RSVP: 237-9874 

 

Mediterranean Herbs 

1:30 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Tour of herbs. Learn myths and legends, ideas for planting in home gardens. 

643-1924 

 

Jazz on 4th Street Festival 

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

4th St. between Hearst and Virginia 

Performances by Berkeley High Jazz Ensemble and two Berkeley High Jazz Combos, among others. Also 4th St. merchants, raffle prizes, arts and crafts. Free admission. Proceeds benefit Berkeley High Performing Arts.  

526-6294 

 

 


Hundreds attend clinicsfor meningitis screenings

By Jon Mays Daily Planet staff
Tuesday May 15, 2001

An aggressive public information campaign spurred by the recent hospitalization of a 19-year-old woman with bacterial meningitis seems to be working as hundreds of west Berkeley residents and scores of students attended clinics to be screened and treated. 

Over the weekend, Fred Medrano, director of Berkeley Health and Human Services, said more than 500 people attended neighborhood clinics to find out more about meningitis and see if they should receive a dose of the drugs Cipro or Rifanpin. The drugs kills all meningitis bacteria that may be in the body already, but does not protect the taker from picking up the bacteria again after 24 hours, said Stephanie Lopez, communications director for the city of Berkeley. 

“You can’t share a joint and think you are okay, you’re still at risk,” Lopez said. 

Kimi Sakashita, Berkeley High School associate health clinic director, said around 75  

students stopped by after a morning assembly described the types of behavior that could put them at risk for meningitis.  

“I’m hella nervous,” said one student as he lined up for a consultation with health clinic staff. 

Most students said they wanted to take the pill just to be on the safe side. 

“Everyone’s going around sharing drinks and French kissing and all that,” said Berkeley High student Shamiya Henesley. “I think everyone really needs to take responsibility and really get tested and screened.” 

Other students said the bathrooms at the high school are so unsanitary that they worried about picking up the bacteria that way. 

Sakashita said that is not the case and that meningitis can only be spread through direct contact of saliva, blood or other bodily fluid. The disease can be transmitted by shared cigarettes, pipes, drinks or food. It can also be transmitted through kissing and sex (including oral sex). 

Health officials have been trying to get information out since Friday’s incident. The woman, whose identity has not been officially released, was in critical condition over the weekend, but was listed in good condition yesterday, said Alta Bates Hospital spokesperson Carolyn Kemp.  

The case is the second in Berkeley this month. On May 1, 9-year-old Oxford School student Nambi Phelps died from an infection of bacterial meningitis. Although it was reported that Phelps and the woman hospitalized Friday knew each other, health officials say the cases are unrelated.  

Meningitis is an infection of the brain and spinal fluid. The infectious period is three to four days and symptoms can appear between two and 10 days of exposure. Early detection and treatment with antibiotics is key to preventing serious illness and death. Symptoms include sudden fever, headache and stiff neck sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting. 

There is a vaccine for meningitis but Berkeley Health Officer Dr. Poki Namkung said it does not take effect for two weeks and would only be used in an outbreak. An outbreak, Namkung said, is characterized as three cases in three months that translates to 10 cases per 100,000 people.  

Now, Medrano said that the health department is actively pursuing a group of 100 people associated with the young woman who engage in “high-risk” behavior.  

While the disease is spread through high-risk behavior like sex and drugs, Medrano said it’s hard to pigeon hole it since it is spread by more mundane ways as well. 

“Practices stem from regular family life like sharing a toothbrush to high-risk behaviors,” he said. “But we want to get good information to people, Now that we’ve had two cases, there’s a great deal of public information with the main message of prevention.” 

Now that the word is out about the disease, Berkeley PTA Council President Mark Copeland said there is little else to do. 

“Parents are ready to volunteer but there’s really nothing to do. It’s a foe that we can’t reach out and grab. It’s one of those things that we keep watching,” Copeland said, adding that he took his son to the doctor on Friday. “We’re watching our kids closely and taking them to the doctor if there is any question at all.”


Court decision won’t affect local pot rule

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Tuesday May 15, 2001

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt medical marijuana users a blow Monday with a unanimous decision that a medical necessity defense can not be used against federal marijuana charges. 

The ruling should have little effect locally, as medical marijuana activists vowed to continue dispensing the drug, and city officials said they will not change their enforcement. 

Lt. Russell Lopes of the Berkeley Police Department verified that the decision will not effect current police policy toward medical marijuana users.  

“To us this is all just conversation,” he said. “As far as we’re concerned nothing changes.” 

The decision was a result of the United States vs. the Oakland Cannabis Buyers Cooperative, which was instigated in 1998 when the cooperative refused to stop dispensing medical marijuana under federal orders. The cooperative fought the injunction using a medical necessity defense.  

The cooperative has since stopped operating and the founder, Jeff Jones, said it is uncertain if it will ever reopen. 

California, along with several other states including Oregon, Arizona and Hawaii, have adopted laws allowing the use of marijuana as treatment for a variety of illnesses including cancer, AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis and migraine headaches. The state laws have been  

adopted despite the fact that marijuana remains illegal under federal law, which takes precedent.  

Since the passage of the California Compassionate Use Act of 1996, also known as Proposition 215, many counties and cities have adopted policies or ordinances allowing marijuana use for medical purposes. Berkeley adopted a Medical Marijuana Ordinance in March. The city also recently took steps to amend the Zoning Ordinance to provide guidelines for issuing permits and standards for medical marijuana cooperatives and collectives that distribute the drug. 

Currently city officials estimate there are five such cooperatives operating in Berkeley. 

Monday’s 8-0 Supreme Court decision that using marijuana for medical purposes is not an option under the federal Controlled Substances Act has caused uncertainty among patients who say they rely on marijuana to ease symptoms like lack of appetite, soreness of joints and involuntary muscle spasms. 

Justice Clarence Thomas, writing for the majority, said “In the case of the Controlled Substances Act, the statute reflects a determination that marijuana has no medical benefits worthy of an exception (outside the confines of a government-approved research project).” 

It was also noted in the written decision that the act allows no legal use of marijuana. 

Justice Stephen Breyer, did not participate in the decision because his brother, a federal judge, ruled on the case in a lower court. 

Berkeley City Attorney Manuela Albuquerque said the ruling will not effect the newly adopted Medical Marijuana Ordinance. She said the same federal laws applied when the ordinance was adopted.  

“It has always been a problem in California that federal law prohibits the distribution cultivation and use of marijuana,” she said. 

Robert Rach, attorney for the Oakland Cannabis Buyers Cooperative, said the ruling is just the beginning of a long battle over medical marijuana.  

“There are a number of Constitutional issues the Supreme Court has not yet considered,” he said. “One is states’ rights under the Ninth and 10th amendments and another is that under the Commerce Clause, every American has the right to be free from pain.” 

Don Duncan, co-director of the Berkeley Patients Group, a marijuana cooperative that has dispensed medical marijuana for over a year, said they will continue to operate despite the Supreme Court decision.  

“The most important thing is to take care of the patients, not politicians,” he said.  


Tenant law at top of council agenda

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Tuesday May 15, 2001

 

The City Council will consider amending the Berkeley Municipal Ordinance to require landlords, who are evicting tenants under the Ellis Act, to offer displaced tenants available units in other properties they own. 

In February the council asked the city attorney to draft an ordinance that would help protect tenants being evicted under the Ellis Act. The council requested the ordinance to protect tenants in three ways. It would require landlords to offer tenants available units in other residential property they owned, require that those units be offered at the same monthly rent as the “Ellised” unit and it would also require landlords own rental property for a specified amount of time before using the Ellis Act to evict tenants. 

The Ellis Act is a state law that allows landlords to evict tenants provided they take the property off the rental market for at least three years. 

But the city attorney wrote in her report to council that the city can only require landlords to offer tenants available space. According to the report, it would be illegal, under the Costa Hawkin’s Act, to require the monthly rent to stay the same if a tenant decided to take an available unit.  

Also requiring landlords to own a property for a specified time before evicting tenants would be unenforceable under the Ellis Act. 

Moratorium in the MULI 

Another issue will be a moratorium on new office development in west Berkeley. The Planning Commission recommended the council enact a one-year moratorium on office development in the Mixed Use-Light Industrial District, also known as the MULI, in west Berkeley. 

The staff report on the recommendation states the moratorium should remain in effect until the impact of the growing number of offices on blue-collar jobs and artists can be determined. 

Another concern is increased traffic congestion posed by more offices. The council report, approved by Planning Commission Chair Rob Wrenn, said that about 349,000-square feet of office space has been developed in the MULI in the last three years. 

This item has been on the council’s agenda for the last three meetings.  

Sunshine Ordinance 

The Sunshine Ordinance is back on the agenda after being pulled from the consent calendar on March 27. The ordinance will make it easier for the public to obtain city government information. 

The recommendation, sponsored by Councilmember Kriss Worthington, would set a timeline to establish an index of city records on the Web. The records would include all public records, documents and digital files including e-mails. 

The ordinance would also encourage law enforcement agencies to make police logs and records available to the public and the press. 

The recommendation was pulled from the consent calendar by Councilmember Polly Armstrong because she wanted to make sure the ordinance was needed. She said implementing the ordinance could be an expensive project and provide services that already exist. 

Closed session meeting 

The council will also hold a closed session meeting at 5:30 p.m. at 2180 Milvia St. in the sixth floor conference room.  

City officials are negotiating a new contract with the police department that will include a “3 percent at 50” clause that will allow police officers to retire at 50 years old with a pension that adds up to 3 percent of their current salary for every year they have worked. 

Once the plan is approved, it is expected that nearly 40 percent of the current police department will retire, leaving Berkeley to compete with other cities in the state for qualified police officers.  

The city is also negotiating an improved health benefits package for all emergency workers.


Willard students to show off ‘talent’ in play

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Tuesday May 15, 2001

With opening night nearing, things were a bit hectic at Willard Middle School’s Metal Shop Theater last week. 

Actors poured over the script, turned cartwheels and stuffed themselves with junk food. 

“I can’t act on an empty stomach,” groused seventh grader Daniel Krasnor (the cartwheel turner), who avoided the junk food and munched on a breast of chicken. 

The play, “The Talent Show,” opens Wednesday at 7:30 at the Metal Shop Theater. It is written, acted and largely directed by Willard students, with the help and guidance of Willard math and science teacher George Rose.  

Between scenes at the rushed lunchtime rehearsal, some student-actors chatted nervously about the big night ahead, others waxed nostalgic about the sweat and tears they’d given the project during the last two years. 

“At the beginning we weren’t really getting much done because everybody was running around, like talking about banana soda and stuff,” recalled Selena O’Conner. 

It was an uphill battle, others agreed, to get people to concentrate and remember their lines. Some actors even lost interest and had to be replaced. 

But it all worked out for the best in the end.  

“I really like that we were able to work as team,” said Phoebe Bryson-Cahn. 

“Because we did it, it’s our work, we actually feel really proud of what we did,” agreed Alison Dahlstrom.  

The play comes out of “mini-course” in creative writing that Rose has taught during lunch periods since February 2000. It is funded by the Berkeley school district’s Gifted and Talented program and the Berkeley Public Education Foundation. 

Rose came up with the idea of having students write their own play to help them master the basic elements of a successful narrative, and to give them a chance to explore some of the issues they face as middle school students. 

“It gives them a chance to experience a lot of creative ideas, and also work out a lot of issue that are peculiar to middle schools,” Rose said. “Who’s in and who’s out, what do you do when you’re blue, who do you go to.” 

Or as Dahlstrom put it: “It’s like taking your average school and turning it into a story.” 

With, of course, a hefty does of creative license. 

The play opens with a hilarious (and, parents will hope, much exaggerated) rendition of the student/teacher communication gap. As a timorous teacher drones on inaudibly at the head of the class, students talk loudly amongst themselves, climbing around their desks as though they were jungle gyms. 

“Does anybody have any questions?” the teacher asks after several minutes. Hearing none, he begins wrapping up class with an air of self-satisfaction. By the time he looks up to announce “Class dismissed,” the students, of course, have already gone. 

The are lots of other touches that the student-writers hope will capture the flavor of the middle school experience at Willard. 

“We can improvise sometimes because we wrote the lines ourselves,” explained Willard student Eric Olson. 

In the interests of verisimilitude, student-actor Carina Renner said she makes liberal use of the word “like”, as in: “It’s like, I’m like, ‘like, like, like, like, like’, like all the time.” 

But the play takes on some deeper issues at well. It portrays students preparing for a talent show in which the winner is guaranteed a acting contract with a Hollywood “talent scout” played with obvious relish by Ariadna Anisimov. 

In the effort to top each other’s “acts,” the students go to greater and greater extremes. But instead of improving in the heat of competition, they find themselves descending to the depths of mediocrity.  

Ultimately, it falls to a character played by Fay Scott to be the voice of reason. 

“What if we forgot about the script?” she asks. “What if we’re ourselves...” 

This climatic moment mirrors a moment the Willard students experienced themselves while writing the play, according to Rose, after some students demanded bigger and bigger roles. 

“To me that’s what’s really important,” Rose said. “This whole process of students coming together, making decisions and taking responsibility for some thing that’s their own.” 

The play will be the first production to appear in Willard’s Metal Shop Theater. With the help of school district bond measure funds and parent volunteers the former home to the now extinct school metal shop classes was converted to an alternative theater rehearsal and performance space last year. 

The are two showing of “The Talent Show,” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. Willard Middle School is located at 2425 Stuart Street. For more information call 644-6330.  

 


Nontraditional church undergoes restoration

By Jennifer Dix Daily Planet Correspondent
Tuesday May 15, 2001

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church is ordinarily filled with the sounds of hymns and prayers, but lately the rafters have been ringing with the sounds of saws and jackhammers. 

In anticipation of its centennial next year, the 99-year-old church on Bancroft Way is undergoing a much needed renovation and restoration.  

The project will restore some of the original Mission Revival architectural details, provide seismic reinforcement and create disabled access. 

That’s an important part of the church’s mission, said Pastor Robbin Clark.  

“We feel a moral responsibility to provide safety and access to all our parishioners. Part of our theological stance is inclusivity,” she explained.  

“That means being inclusive of people of diverse sexual orientation, different lifestyles and disabilities. But how inclusive are you being if people can’t get up to the second floor?” 

Long known for its liberal tradition, St. Mark’s played an important part in the free-speech movement of the 1960s. Under the leadership of pioneering minister George Tittmann, the church was a space where opposing sides could come together for discussion and mediation.  

Tittmann laid the ground for a congregation that today is a mixture of singles and couples, gays and straights.  

The church membership is comprised of 225 households.  

“It’s not your typical suburban congregation,” Clark said.  

But this nontraditional congregation does inhabit a historic building, with a handsome sanctuary whose fine acoustics and Flentrop organ make it a favorite concert space. St. Mark’s is the first Episcopal parish in Berkeley.  

It was one of the first local buildings and some believe it to be the very first built in the new Mission Revival style. Designed by William Curlett and built in 1902, the distinctive Spanish-style church features a prominent open belfry tower with a contrasting smaller second tower, large arched doorways, and a long arcade reminiscent of a cloister. 

It has several stained-glass Tiffany windows, including the focal rose window. 

Over the years, some features were lost or diminished in the wake of modern “improvements.” The towers were boarded up to discourage pigeons. 

Some decorative stucco details were stripped from the exterior.  

When a plaza was added on the north side in the early 1960s, a massive concrete wall went up around the old church entrance, hiding it from view.  

Now the wall has come down and the towers are being restored. As far as possible, the church building committee hopes to restore the look of the original church.  

But the project, originally budgeted for $1.7 million, has ballooned to over $3 million, and some wished-for architectural details have had to be sacrificed.  

Restoration of the decorative stucco quatrefoil around the rose window, wrought-iron stair railings, and replacing the roof with authentic tiles all have been axed. 

Unless, that is, more funds can be raised.  

The Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association has taken an interest in the restoration of St. Mark’s.  

A recent BAHA newsletter declares the church to be a landmark Mission Revival building, and BAHA is appealing to its members and the larger community for donations.  

Meanwhile, St. Mark’s continues its Sunday worship services a few blocks up the street, at the YMCA. If all goes according to schedule, the congregants will return in September to a building that meets modern safety and accessibility standards while enjoying its former pristine architectural glory. The original cornerstone has been uncovered, and church members hope to open the time capsule inside, which according to church records contains news clippings, documents, stamps, and coins dating from the beginning of the 20th century.  

And while renovations to the building are in progress, Clark thinks there may be some subtle changes taking place among the congregation as well. 

Although St. Mark’s is known as a liberal institution, she said, the worship service consists of, she said, “a fairly stately and classic liturgy, in line with the music.”  

Clark thinks it wouldn’t hurt to loosen up a bit. 

“Frankly, that’s happening now, with worship at the YMCA, which is a very plain, simple space,” she said. “It will be interesting to see how it carries over when we go back.”


Governor releases pared down state budget

The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Blaming a plunging stock market and slipping economy, Gov. Gray Davis said Monday he will abandon almost $3.2 billion in new programs, tax cuts and spending increases he proposed in January. 

“We knew this day would come,” Davis said, unveiling a revised version of the $102.9 billion budget that is to take effect July 1. “Right now there’s just not enough money to meet every legitimate need.” 

The economy, rather than the yearlong energy crisis, is forcing the cutbacks, Davis said, although the budget plan includes new spending on energy-related items, such as $5.5 million for power plant inspections. 

Davis said his revised budget protects his two top priorities — education and public safety — but cuts back the state’s reserves and slashes funding for transportation projects, city governments and the clean beaches program. 

It scraps many of the governor’s tax cut proposals, including a three-day “holiday” from paying sales taxes designed to help parents buy school clothes and supplies. Also, the budget calls for all non-public safety state agencies to cut 2.5 percent of their budgets. 

The early months of 2001 indicate slowing in several areas of California’s economy, including personal income growth, employment and sales taxes, according to the budget. 

Planners also expect the high-tech sector – a major source of income over the past two years – to take more hits in upcoming months. 

The state’s income from taxes on stock options and capital gains — which pumped billions in unexpected dollars to the state treasury last May — sunk to 1999 levels, Davis said. 

“A declining NASDAQ, more than anything else, is responsible for the drop in revenues this year,” Davis said. 

The 83-page “May revise” comes after months of fears that the economy and energy crisis would force Davis to shave his spending plans for the first time since he took office. 

The budget assumes the state will be repaid by mid-August for at least $6.7 billion in energy buys on behalf of the beleaguered investor-owned utilities. Davis signed a bill last week authorizing the sale of revenue bonds to repay the general fund for the power buys. 

But he criticized Republicans for putting “ideological purity” over the state’s needs to issue bonds to pay back spending for electricity. Republicans opposed the bill, causing it to pass without the two-thirds majority needed for it to go into effect immediately. 

Davis said he will ask Republicans to “see the error of their ways” and approve an urgency measure to allow the state to issue the bonds immediately. Lawmakers launched a second emergency session Monday afternoon to address energy legislation. 

Still, the budget includes several energy-related changes. They include: 

•$540.8 million to assist school districts with energy-related costs and $183 million for the state’s universities and community colleges to pay rising natural gas bills. 

•$5.4 million more for a task force investigating allegations of price-fixing in the statewide power crisis, and $380,000 for the Department of Water Resources for energy-related legal bills. 

•$5.5 million for the development and enforcement of power plant standards and inspections. 

•$41 million more for this year and next for state agencies to pay utility bills. 

Now, a joint legislative committee will approve its own version of the budget that will be subject to approval by the full Legislature and the governor. 

Assemblyman Tony Cardenas, an Arleta Democrat who chairs the joint budget committee, said to expect the Legislature to tinker with Davis’ budget. 

Republicans criticized the budget, saying it drains too much from the state’s emergency reserves. The revised budget would leave the state with about $1 billion in reserves in July 2002, while the budget for the current fiscal year includes $5.9 billion. 

“The governor took the grossly irresponsible step of looting our state’s prudent reserve to fund government growth,” said Assembly Republican Leader Dave Cox in a written statement Monday. 

Davis defended his budget choices. 

“Reserves are for rainy days. It’s starting to rain,” Davis said. 

Other key changes in the revised proposal include: 

•A reduction in the state’s Clean Beaches Initiative funding by $90 million to $10 million. 

•$54 million in cuts to the Department of Corrections spending, which Davis said will be absorbed by a decrease in the state’s prison population due to a new drug treatment initiative 

•Cuts to the state’s transportation budget totaling $1.2 billion by postponing for two years a program that would divert all state gasoline tax revenues to transportation projects. 

•Reductions of $255 million discretionary funding for local governments and $50 million for technology grants for local law enforcement. 


Prisons, law enforcement take cut in Davis proposal

The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Slowing growth in the state’s inmate population due to a new drug treatment initiative allowed Gov. Gray Davis to cut $54 million in Department of Corrections spending in the revised budget proposal he released Monday. 

Nevertheless, Davis said, his budget protected law enforcement, one of what he called his two highest priorities, with public education. 

Davis’ highly touted “war on methamphetamine” initiative also took a hit, as he cut $10 million from the program he introduced in January. Despite the decrease, the budget proposes spending $30 million to fight meth production and distribution, particularly in the Central Valley. 

The prison population by the end of the fiscal year beginning July 1 is now projected to be nearly 9,000 inmates lower than was assumed in the budget Davis sent legislators in January. The number of parolees also is expected to shrink. 

Both changes are in large part due to voters’ approval in November of Proposition 36, which requires first- and second-time nonviolent drug offenders to be sent to treatment programs instead of prison or jail. 

That reduction will save the state’s general fund an estimated $81 million, but Davis proposes to spend part of the savings on other programs, including: 

•$1.9 million to study the results of Proposition 36 and coordinate with other agencies the movement of inmates and parolees into treatment programs. 

•$12.1 million to simultaneously fight and comply with a lawsuit over inmate medical care. That includes $5.3 million for legal and medical experts to fight the suit, and $6.8 million to try to gain certification for the prison system’s health care facilities as the suit demands. 

•$12 million to increase staff at prison segregation units. 

• $4 million to improve backup electricity generators, in light of the state’s energy crunch. 

• $6.9 million to cover holiday pay for the state’s new Cesar Chavez Holiday. 

Along with the Corrections Department changes, the revised budget proposes to increase Department of Justice spending by a net $4.4 million after a series of cuts and additions. 

That includes an extra $5.4 million for the attorney general’s office to expand its investigation into whether energy suppliers illegally cut supply and drove up prices in California. 

Budget changes and additions also provide an additional $6.7 million for the attorney general to prosecute antitrust violations in the high technology industry. 

It also includes $877,000 for special legal consultants to assist in efforts to recover an estimated $16.5 million in repairs to the state Capitol after a truck driver rammed it with his 18-wheeler in January.  

The state is attempting to recover the money from the driver’s employer, Salt Lake City-based Dick Simon Trucking, or its insurance company. 


CSU considers sweeping alcohol policy

The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

LONG BEACH — California State University, the nation’s largest public university system, is considering a sweeping alcohol policy for its 23 campuses following the drinking-related death of a student. 

The proposed policy, scheduled to be presented Tuesday at CSU’s governing board meeting, is believed to be the first in the nation to set systemwide policies – from controlling alcohol advertising on campus to enforcing existing drinking laws on and off campus. 

“It’s a time when young students for the first time in their lives feel more freedom than they every have. They want to go off and experiment with alcohol as if it were some college or university rite of passage,” CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed said Monday. “We need to do everything we can ... to promote healthy choices for students and try to overcome this culture” of college drinking. 

If approved, the policy would require CSU campuses, which enroll more than 350,000 students, to begin enforcing the policy in the fall. 

General recommendations include campuses developing treatment programs, regularly reviewing state alcohol laws and notifying students of changes, banning alcohol advertising and products at campus events, offering awards and incentives to student organizations that raise funds from sources other than alcohol companies. 

The proposed policy also calls for early intervention and treatment of alcohol-related problems for students. 

It also would provide $1.1 million in funding to help campuses implement the policy. Currently, there is no systemwide funding for alcohol education, prevention and enforcement policies. 

“Our approach is not to say we are going to ban alcohol and believe that will solve the problem. It won’t,” said John D. Welty, president of California State University, Fresno, and chair of the alcohol policies committee. “We have to look at changing the campus culture, developing a guide for each of our campuses to follow.” 

To help implement the policies, the proposal calls for the creation at each campus of an alcohol advisory council, which would include faculty, staff, administrators, students and members of the community, including law enforcement. 

“This problem is so big that everybody has to help work on it. The law says if you’re not 21, you shouldn’t be able to buy alcoholic beverages. We need to enforce that business owners aren’t selling to students under 21,” Reed said. 

The chancellor called for a review of the campuses alcohol policies after Adrian Heideman died Oct. 7 when he tried to drink a bottle of brandy during a Pi Kappa Phi fraternity party. The California State University, Chico, freshman from Palo Alto had a blood-alcohol content of .37 percent, more than four times the legal limit at which a driver is considered intoxicated. 

At CSU’s San Diego campus, two fraternity-related incidents last year left two students hospitalized for drinking too much. 

The biggest obstacle, Reed said, will be overcoming the pervasive culture of drinking. 

“We start with their parents and with them when they visit the campus the first time. You continuously bombard them with it,” he said. 

Although students generally agreed an alcohol policy was needed, many believed it would do little to end underage college drinking. 

“I don’t think it will stop it. But I think it will give us better knowledge about being safer,” said Brendan Wonnacott, a 20-year-old student at CSU Sacramento. 

Vivian Brassel, 20, agreed. 

“I think regardless of the rules and regulations, people are going to do what they want to do,” said the CSU Sacramento junior. “The college party experience is what a lot of us come here for. ... But it is a part of the overall experience.” 

 

PROPOSAL 

• Limit vendor advertising at campus events. 

•Limit alcohol industry funding of student-sponsored events. 

•Provide an education program to make students aware of the risks of illegal and irresponsible drinking. 

•Distribute campus alcohol-related regulations and policies to all students. 

•Enforce campus rules as well as state and local drinking laws. 

•Partner with local law enforcement agencies to enforce drinking laws. 

•Create an advisory council to examine issues of alcohol use by students. 

•Institute annual alcohol policy orientation program for campus organization advisers and student officers. 

•Institute alcohol policy training for all campus peer advisers and residential staff. 

•Adopt new student and parent orientation programs. 

•Adopt orientation programs for higher-risk students, such as fraternities, athletes and large residential campus populations. 

• Provide a systemwide grant writer to seek out possible funding to implement and maintain the policies


Israelis target Palestinian police for retaliation

The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

JERUSALEM — Israeli troops killed five Palestinian policemen in the West Bank and rocketed security targets in the Gaza Strip on Monday – part of an emerging strategy of taking the offensive against Palestinian security forces, rather than retaliating for specific attacks. 

The rocket attack in Gaza targeted a small armored force of the Palestinian police, and Palestinians said 10 vehicles were destroyed. 

In previous Gaza raids, Israeli troops razed dozens of Palestinian police buildings, including ammunitions depots, food warehouses, mosques and carpentry shops affiliated with the security forces. 

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat said the Israeli attacks were aimed at demoralizing the Palestinians and insisted his people “cannot be shaken.” He denounced the killings of the policemen as “assassinations.” 

Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon said he had implored Arafat in recent weeks to “act against the perpetrators of terror.” 

“If he doesn’t take these steps, then we will have to take these steps,” Sharon said. “We don’t have any other choice.” 

Sharon adviser Raanan Gissin said the Palestinian Authority has been warned repeatedly that Israel would not tolerate the involvement of Palestinian security forces in attacks on Israelis. 

“The Israeli Defense Forces has decided, with the approval of the government, to take initiated action ... against those targets from where such attacks are being conducted,” Gissin said. 

Over almost eight months of steadily escalating hostilities, Israel has wrestled with how harshly to hit back against the Palestinian forces it helped set up during the 1990s autonomy accords.  

Actions were generally described as reactions or retributions against specific militants. 

In the West Bank violence, the Palestinian officers, ages 17 to 29, were shot in the head and chest before dawn Monday while manning a small police outpost near the town of Ramallah, Palestinian officials said. Several bullets tore through the barrack walls. 

It was the bloodiest single incident since Feb. 14, when eight Israelis were killed by a Palestinian who crashed his bus into a crowd near Tel Aviv. 

Gissin said Israeli soldiers were responding to fire but admitted that the five Palestinian officers killed may not have been the ones shooting. “They could have remained alive if they had been the ones stopping terrorism instead of taking part in it,” he said. 

In the Gaza Strip, Israeli helicopters and navy gunboats shelled security installations, including a compound of the Force 17 security service, a police building and the offices of Arafat’s Fatah movement. Four people were injured by shrapnel and one suffered from shock, doctors said. 

Israeli hard-liners, including Sharon, had long argued that Israel erred in permitting the establishment of the Palestinian security forces. And Israel has charged that the forces are much larger than permitted by the agreements and are using weapons they are not allowed to have. 

Still, until the fighting erupted last fall, cooperation between Israeli and Palestinian security was generally good and sometimes even comradely. 

In October, when Israel first attacked Palestinian installations – in retaliation for the lynching of two reserve soldiers in the West Bank town of Ramallah – it gave warning to avoid casualties. 

Since then, Palestinian forces have openly participated in shooting incidents and a militia affiliated with Arafat known as the Tanzim has been at the forefront of some. 

The Palestinian police “have to be attacked so we can protect our people,” Israeli Education Minister Limor Livnat said Monday. 

Palestinian Information Minister Yasser Abed Rabbo called the Israeli attack on the five policemen a “premeditated, cold-blooded murder” and said no gunfire came from the post, which he called a center for coordination with a nearby Israeli position. 

Later, about 2,000 Palestinians, some firing rifles in the air, marched alongside an ambulance carrying the bodies of the policemen. 

The Palestinians clashed with Israeli forces at a checkpoint and two Palestinians were wounded by Israeli gunfire, hospital doctors said. 

In other developments Monday, two Palestinians were killed in an exchange of fire with Israeli soldiers near Karara in the southern Gaza Strip, a Palestinian official said.  

The Israeli military said soldiers fired at Palestinians who threw grenades and fired at an outpost. One was a suicide bomber, the military said. 

Palestinians said Israeli tanks and bulldozers entered Palestinian territory in three places, leveling farmland. 

Also, four Israelis were wounded, one seriously, when Palestinians fired on the Jewish neighborhood of Gilo, built on land that  

Israel captured in the 1967 Mideast war and declared a part of Jerusalem, but is claimed by the Palestinians for their future state. 

Police said the gunfire was apparently timed to coincide with observance Tuesday of “al-Nakba,” or “the catastrophe,” as Arabs refer to the creation of the state of Israel on May 15, 1948. 

An Israeli tank fired back at the gunmen in the Palestinian village of Beit Jalla, damaging a house, Palestinians said.


Techs fall as market awaits Fed meeting

The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

NEW YORK — Anxiety over interest rates made for a quiet Monday on Wall Street, with investors reluctant to make any big moves on the eve of an important Federal Reserve meeting. Blue chips rose moderately, while technology stocks drifted lower, giving the Nasdaq composite its fourth straight decline. 

Analysts said the market’s tentativeness resulted from doubts about how big a rate cut the Fed will make – if it makes one at all – on Tuesday. 

“It’s really been a non-event day,” said Stephen Carl, head of equity trading at The William Capital Group. “Everybody’s just on the sidelines waiting to see what the Fed does. The volume is so low that it’s hard to tell what, if anything, else is going on.” 

Trading activity was muted throughout the session, with the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market experiencing their slowest day of the year. 

NYSE volume was 858.27 million shares, compared with 906.25 million Friday, the previous low this year. The Nasdaq recorded 1.30 billion shares trading hands, compared with its previous 2001 low of 1.43 billion recorded Friday. 

Although most analysts still expect the Fed to make its fifth interest rate cut of 2001 at its Tuesday meeting, there are doubts about whether the reduction will be as big as expected. 

The central bank has been lowering rates to stimulate the sluggish economy, but some recent data have indicated business may not be as weak as previously thought. If the economy shows signs of strength – as some better-than-expected retail and consumer sentiment reports suggested last week – many fear the Fed will be less inclined to cut aggressively. 

The problem for the market: In the absence of strong earnings, investors have become increasingly dependent on the Fed’s cuts for catalysts to rally stocks. Stocks spent most of last week in a narrow trading range in anticipation of the Fed’s next move. 

“Not having the 100 percent certainty that the Fed will lower interest rates as much as many want is what’s causing this,” said Steven Goldman, market strategist at Weeden & Co. “But overall, the market remains on good footing.” 

The latest Fed report released Monday showed further evidence that the economy slowed during the spring. Industrial production fell in April by a bigger-than-expected 0.3 percent, the seventh straight monthly decline, according to the report. 

Technology stocks were especially weak, reflecting the gradual selling since April’s big advance. Cisco Systems fell 48 cents to $18.57, while Intel dropped 53 cents to $27.41. 

Non-technology issues fared better, including banker J.P. Morgan, up $1.20 at $47.64. 

Also Monday, SunTrust Banks fell $4.81 to $60 on news it made a $14.7 billion bid for Wachovia, a move that could derail First Union’s planned $12.5 billion purchase of the North Carolina bank.  

On the Net: http://www.nyse.com 


Today’s problems were addressed several years ago

By John Cunniff The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

NEW YORK — If you have a decent memory, you will experience the sensation of reliving events, including such diverse public drives as conserving energy, saving for retirement and simplifying taxes. 

All these and many, many more educational efforts had rather short-term results, the problem being that most Americans, or so it seems from the evidence, are more inclined to forget rather than to remember. 

For example, saving for retirement? 

In newspapers three decades old you can find admonishments about the need of doing so. For years it was the smart thing to do. But now, amid constant reminders and great prosperity, the saving rate is below zero. But, you say, people are indeed saving through 401(k)s and similar tax-advantaged arrangements and by investing directly in stocks.Yes, but they’ve forgotten warnings about pushing prices to foolish heights. Buyers have treated warnings about risk as neurotic residue from the past. Forgotten also was the stockbroker’s requirement to “know your customer.” And the admonition to customers to know your broker. 

How about more fuel efficient cars? The first shock for gasoline consumers came three decades ago with the actions of a production-fixing cartel called the Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries to withhold oil from the market. 

The resulting price shock forced conservation upon Americans. Fuel-efficient cars were created. Additional insulation was decreed for newly built homes, and solar heating even had its day in the sun. Conservation seemed permanent. 

But now, a few decades later, relatively more prosperous Americans show a robust desire for gas-hogging sport-utility vehicles that satisfy the desire for utility but not for fuel or price efficiency. And solar heating, once thought to be “in,” barely gets a peak inside. 

Do you recall the campaigns for simplifying taxes and for clear explanations in borrowing and savings terms? These too are not just decades old but often have been reviewed, resurrected and ignored. 

Most people, it seems reasonable to assume, would like to understand what they are doing when they confront a tax form or a credit-card truth-in-lending statement. It is unlikely that they do. Very unlikely. 

A report this month from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration found in a survey that the Internal Revenue Service’s own tax assistants gave inappropriate answers 73 percent of the time. 

The sorry results of these programs raise questions about the ability of service providers such as lenders and IRS personnel to explain details without adding to rather than reducing the confusion. It’s also worth studying how a new generation seems unable to learn from the errors of the old. The latter question applies not just to ordinary Americans but to those who consider themselves experts – such as real estate developers. 

Those who risk huge amounts of money on developments often do so because of infinite trust in their egos and expertise. These, they assume, make them different from those who failed in the past. 

John Cunniff is a business analyst for The Associated Press


Remodeled Civic Center is ready for rumble

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Monday May 14, 2001

The newly renovated and seismically upgraded Martin Luther King, Jr. Civic Center Building was dedicated Friday during a ceremony attended by 300 people and a slew of city and state dignitaries who praised the $37.7 million remodel. 

City Manager Weldon Rucker graciously hosted the ceremony in front of the Milvia Street building, which was closed between Center Street and Allston Way. Rucker introduced the mayor and councilmembers who, like good politicians, couldn’t refuse an opportunity to say a few words to a crowd.  

Mayor Shirley Dean thanked a long list of people who made the remodel possible and then praised the building.  

“This building will stand in a major earthquake and it will function afterwards,” she said. “This building is dedicated to the people of Berkeley.” 

The remodel was paid with $16.4 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, $16.1 million from Bond Measure S and the remainder from the city’s general fund. 

The building, designed by architect James Plachek and built in 1940, is on the National Register of Historic Places and is corner stone to Berkeley’s Civic Center Historic District. It was the Farm Credit Administration Building until the city purchased it for $1.7 million in 1977 and made it the Civic Center.  

After the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989, the building was deemed seismically unsafe.  

There was a chance the building was going to be demolished but Dean said the voters passed Measure S by a squeaking two thirds plus 87 votes. At the time, bond measures required a two-thirds vote to be approved. 

The major expense was installing the 74 state-of-the-art base isolators that will allow the building to move 30 inches in any direction in case of a major earthquake.  

The interior of the building was restored with new finishes, custom energy efficient light fixtures and exposed ceilings. The cubicles and tall filing cabinets that clogged the offices before the remodel were removed in favor of open office space. The result is work areas that are filled with natural light and a sense of airiness.  

The exterior was also restored and two meeting rooms were added to the sixth floor. 

After the elected officials addressed the crowd, Public Works Director Rene Cardinaux, who oversaw the remodel, took the podium.  

“The Civic Center is more than just bricks and mortar,” he said, “It’s a symbol of pride for the people who work here and the people of Berkeley.” 

After the speeches, the public was invited to an open house to have coffee and cake, tour the offices and listen to the Berkeley High School Jazz Band.


Calendar of Events & Activities

Compiled by Sabrina Forkish
Monday May 14, 2001


Monday, May 14

 

Seeing Into the Afterlife  

7:30 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Yossi Offenberg will discuss Judaism’s philosophy on what happens beyond this world.  

$10  

848-0237 

 


Tuesday, May 15

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion will be about the effect of the media on our lives. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Fibromyalgia Support Group  

Noon - 2 p.m.  

Alta Bates Medical Center 

Maffly Auditorium, Herrick Campus  

2001 Dwight Way  

Dr. Kathryn Williams, former chairman for the department of rehabilitation, Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, will discuss the current understanding of fibromyalgia.  

601-0550 

 

Business of Seeds 

7 - 9 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

How seeds became a commodity and their journey from the fields to the lab to wall street and a discussion of our potential role as urban seed stewards in the global system.  

548-2220 

 

Basic Electrical Theory and  

National Electric Code  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St.  

Instructed by author/retired City of Oakland building inspector Redwood Kardon.  

$35 

 

Silent Vigil Against Death  

Penalty 

8 - 9 a.m. 

Federal Building 

1301 Clay St, Oakland 

Sponsered by East Bay Women Against the Death Penalty is sponsoring a silent vigil in protest of the execution of Timothy McVeigh, the first federal execution in 38 years. Wear black, bring signs. 

841-1896 

 

Bicycling Get Together 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Wesley Foundation 

2398 Bancroft Way 

Special presentation on bicycling in Germany. 

597-1235 

 

 


Wednesday, May 16

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 


Thursday, May 17

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

“What is Queer Spirituality?” 

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 

1798 Scenic Ave.  

Mudd Bldg., Room 100 

Bill Glenn, PSR alumni and leader of Spirit Group, will lead a panel discussion on the dynamic shape of queer spirituality today.  

849-8206 

 

Simplicity Forum 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Library 

Claremont Branch  

2940 Benveue Ave.  

Facilitated by Cecile Andrews, author of “Circles of Simplicty,” learn about this movement whose philosophy is “the examined life richly lived.” Work less, consume less, rush less, and build community with friends and family.  

Call 549-3509 or visit www.seedsofsimplicity.org  

 

Free Smoking Cessation Class  

5:30 - 7:30 p.m.  

Six Thursday classes through May 17.  

Call 644-6422 to register and for location  

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meeting is the spring barbecue.  

654-5486 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

First day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continues Tuesday May 22. $70 for both days. 

525-7610 

 

John Muir May Fair 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

John Muir Elementary School 

2955 Claremont Ave 

Cake walk, face painting, games, food and student performances, quilt raffle. Free. 

644-6410 

 


Friday, May 18

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 


Saturday, May 19

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Annual strawberry tasting 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Get to Know Your Plants 

1 - 4 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn what to look for and what and how to record it to more intimately know your plants.  

548-2220 

 

“Be Your Own Boss” 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

YWCA 

1515 Webster Street, Oakland 

Second Saturday of a two day workshop on starting up small businesses (see May 12). 

415-541-8580 

 

Community Summit on  

Smaller Learning  

Communities 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Alternative High School  

MLK Jr. Way (at Derby)  

All teachers, students, administrators, parents, and community members are encouraged to attend this meeting on smaller learning communities at Berkeley High. Translation, childcare, and food will be provided.  

540-1252 to RSVP for services 

 

Campaign for Equality Benefit  

7:30 - 10 p.m. 

Montclair Women’s Cultural Arts Club  

1650 Mountain Blvd.  

Oakland 

A comedy benefit with performances by Karen Ripley, Julia Jackson, Pippi Lovestocking, Darrick Richardson, and Nick Leonard. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the International Lesbian Gay Association Scholarship Fund for the 2001 ILGA Summit in Oakland.  

$15 - $20  

466-5050 

 

Finish Carpentry 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Carpenter/contractor Kevin Stamm leads workshop. $95. 

525-7610 

 

Earthquake Retrofitting 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Seminar taught by structural engineer Tony DeMascole and seismic contractor Jim Gillett. $75. 

525-7610 

 

How to Prevent Home Owner Nightmares 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Dispute prevention and early resolution seminar taught by contractor/mediator Ron Kelly. $75. 

525-7610 

 

Puppet Shows 

1:30 and 2:30 p.m. 

Hall of Health (Lower Level) 

2230 Shattuck Ave. 

Program on physical and mental differences. Promotes acceptance and understanding. Free. 

549-1564  

 


Sunday, May 20

 

Reimagining Pacific Cities  

6 - 8:30 p.m. 

New Pacific Studio  

1523 Hearst Ave.  

“How are Pacific cities reshaping their cultural and environmental institutions to better serve the needs and enhance the present and future quality of life of all segments of their societies?” A series of ten seminars linking the Bay Area, Seattle, Portland, and other pacific cities.  

$10 per meeting  

Call 849-0217 

 

Working with Awareness,  

Concentration, Energy 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Nyingma members discuss meditative awareness in everyday life. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Salsa Lesson & Dance Party  

7 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Kick up your heels and move your hips with professional instructors Mati Mizrachi and Ron Louie. Plus Israeli food provided by the Holy Land Restaurant. Novices encouraged to attend and no partners are required.  

$12  

RSVP: 237-9874 

 

Mediterranean Herbs 

1:30 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Tour of herbs. Learn myths and legends, ideas for planting in home gardens. 

643-1924 

 

Jazz on 4th Street Festival 

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

4th St. between Hearst and Virginia 

Performances by Berkeley High Jazz Ensemble and two Berkeley High Jazz Combos, among others. Also 4th St. merchants, raffle prizes, arts and crafts. Free admission. Proceeds benefit Berkeley High Performing Arts.  

526-6294 

 

 

 


Letter to the Editor

Monday May 14, 2001

Comparison is ‘dishonest and disrespectful’ 

Editor: 

 

What is particularly disturbing to me in the letter from Alan Kay and Carole Norris about Congregation Beth El's building plans is the reference to parking at Safeway: “Count the number of parking spaces in Safeway’s lot, including the underground spaces.” 

The only reason to raise this suggestion is dishonest and disrespectful. Beth El's use of its property will be similar to that of other religious institutions. The use is nothing like that of an office building, a manufacturing plant, or a grocery store.  

The comparisons in the letter with parking at other religious institutions represented as "models" are equally dubious. Saint Mary Magdalene has three masses on Sunday morning, some of which are attended by 300 people, who park on a parking lot created by paving over Codornices Creek. Saint John's Presbyterian rents its sanctuary every weekend of the year; some of the performances attract as many as 500 people (the 400 seat sanctuary expands into an adjacent area). The First Unitarian Church of Berkeley is actually located in Kensington, an area with parking regulations very different from Berkeley’s. Virtually all other churches in Berkeley have less parking than Beth El is proposing.  

The proper comparison is Beth El now and Beth El at the new location. Both the on-site parking and the much larger availability of street parking make the new location much better for the neighborhood. 

 

James H. Samuels AIA  

Berkeley 

 

Creekside path ideas are not based in reality 

Editor: 

 

I read with interest and some disbelief Ted Vincent’s recent letter to the editor (“Create Creekside Path,” May 9, 2001) suggesting that a public path along Codornices Creek be created through our yard and some of our neighbors’ yards.  

Does this proposal include eliminating the culvert that currently runs under Spruce Street and much of my yard? I guess so, since a couple hundred feet or so in a low culvert hardly adds to the creek experience, at least for the lay observer. Personally, I think a little rustic wooden bridge over Codornices Creek where it crosses Spruce might be nice. In fairness, I’m not so sure all those people who drive their cars and ride their bikes up and down Spruce every day would like it, but it would sure slow things down. And maybe it would get some of them off Spruce and onto Oxford. And while we’re at it, we could use a little wooden bridge in our yard, to cross over the creek channel to what little would be left of our garden after the creek is daylighted.  

Of course Mr. Vincent’s idea would have a major significant adverse environmental impact on the environment. We would lose some on-street parking, and there would be a two-car increase in the demand (the culvert runs under my off-street parking area). I suppose this could be mitigated by putting an underground parking garage under our house. Unfortunately, we’re a little short of cash this month. Could we wait until next month?  

Mr. Vincent says that, “no houses would need to be eminent domained.” This may be true, since I suppose there are not too many houses over the creek (although I’m not to sure about that house on Glen). But the reader might want to consider that property would have to be "eminent domained.” I know, Mr. Vincent has assured us that it is only a “minimal bother,” but I figure that even minimal bothers like losing one’s garden and much of one’s property deserve at least some compensation-- if only as a matter of principle.  

It is fair to say that I don’t particularly appreciate Mr.Vincent’s somewhat cavalier attitude about others’ property (well, ours anyway; others can speak for themselves). I do appreciate Mr. Vincent’s concern for Codornices Creek and his interest in establishing a good long path along it and improving the path that does exist in some places.  

I just wish his solution was a little more reality-based. It would have a better chance of succeeding. 

 

Zach Cowan 

Berkeley 

 

 

 

Commendations for Beth El effort 

Editor: 

 

I am writing to commend Congregation Beth El for the wonderful volunteer effort that its Social Action Committee mounted to support our efforts at Chaparral House, a not-for-profit skilled nursing facility on Allston Way. As part of the “Rebuilding Together” national spring event, Beth El’s “Sukkot-in-April” brought over 30 volunteers to Chaparral for the last two weekends in April. These volunteers planned and organized, then painted our dining room a bright cheery white which increased the light capacity of our dining room a good 25 percent. Besides saving us the expense, their efforts help to make the space more livable for our elder, disabled residents, many of whom have diminished vision. The highlight of the last weekend was a wonderful community barbeque in Strawberry Creek Park which brought together the volunteers from our neighbor — the Berkeley Youth Alternatives — as well as residents, family, staff and the volunteers from Beth El. This endevor is just one more example of the community contributions which the Beth El congregation makes to Berkeley. 

 

Jim Johnson,  

Chaparral Foundation 

Berkeley 

Preparations should never slow down for  

‘The big one’ 

 

The Berkeley Daily Planet received a copy of this letter to the Berkeley City Council and Bekeley Union High School Directors: 

 

My “Thanks” to the City Council and School Board for work on seismic disaster planning preparations! 

The Disaster Council has lots of work to perfect Berkeley for a worst-case scenario. 

Fire resistance is low for redwoods, high for pine and eucalyptus, according to one source; I see a lot of the latter two about the area. 

Regarding food supply, nourishing: I cringe, thinking about the quality of food supposedly good for “ten years” or some such; seven year-old “food” was consumed by troops in the “gulf war,” and I needn’t remind you of the endless “mysterious” health problems suffered by our troops after that morass. 

South pool, BHS, is a warm place in winter; I’ve wondered if it might be suitable for cautious, sober users for sleeping in emergencies; dozens of cots could be stored in miscellaneous rooms; I’m optimistic about the toughness of that structure; (architects are qualified to design building structures, please remember; I’m especially interested in seismically good structural design). 

I was frightened by the last fire-storm more than the quake, even though flammable landscape material was not frequent in the neighborhood near Kensington where I was then living. The wood and timber structure had a bit of flexibility built-in which engineers like. I’d never been near a monster fire, and my legs were beginning to fail me. 

 

Terry Cochrell 

Berkeley 


Arts & Entertainment

Monday May 14, 2001

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels like an earthworm, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins, and become little “dump” workers. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” Through May 2002 An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum “Joe Brainard: A Retrospective,” Through May 27. The selections include 150 collages, assemblages, paintings, drawings, and book covers. Brainard’s art is characterized by its humor and exhuberant color, and by its combinations of media and subject matter. “Ricky Swallow/Matrix 191,” Including new sculptures and drawings; Through May 27 $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history.“Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing.This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge.“Within the Human Brain” Ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “T. Rex on Trial,” Through May 28 Where was T. Rex at the time of the crime? Learn how paleontologists decipher clues to dinosaur behavior. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 18: Ensign, All Bets Off, Playing Enemy, Association Area, Blessing the Hogs; May 19: Punk Prom and benifit for India quake victims features Pansy Division, Plus Ones, Dave Hill, Iron Ass; May 25: Controlling Hand, Wormwood, Goats Blood, American Waste, Quick to Blame; May 26: Honor System, Divit, Enemy You, Eleventeen, Tragedy Andy; June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2 El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 15: 8 p.m. Edessa and Cascada de Flores; May 16: 9 p.m. Creole Belles; May 17: 10 p.m. Dead DJ Night with Digital Dave; May 18: 9:30 p.m. Reggae Angels with Mystic Roots; May 19: 9:30 Kotoja; May 20: 8:30 p.m. Jude Taylor and His Burning Flames 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 14: Acoustic Guitar summit Quartet; May 17: The Rincon Ramblers; May 18: Todd Snider; May 19: Oak, Ash and Thorn; May 20: KALW’s 60th Anniversary Concert featuring Paul Pena, Orla and the Gasmen, Kennelly Irish Dancers, Kathy Kallick and Nina Gerber. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jazzschool/La Note All music at 4:30 p.m.  

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 15: Chris Shot Group; May 16: Spank; May 17: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Rythm Doctors; May 29: The Lost Trio; May 30: Zambambazo 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Pena Cultural Center May 17, 8 p.m.: Tribu; May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane; May 20: 6 p.m. Venezuelan Music Recital 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

The Crowden School Annual Spring Concert May 16, 7:30 p.m. $5-$10 St. John’s Presbytarian Church at College and Garber 559-6910 

 

Tribu May 17, 8 p.m. Direct from Mexico, Tribu plays a concert of ancestral music of the Mayan, Aztec, Olmec, Zapotec, Purerpecha, Chichimec, Otomi, and Toltec. Tribu have reconstructed and rescued some of the oldest music in the Americas. $12 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Jazz Singers Collective May 17, 8 p.m. Anna’s Bistro 1801 University Ave. 849-2662 

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fundraiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21, 2001. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

 

 

“En Mouvement/In Motion” May 18, 19 7 p.m., May 19, 20 2 p.m. Part of the Berkeley Ballet Theater Spring Showcase, this production is a collection of works by student dancers/ $15. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 843-4689  

 

Theater 

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“The Laramie Project” May 18 - July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members travelled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard. The play is about the community and the impact Shepard’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Sister, My Sister” May 20, 5 p.m. Poetry, photography and dramatic readings which give voice to women and children cuaght in homelessness. Admission is free, donations welcome. Live Oak Park Theatre1301 Shattuck Ave. 528-8198 

 

Films 

 

Pacific Film Archive May 18: 7:30 The Cloud-Capped Star; May 19: 3:30 Starewicz Puppet Films; May 20: 5:30 The New Gulliver Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“Drowning in a Sea of Plastics” Video and Discussion Night May 16, 7 p.m. Join the Ecology Center’s Plastic Task Force for a viewing of “Trade Secrets” and “Synthetic Sea.” Free. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo Ave. 548-2220 ext. 233 

 

 

 

Exhibits 

 

“The Art of Meadowsweet Dairy” Objects found in nature, reworked and turned into objects of art. Through May 15, call for hours Current Gallery at the Crucible 1036 Ashby Ave. 843-5511  

 

“Scapes/Escapes” Ink, Acrylic, Mixed Media by Evelyn Glaubman Through June 1 Tuesday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 2:45 p.m. Gallery of the Center for Psychological Studies 1398 Solano Ave. Albany 524-0291 

 

“Watercolors and Mixed Media” by Pamela Markmann Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. A retrospective of 30 years’ work at Markmann’s Berkeley studio. Red Oak Gallery 2983 College Ave. 526-4613  

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse. Meet the artists May 18, 19, 20 (call for times). Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Opening reception May 3, 4 - 6 p.m. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts & Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Tropical Visions: Images of AfroCaribbean Women in the Quilt Tapestries of Cherrymae Golston” Through May 28, Tu-Th, 1-7 p.m., Sat 12-4 p.m. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 14: Edie Meidav reads and signs “The Far Field: A Novel of Ceylon”; May 15: Kathleen Norris discusses “The Virgin of Bennington”; May 16: Tim Flannery describes “The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples”; May 17: Lalita Tademy reads “Cane River”; May 18: Oscar London, M.D. copes with “From Voodoo to Viagra: The Magic of Medicine”; May 21: Ariel Dorfman reads “Blakes Therapy”  

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. 559-9500 All events at 7 p.m., unless noted May 17: Jean Shinoda Bolen talks about “Goddesses In Older Women: Archetypes in Women Over Fifty”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or www.bookpride.com  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”; May 29, 7 - 9 p.m.: Travel Photo Workshop with Joan Bobkoff. $15 registration fee  

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 17: Gregory Listach Gayle with host Mark States; May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo; May 31: Connie Post with host Louis Cuneo Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

Rhythm & Muse Open Mike May 12, 6:30 p.m. An ongoing open mike series, featuring poet/artist Anca Hariton. Free Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 527-9753 

 

Adan David Miller and JoJo Doig May 20, 7 p.m. Poetry and spoken word. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo 548-3333 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 


Piedmont makes Panthers work for BSAL track title

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Monday May 14, 2001

St. Mary’s girls win league meet in last race 

 

All year, it’s been pretty much a given that the St. Mary’s track & field team would win the BSAL. They just had too much firepower, and no opponent came close to knocking off the Panthers in any league meets. But their domination was threatened on Saturday at the league championships. 

The Piedmont girls’ team kept the score so close, in fact, that it all came down the final race of the day, the 4x400-meter relay. But the Panthers’ squad of Riana Shaw, Bridget Duffy, Parris Vega and Shameka Savage came through in the end, beating the Piedmont team by two seconds to claim the league title, 192-186. 

St. Mary’s head coach Jay Lawson pointed to the absence of the injured Tiffany Johnson as a major reason for the narrow win. 

“Not having Tiffany probablay cost us 36-38 points in the jumps and 100, and that made the meet a lot closer,” Lawson said. 

Johnson, one of the league’s best in three different events, will have a chance to qualify for the North Coast meet on Tuesday in a run-off against the fourth place finishers in each of her events, the 100-meter dash, long jump and triple jump. Also participating in the run-off will be St. Mary’s Chris Dunbar and Darnell Tolliver, who were both injured and did not compete on Saturday. 

The Panthers winning relay team was all also responsible for individual wins on the day. Savage won the 400, Vega the 800, and Duffy the 1,600 and 3,200. Shaw, who doesn’t usually run the relay, won the high jump by tying her personal best at 5 feet, 8 inches. 

With Johnson out, other girls had to make up for her absence. Shaw, for example, not only participated in the relay, but took second in the 100-meter hurdles and sixth in the 300-meter hurdles, which she hasn’t run in competition all season. 

“We scouted this meet out, and knowing it would be that close, we talked to the girls and had them do some events they aren’t used to, but we needed every single point,” Lawson said. “We have a lot of quality, but Piedmont had a lot of depth in some events. We each dominated certain events.” 

Also winning for the Panthers was Danielle Stokes, who won both hurdles races. The big shock of the day was Kamaiya Warren, northern California’s dominating thrower, fouled on all three attempts in the discus. Although she won the shot put easily, Warren will have to seek special dispensation to compete in the discus at the North Coast meet next weekend. Lawson said another St. Mary’s thrower who qualified for the meet has agreed to step aside, and Lawson will try to get permission for the switch this week. 

The Panthers had a considerably easier time on the boys’ side, winning the meet with 253 points and winning 10 of the 12 events. Piedmont finished second with 75 points. Courtney Brown won both the 200 and 400 races, while Halihl Guy won both hurdles events, and both took part in the Panthers’ winning relay teams, with Julian Keyes substituting for the injured Dunbar in both races. Phil Smith won the high jump with a personal best of 6 feet. 

Phil Weatheroy won both the shot put and discus competitions, but the Panthers got a suprise boost from sophomore Leon Drummer, just promoted from the junior varsity squad. Drummer came in fourth in both throwing events, qualifying for the North Coast meet. 

Lawson said the easy victory for the boys was expected. 

“On the boys side, we wanted to go in and run well and not have anything bad happen. A lot of our kids who don’t normally go to the big invitationals did very well,” he said. “We qualified everyone we wanted to qualify.”


Student housing still crunched

By Diwata Fonte Special to the Daily Planet
Monday May 14, 2001

It’s a bit like meeting your disapproving future in-laws, a bit like third-degree interrogation, and a bit like the Miss Universe Pageant.  

But instead of the questions like, “If you won the title, how would you promote world peace?” they are: “What’s your major?” “How quiet are you?” and “Where does your money come from?” 

Like many meetings, it’s all about first impressions. At this one, dozens of competitors (mostly students) take particular pains to appear responsible, studious, clean and quiet. They are jostling for the same prize: a clean two-bedroom apartment for $1,250, only one mile from the University campus.  

These competitions, known as open houses, thrive on summer season’s renter-heavy market. And despite the softening housing market caused by the dot-com crash, rentals near UC Berkeley are still a hot commodity. 

Landlords advertise in popular apartment listings that interested persons may come see the apartment at a certain day and time. If the place is attractive — close to campus, cheap, safe neighborhood — anywhere between 20 to as many as 100 applicants can show up. The apartment or house is showcased for a few hours.  

From this pool, landlords choose their winners.  

This time of year is when the stakes start getting high. The housing market can be both competitive and cruel. Students travel to open houses only to find out that the apartment is already taken. Or, if not, it only takes five minutes to go. 

Students can get desperate.  

Xiomara Ferrera and Shermaine Barlaan are looking for a “decent” place. That means a place free of stains on the walls and garbage on the sidewalks. It also means the stairway doesn’t smell like urine — much like other places they have seen. 

“I’m going to be homeless in two weeks,” Ferrera said.  

“I’m homeless in one week,” Barlaan said. 

Becky White, assistant director at Cal Rentals, the apartment service associated with UC Berkeley, said they are serving about 1,200 to 1,300 active clients. She said that they’re numbers will be “growing exponentially” every day from now until August.  

“This is just the tip of the iceberg,” she said. 

For the landlord, open houses can be a convenient method to deal with the high-demand market. They only need to show the apartment or house once. Many do not live in the area.  

But for renters, the situation can be impersonal, frustrating and almost demeaning. They are forced to jockey for the landlord’s favor and attention in a room swarming with college students, just like them. The whole process becomes more about selling their qualities to the landlord, rather than the landlord selling the qualities of the property to them.  

Two of 30 applicants at a West Berkeley open house Saturday, Rhea Muchow and Sara Vessal, think they know the game pretty well. They’ve been to enough open houses to know how to avoid amateur mistakes.  

They said successful candidates must arrive with a tenant resume, a credit check and an application already filled out. Also, they said all roommates must be present; they must be early; they should stand at the front of the line, talk first and repeat their names a lot. 

“At first we didn’t do these things,” Muchow said. “Now we wised up.”  

The short five to 10 minute conversation when the applicants actually meet the landlord is where they must project traits they sense landlords want. It’s important that they leave a good impression. 

Muchow and Vessal’s last comment to the landlord was, “OK, sounds great! We just want to find a quiet place to study near campus.”  

“You tell them what they want to hear,” said Vessal.  

However for students, it is difficult to gauge exactly what landlords want to hear.  

A common conception among students was that landlords want to know if the rent will come in on time. This caused some students to divulge information like that their parents always gave them money or that their father is the vice president of a successful company. 

“My parents are wealthy,” said Matt Mercier, who felt forced to convince her that he had enough money to pay rent regularly.  

“My parents pay. I have a checking account, but I get money from them.”  

Another creative strategy is to prove your responsibility by bringing your parents. 

Brannon, who has seen almost 60 places in the last three months said that those who bring their parents have an advantage if a landlord immediately wants the deposit and contract.  

But some found out that bringing others doesn’t always help. 

“I don’t think it was a plus,” said Sally Rogers who came with her husband, Phil, from Los Angeles. “It doesn’t matter if we pay our bills on time. They want to concentrate on who is living there.” 

There were other ways to stand out. Some students said landlords definitely value certain majors over others. If you have the right major, exploit it.  

“You must have done very well to get into computer science,” Jason Song and James Yang said a landlord told them.  

They were reminded to write their majors on the application when they turned it in.  

But others majors, like Jesse Dienner’s comparative literature, registered no worth or even recognition.  

“What’s that?” the landlord said. “I don’t know that.” 

“Uh-oh,” Dienner said. “This means this isn’t going well.” 

Most students were forced to use whatever they could to increase their chances. Some spoke Chinese with the landlord, others mentioned that they were graduate students and liked to study.  

But by the end of the open house, not one could say for certain that they were chosen. 

“It's luck,” said the landlord, who declined to give her name. “It depends. No one has a 100 percent chance.” 


Cal women move on

Daily Planet Wire Services
Monday May 14, 2001

The No. 7-ranked California Golden Bears (16-6), struggled early, yet managed to pull off a tough 4-1 victory over the No. 20-ranked North Carolina Tar Heels (16-7), Sunday at the Hellman Tennis Courts. 

The Bears got off to a sluggish start, losing the first doubles match at court No. 2, where Jieun Jacobs and Nicole Havlicek fell, 8-3, to UNC’s Marlene Mejia and Julie Rotondi. Cal evened the score when the duo of Christina Fusano and Catherine Lynch downed UNC’s tandem of Courtney Zalinski and Elina Bairos, 8-4, on the No. 3 court.  

All eyes were on the No. 1 court, where Anita Kurimay and Raquel Kops-Jones traded points the entire match with UNC’s Kendrick Bunn and Kate Pinchbeck. Neither team led by more than a point the entire match, before UNC took an 8-7 lead. Kops-Jones struggled with her serve as numerous double-faults hampered the duo’s chances to take an advantage. UNC’s duo would take the final game, and the first team point of the afternoon, defeating Cal, 9-7.  

Needing three singles victories to clinch the match, UNC gave the Bears a scare as singles competition got underway. The Tar Heels won the first set on three of six courts, forcing Cal to step up their level of play. Cal would find comfort in wins at courts No’s. 5 and 6, as Sekita Grant would tally the first point for the Bears with a 6-4, 6-2 victory at No. 6, before Catherine Lynch tallied a 7-5, 6-2 victory at the No. 5 court.  

With a 2-1 lead, the Bears began to turn the tables. The three singles players who lost their first set at courts No.’s 2 through 4 began to make comebacks. At No. 3, Raquel Kops-Jones fought back from a 5-7 loss in the first set, to take the next two, 6-1, 6-2. The Bears would win the final point and take the match from UNC when Jieun Jacobs came back from a 6-7(6) first set loss, to defeat defeat UNC’s Kristin Koenig in the final two stanzas, 6-3, 6-1.  

Cal will travel to Stone Mountain, Georgia, where Georgia State University will host the final rounds of the NCAA championships, May 17-20.In addition to the team competition, Kurimay, Fusano and Kops-Jones will play for the singles title. 

Cal’s doubles team of Kurimay and Kops-Jones will also compete in the doubles portion of the championships. They will have big shoes to fill, as the Bears have produced the last three NCAA doubles champions.


School tax helps soften budget blow

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Monday May 14, 2001

Faced with escalating operating costs — and little hope that the now cash-starved state government would come up with extra education dollars at the final hour — the Berkeley Unified School District board cut millions of dollars from its budget earlier this month. 

Berkeley High School, by now accustomed to watching some of it fundings evaporate toward the end of budget planning season, lost the equivalent of 3.6 teachers in this latest round of cuts. 

But a local parcel tax measure originally passed in 1987 to provide extra support to Berkeley schools is, as in years past, helping to soften the blow at the high school.  

In fact, at the very moment the school board was preparing to finalize its budget cuts (which, in fact, won’t be completely finalized until this Wednesday), the high school’s Berkeley Public Schools Educational Excellence Project (BSEP) Site Committee was figuring out how to distribute more than $400,000 to fund high school programs next year. 

These so-called “enrichment” funds come directly from Berkeley taxpayers, under the BSEP tax measure. Most of the millions raised each year under this measure go to teacher salaries, to help keep class sizes small. But a certain percentage is set aside for enrichment purposes, helping to pay for those extra activities and programs that would not otherwise make their way onto a public school budget. 

At Berkeley High, a committee of five parents, five staff (including the principal) and five students reviews proposals for how the money should be spent each year then votes on the final allocations. The BSEP Site Committee submits the plan to the Berkeley School Board for approval in June. 

The committee begins its work each year by completing a needs assessment study of the high school, said committee Chair Frances Cohen, a Berkeley High parent. It then studies programs already operating on campus and conducts interviews with students and staff to evaluate how they are meeting the needs of the school. 

This year the committee has tentatively awarded more than one third of the high schools’ $400,000 in enrichment funds to programs that support student learning in particular areas, Cohen said. 

After determining that BHS students need more one-on-one help in improving their writing skills, the committee chose to fund a program that brings writing tutors onto the campus to work with the students. 

To help Berkeley High students who are being asked to master high school level English curriculums when they barely know how to read, the BSEP committee will fund a reading teacher next year. 

“It’s something that hasn’t been done at the high school, and yet, it’s a need that gets mentioned over and over again,” Cohen said. 

In a similar vein, the BSEP committee chose to provide money for Check and Connect, a program aimed at tackling the schools notorious problems with truancy. The money would pay for a staff person to carefully track student absences, and for another person to dedicate a number of hours each day to the task of contacting parents of absent students. 

“It’s a constant complaint,” Cohen said. “You have students not going to class, and parents don’t know, and before you know it it’s the end of the semester and it’s a big problem.” 

As the school board continues to chip away at parts of its own budget, the BSEP committee sometimes takes up the slack. For example, the arguably indispensable position of the high school’s college advisor was cut from the regular school district budget some time ago. Ever since, the BSEP committee has stepped up to pay that person’s salary. 

Next year, the BSEP Committee plans to fund the salary of computer technician to keep the schools computers up and running. The school district, again, couldn’t come up with the cash. 

“The BSEP committee is supposed to fund enrichment activities, rather than things that are sort of basic,” Cohen said. “Our hope is that, in the future, the district would pick up some of this.” 

None of this is too say that the BSEP Committee has given up on funding more traditional enrichment activities, however. Next year the committee plans to pay for tutors in math and English as a second language; chemistry lab assistants; section instructors for the jazz lab band; a ballet teacher; peer health educators; visits to campus by musicians, poets and other artists; and student outings to inspirational performances in drama and music.  


Bear golfers squeak through to NCAAs

Daily Planet Wire Services
Monday May 14, 2001

Women finish eighth at regional, headed to championship 

 

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – No. 25 California finished eighth Saturday at the NCAA Central Regional with a score of 940, earning the final bid out of the region to the NCAA Championship, May 23-26, in Howey-in-the-Hills, Fla.  

The Golden Bears shot a 319 in Saturday’s third and final round, which was high like the other 20 teams due to extremely windy conditions at the par 72, 6040-yard Kampen Golf Course. Cal finished four strokes ahead of ninth-place Oklahoma, which started the day in a tie for eighth with Baylor, which also didn’t advance.  

After standing in a tie for third after two rounds, Cal sophomore Vikki Laing fired an 81 Saturday to finish the tournament in a tie for eighth (226), which is the best a Cal women’s golfer has ever placed at regionals.  

Freshman Sarah Huarte posted Cal’s best round Saturday with a 76, finishing in a tie for 58th (242).  

Purdue’s Kari Damron took medalist honors with a 216, shooting an outstanding final round of 71, especially given the conditions. Tulsa’s Stacy Prammanasudh was second at 218.  

Tulsa shot a 313 in the final round to win the competition with a 54-hole score of 904. Host Purdue finished two strokes back in second at 906. Texas shot the best round of the day (302) to place third at 910. The other teams advancing out of the regional were New Mexico State (925), Oklahoma State (925), LSU (928) and Kent State 932.


Inventor wants to harness energy

Bay City News
Monday May 14, 2001

A Berkeley inventor has started a company to harness the power in ocean waves to provide renewable energy to coastal communities. 

Mirko Previsic, chief executive officer of Sea Power and Associates, says the company's patented method uses a series of buoys that are driven up and down by the waves.  

That activity is then channeled through a hydraulic pump that converts the motion energy into electricity. 

Previsic says he's hopeful that each yard of coastline could power 20 homes, cutting down on greenhouse gas emissions in the process. 

Sanjay Wagle, who is chief financial officer at Sea Power, is also optimistic: “We've tested our prototype at half scale in the world's largest wave tank,” he said. “Now we're ready to put it into the ocean.” 

Their plan won top honors this weekend at the Haas Social Venture Competition, a national competition sponsored by the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. 

 


Cal men advance to round of 16 playoff

Daily Planet Wire Services
Monday May 14, 2001

PROVO, UTAH - In the final match of men's regional tennis action at BYU, No. 1 seed Cal defeated No. 2 seeded Fresno State, 4-2, on Saturday afternoon at the BYU Outdoor Tennis Courts. 

California (16-8) started the match by winning an exciting doubles point. Fresno State's Peter Luczak and David Mullins defeated Scott Kintz and Adrian Barnes at the top spot, while Berkeley's Ben Miles and Balazs Veress won at the No. 3 spot. With doubles tied, 1-1, Cal's John Paul Fruttero and Robert Kowalczyk defeated Nick Fustar and Sean Cooper, 8-6 to take the point at the No. 2 court.  

"It really was the doubles point. The key was number two doubles," said Cal head coach Peter Wright. "It was exciting and it gave us momentum going into singles."  

In singles, Cal won at the No. 2 and 5 spots, while Fresno State won at the No. 1 and 3 courts, bringing the score to 3-2. The match was decided at the No. 6 spot, where Cal's Ben Miles defeated Alex Krohn, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, to give the Golden Bears the victory.  

"We had a great performance today from our singles, we fought so hard the whole way," said Wright. "Our seniors really came out and played great today to lead us to the victory."  

With the win, Cal advances to the Round of 16, held in Athens, Georgia on May 18-29.


New cancer drugs show little punch in early testing

By Daniel Q. Haney The Associated Press
Monday May 14, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Much-anticipated new drugs intended to stop cancer by cutting off its blood supply show only slight benefit in early testing on terminally ill patients, although experts say the medicines still may prove useful. 

Whatever their eventual role, however, new data released Sunday suggest the drugs will not be the kind of across-the-board cancer cure that some had predicted. 

None of the drugs prompted the kind of dramatic tumor shrinkage or disappearance that doctors look for even in the first stages of human testing, which are largely intended to see if medicines are safe. Although the drugs had little effect overall, there were hints they might sometimes slow or even stop some tumor growth, at least temporarily. 

Reports on three of the drugs, all discovered in the lab of Dr. Judah Folkman, were presented at a meeting in San Francisco of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. 

Folkman, a surgeon at Boston’s Children’s Hospital, pioneered the field called angiogenesis, which involves trying to starve tumors with chemicals that stop them from building new blood vessels. 

Many angiogenesis drugs are being tested, but the two highest-profile candidates are endostatin and angiostatin, discovered in Folkman’s lab by Dr. Michael O’Reilly. A frenzy erupted over them in 1998 when an optimistically worded article in The New York Times quoted scientists predicting the drugs would soon provide a cancer cure. 

The latest data suggest this is unlikely. Doctors updated preliminary findings on endostatin research that were first released in November. Sunday’s presentations were the first on human testing of angiostatin and Panzem, another blood vessel blocker discovered by Folkman’s team. 

“The data are encouraging but not yet definitive,” O’Reilly said. “There is enough information to suggest that angiogenesis inhibitors will be used in the clinic. It’s just a question of which ones.” 

Doctors said that in some patients, the drug seems to halt cancer in some parts of the body while having little effect elsewhere. Overall, however, scans shows that the flow of blood to the patients’ tumors decreases. 

The next step will be to test these drugs in people with less advanced disease and to combine them with chemotherapy and radiation, as well as perhaps other medicines that block blood vessel growth. Some speculate that long-term use will hold cancer in check without curing it. 

Dr. Larry Norton of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center said many have wondered whether it will do any good to cut off new blood vessels to tumors that already have a blood supply. 

“In many ways, it was miraculous that there was any biological effect at all,” he said.


Federal judge expands racial profiling lawsuit against CHP

By Justin Pritchard Associated Press Writer
Monday May 14, 2001

SAN JOSE – A federal judge has dramatically expanded a racial profiling lawsuit against the California Highway Patrol. 

U.S. District Court Judge Jeremy Fogel ruled Friday that a case alleging CHP officers on three occasions pulled over Hispanic and black men because of their race could become a class-action suit. 

As a result, the case now covers all Hispanic and black drivers stopped by the CHP since June 1998 in areas that stretch along Highway 101 and Interstate 5. 

Fogel did not find that the CHP has done anything wrong — rather, the judge believes if profiling does exist, it would not likely be limited to a handful of incidents. 

Lawyers who brought the case were elated with the judge’s ruling. 

“This makes it much more powerful as a tool to achieve meaningful change in policies that result in racial profiling,” said Jon Streeter, a San Francisco lawyer whose handling the suit with the American Civil Liberties Union. 

Staff at the CHP’s Sacramento offices said Commissioner D.O. Helmick would have no comment until at least Monday. 

A lawyer from the state attorney general’s office downplayed the decision. 

“All it really does is allow the plaintiffs (to continue) their claim that the Highway Patrol has policies and practices that discriminate against Latinos and African Americans,” said Tyler Pon, an attorney general’s office lawyer representing the CHP. “What remains to be seen is whether they can prove it.” 

Pon said the CHP does not discriminate against minority motorists. 

“If it is determined that the policies of the Highway Patrol discriminate against Latino and African American motorists, then they will be changed,” Pon said. 

Findings from the case have already prompted the CHP to change one policy. 

Last month, Helmick issued a six-month moratorium on “consent searches” — the kind that officers can conduct only if they receive permission from a driver. 

Helmick made that decision after reviewing traffic stop data he asked the CHP to collect from last July through March. Though he initiated the ban, Helmick said, “Our people clearly do not clearly racially profile. ... I think we treat people fairly. We’re just trying to be sure.” 

The ACLU countered that it analyzed similar data and concluded that after being stopped, Hispanics were nearly four times more likely to be searched than whites in the central coast region that includes Highway 101 — and that blacks were more than twice as likely to be searched. 

The ACLU said CHP data show similar rates in a Central Valley division that includes Interstate 5. 

The class-action originated in 1999 with a single plaintiff — San Jose attorney Curtis Rodriguez. 

Rodriguez alleges that in June 1998, he was driving on Highway 152 east of San Jose when he noticed CHP officers pulling over Hispanic drivers. 

Soon after, Rodriguez also was stopped and detained while a drug-sniffing dog checked the car, but found nothing. 

Rodriguez and plaintiffs from two similar incidents want a permanent ban on consent searches and reform in drug interdiction officer training. 

The ACLU has argued similar search cases against highway officers in states including Illinois, New Jersey, and Maryland. this week, police in New Mexico recently settled a class-action suit brought by the ACLU alleging discriminatory law enforcement.


Landlords offer prizes as S.F. office market dives

By Margie Mason Associated Press Writer
Monday May 14, 2001

Property owners going from powerful to desperate in economic downturn 

 

SAN FRANCISCO – During the height of the dot-com craze, some landlords here charged more than $100 a square foot for office space and demanded choice stock options in technology companies. Now, many of those options are worthless, and it’s the landlords’ turn to beg. 

Some desperate property owners are offering golf clubs, expensive tech gadgets and even luxury cars to brokers who can fill spaces suddenly vacated by technology companies that once paid Manhattan-style rents. 

Commercial real estate vacancies in San Francisco jumped more than doubled in the first quarter of 2001 compared to the previous quarter. Available space increased from 3.7 million to 8.7 million square feet, sending some companies scrambling to sublet space to help defray costs. 

Internet companies accounted for 77 percent of the space returned to the San Francisco office market between October 2000 and February 2001, according to CoStar Group Inc., which provides information services to the commercial real estate industry. 

The market flip-flop stands out in the city’s South-of-Market area. “For Rent” and “For Lease” signs are visible in every direction on blocks where dot-coms paid high prices for even low-grade warehouse space last year. 

“The market has dived, and I’ve seen a blood bath,” said Mike Mayeri of Cityfeet.com, a Web site that posts vacant commercial real estate for eight Northern California counties. “We’re running out of people to go broke. Sooner or later you flush it out of your system. I probably get 30 new e-mails every day with empty spaces.” 

Dan Mihalovich, of Mihalovich Partners commercial real estate services firm, says he regularly gets invited to open houses where prizes are raffled off. 

Some city residents couldn’t be happier. While the dot-com boom brought riches to landlords and companies, exploding rents forced many longtime tenants from their offices and work spaces. 

After receiving eviction notices, the 22 renters at the Grant Building on Market Street began a six-month campaign last fall to save their square footage. 

A collage of artists, writers and nonprofits took on Seligman & Associates, their Southfield, Mich., landlord, and eventually got what they wanted — new leases were signed in March. 

Seligman officials did not return a telephone call seeking comment. 

“The original plan was to raise rent about 350 percent,” said Chris Carlsson, executive director of Shaping San Francisco, writer/researcher multimedia producer of San Francisco history. “They thought it was just ‘Go, go, go frenzy’ and all these dot-coms were just dying to get in here, but it never materialized during the boom.” 

Although their rents did increase, the tenants were able to stay, an outcome they say is symbolic of a new beginning in the city. 

“We thought it would be the first victory or the last defeat,” said Jim Brook, a Grant Building poet, translator and editor. “Now I think it’s the first victory.” 

But Sharky Laguana, a singer and guitarist, said many musicians are still struggling to find practice space. 

“Even if (rents) were to drop like 50 percent, it’s still out of range of what musicians can pay,” he said. 

At $62 per square foot, San Francisco had the nation’s highest prime office rents in the first quarter, according to the nationwide commercial real estate company Cushman & Wakefield. New York’s midtown Manhattan market is the second most expensive at $57 per square foot, the report said. 

San Francisco’s vacancy rate is projected to hit 13.6 million square feet in the next year, a further increase of more than 50 percent, according to CoStar. March 2000 was the tightest market at about 2 million square feet of available space. 

Mayeri’s Cityfeet.com, which opened in San Francisco last June, has watched the market and its players go from shortage to surplus, and landlords post more ads every day. 

“It was the heyday,” Mayeri said. “It was the gold rush, but it seems as though the tides have changed.” 

 

Here’s a look at current vacancy rates in San Francisco’s commercial real estate market, and space expected to be open within the next year. 

—Office space currently vacant: 8.57 million square feet, up 232 percent from 3.69 million three months ago. 

—Expected office space available one year from now: 13.59 million square feet, up 69 percent from 8.03 million three months ago. 

Source: The CoStar Group, Inc. 

 

—Top five U.S. cities with the overall highest asking rents per square foot as of the first quarter 2001: 

1. San Francisco $62.04 

2. Midtown New York $56.98 

3. Boston $53.33 

4. San Jose $50.64 

5. Downtown New York $43.73 

 

—Top five U.S. cities with least amount of vacant office space as of the first quarter 2001: Numbers refer to percentage of available space. 

1. Downtown San Jose 2.4 percent 

2. Washington, D.C. 4.3 percent 

3. Downtown New York 4.8 percent 

4. Midtown New York 4.8 percent 

5. Boston 5.3 percent 

6. Midtown South New York 5.8 percent 

7. Portland, Ore. 6.1 percent 

8. San Francisco 6.7 percent 

Source: Cushman & Wakefield


AMD to introduce new mobile chips

The Associated Press
Monday May 14, 2001

SUNNYVALE – Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is introducing new chips in a move to catch up with rival Intel Corp. in the mobile computer market. 

AMD will announce Monday new Athlon and Duron mobile processors that are faster, more powerful and less of a battery drain than their earlier versions. The Sunnyvale-based chipmaker also claims the processors outperform those of Intel, which have dominated the laptop market. 

“AMD PowerNow! technology not only makes notebooks run cooler and quieter, it offers extended battery life and up to 50 percent more performance than the competition’s offering,” said Pat Moorhead, vice president of desktop and mobile marketing for AMD’s Computation Products Group. 

The debate over performance, however, rages constantly in the industry. 

Developing power-efficient microprocessors has become a high-stakes competition in the fast-growing segment of notebook computers, which is projected to triple to 30 million units in the United States by the year 2005. 

Intel introduced the first 1-gigahertz chip for mobile computers — a Pentium III with Intel’s so-called power-saving SpeedStep technology — in March. 

The top of AMD’s new mobile lineup is the Athlon 4, a 1-gigahertz chip, targeted for the high-performance market. The fastest of the new mobile Duron chips, which are billed as bargain alternatives to Athlon chips, runs at 850-megahertz.


Bay Briefs

Monday May 14, 2001

Boy shot by cops could get $1 million 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A boy accidentally shot by San Francisco police would get more than $1 million under a proposed settlement recommended by the city attorney’s office. 

Max Castro, 12, was hit in the left knee last year after police responded to a 911 call the boy made. Authorities believe that a rookie officer was aiming at one of the Castro family’s dogs, which was biting his partner. The boy was hit by a bullet fragment that ricocheted off the floor. 

Max, his mother and grandmother filed the suit in December, asking unspecified damages for loss of future earning capacity, pain and suffering and medical bills. 

Police Commission records show that the Castro suit is on its Wednesday agenda. The commission still has to approve the settlement, as does the Board of Supervisors. 

Castro family attorney Angela Alioto said Max Castro had been through enough trauma without enduring a lengthy trial. The growth plate in his knee was hit, and he faces a series of risky or painful surgeries. He also faces the probability of severe arthritis in the joint. 

Max and his family would receive $925,000 under the settlement, plus $150,000 for future medical needs. 

Suspect gives himself up to police 

ANTIOCH – A man wanted in connection with the alleged strangling and dismemberment of an Antioch woman surrendered to police on separate charges this week, insisting he was not involved with the killing. 

Edward Lee Cunningham, 38, turned himself in Wednesday on two no-bail warrants stemming from recent probation violations, officials said. 

He was questioned for several hours by police about the April 13 disappearance of Margaret Bernard, 62, whose remains were found a week later in Solano and Sierra counties, officials said. 

Authorities already have filed murder charges against Bernard’s daughter, Kendra Bernard, 38, who officials say has been romantically involved with Cunningham. Police are not ruling out the possibility of other suspects. 

Court documents released last week indicate that Margaret Bernard was killed some time over the Easter weekend. Her body was found at the base of a hill in Sierra County, but her head, hands and feet were found in Solano County. Several knives, a machete and an ax were found at both sites, along with other evidence. 

 

Asian Americans wary of movie’s influence 

SAN FRANCISCO – Bay Area Asian Americans say they’re apprehensive the new movie “Pearl Harbor” could rekindle animosity and mistrust toward Japanese and other groups. 

The movie focuses on the events of December 7th, 1941, when Japanese bombers descended on American troops and warships in Hawaii. 

Mistrust caused the U.S. government to imprison people of Japanese descent, many of them U.S. citizens, in relocation camps during World War II. 

John Tateishi, president of the Japanese American Citizens League, was consulted by Disney studios and producer Jerry Bruckheimer on the movie’s script. Tateishi said the script is largely fair to Japanese characters, but he worries movie-goers will dwell on the attack and the attackers. 

The Organization of Chinese Americans and other Asian groups plans to launch an education campaign before the film’s Memorial Day release. 

 

‘Senioritis’ not students’ fault, professor says 

STANFORD – High school seniors guilty of slacking off after getting their college acceptance letter in the mail aren’t necessarily lazy. 

At least, so says Stanford education professor Michael Kirst. 

Kirst attributes the so-called senioritis to inadequate testing requirements and a college admissions schedule that doesn’t force students to work hard after the first semester of senior year. 

Kirst says that lack of work caused 66 percent of students admitted to the California State university system to fail at least one placement test. Many students require remedial classes when they start school. 

Kirst said colleges should set knowledge requirements and reject students who don’t pass those standards at year’s end. High school teachers should also gear curriculum throughout senior year toward subjects that will be revisited in college.


Second meningitis case spurs action

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Saturday May 12, 2001

Ten days after the bacterial meningitis death of 9-year-old Nambi Phelps, Berkeley Health Officer Dr. Poki Namkung held a press conference Friday to announce a second case of the contagious disease.  

The second case has spurred the Health and Human Services Department to launch an aggressive information campaign that will include going door to door in west and south Berkeley neighborhoods.  

The city also held a screening clinic at Berkeley High School Friday and will hold two others at various locations during the weekend.  

“We are taking a very aggressive course of action because it is imperative we break the chain of transmissions,” Namkung said. 

A 19-year-old woman, who is a friend of Phelps’ family, was taken by ambulance to Alta Bates Hospital at 8 p.m. Thursday complaining of flu-like symptoms.  

The woman, who was not identified, is listed in serious condition. Doctors have made a tentative diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Namkung said a definitive diagnosis will be made sometime today. 

Meningitis is an infection of the brain and spinal fluid.  

The germ is transmitted through saliva or droplets from the nose. Engaging in any activity where saliva is exchanged can transmit the disease.  

The infectious period is three to four days and symptoms can appear between two and 10 days of exposure. Early detection and treatment with antibiotics is key to preventing serious illness or death. 

Casual contact or simply breathing the same air as an infected person is not enough to transfer the disease.  

Symptoms include sudden fever, headache and stiff neck sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting. 

Despite the family connection, Namkung said she has ruled out direct transmission of the illness from Phelps to the most recent case because the incubation period of 10 days had passed. It is more likely that the two contracted the disease from two different sources. 

Namkung said a group of people, associated with Phelps’ family, has been identified as the likely source of the disease. She said there was not enough known about the group to say what the group connection is.  

“They are mostly teenagers and young adults that engage in high-risk behavior like sharing cigarettes, joints, drinks and food,” Namkung said. 

She said members of the group may be having unprotected sex and using drugs like crack cocaine, both of which can transmit the infection. 

Arrietta Chakos, the city manager’s office chief of staff, said Berkeley is in a good position to stop the spread of the disease because of the city’s Health and Human Services Department. Since it is local, Chakos said it has connections with the community.  

“Our staff knows some of these people and that will make it a lot easier to help them,” she said. 

A city hot line will be staffed by nurses who will answer questions about the infection from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. today and Sunday. The number is (510) 981-CITY (2489). 

There is also information on the city’s web site at www.ci.berkeley.ca.us.  

The screening clinics will be held at two locations at different times over the weekend. 

Saturday, May 12 at Fire Station #1 at 2442 Eighth St. at Dwight from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  

Sunday, May 13 at Francis Albrier Community Center at 2800 Park St. from 1 to 5 p.m. 

 


Calendar of Events & Activities

Saturday May 12, 2001


Saturday, May 12

 

Aquatic Park Playground (Dreamland for Kids) Work Party 

10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Bancroft Way at Bolivar Drive. 

Bring your wheelbarrow, shovel and garden rake. Work on the Ecology Garden. 

Kids and adults needed. Lunch will be served. 649-9874 

 

“Positive Knowledge” Jazz Trio 

8 p.m. 

South Branch Berkeley Public Library 

1901 Russell St. 

“Positive Knowledge,” a first-rate avant-garde jazz trio, will appear in a free two-set concert sponsored by the Friends of the Library. 644-6860 

 

West Coast Live  

10 a.m. - Noon  

Freight & Salvage  

1111 Addison St. (at San Pablo)  

Adair Lara, author of “Hold Me Close, Let Me Go,” Janis Newman, author of “The Russian Word for Snow,” Wavy Gravy, and Accoustic Guitar Summit guitar quartet. 415-664-9500 for reservations 

 

Cordornices Creek  

Work Party 

10 a.m. 

Meet at 10th St. south of Harrison St. 

Join Friends of Five Creeks in removing ivy and reducing erosion as part of National River Cleanup Week. Learn to create creekside trail. Bring work gloves and clippers if possible. 

848-9358 

f5creeks@aol.com 

 

Bulbs of Southern Africa 

3 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Free, reservations required. 

643-1924 

 

Jefferson School PTA Mayfair 

10 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

Jefferson School 

Rose and Sacramento 

Music and entertainment, carnival games, book and plant sale, food, cakewalk and prizes including drawing for Jefferson Parent Quilt. Free admission. 

558-9096 

 

Mother’s Day Plant Sale 

Willard Middle School 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Flowers, vegetables, bouquets. Benefit for the Willard Greening Project. 549-9121 

 

Yard Sale 

10 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

University Lutheran Chapel 

2425 Collage Ave. 

“Junk and Gems” of the members of Opus Q - The East Bay Men’s Chorale. Also seeking donations. 

664-0260 www.opus-q.com 

 


Sunday, May 13

 

 

Mother’s Day Concert 

3 - 4 p.m 

Environmental Education Center 

Tilden Regional Park  

Featuring Mary Mische singing children’s songs. Free 

525-2233 

 

Hands-On Bicycle Repair  

Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn how to adjust the brakes on your bicycle from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free  

527-4140 

 

Tapping Into Creativity 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Based on Tarthang Tulku’s “Knowledge of Freedom”, ideas and meditations to inspire creativity. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Mother’s Day at the  

Rose Garden 

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Euclid at Eunice 

Bring mom to the Rose Garden to hear the Albany Big Band and Wine Country Brass. Food will be available from Classic Catering, or bring your own picnic from home. Roses should be in full bloom. 

525-3005 

 

Carpentry Basics for Women 

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Second day of weekend hands-on workshop taught by Tracy Weir, professional carpenter. Build your own bookshelf unit. $195 for Saturday and Sunday. 525-7610 

 

Ceramic Tile Installation 

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Second day of weekend hands-on workshop taught by tile-setting expert Rod Taylor. $195 for Saturday and Sunday. 

525-7610 


Monday, May 14

 

Seeing Into the Afterlife  

7:30 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Yossi Offenberg will discuss Judaism’s philosophy on what happens beyond this world.  

$10 848-0237 


Tuesday, May 15

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time  

548-8283 www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion will be about the effect of the media on our lives. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Fibromyalgia Support Group  

Noon - 2 p.m.  

Alta Bates Medical Center 

Maffly Auditorium, Herrick Campus  

2001 Dwight Way  

Dr. Kathryn Williams, former chairman for the department of rehabilitation, Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, will discuss the current understanding of fibromyalgia.  

601-0550 

 

Business of Seeds 

7 - 9 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

How seeds became a commodity and their journey from the fields to the lab to wall street and a discussion of our potential role as urban seed stewards in the global system.  

548-2220 

 

Basic Electrical Theory and  

National Electric Code  

7 - 10 p.m.  

Building Education Center  

812 Page St.  

Instructed by author/retired City of Oakland building inspector Redwood Kardon. $35 

 

Silent Vigil Against  

Death Penalty 

8 - 9 a.m. 

Federal Building 

1301 Clay St, Oakland 

Sponsered by East Bay Women Against the Death Penalty is sponsoring a silent vigil in protest of the execution of Timothy McVeigh, the first federal execution in 38 years. Wear black, bring signs. 841-1896 

 

Bicycling Get Together 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Wesley Foundation 

2398 Bancroft Way 

Special presentation on bicycling in Germany. 

597-1235 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 


Wednesday, May 16

 

Computer Literacy Class 

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.  

MLK Youth Services Center  

1730 Oregon St.  

A free class sponsored by the City of Berkeley’s Young Adult Project. The class will cover basic hardware identification and specification, basic understanding of software, basic word-processing and basic spreadsheets.  

Call 644-6226 

 


Thursday, May 17

 

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

“What is Queer Spirituality?” 

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 

1798 Scenic Ave.  

Mudd Bldg., Room 100 

Bill Glenn, PSR alumni and leader of Spirit Group, will lead a panel discussion on the dynamic shape of queer spirituality today.  

849-8206 

 

Simplicity Forum 

7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Berkeley Library 

Claremont Branch  

2940 Benveue Ave.  

Facilitated by Cecile Andrews, author of “Circles of Simplicty,” learn about this movement whose philosophy is “the examined life richly lived.” Work less, consume less, rush less, and build community with friends and family.  

Call 549-3509 or visit www.seedsofsimplicity.org  

 

Free Smoking Cessation Class  

5:30 - 7:30 p.m.  

Six Thursday classes through May 17.  

Call 644-6422 to register and for location  

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This meeting is the spring barbecue.  

654-5486 

 

Solving Residential Drainage Problems 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

First day of two day seminar led by contractor/engineer Eric Burtt. Continues Tuesday May 22. $70 for both days. 

525-7610 

 

John Muir May Fair 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

John Muir Elementary School 

2955 Claremont Ave 

Cake walk, face painting, games, food and student performances, quilt raffle. Free. 

644-6410 


Letters to the Editor

Saturday May 12, 2001

Berkeley needs to clean up  

contamination 

 

Editor: 

 

2700 San Pablo Ave. remains a contaminated property from petrochemical residuals, although leaking underground gasoline storage tanks were removed in the 80s and some contaminated soil was remediated in 1994.  

There is a deed notice attesting to the contamination. Because there has been no monitoring of the contamination since soil and water samples were recorded in 1997 (monitoring wells were ordered destroyed in1998 as a condition for closure of the site) there is no way of knowing if previously extraordinarily high levels of cancer causing chemicals have degraded. MTBE is known to be particularly recalcitrant. 

The West Berkeley Plan calls for cleanup of toxic contaminated sites before development. The Federal Clean Water Act encourages local agencies to take more proactive steps in protecting our precious resource, the San Francisco Bay water basin. Allowing residual contamination to remain in the soil where it continually recharges the water table and further migrates off site is a very irresponsible way to deal with the problem and it is antithetical to the Berkeley City Council’s resolution resisting state imposed efforts to simply “contain” contaminated landsites. 

It behooves the City Council to employ the “precautionary principle” in regard to the contamination problem of 2700 San Pablo Ave. A Phase II Environmental Assessment, which would entail further water and soil sampling and analysis, must be required- before a development permit is issued, as prescribed by CEQA. A health risk assessment must be done for whatever is the actual proposed project. The project before you is not the project that was reviewed by the Zoning Adjustments Board, and previous iterations of project were not adequately reviewed for their contamination related issues. Also the toxics contamination evaluation and “modeling” should not be left up to the developer or his hired contractor or consultant. That would be an inherent conflict of interest which goes against the letter and intention of CEQA. Impacted neighbors should have a right to participate in the selection of an independent testing company and to be full participants in the review of test results. 

Berkeley has dozens of similarly contaminated potential development sites, especially in West Berkeley. It’s time for Berkeley to set a good environmental example.  

 

Peter Teichner 

Berkeley 

We must seek peace in the Middle East 

 

Editor: 

 

For anyone who follows events in the Middle East, the past six months have been difficult. For Jewish and Arab Americans and especially students it’s been trying to see such awful violence occurring between their peoples; only months after true peace seemed to be just footsteps away. Unaffiliated others must have trouble picking through the rhetoric thrown by both sides to decide which “truth” to believe.  

The fact is however, that there is no "truth.” In this conflict there are two sides that see the same history and view it completely differently. While one side sees “orange,” the other sees “apple.” 

So, in a sense both sides are right, and both sides are wrong. There are flagrant violations of the Oslo accords on both the Palestinian and Israeli side, and while one may see one violation as worse than another, it no longer matters. One side may say that the other “discriminates,” or that the other “teaches hatred of us in their schools,” but if we truly are ready to sit down at the negotiating table once and for all, does name calling accomplish anything? 

What matters is where we go from here. Today we must decide to accept conditions as they are right now, and use them as a springboard for true change. Today, not tomorrow, is the day to find a solution, to talk peace. 

Today we must move from asking who did what and when, to what we’re going to do now. Israel supporters can site wrongs of the Palestinians in the current conflict, and vice-versa as well, but much of this is based on perspectives and biases. The bottom line is that Israel has offered peace, the most generous peace ever offered to resolve this conflict; the Palestinian authority rejected this peace and instead turned to violence as a means of achieving what they couldn’t achieve through negotiations.  

 

Today the violence must stop. The "occupation" of Wheeler Hall was an uncalled for event that moved this conflict onto another level from where it had previously been. This protest turned the conflict from political to just pure hatred. Event speakers called Jews "conniving", and a Star of David was equated with a swastika. Nothing could be more offensive to Jews and rational thinking people everywhere.  

In just the past few days too many children have been lost to both sides as well. Two 14-year-old Jewish boys (one a United States citizen) were stoned to death by Palestinians while hiking near their homes. A 4-month-old Palestinian girl was killed when her house collapsed on her after Israeli return-fire hit it. Must children suffer any longer? Must anyone from either side suffer any longer?  

It’s time that Palestinians accept that what they’ve lost was lost in a war that they initiated – it’s gone forever. Israel has offered much of it back however in return for peace. They must realize that Jews have every right returning to their ancient homeland, whatever negative consequences that may or may not have had. Israelis, for their part, need to accept that the creation of their state has, unfortunately, caused the suffering of another people (the extent of which can be hotly debated). Israelis must accept that Palestinians are a distinct people who too deserve their own state. Israelis cannot control the Palestinians any longer and will need to trust that all signed peace treaties will be upheld to the utmost extent. 

Today both sides need to understand and listen to the claims of the other. Resolution of this conflict will not come through violence, protests, divestment, hate or name-calling; it will only come through face-to-face dialogue and understanding, and a genuine desire to live in peace. The time to start is now.  

 

Daryl Kutzstein 

San Diego 

 

Working people need their own  

political party 

 

Editor: 

 

Governor Gray Davis tells us that the deregulation of the electric power industry has been a colossal disaster. On the contrary, as each day we learn of new and fascinating ways by which the power industry is robbing us blind, it’s clear that deregulation has been a stupendous success – for the power industry. This demonstrates that, in reality, we do not yet have a government of, by, and for the people, but rather a government of, by, and for the wealthy. 

Under our famous two-party system, if we don’t like what the people in our office have done, we can always turn the rascals out, and vote in the other set of rascals. 

The problem is, the vote in the the legislature in favor of deregulation was unanimous.  

Since nobody in either major party is capable of standing up against the power monopoly, we’d be fools to keep on voting for them. Maybe it’s time for working people to get together and organize a political party of our own.  

Marion Syrek 

Oakland 


Arts & Entertainment

Staff
Saturday May 12, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels like an earthworm, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins, and become little “dump” workers. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” Through May 2002 An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum “Joe Brainard: A Retrospective,” Through May 27. The selections include 150 collages, assemblages, paintings, drawings, and book covers. Brainard’s art is characterized by its humor and exuberant color, and by its combinations of media and subject matter. “Ricky Swallow/Matrix 191,” Including new sculptures and drawings; Through May 27 $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 12: The Sick, Impalid, Creuvo, Tearing Down Standards; May 18: Ensign, All Bets Off, Playing Enemy, Association Area, Blessing the Hogs; May 19: Punk Prom and benefit for India quake victims features Pansy Division, Plus Ones, Dave Hill, Iron Ass; May 25: Controlling Hand, Wormwood, Goats Blood, American Waste, Quick to Blame; May 26: Honor System, Divit, Enemy You, Eleventeen, Tragedy Andy; June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2 El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 12: 9 p.m.The Johnny Otis Show; May 13: 9:30 p.m. Toyes, The “Smoke Two Joints” Band; May 15: 8 p.m. Edessa and Cascada de Flores; May 16: 9 p.m. Creole Belles; May 17: 10 p.m. Dead DJ Night with Digital Dave; May 18: 9:30 p.m. Reggae Angels with Mystic Roots; May 19: 9:30 Kotoja; May 20: 8:30 p.m. Jude Taylor and His Burning Flames 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 12, 10 a.m. - Noon: West Coast Live with authors Adair Lara and Janis Newman, and the Accoustic Guitar Summit guitar quartet; May 12: Robin Flower and Libby McClaren; May 13, 1 p.m.: The Kathy Kallick Band; May 13, 8 p.m.: The Pine Valley Boy; May 14: Acoustic Guitar summit Quartet; May 17: The Rincon Ramblers; May 18: Todd Snider; May 19: Oak, Ash and Thorn; 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jazzschool/La Note All music at 4:30 p.m. May 13: Michael Zilber Group 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 or visit www.jazzschool.com 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 12: Post Junk Trio; May 15: Chris Shot Group; May 16: Spank; May 17: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Rhythm Doctors; May 29: The Lost Trio; May 30: Zambambazo 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Peña Cultural Center May 12, 10:30 a.m.: Colibri; May 13, 4 p.m.: In the Cafe La Pena - Community Juerga; May 13, 3 p.m.: Juanita Newland-Ulloa and Picante Ensemble; May 17, 8 p.m.: Tribu; May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane; May 20: 6 p.m. Venezuelan Music Recital 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

“The Children’s Hour” May 12, 8 p.m. and May 13, 4 p.m. The Berkeley Community Chorus and Orchestra, conducted by Arlene Sagan will perform Julian White’s piece along with Beethoven’s Choral Fantasia and selections from Randall Thompson’s Frostiana, poems of Robert Frost set to music. Free St. Joseph the Worker Church 1640 Addison St. 528-2145  

 

Berkeley Opera Gala Concert May 12, 7 p.m. Berkeley Opera singers and special guest artists will be joined by Music Director, Jonathan Khuner and members of the Berkeley Opera Orchestra to provide entertainment highlighting the 2001 theme, “Opera Uncensored.” Also a silent auction, balloon raffle, champagne and more. $15 - $40 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

Juanita Newland-Ulloa & Picante Ensemble May 13, 3 p.m. Romantic songs from South America. Luncheon served at 1 p.m. at the Valparaiso Cafe. $13 - $15 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Mother’s Day Celebration May 13, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Albany Big Band will play from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. followed at 2 p.m. by Wine Country Brass. Picnic fare will be available fom Classic Catering, or bring food from home. Flowers for sale. 525-3005 

 

The Crowden School Annual Spring Concert May 16, 7:30 p.m. $5-$10 St. John’s Presbytarian Church at College and Garber 559-6910 

 

Tribu May 17, 8 p.m. Direct from Mexico, Tribu plays a concert of ancestral music of the Mayan, Aztec, Olmec, Zapotec, Purerpecha, Chichimec, Otomi, and Toltec. Tribu have reconstructed and rescued some of the oldest music in the Americas. $12 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Jazz Singers Collective May 17, 8 p.m. Anna’s Bistro 1801 University Ave. 849-2662 

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fundraiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21, 2001. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

“En Mouvement/In Motion” May 18, 19 7 p.m., May 19, 20 2 p.m. Part of the Berkeley Ballet Theater Spring Showcase, this production is a collection of works by student dancers/ $15. Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 843-4689  

 

 

“Grease” May 12, 8 p.m. and May 6, 2 p.m. By Berkeley High Performing Arts Department. Rock-musical set in late 1950’s explores teen issues. A classic. $6 Little Theater Allston Way between MLK and Milvia 524-9754  

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Musical Tree of India” May 13, 2 p.m. Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre present this legend from tribal India. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“The Laramie Project” May 18 - July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members travelled to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepard. The play is about the community and the impact Shepard’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Sister, My Sister” May 20, 5 p.m. Poetry, photography and dramatic readings which give voice to women and children cuaght in homelessness. Admission is free, donations welcome. Live Oak Park Theatre1301 Shattuck Ave. 528-8198 

 

Films 

 

Pacific Film Archive May 18: 7:30 The Cloud-Capped Star; May 19: 3:30 Starewicz Puppet Films; May 20: 5:30 The New Gulliver Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

 

“A Ship with Painted Sails: The Fabulous Animation of Karel Zeman” May 12: 7 p.m. Baron Munchausen, 9:10 p.m. Kraba - The Sorcerer’s Apprentice May 13: 5:30 The Thousand and One Nights, 7:05 p.m. The Tale of John and Mary. Admission: $7 for one film, $8.50 for double bills. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“Mirele Efros” May 13, 2 - 4:30 p.m. Jacob Gordin’s classic story set in turn-of the century Grodno. A classic study in family relations. Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center Cinema 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237 x127 

 

“Drowning in a Sea of Plastics” Video and Discussion Night May 16, 7 p.m. Join the Ecology Center’s Plastic Task Force for a viewing of “Trade Secrets” and “Synthetic Sea.” Free. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo Ave. 548-2220 ext. 233 

 

 

 

Exhibits 

 

Youth Arts Festival A citywide celebration of art, music, dance and poetry by youth from the Berkeley Unified School District. Featuring paintings, drawings, sculpture and ceramics by K-8 students Through May 12, Wednesday - Sunday, Noon - 5 p.m. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St.  

 

“The Art of Meadowsweet Dairy” Objects found in nature, reworked and turned into objects of art. Through May 15, call for hours Current Gallery at the Crucible 1036 Ashby Ave. 843-5511  

 

“Scapes/Escapes” Ink, Acrylic, Mixed Media by Evelyn Glaubman Through June 1 Tuesday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 2:45 p.m. Gallery of the Center for Psychological Studies 1398 Solano Ave. Albany 524-0291 

 

“Watercolors and Mixed Media” by Pamela Markmann Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. A retrospective of 30 years’ work at Markmann’s Berkeley studio. Red Oak Gallery 2983 College Ave. 526-4613  

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Berkeley Potters Guild Spring Show and Sale May 12, 13, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Fifteen artists open their personal studios to the public and offer pieces for sale. Berkeley Potters Guild 731 Jones St. 524-7031 www.berkeleypotters.com 

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse. Meet the artists May 18, 19, 20 (call for times). Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Opening reception May 3, 4 - 6 p.m. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts & Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

Quilt Show through May 12. M-Th, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m., Fri-Sat, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Twenty-second annual show displays over 60 quilts. Berkeley Public Library’s North Branch. 1170 The Alameda 644-6850 

 

“Tropical Visions: Images of AfroCaribbean Women in the Quilt Tapestries of Cherrymae Golston” Through May 28, Tu-Th, 1-7 p.m., Sat 12-4 p.m. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 12: Ike Oguine reads “A Squatter’s Tale”; May 14: Edie Meidav reads and signs “The Far Field: A Novel of Ceylon”; May 15: Kathleen Norris discusses “The Virgin of Bennington”; May 16: Tim Flannery describes “The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples”; May 17: Lalita Tademy reads “Cane River”; May 18: Oscar London, M.D. copes with “From Voodoo to Viagra: The Magic of Medicine”; May 21: Ariel Dorfman reads “Blakes Therapy”  

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. 559-9500 All events at 7 p.m., unless noted May 17: Jean Shinoda Bolen talks about “Goddesses In Older Women: Archetypes in Women Over Fifty”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 12: Krandall Kraus will read “Love’s Last Chance: A Nigel & Nicky Mystery”; May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or www.bookpride.com  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”; May 29, 7 - 9 p.m.: Travel Photo Workshop with Joan Bobkoff. $15 registration fee  

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 17: Gregory Listach Gayle with host Mark States; May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo; May 31: Connie Post with host Louis Cuneo Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

Rhythm & Muse Open Mike May 12, 6:30 p.m. An ongoing open mike series, featuring poet/artist Anca Hariton. Free Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 527-9753 

 

Adan David Miller and JoJo Doig May 20, 7 p.m. Poetry and spoken word. Ecology Center 2530 San Pablo 548-3333 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 13: Abbe Blum on “Tapping Into Creativity”; May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 


Multi-cultural singer reaches many with music

By Mary BarrettSpecial to the Daily Planet
Saturday May 12, 2001

José-Luis Orozco, a long time Berkeley musician, is an expert in bilingual education through music and song.  

Ever since he was a child in Mexico City, he’s been singing for multi-cultural audiences. The second of eleven children, Jose-Luis learned old songs from his grandmother. His mother taught him to interpret the spirit of the song. 

“My mother, though not a professional, was very good at singing the feeling of the music, from a slow Bolero (love song) to Mexican polkas,” Orozco said. “I picked up the energy of the music from her, the feeling.” 

Last week, Orozco brought that musical tradition to Washington School. People in the audience were awed by the performance. 

“He had the whole audience, whole families, up dancing to children’s songs like Itsy Bitsy Spider in Spanish and English. Nobody just sat. It was amazing!” said Pat Ungern, a teacher at the school.  

At 7, he and a brother were chosen to travel with the Mexico City Children’s Choir throughout Latin America, the Caribbean and Europe. They stayed with families – both rich and poor – and performed for heads of state and a diverse range of audiences.  

Traveling gave him opportunities that he could never have had at home. He learned church music in Latin, Mexican folk music, and sang world music including American folk songs like, “Home on the Range.” While in Spain, he was given a guitar as a gift and his father taught him to play once he arrived home.  

While touring, he also learned about politics. In Venezuela, the choir was turned back because of a coup. During the Bay of Pigs invasion, he was staying with Basque families in Spain.  

The families were progressive and sat up late at night listening for news about Cuba.  

The Cuban revolution was a very big thing, Orozco said, to people who lived whole lives under dictatorships.  

When his voice changed at 13, and he could no longer be part of the children’s choir, he formed a musical group with neighbors and played at various barrio gatherings. He attended evening music classes, but also worked to help his mother support the family. Life was not easy. 

In 1968, there was a student rebellion in Mexico City similar to rebellions around the world including the civil-rights movement and the anti-war movement in the United States. It ended in the massacre of many students, some of whom he knew, three blocks from his mother’s home.  

Jose-Luis’ father called him at work and told him not to go home because the army was searching for students and taking them from the neighborhood, even if they had not been part of the rebellion. He stayed away for three days. 

The sadness of that event coincided with a friend’s urging him to come to the United States. He and his mother decided it was something he should try. He moved to San Jose and mopped floors.  

After six months, lonely for music, he bought a cheap guitar and started singing at schools in the Bay Area. 

Quickly he discovered Berkeley. He went to Laney College and transferred to UC Berkeley to complete his Bachelor of Arts.  

Oscar Lewis’s book, “The Children of Sanchez,” was written about the barrio where his parents were born and raised and inspired Orozco’s strong interest in sociology.  

The University of San Francisco offered him a scholarship and he earned an Master of Arts in multi-cultural education. 

For several years in the 70s, he worked as a community liasion in Berkeley. He married and fathered three children – Jose-Luis, Maya, and Gabriel. He also co-founded a national Hispanic university and ran summer programs for the University in Gudalajara. 

In all of this mix, his interest in music became foremost and his ability to support himself through music was accomplished by the mid-80s. His politics, he said, is connected to his daily life education. He wrote a corrido, or ballad, for Cesar Chavez and for Dolores Huerta of the United Farm Worker’s Union. He will be performing them at La Peña Cultural Center on June 9.  

Orozco loves to sing to any age group, but the demand to sing to children is always the highest.  

“The most important thing about my music is the effect it has on the education of children,” Orozco said.  

“Seeing the joy in the children and then the joy in the teachers noticing the music’s impact on the children keeps me motivated. 

“Music brings down barriers between people, barriers of prejudice and racism. Music is a non-threatening tool. It brings people together, it makes people happy. All along, since I was very young, I’ve seen that music is magic,” he said. 

When Jose-Luis Orozco sings to children he is warm, engaging, and upbeat. He presents his music in a way that values children. He makes them feel important. They know, during his time with them, that they matter. He can take a dull classroom and fill it with color and light.  

He has been recording for years. The recordings for children are done simply with just his guitar and voice – a soothing combination, he’s been told.  

“They use my music to calm fussy babies, “ he said, laughing.  

One compact disc, “De Colores,” has sold over thirty thousand copies. There is a companion book with songs in Spanish with English translations. The illustrations by Elsia Kleven are richly conceived and whimsical. One song from this collection, “Paz y libertad,” has a life of its own. People have been dancing to it at circle dance gatherings for years never knowing that José-Luis Orozco wrote it. 

His oldest son, Luis, has been managing his business for him.  

“Luis is an excellent organizer,” Orozco said, bragging. “And he has great people skills. Even when he was twelve people would ask him questions and he would explain everything to them.” 

Dual immersion programs, the best model for dual language acquisiton, are flowering in schools throughout the United States. Three of Berkeley’s schools have programs; Orozco’s youngest son, Pablo, is at Cragmont’s. And because Orozco is emerging as the foremost educator in Spanish-English music for children, he is highly sought after. He has song recently in New York City, Houston, and Miami, and, unpredictably, a dual immersion school in Anchorage, Alaska. 

At 52, Orozco is realizing that the possibilites for his music are limitless. He wants to keep on creating and letting his music provide continuity across generations.  

He feels he’s reached two generations already, his and that of his children. He’s working on his third. His daughter’s new born son is one baby he’s singing to already. 

You can hear José-Luis Orozco in a Benefit Concert for Centro Vida-Bahai, a child care, at the Freight and Salvage, 1111 Addison Street on June 2 at 11:00a.m. Call 524-7300 information.


Cal women drop to 10th place after two rounds

Daily Planet Wire Services
Saturday May 12, 2001

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – No. 25 Cal shot a 312 in the second round of the NCAA Central Regional Friday to drop from eighth to 10th place (621) with the final round of the 21-team tournament slated for Saturday. The Bears are only one stroke back of being one of eight teams to advance to the NCAA Championship, May 23-26, in Florida.  

The Tulsa Golden Hurricane turned in the best round of the day Friday, a three-over-par 291, and moved into first place with a two-day score of 591. Led by the regional’s individual leader, Stacy Prammanasudh, with a two-day, two-under-par total of 142, the Golden Hurricane blew into a four-stroke lead over first-day leader Purdue (595). The tournament host settled for a 12-over 300 on Friday, five strokes off their first-day total.  

Prammanasudh carded a 72 Friday after a 70 Thursday to hold a one-stroke lead over Heather Zielinski of Purdue, who fired a 71 Friday after a 72 Thursday for a two-day total of 143. California sophomore Vikki Laing (72-73=145) is part of a four-way tie for third place. If the tournament ended today, Laing would be one of two individuals earning bids from non-advancing teams to the NCAA Championship.  

The Bears next best golfer is sophomore Ria Quiazon, who is tied for 38th (156) after duplicating her opening round of 78.  

Moving into third place heading into the final 18 holes was Oklahoma State (599), followed by New Mexico State (602), Texas (608), Kent State (608), Louisiana State (610), Oklahoma (620), Baylor (620) and California (621), rounding out the top 10.


Quilting group brings parents together to talk school, kids

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Saturday May 12, 2001

The huge galaxy of volunteer committees that serve Berkeley public schools give parents a chance to bring professional expertise to bear on a baffling range of problems.  

Computer gurus keep computer labs running, botanists help maintain school gardens, artists recruit talent for school assemblies, CPAs help oversee the district’s budgeting process.  

The PTA, the mightiest committee of all, dabbles a bit in everything. 

But where would the PTA committees be without the quilters – that small group of parents that come together at the beginning of each school year to choose fabric and patterns for a school quilt to be raffled off at a spring carnival. 

At Jefferson elementary school, where the quilting tradition goes back so far that 10-year veterans can’t recall its origins, a quilt whose raw materials cost about $5 helped raise more than $5,000 for the school’s PTA last year.  

Over the years, John Muir, Thousand Oaks and Cragmont and other Berkeley Schools have adopted the tradition of raffling quilts to raise money each spring as well.  

This year Jefferson PTA President Matthew Wong expects the school’s quilt to be one of the biggest enticements – right up there with the tickets to Disneyland – for people to snatch up the schools raffle tickets. 

But more than just a fund raising mechanism, the Jefferson quilt is literally part of the fabric of the school. It is a way for parents without the time or the taste for PTA meetings to come together, share ideas and demonstrate support for their children’s school. 

“PTA meetings are not as fun as the quilting circle,” said Melissa Quilter (yes, that’s her real name), a driving force behind the Jefferson quilt for the last nine years. “It builds community, allows for connections to get built.” 

Carrie Blake, a 10-year veteran of the Jefferson quilting effort until her youngest child moved on to middle school last year, agreed. 

“It’s low key,” Blake said. “It was kind of a way for me to introduce myself that didn’t require me to be on a big committee where I had to talk a lot.” 

At Jefferson, Quilter and other experienced quilters gather the various fabric pieces for the quilt into piles and assign one student responsibility for sewing each foot-wide square – usually with the help of a parent or grand parent. Later parents gather in the evening at Jefferson to complete the careful work of hand stitching all the squares together into a quilt. These are the members of the so-called “quilting circle.” 

Parents who pick their children up at school are, Quilter said, “invited to come early and stay late and really spend time at the school. It’s a forum to discuss school issue, neighborhood issues, etc.” 

“We kind of had our own PTA,” Blake said. “We’d assess teachers, swap stories, talk about what we thought students should be doing.” 

It was a fun and welcoming environment for parents, Blake said, with more than a hint of nostalgia in her voice. One of Blake’s children is a student at Berkeley High School today, a place where Blake said she has yet to figure out how to become involved in school activities.  

“My child is totally against me setting foot on campus,” she joked.  

The Jefferson quilts are typically finished in early April, in time to be part of annual exhibition of locally made quilts at the North Branch of the Berkeley Public Library.  

For those interested in seeing the 60 quilts on display this year, today is your last chance. The quilts come down Monday. The North Branch library, located at 1170 The Alameda, is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays. 

But the quilts on display, to the dismay of many visitors, are not for sale. If you want a shot at winning one of the elementary school quilts, pick up a raffle ticket at the Jefferson May Fair, today from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1400 Ada Street; or at Cragmont’s Spring Carnival Day, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. today, at Cragmont School, 830 Regal Road. 


Bears led by senior, freshman

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Saturday May 12, 2001

The Cal women’s tennis team heads into the postseason today with two leaders: one senior and one freshman. 

The senior is Anita Kurimay, who was named second-team All-Pac-10 this week. Kurimay overcame leg surgery early in the season to post a 10-4 singles record. The team’s lone senior, she has provided a steadying influence for the team’s five freshman, regaining her top spot after her surgery. 

The freshman is Raquel Kops-Jones, who held down the No. 1 spot during Kurimay’s six-match absence. Kops-Jones was also named to the conference’s second team, as well as taking home the freshman of the year award. She compiled a 27-14 record and made it to the finals of the Pac-10 singles tournament. 

Cal head coach Jan Brogan said she was surprised how fast Kops-Jones adapted to the top spot. 

“Raquel has really been a fast learner,” Borgan said. “She has professional aspirations, so she works very hard on her game, puts in a lot of extra time. When she came in, we knew she had a lot of talent, but was inconsistent. I've tried to bring out the consistency and mental edge she didn't have before.” 

The two leaders, old and young, teamed up with their strong doubles teammates to earn the No. 9 seed in the country, and are the top seed in their regional this weekend. Cal takes on Loyola (Maryland) today at 2 p.m. at the Hellman Tennis Courts. The regional’s other matchup will be North Carolina against Iowa at 10 a.m., with the winners meeting Sunday at 10 a.m. 

Cal’s doubles team of Catherine Lynch and Christina Fusano come into the weekend on a roll, having advanced to the final of the Pac-10 doubles tournament. And they aren’t the only Bear doubles team that has played well this year. Cal’s other duo of Kristen Case and Morisa Yang made it to the semifinal match before falling to Lynch and Fusano. 

Case and Lynch are both freshmen, and Brogan has gone through the growing pains of playing five freshmen this year, along with Fusano and Yang being sophomores. All together, the Bears are the youngest team in the Pac-10. 

“Five freshman have played for us all year,” Brogan said. “I don't think any other team in the country can say that.”


Dad marches with moms against guns

By Jon Mays Daily Planet staff
Saturday May 12, 2001

It took Griffin Dix a year to get over the initial shock that his 15-year-old son Kenzo was shot and killed by a friend with a gun that the friend’s father left loaded and unlocked.  

The friend took a full clip out of his father’s Beretta and put in an empty one. What he didn’t know was that there was a bullet left in chamber. The shot went through Kenzo’s arm and entered his heart 

Kenzo died at Oakland’s Children’s Hospital that day. That was 1994.  

“The boy was tricked by the design of the gun but also his father was able to buy a gun without getting gun safety training,” he said. “He didn’t know how to minimize the risk of bringing a gun into the home.”  

Since 1995, Dix has been on a crusade to force gun manufacturers to install better safety mechanisms and to require that all gun owners get the proper training to ensure that tragedies like Dix’s do not happen again.  

He has worked with state and local legislators to tighten gun laws and helped the San Francisco General Hospital’s Bell campaign and trauma foundation’s effort against gun violence.  

That organization recently joined forces with the Million Mom March, a national organization dedicated to preventing gun death and trauma and supporting gun trauma victims and survivors. 

 

Once a professor of anthropology at Santa Clara University, Dix now spends much of his time organizing efforts to require personal gun locks. He also wants gun ownership to require safety testing similar to what motorists must undergo. 

“Guns and automobiles are very dangerous. If people are going to use them, they should know how,” he said.  

Today, Dix will be making signs and preparing for a train journey to Sacramento in which members of the Million Mom March will present letters and petitions to state legislators. His group will be leaving Jack London Square in Oakland at 8:45 a.m. on Sunday. 

Last year, the million mom march brought more than 750,000 people to Washington, D.C., and Dix hopes the number will be in even greater this year. He also expects that 5,000 people will show up in Sacramento.  

Dix, who is suing the Beretta gun manufacturer to get them to allow locks and chamber loader indicators on their guns. That battle has been uphill, Dix said, because the gun industry is resistant to putting changes in. Dix filed the lawsuit in 1997. While a jury ruled against him, a judge threw out the verdict because there was an indication that there was some jury misconduct. That decision is currently being appealed by Beretta, he said.  

Dix, 57, is a walking encyclopedia of gun-related knowledge and can regurgitate stats like the percentage increase in Oakland gun deaths last year (55 percent) and the percentage of guns that are unlocked with a child in the house (43 percent). While Dix does not advocate the abolition of guns in the home or handguns, he does support proposed legislation that would enact greater control. He is also working on a book on gun violence based on his experience. And although it often takes a tragedy like the shootings at Columbine and Santana high schools to bring attention to gun violence, Dix said he has hope that things will change. 

“People’s attention wanes, but we still have loopholes in gun laws. With the Bush administration not willing to close the loopholes, people are discouraged,” he said. “But they need to realize that there’s a lot that can be done.” 

For more information on the Million Mom March call 655-6520.


Late rally snaps skid

Daily Planet Wire Services
Saturday May 12, 2001

EUGENE, Ore. - The No. 6 California Golden Bears scored three times in the top of the seventh to break a 4-4 tie to eventually defeat the Oregon Ducks, 7-4, at Howe Field on Friday afternoon.  

With the win, the Bears snap a three-game Pac-10 skid and improve to 49-13 overall and 6-12 in the conference. The loss drops the Ducks to 28-38 overall, 1-18 in Pac-10 play.  

Cal jumped out to an early 1-0 lead in the first on an RBI double by junior Candace Harper, scoring senior Pauline Dueñas from second after singling one batter earlier and moving to second on a passes ball.  

Oregon took the lead in their half of the first, 2-1. Alyssa Laux hit her first home run on the year, bringing in Lynsey Haij who singed earlier in the inning.  

The score remained 2-1 until Cal plated three runs in the fifth to take a 4-2 lead. With two outs, senior Paige Bowie homered to deep right center to tie the score at two apiece. Dueñas followed with her second single of the game and scored on a Harper single and a throwing error by the Oregon right fielder. Harper moved to second on the error as well and later scored the third run in the inning when sophomore Veronica Nelson lined a single in front of the right fielder.  

The Ducks knotted the score at four, with a two spot in the sixth, but the Bears answered with three runs in the seventh highlighted by a two-RBI two-out double by sophomore Courtney Scott to right center to bring home Nelson and Harper. Bowie scored the first run in the inning on a shortstop fielder's choice who threw the ball away at the plate trying to Bowie out on the play.  

Junior Jocelyn Forest started for Cal and went the first four innings, allowing two runs on four hits while striking out four, before giving way to senior Nicole DiSalvio who pitched the remaining three innings of two run (one earned), four hit ball to earn the win and improve to 18-6 on the year.  

Connie McMurren went the distance for the Duck and falls to 8-18 with the loss.  

Bowie, Dueñas and Harper each had two hits on the day, while Nelson, sophomore Eryn Manahan and Scott added one hit each for a total of nine hits in the game for the Bears.  

Cal completes the regular season tomorrow with a doubleheader versus the Oregon State Beavers in Corvallis, Ore. Game one is scheduled to get under way at noon.


John Woolley House conveys layers of history

By Susan Cerny
Saturday May 12, 2001

The John Woolley House stands forlornly between a weedy empty lot and a large parking lot.  

The paint is peeling and it is somewhat hidden behind a sagging board fence.  

But this simple, dignified, Italianate Victorian house, an officially designated Berkeley Landmark, remains a visible link to the past. 

The house conveys layers of national, state and local cultural history.  

John Woolley’s life story is a record of a single individual’s pursuit of the American Dream which began in 1850 when he left his native England and went to Philadelphia where he worked as a boiler maker and blacksmith. In 1852 he sought his fortune in California.  

In California Woolley’s story is intertwined with the story of how California, the Bay Area and Berkeley developed over time.  

He worked for Southern Pacific Railroad and the Spring Water Company – both vital enterprises to the growth of California and the Bay Area.  

Woolley’s Oakland Boiler Works provided boilers for early campus buildings. After settling in Berkeley in 1876, he was involved in civic activities and in the establishment of public schools.  

The present location of the John Woolley House, facing Haste Street, (it originally faced Telegraph Avenue) reflects Berkeley’s growth in the 1890s.  

t is the story of Telegraph Avenue, the introduction of electric streetcars, the grading of streets and the general growth of the city’s population after the 1906 earthquake.  

John Woolley lived in this house until his death in 1912 at the age of 85. Members of the Woolley family lived in the house until 1943 and it remained a private home until 1993. 

The house remains a singular physical artifact in this neighborhood that links the distant past to the present; the story of how, why, and by whom a place is settled, planned, designed, and celebrated. If the house did not exist would anyone bother to tell its story?


Inventor trying to harness energy

Bay City News
Saturday May 12, 2001

A Berkeley inventor has started a company to harness the power in ocean waves to provide renewable energy to coastal communities. 

Mirko Previsic, chief executive officer of Sea Power and Associates, says the company's patented method uses a series of buoys that are driven up and down by the waves. That activity is then channeled through a hydraulic pump that converts the motion energy into electricity. 

Previsic says he's hopeful that each yard of coastline could power 20 homes, cutting down on greenhouse gas emissions in the process. 

 

 

 

 

Sanjay Wagle, who is chief financial officer at Sea Power, is also optimistic: “We've tested our prototype at half scale in the world's largest wave tank,” he said. “Now we're ready to put it into the ocean.” 

Their plan won top honors this weekend at the Haas Social Venture Competition, a national competition sponsored by the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. 

 


Hispanics, blacks over-represented in San Diego traffic stops

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

SAN DIEGO — Hispanics and blacks are over-represented in traffic stops, but there isn’t enough evidence to conclude racism is the cause, the police chief said Friday. 

A year-long analysis showed blacks last year made up 11.7 percent of traffic stops but 8 percent of San Diego’s population while Hispanics totaled 29 percent of stops and 20 percent of the population, Chief David Bejarano said at a news conference. 

Blacks were also subjected to 26 percent of vehicle searches following traffic stops while Hispanics made up 32.7 percent, Bejarano said. 

Whites, at nearly 59 percent of San Diego’s population, were subjected to 48 percent of the stops and 33 percent of the searches, according to the study. 

But the results, which mirror an earlier six-month study, do not prove racism because other factors, such as the city’s proximity to the U.S.-Mexico border and the high number of tourists, make it difficult to measure the ethnic breakdown of the driving population, he said. 

In addition, the new 2000 census data could change the study’s results, which were based on 1998 estimates of San Diego’s ethnic composition from a local government association. 

“There’s just too many factors we can’t explain,” Bejarano said. 

San Diego was one of the first large cities in the nation to begin collecting racial data from traffic stops and the chief deserves credit for the study, said Jimma McWilson, executive vice president of the San Diego Urban League. 

“There is a real problem here and we have to find out the reason for it,” said McWilson, who is a member of a task force appointed by the chief to advise the department on ethnic issues. 

The study noted little difference in the amount of contraband found during vehicle searches.  

Officers found something illegal in 12.7 percent of searches involving Asians; 15.9 percent for blacks; 12.6 percent for Hispanics and 17.4 percent for whites. 

The police and community groups will continue studying the issue while the department also increases racial sensitivity training for officers and new recruits, the chief said. 

But Bejarano, the city’s first Hispanic chief, said he doubts there is widespread racism among San Diego officers. 

“I truly believe that our department does not engage in racial profiling,” he said. 

The study was based on an analysis by three university professors of 168,901 vehicle stop forms filled out by officers on Bejarano’s orders in 2000.


Both California unemployment, jobs up in April

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

SACRAMENTO — California’s unemployment rate jumped slightly in April, but the number of people with jobs also increased, state officials said Friday. 

The unemployment rate climbed from 4.7 percent in March to 4.8 percent in April, according to the state’s Employment Development Department. The rate was 5 percent in April 2000. 

At the same time, the number of people with jobs increased last month, according to surveys of employers and households. 

The survey of households, which includes people who are self-employed, found that a record 16.5 million Californians were working last month, up by 21,000 from March and by 379,000 from April 2000. 

There were 834,000 who were unemployed and looking for work. That total was up 16,000 from March but down 13,000 from April of last year. 

Nationally, the unemployment rate was 4.5 percent last month. 

Suzanne Schroeder, a spokeswoman for the department, said the growth in both employment and unemployment figures in California was caused by an increase in the number of workers. 

“Over the month we had a 37,000 increase in the labor force and 21,000 found jobs. That meant that there was an increase of 16,000 that did not find jobs,” she said. 

The department said five industry divisions – construction, wholesale and retail trade, services and government – added jobs during the month while transportation and public utilities reported no change. 

Mining, manufacturing and finance, insurance and real estate reported job losses. 

The services industry added 10,900 jobs, the biggest job gain, while manufacturing had the biggest loss, 7,000 jobs. 

—— 

On the Net: See the figures at www.edd.ca.gov 


GOP lays low in power crisis while Dems take heat

The Associated Pres
Saturday May 12, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Republicans from the state Legislature to the White House are standing back as California’s Democratic leaders, including Gov. Gray Davis, sweat out the power crisis. 

“The last thing anybody would want to do is step onto the Titanic when it is sinking,” said California GOP strategist Mike Madrid. 

Neither President Bush nor Vice President Dick Cheney has visited the nation’s largest state since taking office. State GOP lawmakers have voted against Davis’ energy proposals, but have yet to offer their own comprehensive power package. 

Even Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Jones, who has pledged to focus on energy in his campaign to unseat Davis next year, has not held a single public event since announcing his candidacy in March. 

“We intend to let (Davis) do as much as he can to unravel himself,” said Shawn Steel, chairman of the California Republican Party. 

At all levels, GOP officials seems to be adhering to Woodrow Wilson’s political advice: “Never attempt to murder a man who is committing suicide.” 

In Washington, where Congress and the White House are controlled by Republicans, GOP lawmakers are expressing concern they could become the victims of a backlash by voters angry about rising electricity prices and sporadic blackouts. 

Some Republican lawmakers have begun urging the White House to address short-term energy concerns as well as longer-term problems when the president unveils his energy plan next week. 

But Chris Arterton, dean of the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University, said Republicans will do as little possible to help save California and Davis — a potential Democratic presidential candidate in 2004. 

“If you can keep him dangling on the horns of that dilemma that he is on as long as possible, it weakens him,” Arterton said. 

The Republicans are not the only ones playing politics. For their part, the Democrats have pointed out at every turn that it was Republican Gov. Pete Wilson who signed into law the 1996 electricity deregulation plan that led in part to the current crisis. 

State GOP lawmakers have focused on attacking Democratic energy proposals rather than offering their own legislation. Assembly Republicans have held several news conferences accusing Davis of waiting too long to attack the power crisis. 

This week, all but one of the 44 Republican state legislators voted against a $13.4 billion bond measure to repay the state treasury for power buys. 

The measure passed, but not by the two-thirds majority it needed to go into effect immediately, leaving Davis and Democrats plucking from the budgets of other state programs to pay for power until at least August. 

After Davis signed the bond bill, Assembly Republican Leader Dave Cox called it “a dangerous gamble for California — a gamble Republicans couldn’t support without a clear endgame.” 

Republicans have attacked Democratic energy proposals as “anti-capitalistic,” including a proposed tax on windfall profits and potential criminal charges against power generators for alleged price gouging. 

Garry South, Davis’ chief campaign adviser, calls the GOP’s hands-off approach “indefensible.” 

“This is not just some matter of political positioning. This is about the solvency and the economic future of the state of California,” South said. “To be playing games with this just to make cheap political points is a very dangerous game.” 

Davis lashed out this week at Republicans after signing the law authorizing the revenue bonds. 

“The people of California have every right to expect us to put aside this partisan affiliation and philosophy in solving this serious crisis. To date, the Republicans have miserably failed that test,” Davis said. 

Democrats also are quick to point out that President Clinton visited the state more than 60 times during his two terms, including 28 days after he first took office. 

“If the eight years of Clinton/Gore is any indication, President Gore would have established residence in California until the problems were solved,” said California Democratic Party Chairman Art Torres.


Rate hikes set to hit businesses

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Like prisoners before a judge, lawyers representing farmers, manufacturers and small businesses appealed for leniency Friday as California’s top power regulators mulled who will suffer most under the largest electricity rate hike in state history. 

The higher rates are set to appear on bills June 1, but the California Public Utilities Commission will announce Monday just what kinds of users – homeowners, manufacturers, retailers – will bear the brunt of the increase. 

“We defined a bigger pie, and this is a pie that nobody wants to eat,” PUC President Loretta Lynch said in an interview. “All the groups that are here today are saying why they don’t want to eat a piece.” 

The commission is struggling to collect enough money to keep the lights on, return the state’s largest utilities to solvency and reimburse state coffers for the $5.2 billion-and-counting it has spent buying power directly from energy companies. 

On March 27, commissioners voted unanimously to raise the rates. Since then, they have grappled with how much more each kind of customer should pay. This week, Lynch proposed rate increases that would boost residential bills on average 35-40 percent. The hikes affect customers of Pacific Gas and Electric Co. and Southern California Edison Co., but not San Diego Gas and Electric Co. 

But under Lynch’s plan, as many as half of the 9 million customers of PG&E and SoCal Edison would not see their bills rise at all. And the heaviest commercial users could pay rates more than 50 percent higher than present. 

Saying they will bear a disproportionate burden, business groups trooped before the PUC on Friday, asking regulators to foist more of the rate hikes onto residential users. 

Each industry also explained why it should be spared. Mobile home parks will have difficulty implementing the proposed rate structure, which would create five tiers to encourage conservation; food processors will suffer because they only use power during the summer harvest, when rates will be jacked up; representatives of small businesses and emergency service providers told similar stories.


Power woes, economy force tough state budget choices

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

SACRAMENTO — With a sagging economy and billions of state dollars flowing to buy power, Gov. Gray Davis is facing tough budget choices and possible cuts for the first time since he took office. 

Davis is making final changes this weekend to his “May revise” budget, which is to be released Monday after months of building concern about the state’s financial health. 

The governor’s aides have declined to give any hints about the revised budget despite their past practice of leaking details in the days leading up to its release. 

Lawmakers and state Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill have warned that lawmakers will need to shave billions from Davis’ 2001-02 budget proposal made in January. 

“Since the early 1990s, we haven’t had to contemplate a downturn of this magnitude,” said Assemblyman Tony Cardenas, an Arleta Democrat who chairs the joint committee writing the state’s budget. “We will have to shift some dollars or, unfortunately, cut some dollars.” 

In January, Davis proposed a $104.7 billion budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. It included $5.5 billion in new spending. 

Under Davis’ original proposal, at least part of the sales tax would be suspended for the last weekend in August this year to let consumers save up to 8 1/4 percent on clothes and computer equipment. 

He also proposed lengthening the middle school academic year and dedicating $335 million to start a three-year, $875 million effort to improve training of reading and math teachers and school principals. 

To keep the state from slipping into the red, lawmakers will be forced to trim at least $1.5 billion from the initial budget proposals made by Davis in January, said Hill, the Legislature’s budget analyst. 

The shortfall could reach nearly $6 billion in 2002-03, Hill said. 

The Senate’s Budget Committee chairman, Sen. Steve Peace, D-El Cajon, predicted an even gloomier picture and said cuts of $2 billion to $4 billion will be needed in this year’s budget. 

Once Davis releases his revised budget, a joint legislative committee will approve its own version of the budget that will be subject to approval by the full Legislature and the governor. 

Meanwhile, Davis has spent the week leading up to the revise blaming Republicans for budget uncertainty. Specifically, he criticized Republican lawmakers for opposing a $13.4 billion bond package to reimburse the state treasury for power buys. 

This week, all but one of the 44 Republican state legislators voted against the measure. It passed, but not by the two-thirds majority it needed to go into effect immediately, leaving Davis and Democrats borrowing from other state programs to pay for power until at least August. 

“We’re going to have to pare back important programs in our budget since we won’t have the cash July 1,” Davis said Thursday. “Running away and playing politics does not serve anyone’s interest, in fact it further complicates the budget and could well do damage to the economy.” 

Republicans, however, have criticized Davis’ budget. 

“The governor has given a green light to tax increases and runaway spending increases,” said Assemblyman George Runner, R-Lancaster, vice chairman of the Assembly Budget Committee, during a press conference Tuesday. 


10,000 Kias recalled

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

IRVINE — Kia Motors America on Friday voluntarily recalled 9,461 Optima mid-sized sedans built this year because of problems with wire harnesses that might prevent air bags from working properly. 

Customers were being notified by mail, Kia spokesman Geno Effler said. 

Driver’s side air bags might be damaged by the seat adjustment mechanism, Effler said.  

If harnesses are not repaired, driver’s side air bags might fail to deploy in a crash or deploy without a crash. 

Effler said the defect was discovered during a routine assessment. He did not know why these particular Optimas had the harness problem and others did not. 

 

Owners were being asked to take their cars to a Kia dealership for the correction. 


Future of gill-netters rests on research into new net

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

ASTORIA, Ore. — Fingers moved frantically through 35 feet of nylon netting, seeking the wild spring chinook salmon trapped inside. 

Vince Tarabochia got there first, but rather than violently pulling the webbing from around the mouth of the 20-pound fish, he tore several strands of the $500 net to free it. 

As gently as a doctor treating a patient, fish biologist Jeff Whisler lowered the salmon into a box of cool, circulating river water and watched as it oriented itself and began swimming softly into the artificial current. 

Within minutes, Whisler was dropping the fish back into the Columbia River. One whip of its strong tail and the salmon dove out of sight, to resume its upriver journey. 

“Wow,” said Whisler, a biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “This really does work.” 

It had better. The future of 550 lower Columbia River gill-netters in Oregon and Washington is riding on the success of Tarabochia and 19 other research teams. 

The new net that Tarabochia and his brother Brian are testing is designed to allow commercial gill-netters to catch and release wild salmon. If the experiment works, it would allow an industry that has jeopardized endangered salmon to improve its practices. 

Call it environmental gill-netting, a paradox to critics of traditional commercial fishing that transfers salmon from the river to the market. 

“This is absolutely the way we’re going to have to operate from now on,” said Brian Tarabochia, 33, a fourth-generation fisherman from Astoria. 

The states of Oregon and Washington, with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, are experimenting with tangle-netting, a new commercial fishing technique developed in British Columbia to aid beleaguered fish runs on the Fraser River. 

Instead of using nets with larger mesh to catch salmon by the gills, suffocating them, the mesh of the experimental nets is much smaller. It tangles in the fish’s teeth and around its mouth, snaring the salmon without mortal injuries. 

Participating fishermen buy one net of their own and add to it one of a slightly different size bought with BPA money.  

The efficiency of the nets will be compared to find the ideal mesh.  

 

Designed for the gills of much smaller fish, each net typically lasts only a few trips. 

Tangled fish are brought aboard, where those with all fins intact are placed into the water of the recovery box. Salmon missing their adipose fins — a small, unused flap in front of the tail that is clipped before young hatchery fish are released — are kept and sold. 

Twenty commercial boats, selected by lottery from among 50 applicants, are participating in the research this season. 

Farther upriver, near Bonneville Dam, two gill-net boats are catching, tagging and releasing salmon to determine how many of the revived fish die after being released. 

Carl Schreck, an Oregon State University fisheries professor, said little is known about what damage is done by removing scales or the salmon’s protective coating of slime. 

“It would become more problematic as the water warms up,” he said. “I think it would be OK, though, in these temperatures. Those fish are pretty doggone hardy right now.” 

Steve King, Oregon’s salmon manager, said the research is critical to the survival of the nontribal commercial fishery. “Beginning next year, in 2002, they aren’t going to be allowed to keep unclipped fish,” King said. 

The Columbia’s tribal fishermen will send observers to Astoria to view the process, but a spokesman said they were not interested in participating, nor required to. 

“We don’t advocate for any catch and release,” said Charles Hudson, a spokesman for the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. “The salmon comes back to either give itself up or to spawn. To judge a fish by the mutilation of a clipped fin is not in keeping with the tribal view of the completion of a life cycle. It’s at the heart of the spiritual question.” 

John Skidmore, a biologist for the BPA who is handling much of the salmon-recovery funding, said the $356,794 tangle-net experiment is one of the ways the agency is trying to help endangered salmon. “We have to attack the problem on all fronts,” he said. 

On the boat, Brian Tarabochia said not all Oregon and Washington gill-netters are likely to participate. “Some of them think it’s being rammed down their throats,” he said. “But we’re not going to fish without this.” 

——— 

On the Net: 

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ 

Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission: http://www.critfc.org/ 


At turning point, wolf recovery project needs change

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

PHOENIX — With the first significant number of wild-born pups expected this spring, scientists say a program aimed at restoring the Mexican gray wolf to its native Southwest is at a turning point. 

An independent preliminary report by three biologists concluded that the 3-year-old effort needs changes to ensure the pups survive and the project succeeds. Federal wildlife officials agree. 

“What’s really going to make the program succeed in the long run is having animals born in the wild,” said Brian Kelly, head of the program for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

The challenge is to switch the program’s direction from reintroduction to minimizing the endangered wolves’ contact with humans, including people who have shot them, campers who feed them and rangers who have had to recapture them too often. 

The Mexican gray wolf, a German shepherd-sized predator that once roamed throughout the U.S. Southwest and central Mexico, was hunted to near extinction in the 1950s.  

The only surviving animals lived in zoos or wildlife sanctuaries. 

Federal officials began working to change that in 1998, when they released 11 wolves in eastern Arizona’s Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. 

They wanted the animals to learn to hunt and mate again in the wild. Their goal was to have a population of 100 wild wolves in the forest area within 10 years. 

The program got off to a rough start, however, as ranchers began complaining that the wolves would kill livestock. Other problems followed. 

Five wolves were shot and the rest had to be recaptured, some because they were coming too close to people and livestock, that there were no wolves left in the wilderness at one point during the first year, said Kelly. 

Today, there are at least 26 wolves in the wild and they’re showing signs of adapting to life without humans.  

They’re eating elk and deer and, most importantly, they’re forming pairs, conceiving and nursing pups on their own. 

“They’re beginning to do what we were helping them to do,” said Kelley, though he added it will be years before the wolf is removed from the endangered species list. 

Since scientists expect six wild-born litters this spring and an average litter consists of four to six pups, the Mexican wolf’s population could conceivably double if most of the pups survive. 

The biologists’ report, which will be completed and released next month, said that requires leaving them alone more because too many recaptures disrupt their adaptation to the wild. 

Wolves are recaptured primarily when they stray from their recovery area or when they attack cattle.  

So the study suggests they might be allowed to roam in larger areas and not be captured if they scavenge livestock carcasses. The study even suggests that wolves only be removed if they threaten humans. 

But some ranchers who opposed the program from the beginning said that the rules are already so restrictive that the wolves can’t even be shot for attacking pets. 

 

 

 

 

“How much more are they going to inflict on everything and everybody?” said Barbara Marks, an Alpine rancher and a spokeswoman for the Arizona Cattlemen’s Association. “I couldn’t stand there and watch a wolf kill one of my dogs. We’ve no need for another predator.” 

Biologists and environmentalists say the Southwest needs wolves to maintain a natural balance. 

“Wolves are efficient landscape managers,” said Defenders of Wildlife spokesman Craig Miller. He said wolves help keep elk populations in check, which in turns reduces grazing and improves air and water quality. 

Kelly said learning to live with wolves also signals a new policy toward endangered species. 

“Our resolve to do something so controversial reflects that we’ve the wherewithal to live with something that competes with us humans,” Kelly said. 

The scientists’ report will be released next month and the Fish and Wildlife Service plans to hold public meetings in Arizona and New Mexico to discuss it. 

Members of the Arizona Game and Fish Commission will study the preliminary report at their monthly meeting Saturday. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction: http://ifw2es.fws.gov/MexicanWolf/ 


Medicare agency prepaid for dead

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — Over the past decade, the government paid a total of $4.1 million to cover future medical costs for patients who had already died, government inspectors said Friday. 

The Health Care Financing Administration made the payments to health maintenance organizations on patients’ behalf even though Medicare listed the beneficiaries as dead, the Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General said. 

The Medicare agency paid premiums for roughly 200 people who had died between 1991 and 1999, the report said. 

The main Medicare database listed the patients as dead, but a smaller HHS database of HMO participants didn’t always square the deaths with the master Medicare database, the report said. 

The report said $3.2 million of the misdirected funds are still outstanding, but officials at the Health Care Financing Administration said they have recovered $4 million to date. 

And the agency has improved its matching of records, officials said. 

“The most recent monthly run of our utility shows no payments made for deceased beneficiaries,” Michael McMullan, acting deputy administrator of HCFA, told the inspector general’s office. 

Officials said they also expect to recover money paid for patients who had died but were not listed in the report. 

Medicare provides health insurance for 40 million elderly and disabled Americans. Most payments are reimbursements made to doctors and hospitals for Medicare’s share of approved patient services. 

In a program designed to attract HMOs to the program, Medicare pays the health plans a set monthly rate per person to deliver medical services.  

About 5.6 million seniors are served by more than 170 health plans nationwide, HCFA officials said. 

The report studied the four states, Arizona, California, Colorado and Florida, with the highest market saturation; 43 percent of the seniors served by HMOs getting such payments live in those states. 

 

The report said an unidentified plan in California received $330,957 from 1991 through October 2000 for dead beneficiaries. 

Inspectors say the discrepancies were noticed in routine regional checks on the HMO program. The report does not assign any blame to the HMOs that receive payments from Medicare. 

Health plan officials said they support efforts to make sure payments are accurate and adequate. 

“To that end this report highlights why regulatory reform and reform of HCFA should be an integral part of any Medicare modernization effort,” said Phil Blando, a spokesman for the American Association of Health Plans. 

Last month, investigations by HHS and Congress showed that felons and fugitives received millions of dollars in Medicare benefits, despite federal laws prohibiting most of them from receiving the health benefit. 

—— 

On the Net: 

Health Care Financing Administration: http://www.hcfa.gov/ 

Health and Human Services Inspector General: http://www.dhhs.gov/progorg/oig/ 


U.S. plans new AIDS contribution

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — With the Nigerian president and the United Nations secretary-general at his side, President Bush on Friday pledged $200 million – and promised more money later – for fighting AIDS and other diseases ravaging Africa. 

The U.S. pledge is seed money for a $7 billion to $10 billion fund that U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan hopes the world’s richest nations and private philanthropists will establish to fight AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Annan also is trying to drum up support for an international action plan to be adopted at a June 25-27 special session of the U.N. General Assembly. 

“Across the world at this moment there are people in true desperation and we must help,” Bush said during a Rose Garden ceremony. 

Activists sniffed at Bush’s promise for future funding and called the $200 million a pittance. A hodgepodge of protesters milled in front of the White House gate, chanting, “Billions for Star Wars, chump change for AIDS,” a reference to the missile defense system Bush has said he wants. 

“In the face of what will soon be the worst plague in human history, it’s tragic that the richest country in human history is unwilling to contribute its fair share to finance the solution,” said Salih Booker, executive director of the nonprofit advocacy group Africa Action. 

Even Annan and Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo gently prodded for more. 

“As we declare global war on AIDS, we will need a war chest to fight it,” Annan said. “We need a response that matches the challenge.” 

Obasanjo estimated that $7 billion to $8 billion will be needed each year “to make an impression” on the epidemic. “But, with this beginning, and just the beginning, I thank you on behalf of all AIDS sufferers in the world, but particularly on behalf of all AIDS sufferers in Africa,” he told Bush. 

Harvard University economist Jeffrey Sachs said the size of the initial donation was not as important as the fact that it represents a new approach to fighting AIDS. 

“There is no doubt in my mind that the $200 million is not sufficient. And there is no doubt in my mind that there will be more money to come,” Sachs said, adding that the global fund will “raise the magnitude of the battle in a very important way.” 

Bush said the funds were “a founding contribution” outside of $760 million the United States was spending this year on international AIDS efforts, and billions devoted to AIDS research. He said the United States would give more “as we learn where our support can be most effective.” Bush noted that 11 million African children have lost their parents to AIDS. 

“In a part of the world where so many have suffered from war and want and famine, these latest tribulations are the cruelest of fates,” Bush said. “Only through sustained and focused international cooperation can we address problems so grave, and suffering so great.” 

House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt, D-Mo., cheered Bush’s announcement but encouraged the president to put sufficient federal resources into fighting AIDS immediately. America “has an obligation to lead this effort, we have the resources and now we must muster the will to devote them to this problem,” he said. 

Since the vast majority of people suffering from infectious diseases who cannot afford treatment are in Africa, the continent is expected to get a large share of the funds. Of 36 million people around the world infected with HIV, roughly 26 million live in Africa. 

Secretary of State Colin Powell will travel to Africa on May 22 to see the AIDS problem firsthand. He was to stop in Mali, South Africa, Kenya and Uganda. 

Friday’s announcement came while Bush, by greeting Obasanjo, held his first meeting with an African president. Bush said they discussed Nigeria’s plans to increase oil production, a move called “positive news for U.S. consumers” expecting to be squeezed by exorbitant fuel prices this summer. 

They also talked about U.S. support for Nigeria’s efforts on peacekeeping and conflict resolution in places such as Angola, Congo and Sierra Leone. “The short of it is that Nigeria is a friend of America, and the president is a friend of mine,” Bush said. 

“I now can feel that if there is any need to call on President Bush, he knows what I look like,” Obasanjo said. 

——— 

On the Net: State Department background on Nigeria: http://www.state.gov/www/background—notes/nigeria—0008—bgn.html 


EPA requires cleaner refineries

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency settled a case Friday in a Detroit federal court requiring seven petroleum refineries to reduce smokestack pollutants by more than 23,000 tons per year. 

Under the settlement, Marathon Ashland Petroleum LLC, of Findlay, Ohio, must spend an estimated $265 million to install pollution control equipment aimed at reducing emissions from smokestacks, wastewater vents, leaky valves and flares at its refineries which account for more than 5 percent of the total refining capacity in the United States. 

Those refineries are located in Robinson, Ill.; Garyville, La.; Texas City, Texas; Catlettsburg, Ky.; Detroit; Canton, Ohio; and St. Paul Park, Minn. 

The new equipment is intended to help ease respiratory problems like childhood asthma by cutting pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, particulate emissions, carbon monoxide, benzene and volatile organic compounds. 

Two states, Louisiana and Minnesota, and Wayne County, Mich., joined the consent decree filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Detroit and announced by the EPA and the Justice Department. 

Marathon Ashland also will pay a $3.8 million civil penalty under the Clean Air Act and spend about $6.5 million for environmental projects in communities near the refineries. Minnesota and Louisiana each will receive $50,000 of the penalty under the agreement. 

Attorney General John Ashcroft called it “a victory for the environment.” 

The case is part of EPA’s national effort to reduce harmful air pollution released from refineries, EPA Administrator Christie Whitman said. 

In March, the government reached similar agreements with Motiva Enterprises, Equilon Enterprises, and Deer Park Refining Limited Partnership, which will reduce air pollution at nine refineries across the nation. 

“The settlement also is expected to facilitate efficiency upgrades and increased production of gasoline over the next eight years,” Whitman said. 

Also Friday, the EPA and Justice Department announced it had reached a separate settlement filed in U.S. District Court in Benton, Ill., requiring Marathon Ashland to reduce benzene emissions at its refinery in Robinson, Ill. 

 

Marathon Ashland will pay a $1.67 million civil penalty under the Clean Air Act and spend another $125,000 on an emergency response project there. 

——— 

On the Net: 

EPA air quality site: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/uatw 

 


FBI ends up with more egg on their face

By Karen Gullo The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — For an agency still reeling from the discovery of an alleged spy in its ranks, the last thing the FBI needed was the disclosure that it withheld evidence from lawyers representing the man convicted of the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. 

Timothy McVeigh was scheduled to be executed by lethal injection on Wednesday. Now his lawyers are weighing whether to seek a stay of the execution, which would have been the first federal death sentence carried out since 1963. 

Attorney General John Ashcroft put off the execution until June 11 to allow McVeigh’s attorneys to review the evidence and ordered an investigation into the FBI’s failure to turn over thousands of pages to McVeigh’s defense team. 

“I know many Americans will question why the execution of someone who is so clearly guilty of such a heinous crime should be delayed,” Ashcroft said. He said he made his decision so that there would be no lingering questions over the case that “would cast a permanent cloud over justice.” 

The mishap comes a little more than a week after FBI Director Louis Freeh said he plans to retire in June – two years short of his 10-year term. Law enforcement officials familiar with the case said there was no connection between Freeh’s decision to retire and the problem with the McVeigh documents. 

The revelation shook the law enforcement establishment – and people waiting to see closure more than six years after a bomb destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168, including many women and children. 

“I’m appalled,” said Kathleen Treanor, who lost her 4-year-old daughter and her in-laws in the bombing.  

“The FBI knew from the very beginning that this was a huge case. How could they have possibly made a mistake this huge?” 

The documents mishap also follows the arrest in February of Robert Philip Hanssen, a 20-year veteran agent accused of selling national secrets to Moscow. 

Hanssen, a counterintelligence agent with access to highly sensitive information, carried on his alleged spying activities for 15 years without being detected by his bosses.  

Investigations are underway to figure out how. 

Other controversies, from a crime-lab scandal in the 1990s to the botched investigation last year of former Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee, have dogged the FBI in recent years. 

The revelation that some 3,135 investigation materials – including interview reports and physical evidence such as photographs, letters and tapes – were inadvertently withheld from McVeigh’s attorneys is another embarrassment for the FBI. 

Law enforcement officials familiar with the documents mishap, speaking only on condition of anonymity, said the mistake resulted from an antiquated records system. The FBI was in the routine process of gathering all documents from the Oklahoma City bombing investigation – numbering more than 1 million – from its bureaus when officials discovered that some pages had never been shared with defense lawyers. 

“One thing that’s overlooked here is that there were thousands and thousands of these statements that have to be stored and catalogued,” said Andrew Cohen, a legal analyst who has followed the case.  

“Certainly you don’t want to encourage the government to lose this sort of thing, but in some ways it’s a bit understandable.” 

As soon as the mistake was discovered, the bureau acted quickly to turn the documents over, the sources said.  

The Justice Department received the documents Wednesday and sent McVeigh’s attorneys copies of everything. 

The department says none of the documents creates any doubt about McVeigh’s conviction or sentence.  

McVeigh’s lawyers could still ask for a stay of execution so they can examine the materials. 

“I think the FBI has given McVeigh the chance to delay his own execution,” said Cohen. 

Paul Heath, who was injured in the bombing, said he was taking a wait-and-see approach to the news. 

“I’m convinced it wouldn’t make any difference to Mr. McVeigh,” Heath said. 

 

“It does not upset me.” 

 

Last year the FBI was stung by the case of Wen Ho Lee, a former Los Alamos scientist indicted on 59 criminal counts of mishandling nuclear weapons secrets. He spent nine months in solitary confinement in a New Mexico jail. All but one count was eventually dropped. 

The FBI also suffered through an embarrassing investigation by its parent, the Justice Department, of its world-renowned crime lab in the mid-1990s. 

Spurred by allegations from Frederic Whitehurst, an FBI lab chemist, Justice Inspector General Michael Bromwich investigated the facility for 18 months. He subsequently blasted the FBI facility for flawed scientific work and inaccurate, pro-prosecution testimony in major cases, including the Oklahoma City bombing. 

The catastrophe at the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, in which 80 people were killed, and a shoot-out with white separatists in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, have also dogged the FBI. 

McVeigh has said he carried out the Oklahoma City bombing to avenge the deaths at Waco and Ruby Ridge.


Many facets to building a successful butterfly garden

by Sally Levinson Special to the Daily Planet
Saturday May 12, 2001

Is a caterpillar a butterfly? Yes and no: Although a caterpillar has no wings, it is only a different life stage of the same animal.  

A successful butterfly garden caters to both life stages, the adult that sips nectar from flowers and the caterpillar which eats leaves.  

Although many people think flowers are important in a butterfly garden, the adults don’t eat all that much and many butterflies are just as happy to get their moisture from dead meat, dung, rotting fruit or mud.  

They will be thankful for the chance to visit flowers of Lantana, Jupiter’s Beard or Butterfly Bush, but they will be forever grateful to find the larval (caterpillar) food plant, because their offspring are ravenously hungry and rather fussy eaters.  

The spiky orange and black gulf fritillary caterpillars, for instance, will only eat passion vine. If you have room for only one butterfly plant in your garden, make it blue crown passion flower, also known as Passiflora caerulea.  

The butterflies, which are orange with silver spots on their under wings, tend to stay near this plant all day, making any yard look like a butterfly garden.  

Cabbage whites, a white butterfly with small black spots, also tend to stay near their host (caterpillar food) plant all day.  

As their name indicates, they lay their eggs on cabbages. They also lay on nasturtiums, which have orange and yellow flowers and are easy to grow from seed.  

Cabbage whites are rather plain looking compared to the stunning yellow and black anise swallowtails, which lay their eggs on fennel, a common weed in the western states.  

When properly maintained, fennel has a soft ferny texture. Cut back a section at a time over several months, it can provide fresh foliage for caterpillars all summer as it resprouts.  

Fennel, like most butterfly plants, needs no water once established. However, the caterpillars depend upon the plant for both solid and liquid nutrition and the butterflies only choose lush plants on which to lay their eggs, so regular water is a must. 

Oak trees, an exception to this rule, are prone to root rot if watered. They are home to California sister butterflies whose name is derived from the black and white coloration. 

Most nuns don’t have the orange spots that sisters have, though.  

The red admiral is another black and white butterfly with orange markings.  

The caterpillars eat another weed, pellitory, which can be found growing in shaded spots all over Berkeley.  

Although the plant prefers shade, the butterflies prefer sun, so it must be in the sun at least part of the day to attract butterflies.  

Growing about knee high with tiny white flowers, it can bring a texture of green to dark corners.  

Hollyhocks, on the other hand, have big bright flowers in many colors.  

Painted ladies are not interested in the flowers, however, and don’t care whether they are single are double since they lay their eggs on the leaves.  

After the caterpillars hatch, they protect themselves from predators with a bit of webbing.  

Buckeye caterpillars protect themselves by feeding at night on snapdragons and kenilworth ivy.  

They also eat plantain, a lawn weed that grows alongside the grasses as long as no herbicides are used.  

Butterflies and pesticides are incompatible because pesticides kill butterflies just as surely as they kill the pests.  

Milkweed, for instance, sometimes has an aphid problem, but killing the aphids could kill the monarch caterpillars, too.  

It is worth it to endure a few aphids to get a chance to see the exquisite orange and black butterfly.  

Compared to monarchs, skippers are small and drab, but they are delightful because they will grace a grassy garden whenever the sun is out.  

They lay its eggs on most grasses, including bamboo. Caterpillars eat almost every sort of garden plant: weeds, trees, vines, vegetables, turf and flowers, so it makes sense to integrate them into the entire garden.  

A comfortable seat is an important part of the plan, so the humans can watch the butterflies court, fight and lay eggs.  

These beauties of the insect world are easy to attract and endlessly fascinating.


Upcoming Microsoft features worry rivals and government

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — When computer users install the next generation of Microsoft’s Windows operating system this fall, they will get an Internet chat program automatically. Plus a new security program, a DVD player and software to make personal CDs. 

Rivals and some state attorneys general are complaining that with its Windows XP system, Microsoft is engaging in the same sort of product bundling that gave rise to the current federal antitrust case involving the company’s Internet Explorer browser. 

AOL Time Warner, the world’s largest Internet provider and the maker of two competing Internet messaging programs, was so upset that it provided a private briefing in March to the attorneys general of the states that sued Microsoft in the case now before a federal appeals court. AOL officials outlined what they believe are new anticompetitive practices. 

“This is a movie that many people have seen before. The direction Windows XP, .NET and Hailstorm all go in is to continue Microsoft’s desktop monopoly and we think that’s bad for consumers,” said John Buckley, AOL vice president. 

Microsoft .NET is the company’s plan to develop Internet technology that works with most other computing devices, encouraging consumers to keep their data on Microsoft Internet servers.  

Hailstorm is Microsoft’s code name for some of the services that will run on .NET. 

Microsoft counters that it is simply trying to improve its product with new features that consumers demand, and that its rivals are trying to do the same thing: expand into new markets. 

“We must continue to add new features and functionality, or else no one is going to want our product,” Microsoft spokesman Jim Cullinan said. “You have to remain nimble and remain focused on delivering value to your customers.” 

The tensions between Microsoft and AOL come even as the two giants work together to resolve common issues, such as a single instant messaging standard. 

Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, who has coordinated the states’ legal strategy in the antitrust case, said Microsoft’s behavior amounted to “history repeating itself.” 

 

“There are certainly some concerns about them continuing dominance,” Miller said. 

The strategy to continue product bundling comes as an appeals court in Washington weighs a trial judge’s order that Microsoft be split into two companies. 

“Without any court restrictions, Microsoft has remained free to continue its previous course with respect to integrating the browser and anything else, and it has acted consistently with its previously expressed views,” Howard University law professor Andy Gavil said. “The snowballing of added features, however, surely will complicate any future remedy if a violation is upheld.” 

Windows XP, which will be sold in stores in October, is the first Windows version designed for both home users and businesses. It promises to be far more stable for consumers, and includes more extras than ever. 

Among them: MSN Messenger, an instant-messaging program; the new Internet Explorer 6 browser; a computer security program known as a firewall; a new media player only available with XP that will play DVDs as well as streaming Internet music and video; and a remote access program that will let a more savvy user troubleshoot someone else’s computer across the Internet. 

For the first time, MSN Messenger installs and loads automatically every time XP is run. 

Several companies already sell security, multimedia and remote access programs. Once Microsoft has these features integrated with Windows, consumer advocates say, there is little reason to go elsewhere for them. 

“At first blush it looks like ease and convenience and simplicity for the user, but in the long run it sets off alarm systems of stifling competition and higher prices,” said Gene Kimmelman of the Consumers Union. 

Competitors are hoping that consumers will see that their products are better than Microsoft’s bundled ones. 

“The Firewall in (XP) is very rudimentary,” said Sarah Hicks, a vice president of Symantec Corp., which makes a competing security program. 

RealNetworks general manager Steve Banfield said that Windows Media Player was “not the best product.” 

Microsoft’s Cullinan maintains that first, the company has to convince consumers to upgrade to XP. 

“If people don’t find those features compelling enough to upgrade,” Cullinan said, “they can keep whatever the heck they want. They’re not forced to upgrade.” 

David Farber, a former Federal Communications Commission technologist who testified against Microsoft in the antitrust trial, thinks consumers will resign themselves to using even more Microsoft products. 

“It’s the same game that they played with (Internet) Explorer,” Farber said. “If it’s sitting there and it’s built in and you have to put a lot of work in to use another product, you don’t do it.” 

——— 

On the Net: 

Microsoft: http://www.microsoft.com/ 


Allergy medications get over-the-counter OK

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

GAITHERSBURG, Md. — Three popular allergy medications are safe enough to be sold without prescription, a federal advisory panel ruled Friday in an unprecedented case that could save the health insurance industry billions of dollars but increase costs for many consumers. 

Acting on a petition by WellPoint Health Networks of Thousand Oaks, the Food and Drug Administration panel recommended that Claritin, Allegra and Zyrtec be made available over the counter, without supervision by a doctor. 

The vote was 19-4 each for Claritin and Zyrtec, and 18-5 for Allegra. The FDA is not required to follow the recommendations of the panel, but usually does so. 

Dr. John Jenkins of the FDA said he did not have a timeframe for a decision in the “very unusual” case. Traditionally drug companies, not insurance companies, ask for a change, he said. 

WellPoint, which could save $45 million a year, had argued that the allergy medications were safe. 

“There is no clinical reason for Claritin, Allegra and Zyrtec to be maintained as prescription drugs,” Robert Seidman, a company vice president, told the 23-member panel. “They have side effects similar to a sugar pill.” 

Drug companies countered that the move would force consumers into a “risky trial-and-error gamble with their health, their quality of life and their money.” People will self-diagnose and treat conditions that need the attention of a doctor, company executives said. 

“Insurance companies see a physician visit as a cost item,” said Dr. Robert J. Spiegel, vice president of Schering-Plough, maker of Claritin. “We see it as an essential part of health care. Now is not the time to drive patients farther away from their physicians.” 

The company said later in a statement that an FDA change without pharmaceutical makers’ support would be a reversal of past agency policy and could create legal questions. 

The financial implications of the FDA’s decision will be huge for the insurance industry, drug manufacturers and consumers. 

Consumers with insurance would have to pay the full cost. Those without insurance may pay less if the drug companies lower prices to meet competition, which some experts expect. 

Last year, the three drugs generated about $4.7 billion in sales. 

The drugs can sell for more than $2 a pill. With a prescription, a patient with insurance can get a month’s supply at the personal cost of a copay charge, perhaps as little as $5. The insurance company then has to pay the balance, $50 to $60. 

If the drugs are reclassified as over the counter, insurance companies would no longer have to pay for them. 

Mike Bernstein, a Washington-based food and drug attorney, said if there is a change, the three drug companies could be forced to compete with other over-the-counter cold, flu and allergy medications, most of which are cheaper than prescription drugs. 

In Canada, Claritin can be purchased at stores without prescriptions for significantly less than the U.S. price. Seidman said the cost there is about $11 a month and that the companies should also have competitive prices in America. 

Jenkins said the FDA cannot force the companies to continue selling the drugs. 

Inappropriate self-treatment could have serious medical consequences, said Dr. Francois Nader, vice president of Aventis Pharma AG, maker of Allegra. 

“Consumers would face a risky trial and error gamble with their health, their quality of life and with their money,” he said. 

Manufacturers pointed to asthma, a serious respiratory condition, as a disease that patients might try to treat without seeing a doctor. 

Nader said WellPoint is pushing for declassification because it does not pay for over-the-counter drugs and the change could save the company millions of dollars. But he predicted that “the short term gain to the insurers would increase the health care burden” on society. 

Pfizer Incorporated, maker of Zyrtec, did not make a presentation at the meeting. 

The allergy drugs are known as second generation antihistamines because they dry up allergy symptoms without causing drowsiness so common with first generation over-the-counter drugs. 

Claritin was approved in 1993, Zyrtec in 1995 and Allegra in 1996. 

In response to the decision, shares of Schering-Plough finished trading on the New York Stock Exchange up $1.20 to $38.20. Shares of Aventis fell $1.22 to $75.53, while Pfizer was off 74 cents to $43.00. 

Dr. Robert Meyer, of the FDA, told the panel that there have been only a few instances of heart and kidney problems and seizures among patients taking the drugs, but there is no clear indication that these adverse events were directly caused by the medication. 

In his presentation, Seidman said that second generation antihistamines are now on sale without a prescription in 17 countries. He said U.S. consumers could save money they now spend for doctors visits to get prescriptions. 

——— 

On the Net: Food and Drug Administration: http://www.fda.gov 


Oklahoma bomber execution delayed

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — Timothy McVeigh’s countdown to execution was suddenly interrupted Friday, five days before he was to die, as Attorney General John Ashcroft ordered an investigation into the FBI’s bungling of records in the Oklahoma City bombing. 

President Bush said he was sure of McVeigh’s guilt but did not want the government “rushing his fate.” 

McVeigh, on death row in Terre Haute, Ind., is now scheduled to die by lethal injection on June 11. 

Attorney Rob Nigh described his client as frustrated and possibly reconsidering his earlier decision against challenging the execution order. 

“He’s distressed about this in that he knows the impact that it has upon his family and those who care about him,” Nigh said outside the federal prison where he consulted with McVeigh. 

Some victims said they were sickened, others resigned, after the dramatic turn of events in what is to be the first federal execution since 1963. 

“It’s like a big old clamp squeezing my gut,” said Dan McKinney, whose wife was among the 168 people killed in the 1995 bombing to which McVeigh has confessed. “We have to wait 30 more days for something we have waited six years.” 

McVeigh’s defense team was handed 3,135 documents that the FBI should have provided more than three years ago during trial. 

Retired FBI agent Danny Coulson, who worked on the case, told The Associated Press that all of the documents involved were generated from interviews on the day of the explosion and the day after – when field offices were chasing leads all over the world about a possible “John Doe No. 2” suspect. 

McVeigh lawyer Nathan Chambers said he was informed by the U.S. attorney of the documents’ existence on Tuesday. Bush and Ashcroft both said they were not told of the problem until Thursday. 

Complaining that 30 days was not enough time to study the mountain of paper, Nigh said McVeigh was now “keeping all of his options open.” 

“He has indicated in the past that he did not want to delay. He’s willing to take a fresh look and evaluate the information,” Nigh said. 

Separately, Michael Tigar, lawyer for convicted conspirator Terry Nichols, who is serving a life sentence, told CNN he would file a new appeal for Nichols with the Supreme Court. 

Ashcroft, his back to the ticking mantle clock in a Justice Department conference room, said government attorneys studied the newly disclosed documents and concluded they did not contradict the 11 guilty verdicts returned against McVeigh for murder, conspiracy and using a weapon of mass destruction. 

The attorney general, who decided last month to telecast McVeigh’s execution for victims, said he was now postponing the date “in order to assure the American people that they have a right to have confidence in our processes.” 

“If any questions or doubts remain about this case, it would cast a permanent cloud over justice,” Ashcroft said. 

McVeigh attorney Chambers called Ashcroft’s decision a public-relations attempt to restore public trust in the federal justice system. 

“Regardless of the content of materials recently released, the most recent episode demonstrates in dramatic fashion why trust and confidence should be reserved,” said Chambers. 

 

 

McVeigh has said he bombed the Oklahoma City federal building to avenge the deadly FBI standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, and raid on the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Texas. 

Bush, in a White House news conference, dismissed the notion that McVeigh might take the FBI foul-up in his case as justification for his anti-government rage. 

“He should say he’s lucky to be in America; that’s what he ought to say,” Bush said. “This is a country that will bend over backwards to make sure that his constitutional rights are guaranteed as opposed to rushing his fate.” 

In Pendleton, N.Y., Bill McVeigh watched Ashcroft’s announcement with a local television crew and confessed mixed emotions, saying he had been bracing all week for his son’s execution on Wednesday. 

“Now this,” Bill McVeigh said. “It’s like starting over.” 

FBI special agent Danny Defenbaugh, who led the Oklahoma City investigation, said that 28,000 interviews were conducted, and 23,290 pieces of evidence and 238,000 photos gathered over the course of the inquiry. Defenbaugh said the problem came to light when the documents — drawn from 45 FBI offices in the United States and one in Paris — were being archived in December. 

Ashcroft said he was instructing the inspector general of the Justice Department to conduct “a careful study” into what went wrong. 

“We are going beyond the requirements of the law,” he said. 

Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said the panel will hold hearings on “the FBI’s inability to comply with basic legal procedures.” He said the hearings would follow the investigation by the Justice Department’s inspector general. 

The failure to turn over the documents is one several “colossal mistakes” by the bureau, said Senate Judiciary Committee member Charles Grassley, R-Iowa. 

Coulson blamed a computer-filing glitch, saying the documents were keyed into FBI computers by field offices but not flagged or cross-referenced to the bombing case. “I’m sure there’s nothing there that changes the outcome of the case, but it makes the FBI look bad,” Coulson said. 

Nigh urged a moratorium on all federal executions. 

But Bush, who was governor of Texas while 152 inmates were put to death, reaffirmed his faith in the death penalty Friday. 

“Today is an example of the system being fair,” Bush said. 

“There is never going to be an end to the twists and turns,” sighed Jim Denny, whose two children were injured in the 1995 blast. “As long as justice comes in the end.” 


Bush says U.N. dues should be paid

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

WASHINGTON — President Bush criticized the House vote to withhold some overdue payments to the United Nations in a display of anger over the ouster of the United States from the U.N. Human Rights Commission. 

“I think we have made an agreement with the United Nations, an agreement that had been negotiated in good faith, and I think we ought to pay our dues,” Bush told a news conference several hours after meeting in the White House with U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan. 

The House voted 252-165 Thursday to pay $582 million in back dues but to withhold an additional $244 million until the United States is restored to the human rights panel. An initial $100 million back-dues payment occurred last year. 

Bush also criticized the U.S. ejection from the seat it has held since the panel’s creation in 1947, calling it “an outrageous decision.” 

“To me, it undermines the whole credibility of this commission to kick the United States off, one of the great bastions of human rights, and allow Sudan to be on,” he said. “And I think most reasonable people in the world see it that way.” 

Annan, back at U.N. headquarters in New York, said it was clear that both Bush and Secretary of State Colin Powell, who was also at the White House meeting, “are very supportive of the U.N.” 

“I had a chance to exchange some ideas about the U.N. dues and the decision in Congress to attach an amendment to the $244 million,” Annan said. “The president did indicate to me that he would also want to see the dues paid without any withholding.” 

The provision was written by Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., chairman of the International Relations Committee, and the panel’s top Democrat, Rep. Tom Lantos of California, to forestall even tougher amendments aimed at blocking all the dues money. 

It was attached to the bill authorizing State Department programs for the 2002 and 2003 fiscal years.  

A House vote is expected next week. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee is still writing its version. 

Powell urged lawmakers Thursday to show “a little more restraint,” telling a House subcommittee that “we should not now try to find a way to punish the U.N.” 

But that word never got to Hyde or Lantos, Hyde said after the vote. 

“The administration did not contact us on this bill,” he said. “It may be that they don’t have personnel in place, or maybe they didn’t care that much. I don’t know.” 

Hyde said the provision could change as the White House makes its opinion known during Senate action and the House-Senate conference resolving differences between the two chambers’ bills. 

“Passage by one house is the beginning of a long journey,” he said. 

On Thursday, Annan predicted the United States would get back its seat on the Human Rights Commission next year, “and I hope in the meantime they will work with other member states to get back on.” 

Despite the Bush administration’s opposition, GOP leaders championed the fight to punish the United Nations. House Majority Leader Dick Armey, R-Texas, implored his colleagues to “send the world a message: America cares and America dares to stand up for any lost soul beleaguered and tortured in any part of this world at any time.” 

The most visible backers of the White House position were Democrats. 

“How can we expect the United Nations to improve its performance or to respect us if we go back on our word and refuse to pay our bills?” asked Rep. Cynthia McKinney of Georgia. 

After the vote, White House spokesman Sean McCormack said: “Our position is we’re committed to paying our arrears. To do otherwise now would undermine what we’re doing at the U.N. and our credibility as a negotiating partner.” 

In other amendments Thursday, the House: 

—Showed it was not opposed to all things United Nations by voting 225-193 to support a return to the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and pay it $65 million. The United States left UNESCO in 1984, upset by management problems and what was perceived to be an anti-American bent. 

—Voted 282-137 to keep the United States out of the proposed International Criminal Court. Majority Whip Tom DeLay, R-Texas, contended it could be used against U.S. military personnel overseas and, by endorsing the court, “we would be abandoning the sacred covenant between the Congress and our men and women in uniform.” 

Asked about that provision, Annan said: “I think that we know the position of Washington but I hope it is not immutable.” 


Multi-cultural singer reaches many with music

By Mary BarrettSpecial to the Daily Planet
Saturday May 12, 2001

José-Luis Orozco, a long time Berkeley musician, is an expert in bilingual education through music and song.  

Ever since he was a child in Mexico City, he’s been singing for multi-cultural audiences. The second of eleven children, Jose-Luis learned old songs from his grandmother. His mother taught him to interpret the spirit of the song. 

“My mother, though not a professional, was very good at singing the feeling of the music, from a slow Bolero (love song) to Mexican polkas,” Orozco said. “I picked up the energy of the music from her, the feeling.” 

Last week, Orozco brought that musical tradition to Washington School. People in the audience were awed by the performance. 

“He had the whole audience, whole families, up dancing to children’s songs like Itsy Bitsy Spider in Spanish and English. Nobody just sat. It was amazing!” said Pat Ungern, a teacher at the school.  

At 7, he and a brother were chosen to travel with the Mexico City Children’s Choir throughout Latin America, the Caribbean and Europe. They stayed with families – both rich and poor – and performed for heads of state and a diverse range of audiences.  

Traveling gave him opportunities that he could never have had at home. He learned church music in Latin, Mexican folk music, and sang world music including American folk songs like, “Home on the Range.” While in Spain, he was given a guitar as a gift and his father taught him to play once he arrived home.  

While touring, he also learned about politics. In Venezuela, the choir was turned back because of a coup. During the Bay of Pigs invasion, he was staying with Basque families in Spain.  

The families were progressive and sat up late at night listening for news about Cuba.  

The Cuban revolution was a very big thing, Orozco said, to people who lived whole lives under dictatorships.  

When his voice changed at 13, and he could no longer be part of the children’s choir, he formed a musical group with neighbors and played at various barrio gatherings. He attended evening music classes, but also worked to help his mother support the family. Life was not easy. 

In 1968, there was a student rebellion in Mexico City similar to rebellions around the world including the civil-rights movement and the anti-war movement in the United States. It ended in the massacre of many students, some of whom he knew, three blocks from his mother’s home.  

Jose-Luis’ father called him at work and told him not to go home because the army was searching for students and taking them from the neighborhood, even if they had not been part of the rebellion. He stayed away for three days. 

The sadness of that event coincided with a friend’s urging him to come to the United States. He and his mother decided it was something he should try. He moved to San Jose and mopped floors.  

After six months, lonely for music, he bought a cheap guitar and started singing at schools in the Bay Area. 

Quickly he discovered Berkeley. He went to Laney College and transferred to UC Berkeley to complete his Bachelor of Arts.  

Oscar Lewis’s book, “The Children of Sanchez,” was written about the barrio where his parents were born and raised and inspired Orozco’s strong interest in sociology.  

The University of San Francisco offered him a scholarship and he earned an Master of Arts in multi-cultural education. 

For several years in the 70s, he worked as a community liasion in Berkeley. He married and fathered three children – Jose-Luis, Maya, and Gabriel. He also co-founded a national Hispanic university and ran summer programs for the University in Gudalajara. 

In all of this mix, his interest in music became foremost and his ability to support himself through music was accomplished by the mid-80s. His politics, he said, is connected to his daily life education. He wrote a corrido, or ballad, for Cesar Chavez and for Dolores Huerta of the United Farm Worker’s Union. He will be performing them at La Peña Cultural Center on June 9.  

Orozco loves to sing to any age group, but the demand to sing to children is always the highest.  

“The most important thing about my music is the effect it has on the education of children,” Orozco said.  

“Seeing the joy in the children and then the joy in the teachers noticing the music’s impact on the children keeps me motivated. 

“Music brings down barriers between people, barriers of prejudice and racism. Music is a non-threatening tool. It brings people together, it makes people happy. All along, since I was very young, I’ve seen that music is magic,” he said. 

When Jose-Luis Orozco sings to children he is warm, engaging, and upbeat. He presents his music in a way that values children. He makes them feel important. They know, during his time with them, that they matter. He can take a dull classroom and fill it with color and light.  

He has been recording for years. The recordings for children are done simply with just his guitar and voice – a soothing combination, he’s been told.  

“They use my music to calm fussy babies, “ he said, laughing.  

One compact disc, “De Colores,” has sold over thirty thousand copies. There is a companion book with songs in Spanish with English translations. The illustrations by Elsia Kleven are richly conceived and whimsical. One song from this collection, “Paz y libertad,” has a life of its own. People have been dancing to it at circle dance gatherings for years never knowing that José-Luis Orozco wrote it. 

His oldest son, Luis, has been managing his business for him.  

“Luis is an excellent organizer,” Orozco said, bragging. “And he has great people skills. Even when he was twelve people would ask him questions and he would explain everything to them.” 

Dual immersion programs, the best model for dual language acquisiton, are flowering in schools throughout the United States. Three of Berkeley’s schools have programs; Orozco’s youngest son, Pablo, is at Cragmont’s. And because Orozco is emerging as the foremost educator in Spanish-English music for children, he is highly sought after. He has song recently in New York City, Houston, and Miami, and, unpredictably, a dual immersion school in Anchorage, Alaska. 

At 52, Orozco is realizing that the possibilites for his music are limitless. He wants to keep on creating and letting his music provide continuity across generations.  

He feels he’s reached two generations already, his and that of his children. He’s working on his third. His daughter’s new born son is one baby he’s singing to already. 

You can hear José-Luis Orozco in a Benefit Concert for Centro Vida-Bahai, a child care, at the Freight and Salvage, 1111 Addison Street on June 2 at 11:00a.m. Call 524-7300 information.


Comfortable retirement is a choice – pain now or later

By John Cunniff The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

If Americans appear to be not fully sold on the idea of saving for their retirement, the explanation might lie in two very broad and different possibilities: 

1. They feel they can’t maintain a modern lifestyle and afford to save. 

2. Deep down, they feel that some outside force will take care of the matter and provide the wherewithal when the time comes. 

Whichever the reason, fewer workers than a year ago are saving for retirement, according to a report by two research organizations. Moreover, they say, confidence in a future comfortable retirement is down. 

Supporting the first possibility is the concern that whatever small amount workers save could be wiped out by illness or other forces beyond their control, such as rising prescription and utility bills. 

It is a fatalistic attitude, but understandable when you consider the overwhelming anxiety that grips some families when they match their incomes against the demands, such as for tuitions and mortgage payments. 

And perhaps taxes, too. Americans in recent years have been paying more in taxes than for food, clothing and shelter, the traditional essentials. The alternative is to stop saving rather than lower living standards. 

Worse, they sense that taxes might very well take an ever bigger bite in future years despite loudly sought tax cuts. 

The possibility of taxes taking an even larger budget share is raised by the Tax Foundation, whose documented but controversial Tax Freedom Day, has been pushed back to May 3 this year. It was April 18 in 1992. 

It means,the Foundation says, that taxpayers must work until then simply to meet federal, state and local tax bills. And, it adds, another week will be added to the grind by 2011, the result of the tax code’s built-in tendency to absorb a larger fraction of the nation’s income. 

While those angry at the tendency have a tendency of their own to blame an avaricious government, much of the tax growth has, in effect, been sought or acquiesced to by voters approving more government services. 

That brings up the second possibility – that some people harbor the notion that government will bail them out. How, they ask, can it not do so? And, if not the government, then possibly the stock market. 

More than one survey has shown, for example, that American investors believe a stock market that can scalp their portfolios one year can replenish it the next.  

The idea of easy fortunes has not been eliminated. 

The decline in savings for retirement comes at a time when publicity about the need to do the very opposite - that is, raise savings rates – is so loud that few worker-taxpayers have failed to hear it. 

But savings declines are what’s been found by the independent researchers – the Employee Benefit Research Institute and the American Savings Education Council – and it presents serious issues of public policy. 

Obviously, there’s evidence of a fundamental contradiction: that you can have the benefits, but avoid the risk and the pain. 

Relying on government rather than oneself to pay for retirement means higher taxes and maybe lower living standards now.  

Depending on the stock market means assuming the risks and perhaps facing a miserable retirement. 

It’s a painful choice for those who face it, but it is a choice – an alternative rather than a dictate. 

John Cunniff is a business  

analyst for The Associated Press


EarthLink co-founder could face claims of $600 million or more

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

SANTA BARBARA — A co-founder of EarthLink, one of the nation’s largest Internet service providers, could face claims of $600 million or more for alleged investment fraud that netted Internet moguls, Santa Barbara socialites, venture capitalists and Hollywood producers. 

Emotions ran high Thursday as 90 investors met with attorneys representing company co-founder Reed E. Slatkin at the Santa Barbara office of U.S. bankruptcy trustee Brian Fittipaldi, who said claims could range as high as $600 million. Some attorneys have estimated the amount could go higher. 

Slatkin filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from creditors last week and remains in control of all accounts and assets under U.S. bankruptcy code. Slatkin has less than $21 million, most of it invested in shares of EarthLink. 

“I thought he was a hero because he made all his money without hurting anyone, but he made his money by hurting everyone,” said investor Patrick Siefe, a Santa Barbara computer consultant. 

Slatkin was not present to answer allegations he mismanaged money given by 500 investors. His attorneys said they advised their client not to attend. 

Bankruptcy trustees called the meeting to organize a seven-member creditors’ committee to represent investors’ interests in court. The committee’s first move was to agree to file a motion Friday asking a bankruptcy judge to freeze all of Slatkin’s accounts and assets, a move that will go uncontested. 

“It’s a very serious, staggering amount of money that’s at stake, and I don’t believe personally we’re going to find (it) stashed overseas,” said attorney Richard Wynne, who represents the committee. 

Another group of investors on Thursday filed a motion asking that a trustee be appointed to wrest control of EarthLink’s assets from Slatkin, 52, who resigned last month from EarthLink’s board of directors. 

More than 1 million documents and three computer hard drives that Slatkin turned over to his attorneys and an independent auditor show about $100 million of investor funds have been funneled into limited partnerships and real estate transactions, said Slatkin attorney Richard Pachulski. 

“Some people have suggested that this was a Ponzi scheme,” where new investors’ money is illegally passed as payment to prior investors, Pachulski said. “We don’t know one way or another what it was.” 

Pachulski said more than $140 million was distributed to investors in the past two years and that one group of investors got $120 million more than they invested, while another group gave $240 million more than they got out. 

The Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating alleged investment fraud. Slatkin also is being sued by three investors who claim he pocketed more than $35 million. Slatkin owes the Internal Revenue Service about $6 million. 

For the past 18 months, Slatkin has fallen under SEC scrutiny for failing to register as an investment adviser as mandated by federal securities law. 


Next big stock sector search won’t be easy

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

NEW YORK — With the stock market appearing its firmest in months, investors looking for the best bets for profitability when the economy and corporate profits begin improving will find little consensus among analysts. 

As trading this week illustrated, the overall market appears to be in a holding pattern. 

Investors hesitated to take any strong positions, instead alternating between technology and blue chips. Although the three major stock indexes slipped for the week, their losses were expected after April’s strong advances. 

In addition, trading volume was light all week, especially Friday when the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market recorded one of their slowest days of the year. 

“Back in 1999 and 2000, we had technology to move stocks higher. Part of the problem we are having in this market is you haven’t had consistent sector leadership in sectors strong enough to take the market up,” said Richard Dickson, a technical analyst at Hilliard Lyons. “You have to make some type of coherence or you end up jumping from sector to sector and going nowhere.” 

That’s not to say some sectors aren’t doing better than others. Retail and semiconductor stocks, which historically been among the earliest performers in recovering markets, are reporting higher rates of return than the broader market. 

The Philadelphia Semiconductor and Standard & Poor’s Retail indexes are up nearly 7.0 and 6.2 percent respectively for the year, compared with the broader S&P 500, which is down about 5.6 percent. 

“The pattern is that retail stocks outperform early in a slowdown and then they underperform for a significant time and shortly before the slowdown is over, they outperform,” said Linda Kristiansen, a retail analyst at UBS Warburg, who expects to see healthy December sales but isn’t sure the momentum will last. “I think we’re still in the middle of the correction.” 

Daniel Barry, Merrill Lynch’s senior retailing analyst, is more bullish, predicting strong performance ahead for the sector. 

“I think retail is going up and it’s going to outperform the market for the balance of the year,” he said. “The average cycle for retail stocks is about 18 months. We’re in the eighth month right now, so we should have another 10 months of performance.” 

Opinions vary even more widely when it comes to technology issues. 

In a research note issued this week, Morgan Stanley upgraded several semiconductor stocks noting “we expect the next cyclical upswing to begin in September or October as the year-over-year growth rate for chip industry revenues begins to reaccelerate.” 

The idea behind this theory is that the Federal Reserve’s lowering of interest rates will spark consumer spending, which should coincide with more orders for semiconductors, the computer chips that form the building blocks of a lot of consumer goods like TVs and computers. 

The skeptics, though, are vocal and numerous. Unlike retail stocks, which have been around for decades and have a longer track record, technology stocks’ behavior is less well known. It wasn’t so long ago that analysts were talking about the “New Paradigm” – the idea that technology was so important to businesses and the economy that it wouldn’t be vulnerable to downturns. 

“With the semiconductors, the only thing that’s changed is the psychology. People are buying now with the expectation that a turnaround won’t happen until next year, but they’d rather be early than late,” said Phil Dow, director of equity strategy at Dain Rauscher Wessels. “I wouldn’t read anything else into this.” 

Meanwhile, interest rates are another variable. The Federal Reserve is widely expected to cut interest rates for the fifth time this year next week, how much, or whether the Fed may be nearing the end of its rate-cutting cycle, remains a topic of much speculation. 

Inflation also remains a potential issue, although most economists say data doesn’t indicate pricing is a problem right now. 

The bottom line for investors, say most analysts, is to keep focused on longer-term returns and realize that the market’s recovery may take awhile. 

“If you’re going to buy stocks, you should be very, very selective,” said Dickson, the Hilliard Lyons analyst. “Use market pullbacks, not rallies, to build a position in technology. I’d also be looking at financial and health care stocks. They tend to be more stable, even in times of weakness.” 

The Dow finished the week down 129.93, or 1.2 percent, at 10,821.31 on a 89.13 loss Friday. 

The Nasdaq composite index fell 84.10, or 3.8 percent for the week. It closed Friday at 2,107.43 on a drop of 21.43. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 ended the week off 20.94, a 1.7 percent change, after slipping 9.51 to 1,245.67 Friday. 

The Russell 2000 index dropped 3.22 Friday to 487.36, ending the week off 5.53 or 1.1 percent. 

The Wilshire Associates Equity Index — which represents the combined market value of all New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange and Nasdaq issues — ended the week at $11.491 trillion, down $196 billion from the previous week. A year ago, the index was $13.151 trillion. 

 

End advance for weekend editions, May 12-13 


Opinion

Editorials

Diagnosis of bacterial meningitis confirmed

Daily Planet staff reports
Friday May 18, 2001

On Friday, a 19-year old woman was hospitalized with a presumptive diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Public health officials confirmed Thursday that the diagnosis is meningococcal meningitis.  

They continue to look for anyone who has had intimate contact with the affected individual, whose name is not being released, or members of her social network. The investigation has revealed this case is linked to the death of a 9-year-old Berkeley girl on May 1. The child died of meningococcal meningitis.  

There is not a single, individual carrier of this bacterial strain, public health officials said. The spread of this bacteria is through multiple social contacts within a social network that engages in activities that allow for the spread of the bacteria.  

People who have engaged in the following behaviors with an infected person are at risk of becoming infected themselves: unprotected sex including oral sex, sharing intravenous needles; using drugs such as crack cocaine that has been in another person’s mouth; sharing cigarettes, joints, drinks, or pipes; deep kissing; sharing food or drinks in a way that saliva is passed on.  

The illness is characterized by a sudden high fever, headache and a stiff neck. Those symptoms are often accompanied by nausea or vomiting. A person with these symptoms, should contact a health-care provider or go to a hospital emergency room immediately.  

Public health officials stress that meningococcal meningitis is hard to get. It requires the direct exchange of bodily fluids with an infected person. Medical experts strongly encourage community members to carefully assess their real risk of exposure before deciding to take medication because medicating unnecessarily sometimes leads to medical complications such as liver problems and, most importantly, antibiotic resistance. For more information, visit the Meningitis Information Sheet at www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/news/generalInformation.pdf or call public health nurses who are available to answer community questions or concerns from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday, at 644-6500.


Street gangs place $25,000 bounty for Rampart cop killings

The Associated Press
Thursday May 17, 2001

 

 

LOS ANGELES — Mayor Richard Riordan issued a stern warning Wednesday to street gangs that have issued a bounty for the wounding or killing of Rampart station police officers. 

“These are men and women in our police department who wear their blue in pride and put their lives on the line every day of the year,” Riordan said.  

“And I can tell these gang members who have made these threats that if they carry out one threat, I will spend the rest of my life helping capture you and helping punish you.” 

The mayor made his remarks Wednesday during a press conference to announce his endorsement in the city’s upcoming mayoral election. 

Rampart officers have been on heightened alert since the threats were first uncovered about two weeks ago. 

“We’ve heard of $10,000 for an injury to an officer and $25,000 for the death of an officer,” Rampart Capt. Michael Moore, a station commander, said Tuesday. 

Moore said the threats have not affected the way officers patrol the community of about 350,000 people. 

“They wanna make threats, they can make ’em. A threat is one thing, but to try to accomplish that threat is another thing,” added Rampart Sgt. Patrick McCarty, who said the threats are not new. 

“We’ve had them in the past. We’re just going to be on alert as always.” 

The street gang threats were the latest cloud to hover over Rampart. 

Former Officer Rafael Perez, the central figure in the city’s worst police corruption scandal, told of misdeeds by fellow anti-gang officers in exchange for a lighter sentence for stealing cocaine from an evidence room. 

Perez claims members of the station’s anti-gang unit allegedly robbed, beat, framed and shot suspects over a period of several years in the mid- to late 1990s. 

 

But residents in the gritty neighborhood just west of downtown remained appreciative. 

“If it wasn’t for police we wouldn’t be able to walk the streets,” Jose Canales told KCBS-TV.


Ruling puts worry into medical marijuana users

The Associated Press
Wednesday May 16, 2001

OAKLAND — Yvonne Westbrook recalls when getting relief from the symptoms of multiple sclerosis meant venturing into seedy parks to buy bags of marijuana from drug dealers. 

So she worries that the U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling Monday could mean a return of those days. “Now they’ve opened us up to the street and all the perils involved,” she said. 

The high court ruled 8-0 on Monday there is no exception in federal anti-drug laws for patients to use marijuana to ease their pain from cancer, AIDS or other illnesses. 

Westbrook is fearful the ruling could mean the end for the dozens of distribution clubs that sprang up after California passed Proposition 215, the state law allowing people to grow and possess medical marijuana. 

“With the clubs you’re able to go to a clean, safe, secure environment,” she said. On the street, “you never know what you’re going to get. You never know who’s lurking behind the bush to jump you.” 

Voters in Arizona, Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Nevada, Oregon and Washington also have approved ballot initiatives allowing the use of medical marijuana.  

In Hawaii, the Legislature passed a similar law and the governor signed it last year. 

Patients like Westbrook could still use marijuana for medical reasons in states that allow it, legal experts said in several states affected by the ruling.  

But it would be more difficult to obtain because distribution violates federal law. 

Dr. Robert Killian of Seattle, the primary backer of the Washington’s successful 1998 marijuana initiative, said the ruling was a blow to marijuana distribution networks, which hoped to be able to provide pot to patients who instead must grow their own or buy it illegally. 

“They were hoping for some validation,” Killian said. “They are and always have been operating extralegally.” 

But JoAnna McKee, of the Seattle-based Green Cross Patient Co-op, said the network would continue to operate. 

“We are a network of patients who help other patients – all with notes from our doctors,” she said. “If you’re starving to death, and I have food, it’s my moral obligation to help you get food. 

“The Supreme Court has been wrong before. It used to be against the law to teach black people to read and write – they were wrong about that,” she said. 

In Alaska, 191 people have registered to use the drug as medicine, and officials there said they expect them to simply grow their own. 

“The ruling is clearly about the distribution of marijuana, not the possession of marijuana,” said David Finkelstein, a former state legislator who led the Alaska petition drive to legalize medicinal marijuana use. 

“Basically what it says is that cannabis clubs can’t be opened up in Alaska,” Finkelstein said in a telephone interview.  

Some Alaskans who registered with the state to use medical marijuana don’t want to grow it, or can’t grow it, Finkelstein said. But “for most patients, it’s working well.” 

But in Arizona, officials said that while two voter-approved measures legalized marijuana for medical use under state law, doctors have not been prescribing it because doing so would violate a federal law – and now they are even more unlikely to do so. 

”(The court’s ruling) confirms that distribution, even for medical purposes, would violate federal law,” said Pati Urias, spokeswoman for the Arizona attorney general’s office. Robert Raich, an attorney who represented the Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative, one of six marijuana distributors challenged by the federal government, said the decision “is not the end of the line by any means.” 

Raich said the issue of medical necessity was just one of several legal arguments they are ready to make in the future in favor of cannabis distribution clubs. 

“We feel we have many other defenses left,” said Jeff Jones, executive director of the club.  

The club was prohibited from distributing pot but has remained open to issue identification cards to verified medical marijuana patients. 

Mendocino County District Attorney Norm Vroman said the ruling would not change the way his office prosecutes drug crimes. In Mendocino, people are permitted up to six mature plants and 2 pounds of dry marijuana. 

“If the feds want to prosecute these people they can,” he said. “In California, the law has not changed one iota.” 

Julie Roche, one of the sponsors of Amendment 20 legalizing medical marijuana in Colorado, said the state’s law does not address distribution and how patients obtain the drug so the Supreme Court ruling should have no effect on it. 

“The law says people in Colorado can possess and use marijuana, and they will continue getting it as they got it before.  

I think the federal government will continue their war on drugs looking for large amounts. I do not expect a crackdown on patients,” Roche said. 

Joel Karlin, a spokesman for Coloradans Against Legalizing Marijuana, cheered the court decision, saying the narcotic in marijuana is already available in a tablet and will soon be available in a patch. 

Karlin added that people who obtain marijuana illegally run the risk of impurities, dosage regulation and adverse effects from smoking it.  

“It’s right that the Supreme Court ruled the way it did. I don’t think there is any good need for it.” 

But Westbrook, 48, who lives in an east San Francisco Bay suburb, says she uses marijuana for pain relief and to control the spasticity that is part of her disease. 

“It’s not about getting high. I’m too old for that. What it does is provide me with the necessary relief I need in order to live a functional life,” she said. 

On the Net: 

Supreme Court site: http://www.supremecourtus.gov 

Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative: http://www.rxcbc.org 

Marijuana Policy Project: http://www.mpp.org 

DEA: http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/agency/agency.htm


Supporters of Oakland club say they’ll keep fighting

The Associated Press
Tuesday May 15, 2001

OAKLAND — Supporters of the Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative say a Supreme Court ruling against them was a blow, but not a fatal one. 

“This decision is not the end of the line by any means,” said Robert Raich, an attorney who represents the club. 

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that there is no exception in federal law for people to use marijuana to ease their pain from cancer, AIDS or other illnesses. 

But Raich and other backers of the Oakland club said medical necessity was just one of several legal arguments they are ready to make in favor of cannabis distribution clubs and they hope to be able to go to the lower courts to contend, among other things, that people have a constitutional right to be free of pain. 

“We feel we have many other defenses left,” said Jeff Jones, executive director of the club.  

The club is forbidden from distributing pot but has remained open to issue ID cards to verified medical marijuana patients. 

The Supreme Court wasn’t ruling on Proposition 215, the voter-approved law that allows the possession and use of marijuana for medical purposes on a doctor’s recommendation. 

Interpretations of what the ruling would mean to medical marijuana users in California varied. 

“As far as I’m concerned, I’m doing business on Monday the same way I did business on Friday,” said Mendocino County District Attorney Norm Vroman, whose policy is not to prosecute in cases where people have no more than six mature plants and 2 pounds of dry marijuana.  

“If the feds want to prosecute these people they can. In California, the law has not changed one iota.” Attorney General Bill Lockyer issued a statement saying the high court’s opinion needed further review. 

But in Washington, Attorney General John Ashcroft issued a statement calling the ruling a “victory for enforcement of our nation’s drug laws.” 

Oakland resident Angel McClary, a 35-year-old woman with an inoperable brain tumor who said that medical marijuana is the only thing that can stimulate her appetite and keep her from starving to death, angrily denounced the ruling as she spoke at a news conference called by club backers. 

“The Supreme Court has American blood on their hands,” she said. McClary said she won’t stop using medical marijuana. 

“I am not going to let my children watch me die. If that is wrong, so be it,” she said.


Deregulation hits infamy in just five years

By Steve Lawrence Associated Press Writer
Monday May 14, 2001

Californians living with higher rates, rolling blackouts; utilities struggling 

 

SACRAMENTO – When he signed California’s electricity deregulation law, Gov. Pete Wilson said it would lower rates, spark competition and improve service “so no one literally is left in the dark.” 

So much for predictions. 

Nearly five years later, rates are up for millions of Californians, there’s virtually no competition for electricity customers, the state lives with rolling blackouts and one bankrupt utility, and Wilson says he knew the law was an “obviously flawed mechanism.” 

Few, if anyone, anticipated this in the final days of the Legislature’s 1996 session, when the deregulation bill passed unanimously and few interest groups uttered a word in opposition. 

“It was like a big prayer meeting,” said Nettie Hoge, executive director of The Utility Reform Network consumer group. ”(Almost) everyone signed off.” 

Now, the flaws have become more visible. They include: 

— A rate freeze that initially kept electricity rates artificially high and then, when wholesale prices skyrocketed last summer, drove the state’s biggest utilities deeply into debt. Wilson said the freeze kept the utilities from keeping pace with rising costs. 

— The Public Utility Commission’s decision to discourage utilities from signing long-term contracts to buy power. People on all sides of the issue now say such contracts could have stabilized prices. 

— The creation of a financial incentive for utilities to sell their power plants to unregulated wholesalers, who then could hold utilities hostage by forcing up prices for power. 

— Failure by lawmakers to anticipate the higher energy consumption that accompanied the state’s sharp economic growth in the late 1990s and 2000. 

Assemblyman Bill Leonard, who helped write the deregulation law, said lawmakers didn’t pay enough attention to state Energy Commission predictions in 1998 that power shortages could hit as early as 1999 or 2000 without more power plants. 

“The Legislature in California has never done its oversight responsibility as well as it should,” he said. “It’s always working on new legislation and trying to solve new problems.” 

California’s electricity consumption jumped 9.2 percent between 1996 and 2000 compared to 5.5 percent in the previous four years, according to the Energy Commission. This came as Arizona, Nevada and the Pacific Northwest increased their use as well, which dried up the power surplus of the early 1990s, said Mike Florio, an attorney for TURN. 

If legislators had anticipated the increased consumption, they could have included tax breaks or other incentives to encourage more plant construction, said Leonard, R-Rancho Cucamonga. 

Even so, electricity prices would have gone up without deregulation, said former PUC Commissioner P. Gregory Conlon, who voted for a PUC deregulation order that preceded the law. 

Electricity wholesalers have profited from the state’s power problems, but extreme weather conditions, limited power plant development, and increases in natural gas and pollution control costs for generators are mostly to blame for sharp increases in power prices, Conlon said. 

But the PUC added to the problem by creating too big of a financial incentive for utilities to sell many of their power plants, he said. 

In a recent report, the state auditor said increases in demand, lack of new plants and extreme weather all helped boost electricity prices. But the auditor also said the markets established by deregulation made it easier for generators to withhold power to get higher prices. 

“The whole system was designed by (power) sellers, not by buyers,” said Bill Sessa, a former spokesman for Pacific Gas & Electric Co., the state’s largest utility company. ”(The utilities) were looking at it from the standpoint of being sellers. The buyers of electricity were never truly represented.” 

Along with the flaws in the law, others have identified several possible culprits who helped create California’s current mess. 

Senate Minority Leader Jim Brulte, who helped write the deregulation bill while in the Assembly, said Proposition 9, an unsuccessful 1998 ballot measure, created uncertainty that discouraged plant construction. 

The proposal, backed by several consumer groups, would have ordered a 20 percent electricity rate cut and limited the ability of utilities to charge consumers to recover their noncompetitive investments. 

But Energy Commission spokeswoman Claudia Chandler said the uncertainty surrounding deregulation, not Proposition 9, caused the lull in power plant development. 

“We began getting applications again as soon as the +deregulation+ law went into effect,” early in 1998, she said. 

The commission certified only one plant, a 240-megawatt project that was never built, between 1995 and 1998. Since 1999, commissioners have approved 13 new plants with the ability to produce 8,464 megawatts. Seven are under construction. 

Jan Smutny-Jones, executive director of the Independent Energy Producers Association, a wholesalers’ group, says California’s deregulation approach was too middle-of-the road. 

“California was sort of a guy with one foot on the dock of regulation and the other foot on the boat of markets, and the boat left,” he said. “California did not stay on the dock and did not get on the boat and as a consequence got wet.” 

Sen. Sheila Kuehl, one of 30 lawmakers who voted for deregulation and are still in the Legislature, says the state never should have considered deregulation in the first place. 

“I believe what we’ve learned from this is that free-market principles only work where you can say no to a product,” the Santa Monica Democrat said. “In a critical industry like energy, water, public roads, free-market principles do not work and these industries need to be strictly regulated.”


San Jose student possibly infected with meningitis

The Associated Press
Saturday May 12, 2001

SAN JOSE— A San Jose middle school student is hospitalized after being diagnosed with what doctors say is probably meningococcal meningitis. 

The seventh grade boy is a student at Castillero Middle School. A letter was sent home with students Thursday afternoon informing parents of the situation – and Thursday night, Santa Clara County Health Department officials were at the school to answer parents’ questions. 

“The good news about meningococcal meningitis is that it’s not that easy to transmit,” said Dr. Sara Cody, a health department official. She told parents that the disease is only spread through contact with an infected person’s saliva or mucous. 

Health officials said there is no evidence of transmission at the middle school at this time and reassured parents that the risk to the general student population is very low.  

They urged parents not to panic and promised that this latest case is under control and not likely to affect other students. 

The infected student is on a course of antibiotics and is said to be doing well. His family and students who may have come in contact with him are also being treated with antibiotics as a precaution, officials say. 

Concerns about the disease have been heightened in recent weeks following the meningitis deaths of Michael Gordon, a Livermore high school student, and Nandi Phelps, a Berkeley elementary student. 

Symptoms of the disease include sever headache, fever and stiff neck.