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Giants stay local, draft Cash, Meyer

Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Thursday June 07, 2001

If all goes according to plan, the San Francisco Giants could have a serious Berkeley connection going at some point in the next few years. They drafted three players with Berkeley connections in Tuesday’s Major League Baseball Amateur Draft. 

With their third-round pick, the Giants took former Berkeley High player Julian Benavidez. Benavidez, a first baseman, has attended Diablo Valley College for the past two years. 

The sixth round saw the Giants taking Cal senior David Cash with the 196th overall pick. Cash, a right-handed pitcher, was an honorable mention All-Pac-10 pick this season. He finished the 2001 season 10-3 with four saves and concluded his Cal career with a 23-7 overall record with six saves. His 23 wins is fifth on the Bears’ career win list and his six saves is seventh on the Cal career save list. Cash is also eighth on the school’s career strikeout list (198). 

The Giants’ final Berkeley pick was Cal senior outfielder Rob Meyer. Meyer may have helped his draft status with a scorching postseason, going 6-for-12 with three home runs and seven RBI, and earning all-tournament honors. He was the Cal’s leading hitter this season with a .355 average and was honorable mention All-Pac-10.  

Other members of the 2001 Bears who were selected included senior first baseman Clint Hoover (14th round by the Houston Astros), junior left-hander Jason Dennis (14th round by the Anaheim Angels), and junior right-hander Trevor Hutchinson (20th round by the New York Mets). 

Hoover finished his Cal career fourth on the Bears’ all-time career RBI list (157), fifth on the career home run list (39) and eighth on the career doubles list (44). Dennis finished the 2001 season 5-3, including a 4-0 shutout of Stanford and a victory against Minnesota at the NCAA Tournament. Hutchinson was the Bears No. 1 starter this season, going 6-7 with a 3.85 ERA and 91 strikeouts in a team-high 114.6 innings. 

Cal head coach David Esquer said there weren’t any big surprises among the seniors taken. 

“I’m happy for all of them chance to go play pro ball,” he said. “I don’t think any of them are disappointed with where they were taken.” 

Esquer said he fully expected the two junior hurlers, Dennis and Hutchinson, to sign with the teams that drafted them rather than return to Cal for another season. 

“I can’t imagine they wouldn’t come to terms,” Esquer said. “With Trevor, I’m surprised he didn’t go higher. The Mets know what kind of talent they’ve got, I’d be surprised if they didn’t give him what he needs to sign with them.” 

Esquer also has to deal with uncertainty surrounding three of his signees for next season. 

Letter of intent signees Terry Jones, Tyler Adamczyk and Justin Nelson were all taken in the draft and could sign with their respective teams rather than play for Cal. Jones, a fourth round pick of the Philadelphia Phillies (110th pick), is a 6-2, 195 pound shortstop from Upland High School in Upland. Adamczyk is a 6-5, 180-pound right-handed pitcher/first baseman from Westlake Village who was drafted in the seventh round by the St. Louis Cardinals. Nelson is a 6-2, 210-pound left-handed outfielder/pitcher from Rancho Buena Vista High School in Vista who was drafted in the 20th round by the Anaheim Angels. Esquer said all three are still considering their options. 

“I don’t think anything is very apparent with the high school kids,” Esquer said. “Jones is a concern, because he was drafted in a good position. But all these kids are aware of value of a college education.” 

Esquer said that college coaches always have to consider the draft status of a recruit. 

“Sometimes players are too good, and they end up getting a lot of money to go straight to the pros. But if you go after those guys, you know there’s a good chance you’re never going to see them,” he said. 

“With other guys it can be a little bit of a crapshoot. You can be looking at a kid early, and they can blossom and become a top-five round talent. There’s always a risk involved, but you do your homework and try and get kids who value a college education.”


Thursday June 07, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 8: The Enemies, Pitch Black, The Fleshies, Supersift, Texas Thieves; June 9: Groovie Ghoulies, The Influents, Red Planet, Mallrats, Goat Shanty. 525-9926  

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m unless noted otherwise. June 7: Keni “El Lebrijano” Flamenco guitar; June 9, 6 - 8 p.m.: Sauce Piquante, 9 p.m. - Midnight: Whiskey Brothers; June 12: Mad and Eddie Duran. 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m. June 7: Irrationals; June 8: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sallie Hanna-Rhine, 10 p.m.: Bluesman Hideo Date; June 9: Robin Gregory and Bliss Rodriguez, 10 p.m.: The Ducksan Distone; June 10: Choro Time with Ron Galen and Friends. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 2, 9:30 p.m.: June 7, 10 p.m.: Dead DJ Nite with Digital Dave; June 8, 9:30 p.m. Ali Khan with Bellydance Troupe Lunatique; June 9, 9:30 p.m.: Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers; June 10, 7 p.m.: Food Not Bombs with Goodbye Flowers and INKA. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June :7 Alice Stuart, Folk blues, $17.50; June 8: Cats & Jammers Hot swing. $17.50; , June 9.: Danny Heines & Michael Manring; June 10: Roy Tyler and New Directions; June 12: Keith Little with Del Williams; June 13: Danu. $17.50.1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

La Peña Cultural Center “Cantiflas!” June 7 and June 8, 8 p.m. Herbert Siguenza, of the  

critically acclaimed trio Culture Clash, stars in this bilingual work-in-progress about legendary Mexican comedian Marion Moreno. With guest performers Eduardo Robledo and Tanya Vlach. 

$16. 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. (510) 849-2568 www.lapena.org  

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 7, Beatdown with DJs Delon, Yamu, Add1; June 8, Harvey Wainapel Quartet; June 9, Om Trio; June 12, Ben Graves Trio 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

The Berkeley TEMPO Festival of Contemporary Performances All performances begin at 8 p.m. June 8: Berkeley Contemporary Chamber Players; June 9: John Scott, John Abercrombie, George Marsh, Rich Fudoli, Mel Graves. $15 Hertz Hall, UC Berkeley Campus www.tempofestival.org 

 

The Farallone String Quartet June 10, 7:30 p.m. Quartets by Haydn. $8 - $10 Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 

 

World Harmony Chorus June 10, 2 p.m. Vocal music from around the world. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800 

 

Sungugal Ballet June 10, 4:30 p.m. Featuring master percussionist Djibi Faye and West African Band with traditional West African dance. $6 - $12. Jazzschool/La Note 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere Through June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“Cymbeline” Through June 24, Tues. - Thur. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Sun. 4 p.m. Opening of the California Shakespeare Festival features one of Shakespeare’s first romances, directed by Daniel Fish. $12 - $146. Bruns Memorial Amphitheater off Highway 24 at the Shakespeare Festival Way/Gateway Exit. 548-9666 or www.calshakes.org 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shaper’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Previews June 8, 9, 10, 13. Opens June 14, runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 7, 7:00: Viy; June 8, 7:30: Aerograd; June 8, 9:15: The Letter That Was Never Sent; June 9, 7:30: Comic and Avant-Garde Shorts; June 10, 5:30: Pitfall, 7:25: Woman In the Dunes. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“The Producers” June 10. Revisit this outrageous comedy classic, starring Zero Mostel and written by Mel Brooks. $2 Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237 

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

East Bay Open Studios June 9 & 10, 16 & 17, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Jennifer Foxly: Oil paintings and 2-d mixed media works 3206 Boise St.; Lewis Suzuki: Scenes from California to the Philippines, florals to nudes 2240 Grant St.; Guy Colwell: Painted replicas and recent original work 2028 9th St. (open until 7 p.m.) 

 

Wosene Kosrof June 13, 7 - 8:30 p.m. Ethiopian-born Berkeley resident will be exhibiting and discussing his paintings. One piece will be up for auction, proceeds to benefit the YMCA. Free. Crystal Room, Shattuck Hotel 2086 Allston 848-9622 ext. 3541  

 

PASSING: The Re-Definition of Sex and Gender Through the Personal Re-Presentation of Self Through June 16, Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Black and white photographs by Ann P. Meredith. Free. Reception with the artist June 7, 6 - 8 p.m. Photolab Gallery 2235 Fifth St.  

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Tyler James Hoare Sculpture and Collage Through June 27, call for hours. Party June 9, 5-9 p.m. with music by Sauce Piquante. The Albatross Pub 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato Through June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethiopia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910” chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. All events at 7:30 p.m. June 7: Dr. Amit Goswami talks about “The Visionary Window: A Quantum Physicist’s Guide to Enlightenment”; June 8: Scott Carrier reads from “Running After Antelope”; June 9: Richard Russo reads from “Empire Falls”, June 10: Irvine Welsh talks about “Glue.” 

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. All events at 7 p.m. June 8: For the younger readers, Eoin Colfer reads from “Artemis Fowl”; June 9: For the younger readers, Lemony Snicket reports on “The Vile Village.”  

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. Featured poets: June 11, Ivan Arguelles. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

Tours 

 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour. June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 


New mayor faces the two cities of L.A.

By Ruben Martinez Pacific News Service
Thursday June 07, 2001

 

 

The morning after L.A.’s most hotly-contested mayoral election in more than three decades, my e-mail and voice-mail are full of messages from friends and colleagues and virtual people. They share one sentiment – “we” were robbed. We Latinos, that is. 

I can’t say I was happy about the results, but neither can I say I agree with these voices. One said the whites weren’t ready to “trust a Mexican” in the mayor’s office. Another said the black political leadership sold out Latinos and sided with whites (implying that blacks, too, do not 

“trust a Mexican”). Yet another prophesied racial division. 

Official election results and exit polls show the election divided Los Angeles along ethnic and racial lines. African Americans voted overwhelmingly for mayor-elect Jim Hahn, as did moderate and conservative whites, especially in the San Fernando Valley. Latinos and progressives, 

we are told, voted for Antonio Villaraigosa who, as the media reminded us for more than a year, would have been become the city’s first Latino mayor since 1872. 

But for me the race wasn’t about race. It was about a candidate from a working-class background, with a long history of labor activism, attempting to forge a new multi-ethnic coalition the likes of which hadn’t been seen since the days of former mayor Tom Bradley, the city’s first African-American mayor. 

Bradley was elected with backing from then mostly-black South Los Angeles and the largely liberal Jewish enclave of the West Side. That coalition went up in flames during the riots of 1992, paving the way for the election of Republican mayor Richard Riordan – a fuzzy, warm kind of conservative who nonetheless called for a vastly increased police force. 

Villaraigosa’s coalition was a newer and more progressive version of Bradley’s. A native son of East L.A., he banked on support from Latinos, of course, but he never played the race card. A labor activist never places race over class inequity – that would set too many demons loose. 

In labor struggles, the issues are wages and working conditions. The labor force may be all brown and the bosses all white or Asian, but that isn’t the point for labor – you never know when you’ll need the support of like-minded people from other racial or ethnic groups. It’s about 

class, not race. 

It is hard to remember that in L.A. these days. The language of race and ethnicity permeates discourse. In large part this reflects the 2000 Census, which shows Latinos nearing an absolute majority, whites dipping below 30, black population about the same and a surging Asian population. But by and large, L.A.’s new neighborhoods are mixed. What divides us 

most is not language, or skin color. It is class. 

L.A. has become a city of staggering wealth – and staggering poverty. The United Way documented this not long ago in a report titled “A Tale of Two Cities.” Only a handful of sectors in the local economy have grown over the last decade. Most jobs have not been in the film and music industries or in high-tech, but in the “service sector” – jobs which involve literally “serving” someone. Hotels and restaurants, landscaping and nannying – in these jobs, union representation is scarce, not to mention health benefits or even a “living wage.” To a great degree, L.A.’s up-and-coming majority, Latinos, fill these jobs. But there are many whites, blacks and Asians “serving” as well, and this is the L.A. Villaraigosa sought to represent. 

In the final weeks of the campaign, Villaraigosa’s opponent Jim Hahn played the race card, using advertising imagery and rhetoric not much different from the infamous “Willy Horton” ads used by George Bush Sr. against Mike Dukakis. 

The problem for Villaraigosa and for the city is not so much the ethnic demons that were set loose. It is the fact that those demons mask, as they always have, the true issue. We may live in a city of many colors and languages, foods and musics. But most of us live in one city or another: in the L.A. of the served or the L.A. of the server. 

Those are the cities that Jim Hahn will face as the new mayor of Los Angeles. 

 

PNS Associate Editor Ruben Martinez is a Loeb Fellow at Harvard University and author of the forthcoming “Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail” (Metropolitan/Holt Books, September 2001)


Calendar of Events & Activities

Thursday June 07, 2001


Thursday, June 7

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Used book sale as a fund-raiser for the club, where public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. The club has regular meetings on the first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

Berkeley Unified School  

District 

Appreciation Dinner 

6 p.m. 

Berkeley Alternative High School 

2701 MLK Jr. Way 

Berkeley Unified School District Office of State and Federal Projects honors District Title I/State Compensatory Education, English Learner Advisory Committee representatives, and departing school principals. Guest speaker Dr. Mary Montle Bacon on “We Need to BE the Change We Want.” 

644-6202 

 

Free Writing, Cashiering &  

Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a community meeting.  

654-5486 

 

Skin Cancer Screening Clinic 

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center 

Summit Campus  

2450 Ashby Ave. 

Markstein Cancer Education Center 

Skin cancer screenings are offered only to people who, due to limited or no health insurance, would be able to have a suspicious mole or other skin changes examined. Appointments are required.  

869-8833 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly summer concert series. This week Advanced Jazz Workshop under direction of Mike Zilber. 

 

Community Environmental  

Advisory Commission Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Planning and Development 

First floor Conference Room 

2118 Milvia Street 

Among items to be discussed, Air Study and Chrome 6, TMD staffing, and arsenic, pentachlorophenol and creosote in playgrounds. 

705-8150 

 

Housing Advisory  

Commission Meeting 

7:30 p.m. 

South Berkeley Senior Center 

2939 Ellis St. 

This meeting will include a status report and possible action on Masons’ decision not to seek housing tax credits for their 3132-3138 MLK Jr. Way Senior Housing Development Project. 

981-5411 

 

Public Works  

Commission Meeting 

7 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst Avenue 

Among other items on the agenda, there will be a report on the May 15 presentation to the City Council on the Sewer Fund and the Sewer Correction Program, as well as the following media coverage. 

981-6300 

 

Board of Library Trustees 

9 a.m. 

South Branch Library 

1901 Russell Street 

Special meeting ending with a closed session to evaluate candidates for the position of Director of Library Services. 

644-6095  

 

“Sepharad, Sephardim:  

A Journey through Jewish Spain” 

7:30 p.m. 

Easy Going Travel Shop and Bookstore 

1385 Shattuck Avenue 

Slide presentation and lecture by Steven David Bileca. Free. 

843-3533 

 


Friday, June 8

 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Backpacking Essentials 

7 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Review the fundamental how-tos of selecting gear for a weekend backpacking trip. Free 

527-4140 

 

City Commons Club,  

Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Doris Sloan, Ph.D., on “Treasures Along the Silk Road Oases.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 

Women In Black Protests 

5 - 6:30 p.m. 

Montgomery and Market Streets 

San Francisco 

Part of a worldwide protest taking place in 103 cities, Bay Area women and men in black will protest 34 years of Israeli occupation of the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Sponsored in part by Berkeley Women In Black and the Middle East Children’s Alliance. 

510-434-1304 

 

Berkeley Women  

In Black Protest 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Bancroft and Telegraph 

If San Francisco is too far to travel, stay on this side of the Bay and join the small group of Berkeley Women In Black who have been protesting on Telegraph every Friday since 1988. 

 


Saturday, June 9

 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Celebrates original crafts, international diversity, and community life. One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live performances and a variety of food. Free admission.  

Call 986-9337 

 

The Bite of REI 2001 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Taste some of the best, lightweight backpacking food and energy snacks available. At 1 p.m. Rick Greenspan and Hal Kahn with demonstrate how to turn your outdoor trips into gourmet adventures. Free 527-4140 

 

La Pena 26th Anniversary  

Benefit to Honor Dolores  

Huerta 

7 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

Music performances, slide show and raffle in honor of special guest Dolores Huerta, farm worker’s and women’s rights advocate. Huerta worked with Cesar Chavez to establish and lead the National Farm Workers Association in the 1960’s, and has worked tirelessly to improve the lives of farm workers for decades. Proceeds will go to La Pena and Huerta’s medical expenses. $20 - $25. 

849-2568 www.lapena.org 

 


Sunday, June 10

 

Counteracting Negative Emotions 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Exercises presented by Sylvia Gretchen, Dean of Nyingma Studies. Free and open to the public. 

843-681 

 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live entertainment and food. Free admission. 986-9337 

 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

 

 

“Kindertransport: A Personal Account” 

10:30 a.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Hear the moving story Ralph Samuel, who escaped Nazi Germany as the age of eight. Samuel was one of an estimated 10,000 children who were rescued through the efforts of the Kindertransport operation. $4 BRJCC members, $5 for general public. Admission includes brunch. 848-0237. 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Ave. 

Group meditation though instrumental music and devotional songs. Led by Lucian Balmer and Baoul Scavullo. Free. 

496-3468 

 

Monday, June 11 

Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board 

4 p.m. 

One Frank H. Ogawa Plaza 

Hearing Room One 

Oakland 

The Board will meet and discuss the request to make the Claremont Hotel an official landmark.  

 

Berkeley School Volunteers 

3 - 4:30 p.m. 

1835 Allston Way 

Orientation for volunteers interested in helping in summer academic and recreation programs. 

644-8833 

 

Tuesday, June 12 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Cooking for BEFHP Women 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

BEFHP Women’s Resource Center 

2140 Dwight Way 

Come help the Berkeley Emergency Food and Housing Project prepare, serve, and cleanup a hot meal prepared for Berkeley’s homeless women and children. Teens 16+.  

650-965-0242 

 

Wednesday, June 13  

Defining Diversity 

7 - 9 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Different interpretations of biological and cultural diversity and how it’s used for very different purposes.  

548-2220 

 

Commission On Disability Hearings 

4 - 6 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst St. 

Open forum, opportunity for public to present ideas and concerns about barriers for people with disabilities and accessibility of City facilities. Public comment on Berkeley’s proposed “Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan.” Also, naming I-80 overcrossing after Ed Roberts, requesting Congressional Representatives and Senators to add benefits for dental and eyeglasses coverage in Medi-Care. 

981-6342 

 

Lead-Safe Painting and Home Remodeling 

6 - 8 p.m. 

Claremont Branch Library 

2940 Benvenue Ave. 

Free course on how to detect and remedy lead hazards in the home. 

567-8280 

 

“Illusions of the ‘New Economy’” 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

Talk by professor and author Dick Walker. $5 donation requested. 

415-863-6637  

 

Claremont Elmwood Neighborhood Association General Meeting 

7:30 - 9:30 p.m. 

St. Clement’s Episcopal Church 

2837 Claremont Blvd. 

Covers area of Berkeley south of Dwight Way and east of Collage Avenue. Presentations on neighborhood issues. 

549-3793 

 

Trees and Shrubs of California 

7:30 p.m. 

UC Berkeley Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

John Stuart and John Sawyer will be speaking about and signing their new book, “Trees and Shrubs of California.” Free. 

643-2755 

 

Thursday, June 14 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley High Folklorico De Aztlan. 

 

Camping and Hiking Slide Presentation 

7 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Guidebook author Tom Stienstra gives a slide presentation on where to go hiking and camping this summer in the Sierra and Shasta region. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Berkeley School Volunteers 

10:30 a.m. - Noon 

1835 Allston Way 

Orientation for volunteers interested in helping in summer academic and recreation programs. 

644-8833 

 

Friday, June 15  

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

City Commons Club, Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Edward Fox on “Regional Development Plans of The Wilderness Society.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 

Saturday, June 16  

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Berkeley Arts Festival Music Circus 

1 p.m. - 5 p.m. 

Shattuck Ave. between University Ave. and Channing Way 

The Music Circus will feature dozens of eclectic performances ranging from string quartets to blues and jazz. Free bus fare to and from the event offered by AC Transit. 665-9496. Free. 

 

Botanical Garden Spring Party 

3 - 6 p.m. 

UC Berkeley Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Celebrating the completion of the new Arid House and the renovation of the Southern African area. Food, wine and jazz. Fund-raiser for the Garden, $25 per person. 

643-2755 

 

Puppet Shows on Cultural and Medical Differences 

1:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. 

Hall of Health 

2230 Shattuck Ave. (lower level) 

Two shows for kids of all ages and their families promote acceptance and understanding of cultural and medical differences. Free. 

549-1564 

 

Poets’ Corner 

1:30 - 4 p.m. 

Shattuck and Kittredge 

Ten poets will read on the downtown street corner as a kick-off event for the two-week Berkeley Arts Festival. 

649-3929 

 

Sunday, June 17 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

11 a.m. 

Berkeley Amtrack Station  

Foot of University Ave. 

Berkeley Arts Festival tour of coastlines installation guided by landscape architect Tom Leader. Walk culminates on the Berkeley Marina. 

486-0411 

 

Carefree/Carfree Tour #2 

1 p.m. 

Berkeley Arts Festival Gallery 

2200 Shattuck Ave. 

Bus and walk to: The Crucuble, workshop of arts and the industry; Bay Area Center for the Consolidated Arts; and the Juneteenth Celebration, annual street fair of African-American Roots with music, dance and food. 

486-0411 

 

The Discord Aggregate Intersection 

7 p.m. 

Gathering of local artists, poets, musicians, composers and others. Non-profit group meets every three to four weeks. For location and other information e-mail alemap@discord-aggregate.com 

 

Tuesday, June 19 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion will center on frugality, generosity, simplifying life, and dealing with money. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Fibromyalgia Support Group  

Noon - 2 p.m.  

Alta Bates Medical Center 

Maffly Auditorium, Herrick Campus  

2001 Dwight Way  

This will be a rap session.  

601-0550 

 

Wednesday, June 20 

Carefree/Carfree Tour 

11 a.m. 

Berkeley Arts Festival Gallery 

2200 Shattuck Ave. 

Meet at the Gallery, take the bus to the Oakland Museum to take a tour with David Bacon of his exhibition “Every Worker Is An Organizer: Farm Labor and the Resurgence of the UFW.” 

486-0411 

 

Thursday, June 21 

Best Northern California Hikes 

7 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Guidebook author Matt Heid shares his favorite day hikes and overnight backpacking trips in Northern California. Slide presentation. Free. 

527-4140 

 

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a “Pride Mass.”  

654-5486 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Capoeira Arts Cafe. 

 

Friday, June 22 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1 - 3 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

City Commons Club, Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Jeffrey Riegle, Ph.D., on “Historical Reasons for China’s Current Conduct.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 

Saturday, June 23 

“Feast of Fire” benefit for the Crucible 

10:30 p.m. 

The Crucible 

1036 Ashby Ave. 

Act III, The Flight of Icarus, will feature live music, and performances by several groups including Capacitor and Xeno. Price of admission benefits the Crucible, a multi-disciplinary community arts center. $20 at the door. 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

Summer Solstice Celebration 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Civic Center Park 

Center St. and MLK Jr. Way 

Farmers market plus crafts fair and live reggae and jazz. 

548-3333 

 

Sunday, June 24 

Hands-On Bicycle Repair Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn how to fix a flat from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free  

527-4140 

 

Uncle Eye 

2 p.m. 

Berkeley-Richmond Jewish 

Community Center 

1414 Walnut Ave. 

Come see Ira Levin, a.k.a. Uncle Eye, give a special performance as a fund-raiser for a television pilot to be filmed this summer. $7 - $10. 

848-0237 or www.uncle-eye.com 

 

Wednesday, June 27 

Conversations in Commedia 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

The series pairs radical theater “elders” to share memories of their years in commedia. This week with former Mime Troupe actress Audrey Smith and Ladies Against Women character Selma Spector. $6 - $8. 

849-2568 

 

Thursday, June 28 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley Opera performs pieces of Carmen. 

 

Friday, June 29  

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Saturday, June 30 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Science of Spirituality 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 Collage Avenue 

Professor Andrew Vidich will speak on “Rumi: Mystic and Romantic Love, Stories of Masnavi.” Childcare and vegetarian food provided. Free. 

925-830-2975  

 

 


Minority numbers up in advanced classes

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Thursday June 07, 2001

Berkeley High is often criticized for lacking diversity in its high level classes, particularly its Advanced Placement classes, but one group has tackled the problem head on. 

In a school that’s 37 percent African American, less than 1 percent of students enrolled in AP classes are African American.  

Students, parents, teachers and administrators have taken turns lambasting the lack of integration in Berkeley High’s AP classes for years, but whenever the discussion got around to how to solve the problem, consensus proved illusive. 

Students can earn college credit after taking AP classes, which are designed to prepare them for advanced studies. 

Lack of diversity in AP classes is a problem throughout the state, said Antwi Acom, a graduate student in sociology at UC Berkeley. In some school districts, Acom said, where the numbers of minority students has increased, AP offerings have declined overall, suggesting an institutional belief that such classes aren’t meant for blacks and Latinos. 

In Berkeley, the lack of diversity in high level classes is often listed as one more symptom of the achievement gap, where whites and Asians tend to outperform blacks and Latinos on standardized tests. Minority students are not prepared for high level classes when they reach Berkeley High, the argument goes. 

But some time last summer, a core group of Berkeley High parents and teachers got tired of the talk. The set out to systemically study the problem and, just as systematically, to solve it. 

The so-called AP Project began with the premise that there has never been a shortage of high-achieving and motivated students of color at Berkeley High to fill up AP classes – should they choose to do so. 

After months of surveying students, the AP Project leaders found that the top reason minority students were not signing up for AP classes was: The fact that minorities were not signing up for AP classes.  

In other words, few minorities wanted to venture into classes where they would very possibly be the only student of color in a class of 24 students. 

The project leaders also discovered a culture of peer pressure at the school, however, where minority students who did take AP classes tended to be disparaged by their minority peers.  

Furthermore, they found concerns among minority students themselves that perhaps they were not prepared for these high level classes, and to sign up for them would mean, among other humiliations, watching their GPAs take a dive. (AP classes are weighted more heavily than regular classes in calculating students’ GPAs). 

Enlisting the help of Berkeley High Principal Frank Lynch, the AP Project set out to woo minority students into AP classes. A select group of high performing minority students were invited to one-on-one meetings with Berkeley High counselors, where they discussed the possibility of signing up for AP classes. After meetings with the first 17 students, 15 agreed to go for it, according to Kristin Shepherd, president of the Berkeley High Parent Teacher Student Association. 

By the end of the year, the AP project had recruited 60 African American and Latino students to take AP economics, government and English next year. The goal, said Shepherd, is to have four AP classes where half the class is made up of minority students. 

On Tuesday night, the teachers who will teach the AP classes next year met with the parents of the African American and Latino students to hear concerns and give assurances. One after another the teachers said they were committed to helping these students succeed, and would find ways to get them any extra help they felt they needed. 

“I’ve been waiting a long time for an opportunity to do something like this,” said Berkeley High government teacher Steve Teel. 

“I think you guys really have an opportunity here to change the culture of the whole school,” said Alison Johnson, chairperson of the Berkeley High English Department. 

After the meeting, Berkeley High junior Regina Alexander, an African American student who plans to take AP English next year, said the prospect of taking an AP class is far less intimidating when she knows there will be many other students of color in the class with her. 

“I think a program like (the AP Project) would be necessary at any school,” said Regina’s father, Reginald Alexander. “It’s a means of getting all cultures involved.” 

 


Gladstone makes his first change, fires two

Staff Report
Thursday June 07, 2001

New Cal athletic directory Steve Gladstone put his first stamp on the athletic department this week, firing two long-time employees and starting a search for five new associate athletic directors just four days after officially taking over his new position. 

The two employees who were let go, associate AD for communications and marketing Kevin Reneau and associate AD and senior women’s administrator Chris Dawson, had a combined 47 years of service to the school. 

“There’s no question that there is considerable emotion around change of any kind,” Gladstone said. “There is clearly a sense of concern and compassion for Chris and Kevin, and their years of service to Cal made the decision even more difficult.” 

Reneau had been with the Cal athletic department since 1977, when he graduated from school. Dawson’s 23 years on campus included 10 years as sports information director for women. 

“These decisions have been made to guide us in our specific mission to serve our athletes and programs and put them in the best possible position to succeed,” Gladstone said in a statement. “This reorganization gives us an opportunity to expand on good work already being performed. We are not starting from ground zero.” 

In addition to replacing Reneau and Dawson, Gladstone announced that he has also created three new associate AD positions, bringing to total to seven. He indicated that a national search for the new positions would begin later this week, and the spots would be filled by the time the fall term begins. 

As part of the re-organization, Bob Driscoll will be retained as an associate AD, as will Kevin Anderson. Driscoll served as interim AD until Gladstone was chosen last month, and was reportedly considering leaving Cal.


FORUM

Thursday June 07, 2001

Editor: 

I am writing in response to a letter that appeared in the daily planet dated June 5, 2001 entitled “County School Board should support its Superintendent” from three locally elected members representing the Berkeley Community. 

As a 10-year member of the Alameda County Board of Education, I was disappointed by the lack of understanding by the three locally elected officials: Terry Doran and John Selawsky of the School Board and Derryl Moore of the Peralta Community College District relative to the budget development process of the County Board of Education. 

Prior to submitting the letter, neither person approached and/or called me to discuss the issues currently facing the County Office of Education. Those who know me as a long time resident/activist of the South Berkeley Community, know that I can be easily be reached. 

In fact, the Daily Planet publishes on a regular basis how the citizens of the community can get in touch with its locally elected officials. I was not contacted by any of these officials to have a “sit down” and discuss the issues facing the County Office of Education and how the County Board, under State law, has responsibility for adopting an annual budget. 

Let me take this opportunity to advise the people of Berkeley what the Issues are. This is clearly an issue around policy implementation of the budget and its expenditures consistent with County Board adopted policy. My concerns are and continue to be, how do we balance the services provided to school districts and meet the needs of students that are the most “at risk”, kids served by the County Office of Education directly. 

Those kids, for the most part, are kids of color. It is the Board's policy that the number one priority for funding in the county is to meet their needs. The issues between the Board and the Superintendent are philosophical differences on how best to expend County resources. 

It is not about personalizing the process; it not about politics.  

Let's talk about the implementation of the budget over the last two years under the stewardship of Superintendent Jordan. The facts are: 

1. To date the county superintendent has failed to produce a balanced budget. 

2. As documented by the most recent fiscal audit, the County Board's reserves are the at its lowest point in years. 

3. There have been expenditures of state lottery funds without County Board approval as directed by Board policy. 

4. There was a failure to submit to the state an evaluation of the juvenile court schools as mandated by the state. 

But more importantly, Superintendent Sheila Jordan has proposed a FY 2001/02 budget that projects a deficit in access of $1.1 million predicated on a 10 percent salary increase to all employees. In order to pay for this increase, Ms. Jordan is proposing to pay for it by eliminating substantially reducing student programs, eliminating the entire student program reserves along with staff reductions in student programs/services.  

I along with other members of the County Board find it unacceptable to “balance the deficit of the County Office on the backs on the students that are the most at-risk kids in Alameda County.” 

It is the board's position that Ms. Jordan reduce management/administrative positions projected to cost roughly $5.8 million or 20 percent of the total FY 2001/02 projected budget. It should be fully understood that one out of every four employees in the County Office of Education under the management of the County Superintendent Jordan is a director, manager or administrator. 

It is the position of the board that this ratio of total employees (66 out Of 259) is excessive and threatens the “future solvency” of the County Office of Education. 

In the words of Spike Lee, Doran, Selawsky and Moore have been “bamboozled.” But don't feel bad you are not alone. 

Jerome Wiggins,  

Trustee Area One, Alameda County Board of Education


Council opens public hearing on Beth El

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Thursday June 07, 2001

The City Council opened the first round of what promises to be a long public hearing concerning a neighborhood land-use issue that has attracted citywide interest – the proposed synagogue and school at 1301 Oxford St. 

The council adjourned Tuesday night’s meeting at 11:30 p.m. after four-and-one-half hours of public testimony from nearly 60 supporters and opponents of the 32,000-square-foot project, proposed by the Beth El Congregation. Mayor Shirley Dean said there are still more than 100 people who have signed up to address the council when the hearing is continued on June 26.  

Speakers included neighbors of the proposed site, Beth El members and representatives from religious and environmental organizations. 

“I don’t think we have ever had this number of speakers,” Dean said on Wednesday. “Usually we are able to complete a public hearing in the course of one meeting.” 

Another public hearing, related to a Beth El appeal of the denial of an Alteration Permit, has yet to be scheduled.  

“We won’t be able to schedule that until we get a good idea when this hearing will finish up,” she said. 

A council decision on both appeals was scheduled for July 24, the last meeting before the council takes summer recess. Now, some councilmembers are saying that a decision isn’t likely until after September or later.  

“I’d be surprised if we are finished with this by Christmas,” said Councilmember Polly Armstrong. 

The fire marshal closed access to the second-floor City Council Chambers a half-hour before the hearing began because the chambers were already filled beyond its 140-person capacity. The closure left more than 100 people in the building’s entrance way and nearly 200 people outside on the stairs and front lawn. Speakers were placed outside the building and a television was set up at the stairwell inside the building so those who couldn’t get in could follow the proceedings. 

Councilmember Dona Spring said she has seen huge numbers of people come out for budget issues but has never seen so many turn out for a land-use issue. 

“I tried to get the hearing moved to the Berkeley Community Theater so we could accommodate everyone,” she said. “That way we wouldn’t have had to lock people out, which is so unfair.” 

Spring said the city manager discouraged use of the theater because the City Council Chambers were already set up for sound and video recording. 

The public hearing is part of a Live Oak Codornices Creek Neighborhood Association appeal of the Zoning Adjustments Board’s approval of a use permit to build the synagogue. The appeal was filed by LOCCNA attorney Sharon Duggan. The appeal was signed by representatives from 10 environmental organizations including the San Francisco Bay Chapter of the Sierra Club, The Golden Gate Audubon Society and the International Rivers Network. 

Project opponents are concerned about irreparable damage to Codornices Creek, the project’s size and traffic problems caused by school programs, religious meetings and social events that will take place at the synagogue. They are also concerned about alterations to the 2-acre site, which is a city landmark. 

Beth El members counter they have taken neighbors concerns and the design reflects a project that is sensitive to the creek, neighborhood and the historic status of the site.  

Religious leaders who spoke if favor of Beth El’s project included the Rev. Marvis Peoples from the Liberty Hill Baptist Church and the Rev. Dr. Frankie Moore, who read a statement from Mark Wilson, pastor of McGee Avenue Baptist Church. 

The City Council requested opposing sides work with professional mediator Peter Bluhon. The parties agreed and have already taken part in two meetings. A third meeting was scheduled for Wednesday.  

Bluhon said both sides have requested the results of the meetings remain confidential. “Both sides are doing something that’s a very important step in the mediation process,” Bluhon said. “They are clearly and completely describing the concerns, needs and goals they have for their respective interests.” 

Dean reminded council and the audience that if a compromise is reached during mediation, the entire public hearing process will begin again.  

The public hearing related to the LOCCNA appeal will continue on June 26, at the City Council Chambers, 2134 Martin Luther King Jr. Way at 7 p.m.


Pacifica Radio troubles continue

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Thursday June 07, 2001

Sen. John Burton, D-San Francisco, president pro-tem of the State Senate, plunged last week into the conflict between the Pacifica Foundation Board – the nonprofit holder of licenses to five radio stations including KPFA in Berkeley – and a number of the radio stations’ listener-sponsors and their paid and unpaid staffs. 

Last week Burton fired off a letter to David Acosta, chair of the Pacifica Board, saying: “The California Legislature continues to have strong concerns about actions by Pacifica Radio and the impact of those actions on its stations and listeners.” 

The letter asks Acosta, who did not return Daily Planet calls, to clarify three issues: the board’s “refusal to share KPFA’s financial information with KPFA management;” its use of listener donations for the board’s legal fees; and the board’s use of funds “to oppose union organizing.” 

David Landau, a journalist with KPFA’s news department and staff representative to the Local Advisory Board, went to Sacramento last week and, in his capacity as a LAB representative, spoke with Burton. David Adelson, interim chair of the KPFK (Los Angeles area) Local Advisory Board and Vic Bedoian, manager of the Fresno station that repeats much of KPFA’s programming, accompanied Landau. 

Landau said Wednesday the conversation with Burton included a discussion of the difficulty KPFA management has in gaining access to the money it has raised. “KPFA’s management doesn’t know its own balance sheet or what it can spend,” he said, adding, “Pacifica’s own board members can’t find out (about the finances).” 

Management must go to the board which signs every check, other than payroll, he said. 

Another issue is that Pacifica is spending an unknown amount of money fighting lawsuits brought by listeners, former employees and local advisory boards. 

On the question of the board opposing union activities, Landau said at WBAI, Pacifica’s New York station, the board fought an attempt to include volunteer staff in the employees’ union. “Pacifica spends a lot of money to try to thwart efforts at various stations,” he said. 

Dave Sebeck, spokesperson for Burton, said the legislature’s role was to assure that the mission of the California nonprofit is carried out. “Public broadcasting has a special place in the state,” he said. 

••• 

In other Pacifica Foundation-related news, the Congressional Progressive Caucus – made up of more than 50 progressive members of the U.S. House of Representatives and one senator – is meeting to talk about how to best follow up after its hearings on the conflict at the listener-sponsored stations. 

Andrew Sousa, spokesperson for Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, who is vice chair of the caucus, said the caucus may decide to hold town-hall style meetings in a number of locations to learn more about the situation. They may “place (the conflict) in the context of free speech,” Soussa said, noting that Pacifica stations are among the few avenues progressive politicians have, on a national scale, to be heard.


Beth El: project blends into area area

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Thursday June 07, 2001

More than 160 people signed up to address the City Council during a public hearing on the controversial Beth El proposal to build a synagogue and school at 1301 Oxford St. 

While time allowed for only 60 people to speak Tuesday, the others will have their turn June 26 when the hearing will be continued.  

Those who spoke on both sides of  

the issue raised concerns that have been debated since Beth El’s application process began two years ago.  

Members of the Live Oak Codornices Creek Neighborhood Association, which has taken the lead in opposing the project, raised concerns that Codornices Creek, which runs through the property, will never be daylighted if the project is allowed to be built at its current scale. They also spoke about traffic and noise problems and the concern that the property, a city landmark, will be altered. 

Alan Kay was the first LOCCNA member to address the council. 

“(Beth El) proposes for that site a massive building,” he said, “one that does not acknowledge or respect that site’s unique history, one that does not integrate gracefully into the neighborhood surrounding the site, and one that will flout the expressed wish of the citizens of Berkeley and the city’s own Creek Ordinance that (says) creeks (should) flow freely and be daylighted whenever possible.” 

Beth El member Harry Pollock was the first speaker in favor of the project. He told the council that the synagogue approached the neighbors during the design process and sought their feedback. 

“The process has worked this time,” he said. “We met with the neighbors and when we hired the architects, we instructed them to incorporate their concerns into the design.” 

The architect for the project, John Rubble of Moore, Rubble and Yedell of Southern California, then made a presentation to the council, showing the measures taken to reduce the scale of the project and to reduce its visual impact. 

“The buildings have been set back from Oxford Street,” Rubble said. “And there is little chance that passersby will be able to see the entire project from the street.” 

He also described how a children’s play area was surrounded by a low wall to muffle noise and how air conditioning allows Beth El members to keep the doors of the social hall closed, also reducing noise. 


BRIEFS

Staff
Thursday June 07, 2001

 

Day dedicated to co-founder of farm workers’ union 

 

June 9 has been declared Dolores Huerta Day in Berkeley. A proclamation by Mayor Shirley Dean will be part of La Peña Cultural Center’s 26th Anniversary Celebration in honor of Huerta, who, with Cesar Chavez, co-founded the National Farm Workers Association in 1962. The organization later become the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee. 

Huerta, National Women’s Hall of Fame inductee, will be the guest of honor at the celebration which begins at 7 p.m. at 3105 Shattuck Ave. La Peña will provide live entertainment and proceeds will go towards Huerta’s recent medical expenses.  

 

Summer classes offered at Berkeley High 

 

Berkeley High School students who need to make up failed classes or receive some elective or physical education credits have opportunities to do so this summer. The BHS summer program runs from June 25 - Aug. 3, and late registration will take place June 20 - 21. The program is open to all BHS students, but cannot accept incoming freshmen. 

An Independent Study Program is also available for students who work or otherwise cannot attend school every week day in the summer. This program runs June 25 - Aug. 3, and students are required to meet with one teacher per subject once a week as well as completing 10 hours of work weekly. Students may also attend the College of Alameda, Merritt, or Vista junior colleges, whose summer sessions run from June 18 - July 28. Students must obtain concurrent enrollment forms from their BHS counselors.  

For more information call 644-6120 or 644-4578 or stop by the BHS administrative portable. For the Independent Study Program call 644-8592 or go to BHS G111. Vista College can be reached at 981-2800. For other junior colleges call 466-7368 or stop by BHS G111.


Senate votes to limit fat, sugar content in school food

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Worrying about “an epidemic” of sedentary, obese and unhealthy students, the Senate voted Wednesday to limit the fat and sugar content in much of the food served at California schools. 

“The food we feed our children is killing them,” said one supporter of the limits, Sen. Steve Peace, D-El Cajon, who argued that fat-filled, sugar-laden food has done more harm to students than tobacco. 

But Sen. Ray Haynes, R-Temecula, said lawmakers should be more concerned about limiting students’ access to condoms, abortions and pornography and that restricting school menus would merely encourage older students to eat off campus. 

“I never thought we would be fast-food fascists,” he said. “This bill goes just a little bit too far. It’s a little bit too intrusive.” 

“What my children choose to eat is none of your business,” added Sen. Tom McClintock, R-Northridge. 

By a 22-15 vote, senators sent the Assembly a bill by Sen. Martha Escutia, D-Commerce, that would: 

• Ban, from a half hour before the start of school until a half hour after school, the serving of fruit drinks that include additional sweeteners, sports drinks containing more than 25 grams of sweeteners and carbonated beverages.  

• Require that no more than 35 percent of the calories in school snacks, sweets and side dishes come from fat and that no more than 10 percent of the calories in those foods come from saturated fat. 

• Allow sugar to make up no more than 35 percent of a snack, sweet or side dish by weight. The restrictions wouldn’t cover nuts, seeds, fruits or vegetables. 

• Limit drinks other than milk and bottled water to 12 ounces, ban the serving of jumbo-size entrees and require school snack bars and stores to offer fruits and vegetables as well as other items. Sen. Deborah Ortiz, D-Sacramento, said the bill was a response to “an epidemic of sedentary children” who are overweight and increasingly suffering from diabetes, heart disease and other health problems. 

“These are children who will burden our health care system in the next 10, 20 and 30 years,” she said.  

Grocery Manufacturers of America, an association that includes food and beverage companies, condemned the bill as “a misguided attempt at addressing childhood obesity” by setting up “arcane rules.” 

“A better approach would be to increase the availability of physical activity programs and give school boards the resources they need to teach children how to make wise choices about proper nutrition,” said Kristin Power, GMA’s western regional director for state affairs. 


Smoker wins $3 billion in Philip Morris suit

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

 

LOS ANGELES — A jury Wednesday awarded a cancer-stricken smoker more than $3 billion from tobacco giant Philip Morris, the largest judgment against a cigarette maker in a lawsuit brought by an individual. 

The Superior Court jury found against Philip Morris on all six claims of fraud, negligence and making a defective product. 

Richard Boeken, 56, of Topanga was awarded $3 billion in punitive damages and $5.5 million in general damages. 

“We thought that figure would hurt them, make them stand up and take notice,” juror Denise Key said of the punitive damages. “We want them to be responsible, to put on their product that the product will kill so when you smoke you smoke at your own risk.” 

It was the largest jury award won by an individual against a cigarette maker. The largest judgment against the tobacco industry in a class-action lawsuit was $145 billion awarded last year to thousands of sick Florida smokers. Philip Morris was one of five tobacco companies in that case. 

Boeken, who suffers from incurable lung cancer, smiled and gave a thumbs-up sign as the 18-page verdict was read. He declined to speak to reporters after the hearing. 

Philip Morris attorney Maurice Leiter said he will appeal. 

“We recognize Philip Morris is an unpopular company. It makes a dangerous product, but clearly, the evidence does not support this verdict,” Leiter said. 

He said the company believes Boeken ignored “a mountain of information” about the health risks of smoking and chose to continue his habit. 

Boeken’s attorney, Michael Piuze, said he did not know how the jury decided on the award. 

“I don’t know where it came from, but we’re pleased,” Piuze said. 

The award may not pass a new test adopted by the U.S. Supreme Court, some attorneys warned. 

“The punitive damage award has to bear some relationship to compensatory damage,” said attorney Michael Hausfeld, who sued tobacco companies in May, claiming they violated federal racketeering laws to hook children on cigarettes. 

“Clearly here the punitive award is an expression of total outrage and I’m not sure under the Supreme Court test for a single individual that kind of a differential would be upheld,” Hausfeld said. 

Boeken had sought more than $12 million in compensatory damages such as medical bills and lost earnings, and between $100 million and $10 billion in punitive damages. 

He was diagnosed in 1999 with lung cancer, which has spread to his lymph nodes, back and brain. He took up cigarettes in 1957 at age 13 and was smoking at least two packs of Marlboros every day for more than 40 years. Piuze said his client had kicked heroin and alcohol, but renewed his smoking habit after trying to quit several times. 

Piuze argued that his client was a victim of a decades-long tobacco industry campaign to promote smoking as “cool” but the company concealed the serious dangers of smoking. 

During closing arguments, Piuze said Philip Morris is “the world’s biggest drug dealer, something that puts the Colombian drug cartels to shame.” 

Attorneys for Philip Morris didn’t deny that smoking caused Boeken’s illness but argued that he ignored health warnings about the dangers of cigarettes and chose to smoke despite the risk. 

The jury began deliberations on May 22 but had to start over again two days later because a panelist was dismissed to take a long-planned vacation. 

Jurors during the 7-week-long trial were presented with a pile of evidence that included company memos and videotaped depositions from Boeken and clips of tobacco company executives’ 1994 congressional testimony. 

Key, the juror, said she viewed Philip Morris as simply a company trying to make money. 

“I don’t see them as corporate scum. I see them as a business,” Key said. 

Juror Ann Anderson revealed some of the thinking that went on in deliberations. 

“I think in the jury room a lot of people thought we wanted to punish Philip Morris,” she said. “It wasn’t to punish them. It was to make them stand up and take notice.” 

The verdict was the latest in a series of tobacco industry courtroom losses. Earlier this week, a Brooklyn, N.Y., jury found tobacco companies liable for deceptive business practices, ordering them to pay up to $17.8 million to treat ailing New York smokers. 

There have been six prior cases in which plaintiffs won individual awards since the mid-1990s, said Richard Daynard, a law professor and chairman of the Tobacco Products Liability Project at Northeastern University School of Law in Boston. 

But only one of those plaintiffs has actually received the money, a 70-year-old ex-smoker who received $1.1 million from Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. as full payment plus interest on a 1995 jury award of $750,000. The company is appealing the verdict to the U.S. Supreme Court, but was ordered to make the payment. 

Shares of Philip Morris finished regular trading at $50, down 83 cents. In after-hours trading, shares fell $1.75 to $48.25.


Bill will expand rights for domestic partners

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

SACRAMENTO — After a long emotional debate involving scripture and hardball politics, the Assembly approved a bill Wednesday that would give new rights to domestic partners. 

The bill would expand the legal rights granted to gay and senior couples who register with the state as domestic partners under a 1999 state law. 

The 43-29 vote came despite an intense campaign of television, radio and newspaper ads and mailed brochures by a conservative religious group aimed at pressuring 17 mostly minority lawmakers to oppose the bill. 

The Campaign for California Families’ campaign said the bill is part of the “radical homosexual agenda” and would undermine Proposition 22, the initiative approved by voters in 2000 that outlaws gay marriages. 

The campaign only angered several of the targeted lawmakers. 

“It does them no good to try to intimidate me because I do not get intimidated,” said Assemblyman George Nakano, D-Torrance. 

The two-hour debate included personal stories and religious lectures. Supporters said the bill was a matter of equal rights, while opponents said it was an attempt to get around Proposition 22. 

The current domestic partner law allows same-sex partners and unmarried straight couples over 62 to register with the secretary of state; 14,000 couples have done so. 

However, that law gave those couples only the right to visit each other in a hospital and get health benefits if one partner is a public employee. 

The new rights in the bill include the ability to adopt a partner’s child more easily, to get health and disability insurance coverage from private employers like married couples, to make medical treatment decisions for an incapacitated partner, to inherit if the partner dies without a will and to file wrongful-death lawsuits. 

The bill would also allow opposite-sex couples where only one member is over 62 to register as domestic partners. Current law allows only opposite-sex couples where both partners are over 62. 

Assemblywoman Jackie Goldberg, one of the Legislature’s four open lesbians, had trouble at first talking about what she called an intensely personal issue. 

She told how her partner of 22 years was unable to adopt her son and how they had to scramble to find an attorney and witnesses when she suddenly was hospitalized and the hospital would not let her partner make medical decisions should she have become incapacitated. 

She admitted she could have gotten that power of attorney before she became ill. 

“Why should I have to? None of you do. You can be in your 14th marriage and each time you get what I can’t get after 22 years. Where is the justice in that?” said Goldberg, D-Los Angeles. 

“There is no other group in this room, however discriminated against in the past, however enslaved, that has to beg, ’Treat me like a human being,”’ she said. 

Many opponents, quoting from the Bible, said they could not support the bill because of their religious beliefs. 

“It has to do with me being obedient to my God. I don’t understand why God said the homosexual condition is an abomination,” said Assemblyman Sam Aanestad, R-Grass Valley. 

“This bill is a steppingstone to undermine marriage,” said Assemblyman Dennis Mountjoy, R-Monrovia. 

“This is not about marriage. This is not about the church,” said the author, Assemblyman Carole Migden, D-San Francisco, also an open lesbian. “This is setting forth some equitable benefits for people who are deserving of it.” 

The bill moves to the state Senate. 

Gov. Gray Davis signed the 1999 bill, but does not yet have a position on the new bill, spokeswoman Hilary McLean said Wednesday. 

On the Net: Read the bill, AB25, at http://www.sen.ca.gov 

See the CCF’s ads at http://www.savecalifornia.com  

Read the supporters’ side at http://www.calcape.orh


New L.A. mayor winner inherits a political dynasty

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

LOS ANGELES — His dad was known as the “pothole guy” – a gregarious pol who couldn’t pass up a chance to shake a hand, a man who also got things done for his constituents during 45 years in office. 

James Hahn is a different style of public servant. Gray-haired and reserved, he seemed to step out of character when he went so far as to pump his fists to celebrate his election as mayor early Wednesday. 

But even after two decades creating his own image in public office, Hahn is still known more for being son of the late Kenneth Hahn than he is for his work enacting gang injunctions as city attorney. 

On the campaign trail, voters often called him “Kenny,” remembering a city councilman and county supervisor who brought services to minority neighborhoods and emergency callboxes to the freeways. 

“My dad was known as the pothole guy, but let’s think about the vision that he had,” Hahn told reporters. 

The son’s vision is pragmatic, like the father’s. 

He campaigned on promises to beef up public safety, expand opportunities for children and help improve the city’s lackluster school system, though the mayor has little control over the schools. 

Hahn’s core of support was inner-city blacks who remember his father, the white politician who was the only elected official to meet the plane that brought the Rev. Martin Luther King to Los Angeles in 1961. 

Facing a charismatic Latino opponent in a city that’s increasingly Hispanic, Hahn added to his base by appealing to more conservative white voters with tough talk about crime. 

Analysts credited that combination, and Hahn’s long tenure in city government, for his 8 percentage-point victory over fellow Democrat and former state Assembly speaker Antonio Villaraigosa. 

The vote recalled the alliance that dominated city government during the elder Hahn’s heyday, a coalition of African-Americans and liberal whites held together by longtime black Mayor Tom Bradley. 

Joining the mayor-elect as inheritor of the Hahn dynasty is James’ sister, Janice, who won a city council seat on Tuesday. 

Some in the Villaraigosa camp blamed their man’s loss on old-style political hardball. Hahn supporters ran a barrage of TV ads with images of a crack pipe, reminding voters that Villaraigosa wrote a letter of support for a drug dealer who won a pardon from President Clinton. 

Hahn said the ad, like the rest of his aggressive campaign, could have been a page out of his father’s playbook. 

“My dad was a tough campaigner. He had some tough fights,” Hahn said.  

“I looked at some of his old campaign literature. My campaign would’ve been mild compared to that, so I’m sure he would’ve been proud of me, and my mom agrees.”


Lucent offers voluntary buyouts

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

TRENTON, N.J. — Lucent Technologies Inc. is offering voluntary retirement buyouts to more than 10,000 U.S.-based employees in an effort to accelerate restructuring of the struggling telecommunications giant. 

The employees targeted for the offer – mostly middle-level managers but also a small percentage of nonunion clerical workers – will be notified Monday by their supervisors or through e-mail or memos, said Bill Price, a spokesman for Murray Hill-based Lucent. All of the employees are either eligible or nearly eligible for a pension. 

“Our top executives are not eligible for this,” Price said, because the company wants to retain the talent needed to execute the turnaround outlined by chief executive officer Henry B. Schacht in January. 

That won’t necessarily happen, analysts said. 

“They’ve lost a lot of talent already” and could lose more of their best people, said telecommunications analyst Steve Levy of Lehman Brothers. “This is sort of a risk that you run when you have to get your organization to the right size.” 

Stephen Koffler, an analyst at First Union Securities, agreed that buyouts often result in the good people leaving and the mediocre ones staying. 

“Maybe there’s certain safeguards they’ve put in to prevent that,” he said. 

News of the buyout offer comes a week after negotiations to merge with French telecommunications rival Alcatel fell apart. 

“The voluntary offer is part of our effort to accelerate the restructuring” because the market for Lucent’s fiber optic and communications gear has softened, Price said. “This is a good program for our employees and a good program for Lucent.” 

Earlier this year, Lucent announced plans to eliminate 10,000 other jobs as part of its restructuring and to remove another 6,000 from its payroll through the sale of factory operations. About 2,000 had been cut as of the end of March, leaving about 104,000 employees worldwide. 

Eligible employees will receive a formal buyout offer on Monday and will have until July 10 to respond. If they accept, their retirement would start the next day. 

Those accepting the offer will receive improvements in retirement benefits, including immediate vesting of stock options that would not have been vested for some time, although most are worthless now given the stock’s sharp tumble since Lucent’s financial problems became public in 1999. 

Under the offer, employees will be eligible to retire with full pension if they have at least 15 years of service and are age 50 or older. Normally, for an employee to get a full pension, their age and years of service must total at least 75, John Skalko, another company spokesman, said. 

 

Company sources predicted at least half of those getting the offers likely will take them and said the resulting payroll and benefit savings could total $100 million annually. 

That barely touches the $2 billion in annual costs that Schacht is aiming to trim, but Levy said it still was encouraging. 

“The whole idea of Lucent taking additional steps to reduce their costs, or “right-size,” is something that we’ve argued they needed to do,” Levy said. “When it comes to Lucent ... anything positive is worth noting.” 

Lucent reported a $3.7 billion loss on sales of $5.9 billion for the first three months of this year. 

In trading Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange, Lucent shares closed unchanged at $8.49. 


State’s economy at risk as power crunch continues

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

CHOWCHILLA — When Tom Fry gets up in the middle of the night these days, it’s likely not for a snack or to check on his 3-year-old daughter. 

He’s probably trudging out into the dark fields surrounding his house looking to save a little money on his electricity bill. 

During those middle-of-the-night trips – sometimes two or three a night – he’s rearranging irrigation pipes so none of his fields or orchards gets more water than necessary, thereby cutting down on the need to run large pumps that gobble up expensive power. 

He’s even taken to irrigating more often at night because the evaporation rates during oppressively hot San Joaquin Valley afternoons require the pumps to work that much harder. 

“I don’t even look at my (electric) bill any more because I’m scared to,” said the fourth generation farmer. 

Consumers and businesses in California will have to dig deeper this month as a $5.7 billion electricity rate increase – designed to trigger conservation and pay skyrocketing wholesale power costs – takes effect. 

Economists say the higher bills won’t trigger a recession, but they are a step in the wrong direction for an economy that already is ailing following a dramatic slowdown in the high technology sector. 

“When you combine them with other factors affecting the state’s economy, it could become the straw that breaks the camel’s back,” said Brad Williams, senior economist in the California legislative analyst’s office. 

Williams said the rate hikes represent about 0.5 percent of California’s $1.1 trillion economy, which is larger than all but seven nations. 

About half of Southern California Edison’s 4.3 million residential and commercial customers and two-thirds of the 4.8 million served by Pacific Gas & Electric will see rate increases that average around 37 percent. Agricultural customers will pay 15 to 20 percent more under the plan. Small businesses say they will adjust to the higher electric bills, but can’t absorb much more in the way of increased energy costs. 

“Family-owned businesses, who exist on Main Street, don’t have the luxury of moving to states that are enticing business out of California,” said Martyn Hopper, state director of the National Federation of Independent Business. 

Bill Pechstedt, president of Sanford-Lussiere, which manufactures hardwood molding in Huntington Park, said he’s not worried about being less competitive with other in-state companies because of higher electric rates. 

“But we do compete with people across the country and that certainly could have an impact,” he said. “It isn’t just power. Worker’s compensation rates have gone up. Gas prices are higher. It all comes off the bottom line and it all depends on how much of a bottom line you have.” 

At Pina’s Bistro, a 24-seat Italian eatery in Tustin, 40 miles south of Los Angeles, the little extras have helped make the family-owned restaurant a success — additional plates with butter and olive oil, clean linens, crisp cloth napkins. 

But as energy costs have gone up, the extras have gone down. 

“I’m a little embarrassed by it, but I’m trying to cut down on the number of dishes I use,” said owner Pina Gruner. “During lunch, I don’t offer the bread and butter plates. You get your bread with your salad. ... It eliminates three or four loads of dishes.” 

Gruner has also reduced use of the air conditioner, changed the kitchen’s exhaust system and begun shopping for a new energy-saving stove. 

She said she has seen a slight drop in business, perhaps reflecting customers’ worries about paying their own rising energy bills. 

“They order one glass of wine instead of two. They don’t order dessert,” she said. ” A couple of days ago, we closed early. We were all standing around. It made more sense to close than stay open.” 

In Chowchilla, 35 miles northwest of Fresno, closing early isn’t really an option for Tom Fry. Striding through a chirping forest of yellow turkey chicks, he echoes the angry complaints of many of his neighbors upset about the spiraling cost of doing business in the energy-starved state. 

Farmers are, of course, intensely bitter about rising energy prices. But almost more upsetting, he says, is the amount of time invested in becoming a power expert. 

“It’s just one more thing to do in a long list of things to do,” Fry said. “I’m trying to come up with backup solutions for power outages. It takes a lot of time to get around to all this stuff when you can’t depend on electricity.” 

He’s arranged for backup generators to run cooling fans in the turkey houses in case of rolling blackouts, turns off the turkey house lights at night and the feeders during certain times of the day. He’s switched from electric to mostly diesel irrigation pumps, and devised a scheme to let gravity move water from a nearby canal into his fields rather than pumps. 

“But in about three weeks we have to start pumping 24 hours a day for a whole month,” he said. “If I only had electric pumps, it would cost about $5,000 a month.” 

That would be bad enough if the state’s agricultural economy was doing better, but in a year when all Fry’s crops will only bring break-even prices or worse, it would likely push him into debt. 


MARKET ROUNDUP

Thursday June 07, 2001

NEW YORK — A warning from Hewlett-Packard about future growth and concerns about weakness in the banking sector Wednesday prompted investors to cash in profits following Wall Street’s four-session advance. 

Although investors know earnings and revenue in general will continue to be weak throughout this year, Hewlett-Packard’s warning served as another reminder to remain cautious, analysts said. 

The Dow Jones industrial average ended the session down 105.60 at 11,070.24. 

Investors also pulled back from the broader market. The Nasdaq composite index fell 15.93 to 2,217.73, and the Standard & Poor’s 500 declined 13.54 to 1,270.03. 

H-P fell $1.34 to $28.71, and weighed down much of the tech sector after chief executive Carly Fiorina said the company experienced soft sales in May, in part due to a global technology slowdown that is expanding beyond the United States and Europe. The company now expects revenue to be flat or down 5 percent for its fiscal third quarter that ends July 31. 

Other tech shares that posted losses were Dell Computer, down 96 cents at $25.26, and Cisco Systems, off 78 cents at $20.76. 

H-P’s announcement was akin to the litany of profit warnings earlier in the year that encouraged investors to unload shares or at least remain on the market’s sidelines. 

“We should be expecting it. We know that second-quarter earnings are going to be as bad as the first,” said Arthur Hogan, chief market analyst at Jefferies & Co, of the H-P news. 

But, “it is catching us off guard for some reason today,” he said. 

The effects of the slowing economy, which have been unforgiving in some sectors, dragged down financial stocks. Bank One slipped 9 cents to $38.96 after UBS Warburg downgraded its rating on the stock. 

J.P. Morgan Chase fell $1.66 to $46.84 after it acknowledged in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Committee that second-quarter business has remained weak, particularly for its investment banking operation. 

“It appears there are plenty of corporate earnings disappointments ahead. In fact, truly nice surprises in corporate earnings seem to be an endangered species,” said Alan Ackerman, executive vice president of Fahnestock & Co. 

In other blue chip sectors, such as oil and steel, profit taking was apparent. ExxonMobil fell $2.15 to $89.40, while oil services company Halliburton fell $2.40 to $45, giving up gains made Tuesday when OPEC agreed to leave its official oil output unchanged for the time being. 

— The Associated Press 

Likewise, steel stocks fell after soaring Tuesday when President Bush said his administration will seek approval for limits on steel imports. USX’s U.S. Steel Group fell 67 cents to $21.07. 

After a stock market advance that started Thursday, Wednesday’s downturn reflected how confused investors are. They are worried about how long it will take for business to rebound while hoping that the worst of the slowdown is over. 

Since late May, Wall Street has been bracing itself for the upcoming second-quarter earnings season, fearing weaker than expected results. Adding to investors’ wariness is the belief of analysts and corporate executives that the third quarter will be the year’s worst. 

Despite investors’ fears, they allowed their optimism to spark a huge spring rally in which the major market indexes made significant strides, including the Dow’s reclamation of the 11,000 level it lost in September. 

But some analysts say investors bid up the market too high and too soon. 

“The market’s recent rallying was based on momentum, rather than good earnings reports,” said Ackerman of Fahnestock. 

Declining issues outnumbered advancers slightly more than 3 to 2 on the New York Stock Exchange, where consolidated volume was 1.27 billion shares, compared with 1.34 billion on Tuesday. 

The Russell 2000 index, the barometer of smaller company stocks, fell 3.90 to 512.58. 

Overseas makets were mostly lower Wednesday. Japan’s Nikkei stock average slipped 0.1 percent, Britain’s FT-SE 100 and France’s CAC-40 were each off 0.3 percent, and Germany’s Germany’s DAX index fell 0.8 percent. 

——— 

On the Net: 

New York Stock Exchange: http://www.nyse.com 

Nasdaq Stock Market: http://www.nasdaq.com 


Residents take up tree causes with Parks panel

By Matt Lorenz Special to the Daily Planet
Wednesday June 06, 2001

Twenty or so residents met in one of the North Berkeley Senior Center’s more cozy, upper rooms Monday evening to share their views with the Parks and Recreation Commission about two ordinances intended to protect trees within the city.  

The first ordinance proposes limits on whether or not Live Oaks can be removed. A property owner who wants to remove a Live Oak with a diameter of 6 inches or more would have to get city approval. The approval would be granted if the tree presents a danger or infringes on a neighboring property.  

The second ordinance aims to protect all other trees of a 10-inch diameter or more. 

Juliet Lamont, a Berkeley resident with a doctorate in environmental planning, asked the commission for greater protection than is outlined in the draft ordinance. 

“A broader definition of the removal of oaks needs to be included in the ordinance as oaks are extremely sensitive to small changes in environment and conditions,” Lamont said. “The word ‘alter’ should be added to the ordinance prohibition in order to provide full protection. And this is because oaks can literally be killed by doing things like encroaching on the drift line. Relocating a mature oak is virtually impossible to do successfully.”  

Lamont and resident Fran Segal also expressed concern over the possibility that certain property owners might use one type of permit to bypass another.  

For example, a property owner might obtain a use permit for a driveway and clear the space of the driveway without regard to tree ordinances.  

Parks Director Lisa Caronna sought to assuage this concern by explaining that, though the ways in which tree ordinances will work along side zoning ordinances are “yet to be developed.” They will be developed, she said.  

“It’s just that (this question will) have to go through a separate procedure through the Planning Commission and the Zoning Adjustments Board as to what the criteria is when they weigh trees against public project bids, housing projects, shelter or school,” Caronna said.  

Charles Smith asked that the city develop some formal procedures to deal with hazardous trees.  

“We turned in a petition to have some horrendous, terrible eucalyptus trees in Indian Rock Park taken down and really worked on, and the City Council treated it like a letter to the council. The staff ignored it,” Smith said. (The city is currently operating under a temporary tree-cutting moratorium.) 

“I personally have been working to get a statewide, hazardous tree law. The City of Oakland has one; Berkeley doesn’t have one.”  

Other residents, like Harvey Sherback, urged the commission to pay more attention to the beauty lost to the city when trees are uprooted. 

“I’d like to talk about trees,” Sherback said.  

“North Shattuck Avenue used to have beautiful bottle-brush trees with beautiful flowers. They needed a little maintenance so (the city) took them all out, and now they put in what they call ‘low-maintenance, non-flowering trees,’” Sherback said. “It’s like a scam.” 

Tom Ashkenas came to speak on behalf of the rights of property owners. 

“I’m a developer, a landlord and all that nasty stuff,” Ashkenas said. “I think it’s outrageous that you have a law that property owners can’t decide what kind of trees they want for themselves. I don’t understand it. 

“I personally put in a number of fruit trees – I happen to like fruit trees – and the only thing to fall on my property, since I’ve owned it since 1971, are two oak trees,” Ashkenas said. “I don’t understand why property owners can’t just decide which trees they want. They’re not evil people. They love trees too. They like diversity.” 

Parks and Recreation Commission Chair Carol Thornton received applause when she questioned the second ordinance, which addresses all species of trees. The ordinance imposes tree-protection standards on dwellings with three or more units, but not on those with fewer than three units.  

“I feel like it is discriminatory to have it include only buildings with units of three or more. It should apply to everybody,” Thornton said.  

After the hearing, Berkeley City Councilmember Dona Spring spoke about a similar kind of discrimination that might arise from the tree ordinances.  

Resdients might need an arborist if, for example, they wanted to challenge their landlords’ decision to uproot a tree and low income people would not be able to do so. 

“This is really geared for wealthier individuals who have money to pay to get to court – money and time. I would think we should make a City of Berkeley parks mini-grant, which is $5,000, available so that there is money for low-income people to be able to pay arborists,” Spring said. 

A parks mini-grant would assist tenants in low-income areas, Spring said, “so that it’s not just something that more wealthy areas of town will be able to do. Really where we need it the most is in the flatlands where regular tenants do not have the means to pay for arborists.” 

During the first 30 minutes of the next Parks Commission meeting, Monday, June 11 at 5 p.m., the public will again have the opportunity to contribute to the discussion of the draft tree ordinances. It will be held at the Corporation Yard, 1326 Allston Way. 


Calendar of Events & Activities

Wednesday June 06, 2001


Wednesday, June 6

 

Fishbowl: “Everything you  

always wanted to know about  

the opposite sex but were  

afraid to ask” 

7 p.m.. to 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Find out what the other half really thinks! The Fishbowl is an interesting way to anonymously ask those burning questions. $8 for BRJCC members, $10 for general public. 848-0237 x127. 

 

South Berkeley Community  

Action Team Advisory Group  

Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Over 60’s Clinic 

3260 Sacramento, 2nd Floor 

All South and West Berkeley residents invited to the regular meeting. Among other agenda items, the planning of upcoming Town Hall meeting. Refreshments provided. 665-6809 

 

ASAP Open House 

5 - 8 p.m. 

2070 Allston Way, Suite 2 

Access to Software for All People is having its 6th annual open house and invites the public to welcome new Executive Director John Kittredge. Refreshments and presentations of ASAP Web Design and Data Management, as well as work by high school employees. 540-7457 


Thursday, June 7

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month. 869-2547 

 

Berkeley Unified School  

District 

Appreciation Dinner 

6 p.m. 

Berkeley Alternative High School 

2701 MLK Jr. Way 

Berkeley Unified School District Office of State and Federal Projects honors District Title I/State Compensatory Education, English Learner Advisory Committee representatives, and departing school principals. 644-6202 

 

Free Writing, Cashiering &  

Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and  

register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a community meeting. 654-5486 

 

Skin Cancer Screening Clinic 

Alta Bates Summit  

Medical Center 

2450 Ashby Ave. 

Markstein Cancer  

Education Center 

Skin cancer screenings are offered only to people who, due to limited or no health insurance, would not otherwise be able to have a suspicious mole or other skin changes examined. Appointments are required. 869-8833 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly summer concert series. This week Advanced Jazz Workshop under direction of Mike Zilber. 

 

Community Environmental  

Advisory  

Commission Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Planning and Development 

First floor Conference Room 

2118 Milvia Street 

Among items to be discussed, Air Study and Chrome 6, TMD staffing, and arsenic, pentachlorophenol and creosote in playgrounds. 705-8150 


Friday, June 8

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Backpacking Essentials 

7 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Review the fundamental how-tos of selecting gear for a weekend backpacking trip. Free 527-4140 

 

City Commons Club,  

Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Doris Sloan, Ph.D., on “Treasures Along the Silk Road Oases.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 848-3533 

 

Women In Black Protests 

5 - 6:30 p.m. 

Montgomery and Market Streets 

San Francisco 

Part of a worldwide protest taking place in 103 cities, Bay Area women and men in black will protest 34 years of Israeli occupation of the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Sponsored in part by Berkeley Women In Black and the Middle East Children’s Alliance. 510-434-1304 


Saturday, June 9

 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Celebrates original crafts, international diversity, and community life. One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live performances and a variety of food. Free admission.  

Call 986-9337 

 

The Bite of REI 2001 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Taste some of the best, lightweight backpacking food and energy snacks available. At 1 p.m. Rick Greenspan and Hal Kahn with demonstrate how to turn your outdoor trips into gourmet adventures. Free 527-4140 

 

Benefit to Honor  

Dolores Huerta 

7 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

Music performances, slide show and raffle in honor of special guest Dolores Huerta, farm worker’s and women’s rights advocate. Huerta worked with Cesar Chavez to establish and lead the National Farm Workers Association in the 1960’s, and has worked tirelessly to improve the lives of farm workers for decades. Proceeds will go to La Peña and Huerta’s medical expenses. $20 - $25. 

849-2568 www.lapena.org 

 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 


Sunday, June 10

 

Counteracting Negative Emotions 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Exercises presented by Sylvia Gretchen, Dean of Nyingma Studies. Free and open to the public. 

843-681 

 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live entertainment and food. Free admission.  

Call 986-9337 

 

“Kindertransport: A Personal Account” 

10:30 a.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Hear the moving story Ralph Samuel, who escaped Nazi Germany as the age of eight. Samuel was one of an estimated 10,000 children who were rescued through the efforts of the Kindertransport operation. $4 BRJCC members, $5 for general public. Admission includes brunch. 848-0237. 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Ave. 

Group meditation though instrumental music and devotional songs. Led by Lucian Balmer and Baoul Scavullo. Free. 

496-3468 


Letters to the Editor

Wednesday June 06, 2001

Murders in Nepal produce sorrow and deep suspicion 

 

By Mike McPhate 

Pacific News Service 

 

KATMANDU, NEPAL – Two sobbing men embraced as riots raged around them Monday afternoon. “What will we do?” one moaned. “We have lost our mother and father.” 

Sorrow followed news of the Nepalese royal family’s massacre Friday night. Virtually every shop in the capital closed, and has remained so. 

But grief turned to anger over the weekend. Young men stomped about and rode in fleets of motorcycles waving red Nepali flags and pictures of the deceased King and Queen chanting, “Hang the murderer,” “We don’t want fake democracy,” and “We don’t want foreign pressure.” 

And Monday, after three days of unsatisfactory government explanations, rioters played a nasty game of dodge ball using bricks and concrete with police who responded with tear gas and bullets. According to the Kathmandu Post, at least two protesters were killed and over 36 sustained gunshot wounds. 

Since then, an all-out curfew has effectively emptied the streets. 

The rioters, including many who shaved their heads in honor of the dead King, have been swarming foreign journalists, telling them that the massacre was in no way the result of a family spat, but a dirty conspiracy by a rival faction within the royal family. 

According to Nepalese officials, Crown Prince Dipendra was at the palace with his family and a few close relatives for their regular Friday evening dinner. An argument ensued over Dipendra’s choice of bride, Suprima Shah, a beautiful school teacher and daughter of the Queen’s chief bodyguard. 

Queen mother Aishwarya disapproved of the match and threatened to bypass royal succession and make his little brother, Nirajan, king if he went through with the marriage. Dipendra stormed away from the table and returned clad in army fatigues spraying the room indiscriminately with a semi-automatic rifle before turning it on himself. 

People in the street paint a more sinister scenario. They say the assassinations were part of a plot by the murdered King’s younger brother, Gyanendra, and his son, Paras, to capture the throne. 

As evidence, they point to the fact that Paras, who was present at the dinner, escaped unscathed while Gyanendra was conveniently out of town. 

Further, Dipendra is considered too nice a person to commit such an act. “He was like the guy next door,” said one observer. “Everyone liked him.” 

The government’s actions since the killings have only served to stimulate suspicion. 

First, they withheld news of the Friday killings until as late as Saturday afternoon. Government-run media implied the deaths had occurred normally, with reports only mentioning that several members of the royal family had “passed away.” 

Then, on Sunday afternoon, Gyanendra issued a laughable statement blaming killings on “the accidental firing of an automatic weapon.” He has since withdrawn that statement and promised to get to the bottom of things. 

In addition, on different occasions officials have provided different times for the death of Dipendra, who reportedly remained on life support until early Monday morning. This has stirred suspicion that Dipendra was killed outright, and news of his death delayed to stall public outrage before Gyanendra assumed the throne. 

“Gyanendra should be hung in public,” cried one rioter to the approval of onlookers. 

Allegedly involved in smuggling operations, Gyanendra has not been popular. Paras is downright loathed. 

He is rumored to be a murderer, and has had many run-ins with the law, commonly in nightclubs. In October, 1999, he allegedly jabbed a police officer in the face with the butt of a semi-automatic rifle. Later that year he was seen molesting a woman in a Katmandu nightclub and firing a gun into the air. Only months ago he is alleged to have murdered a prominent musician by running him over with his car. 

“Paras is a bloody fool,” said former Nepalese Ambassador to the United Nations, Rishikesh Shaha. “He needs to be spanked.” 

Some think the Maoist peasant uprising that has crept toward the capital from a few western districts over the last decade is involved. The Maoists met with political leaders in the weeks before the massacre, and two of the two highest ranking and most reclusive Maoist leaders – Prachanda and Babarum Battarai – had even met with Gyanendra. 

While it is too early to say with certainty what occurred on Friday night, the all-consuming loss will have a long-term effect on the hearts and minds of people in Nepal. 

Portraits of the royal family can be found in virtually every home in Katmandu. They have now been converted to shrines. For the Nepalese, the bloody removal of their King and Queen was more than the loss of a beloved first family. It was a cultural decapitation. 

“I’m not one who loses heart easily.” said the 81-year-old Shaha. “But I’m finding it difficult to cope. The whole world is different to the one I used to know.” 

 

Pacific News Service contributor Mike McPhate is a part-time reporter and copy editor for the Kathmandu Post, Nepal’s leading English daily. He is currently affiliated with a study abroad program in Nepal through the University of Wisconsin. 

 

 

And try BART 

Editor: 

Regarding the letter from the concord couple who had their new car damaged in a downtown garage, I offer the following: before entering any garage, find out what the monitor and damage-control policies are. Try parking in the outdoor lot behind Baskerville Hot Dogs, on Milvia Street between Addison and Center, where at least three people are on duty at all times.  

While I sympathize with your problems, it sadly is a fact of life in most downtown areas that vandalism will happen and it’s a risk we all take just by going out in public these days. 

The best solution i can offer is getting a ride to Concord BART, or parking there, and NOT driving all the way to Berkeley. It would save time, stress, and fuel. 

 

Cindy Wright 

Berkeley 

Toxics deserves more staff 

Editor: 

I write briefly in support of Jami Caseber’s effort (letter, June 1) to procure additional staff funding for the Toxic Management Division of the City of Berkeley. As a former Community Environmental Advisory Commissioner (and former chair for two years) I worked closely with Jami Caseber and with the staff of TMD. As Mr. Caseber has pointed out, the myriad environmental issues of the city, including chromium, dioxin, pesticides, lead, radioactive materials, particulate matter, hazardous waste, and West Berkeley air quality have, at times, overwhelmed the small city staff. Add to these the recent disclosures of arsenic in the wood components of playground equipment, stormwater issues at the Corporation Yard, and well surveying and monitoring (groundwater), and inevitably some of these potential threats (and assets, in the case of groundwater) do not get dealt with in a timely and comprehensive manner.  

It is my belief that an additional staff person in the TMD would help ensure more effective and complete monitoring and correction of potential hazards in our community. I urge the City Council and residents to support this endeavor. 

John Selawsky 

Berkeley 

 

 

Major Development Gaming 

First the applicant should cloak the development with a goodly name such as Gaia or Beth El (House of God). Get a politically correct mix of people to the hearing. Keep decision makers on an emotional plane with allusions to beloved children, the holocaust and potential bombings rather than descending to discussion of the actual context and relevant public policy. If pressed, use terms like a “handful” (of large events, diesel buses, whatever…) and “we don’t have any intention to…” instead of “we won’t…”  

Staff should facilitate the approval process by not checking any of the applicant’s representations; they may include misrepresentations, which would make the plan unacceptable. And staff should not review precedents as each applicant has a unique set of political contacts. If necessary, staff should be prepared to change the process for preferred applicants midway, such as shifting review by Landmarks Commission to an unnoticed once-over at the Design Review Committee. 

Applicant and staff should cooperate in delivering revised plans just before the hearing. These new plans should be incomplete and conceptual. Leaving specifics for staff to work out later allows key staff to apply their demonstrated creativity in accepting two extra floors of office as an “ancillary use,” labeling caretaker housing as “office” and rescinding creek restoration policy as well as the criteria of neighborhood detriment. Don’t worry if the last minute plans aren’t covered by the environmental review; instant “supplementals” can be thrown in.  

Flipping agendas to keep project opponents the midnight hour or at least keep them in the dark until the last possible moment is also part of the game. Allow for a little public theater. The “adults” will take care of business out of the eye of public process.  

It’s a great game for the winners. Too bad about the terrible consequences for public trust. Too bad for landmarks and living creek corridors. Who would have thought Berkeley would entertain paving the prime creek corridor by Live Oak Park so that kids could be dropped off and loaded into buses to go somewhere else for open space? What an absurd game! 

 

Horst Bansner 

Berkeley 

 

 

 

 

 


Arts & Entertainment

Staff
Wednesday June 06, 2001

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery.” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 8: The Enemies, Pitch Black, The Fleshies, Supersift, Texas Thieves; June 9: Groovie Ghoulies, The Influents, Red Planet, Mallrats, Goat Shanty. 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m unless noted otherwise. June 6: Whiskey Brothers; June 7: Keni “El Lebrijano” Flamenco guitar; June 9, 6 - 8 p.m.: Sauce Piquante, 9 p.m. - Midnight: Whiskey Brothers; June 12: Mad and Eddie Duran. 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m. June 6: Bob Schoen with Cheryl McBride; June 7: Irrationals; June 8: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sallie Hanna-Rhine, 10 p.m.: Bluesman Hideo Date; June 9: Robin Gregory and Bliss Rodriguez, 10 p.m.: The Ducksan Distone; June 10: Choro Time with Ron Galen and Friends. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 2, 9:30 p.m.: June 6, 9 p.m.: Aux Cajunals; June 7, 10 p.m.: Dead DJ Nite with Digital Dave; June 8, 9:30 p.m. Ali Khan with Bellydance Troupe Lunatique; June 9, 9:30 p.m.: Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers; June 10, 7 p.m.: Food Not Bombs with Goodbye Flowers and INKA. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 6: Freight 33rd Anniversary concert series with Leni Stern, Jenna Mammina, Jill Cohn, Pig Iron. June :7 Alice Stuart, Folk blues, $17.50; June 8: Cats & Jammers Hot swing. $17.50; , June 9.: Danny Heines & Michael Manring; June 10: Roy Tyler and New Directions; June 12: Keith Little with Del Williams; June 13: Danu. $17.50.1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

La Peña Cultural Center “Cantiflas!” June 7 and June 8, 8 p.m. Herbert Siguenza, of the critically acclaimed trio Culture Clash, stars in this bilingual work-in-progress about legendary Mexican comedian Marion Moreno. With guest performers Eduardo Robledo and Tanya Vlach. 

$16. 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. (510) 849-2568 www.lapena.org  

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 6, Lithium House; June 7, Beatdown with DJs Delon, Yamu, Add1; June 8, Harvey Wainapel Quartet; June 9, Om Trio; June 12, Ben Graves Trio 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

The Berkeley TEMPO Festival of Contemporary Performances All performances begin at 8 p.m. June 6: Shafqat Ali Khan, Pakistani Khyal vocals with David Wessel and Matthew Wright; June 8: Berkeley Contemporary Chamber Players; June 9: John Scott, John Abercrombie, George Marsh, Rich Fudoli, Mel Graves. $15 Hertz Hall, UC Berkeley Campus www.tempofestival.org 

 

The Farallone String Quartet June 10, 7:30 p.m. Quartets by Haydn. $8 - $10 Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 

 

World Harmony Chorus June 10, 2 p.m. Vocal music from around the world. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

Sungugal Ballet June 10, 4:30 p.m. Featuring master percussionist Djibi Faye and West African Band with traditional West African dance. $6 - $12. Jazzschool/La Note 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere Through June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

“Cymbeline” Through June 24, Tues. - Thur. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Sun. 4 p.m. Opening of the California Shakespeare Festival features one of Shakespeare’s first romances, directed by Daniel Fish. $12 - $146. Bruns Memorial Amphitheater off Highway 24 at the Shakespeare Festival Way/Gateway Exit. 548-9666 or www.calshakes.org 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shaper’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Previews June 8, 9, 10, 13. Opens June 14, runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 6, 7:30: Prank and Parody; June 7, 7:00: Viy; June 8, 7:30: Aerograd; June 8, 9:15: The Letter That Was Never Sent; June 9, 7:30: Comic and Avant-Garde Shorts; June 10, 5:30: Pitfall, 7:25: Woman In the Dunes. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“The Producers” June 10. Revisit this outrageous comedy classic, starring Zero Mostel and written by Mel Brooks. $2 Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237. 

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

East Bay Open Studios June 9 & 10, 16 & 17, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Jennifer Foxly: Oil paintings and 2-d mixed media works 3206 Boise St.; Lewis Suzuki: Scenes from California to the Philippines, florals to nudes 2240 Grant St.; Guy Colwell: Painted replicas and recent original work 2028 9th St. (open until 7 p.m.) 

 

Wosene Kosrof June 13, 7 - 8:30 p.m. Ethiopian-born Berkeley resident will be exhibiting and discussing his paintings. One piece will be up for auction, proceeds to benefit the YMCA. Shattuck Hotel 2086 Allston 848-9622 ext. 3541  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Tyler James Hoare Sculpture and Collage Through June 27, call for hours. Party June 9, 5-9 p.m. with music by Sauce Piquante. The Albatross Pub 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473 

 

Ako Castue1ra, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato Through June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethiopia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910” chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. All events at 7:30 p.m. June 6: Ralph Dranow and Carla Kandinsky read poetry; June 7: Dr. Amit Goswami talks about “The Visionary Window: A Quantum Physicist’s Guide to Enlightenment”; June 8: Scott Carrier reads from “Running After Antelope”; June 9: Richard Russo reads from “Empire Falls”, June 10: Irvine Welsh talks about “Glue.” 

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. All events at 7 p.m. June 6: Peter Mayle teaches “French Lessons: Adventures with Knife, Fork, and Corkscrew; June 8: For the younger readers, Eoin Colfer reads from “Artemis Fowl”; June 9: For the younger readers, Lemony Snicket reports on “The Vile Village.”  

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. Featured poets: June 11, Ivan Arguelles. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

Tours 

 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour. June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 


Jerry Rice becomes newest Oakland Raider

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

ALAMEDA — Jerry Rice put on the silver and black for the first time and couldn’t help but admire himself. 

“I look good in it, man,” the NFL’s most prolific receiver said as he donned a new uniform for the first time in 16 seasons. 

After a record-breaking career across San Francisco Bay with the 49ers, Rice ended months of speculation about his future Tuesday by joining the Oakland Raiders. 

“This is a beginning for me, and I hope this is going to jump-start my career all over again,” he said. 

Rice, a 12-time Pro Bowl selection who won three Super Bowls in San Francisco, was released by the 49ers Monday because of salary cap problems. 

On Tuesday morning, he caught a few passes from Pro Bowl quarterback Rich Gannon during an informal workout and took a moment to boast about his new uniform. 

“I hope it didn’t go over the wrong way,” he said, “because I just stood there and said, ‘Hey guys, look at me! I look good!”’ 

Later in the day, dressed in a black suit and sporting his trademark smile, Rice spoke at a news conference with Oakland coach Jon Gruden. 

“I’m not saying that I have to be the main guy, you know,” Rice said. “What I want to do is just come in here and do what I’ve been doing my entire career. That’s basically just being a little kid out there on the football field and doing something I love.” 

His contract with the Raiders was not disclosed, but it was believed to be up to a four-year deal that keeps Rice near his family and his new 15,000-square-foot mansion in Atherton. 

It also keeps Rice close to his fans, who might not like the idea of their hero leaving the 49ers’ family for the rough-and-tumble Raiders across the bay. 

“I think as long as I’m out there giving 100 percent on the football field, I have a chance at winning a lot of hearts,” Rice said. 

Noticeably missing from Tuesday’s workout was veteran Tim Brown, the Raiders’ marquee receiver for more than a decade. The session was voluntary, and Rice did not take offense at his new teammate’s absence. 

“I know what type of person he is, and I’m sure he’s behind me 100 percent,” Rice said. 

Still, questions remain about how Brown and Rice will mesh in the same offense. They have similar styles, and Gruden said their roles have not been determined. 

There also is the matter of Andre Rison, who joined the Raiders last August and helped them reach the AFC title game. Rison, who complemented Brown and fellow Raiders receiver James Jett, had not been re-signed by the Raiders as of Tuesday. 

“My initial thought is that it doesn’t look good for Andre,” cornerback Charles Woodson said. 

Even if Rison does return to the Raiders, there’s no telling how he would fit in with Brown and Rice: “It depends on those guys and their egos, you know what I mean? Those are three future Hall of Famers,” Woodson said. 

Although Gruden said talks continue with Rison, he quickly turned the conversation back to the Raiders’ newest star. 

The 38-year-old Rice holds league records with 1,281 receptions and 187 touchdowns. He was the NFL Offensive Player of the Year in 1987 and 1993 and the Super Bowl MVP in 1989. 

He has amassed 19,247 yards receiving, including at least one catch in his last 225 games, another record. 

Rice also holds records with 176 touchdowns on pass receptions; 12 seasons with more than 1,000 yards receiving; 1,848 yards receiving in a single season; and 22 touchdown receptions in a single season. 

Rice becomes the latest San Francisco great who will spend the twilight years of his career with the Raiders and owner Al Davis, who often clashed with the 49ers during the tenure of former San Francisco GM Carmen Policy. 

Over the years, the Raiders have lured Ronnie Lott, Roger Craig, Tom Rathman, Marquez Pope and others into the silver and black. Oakland signed Charlie Garner, the 49ers’ leading rusher the past two seasons, to a four-year contract in April. 

“He’s going to raise the quality of our play, no question.” 

” Garner said. 

Although it is expected that Rice will play two more seasons before retiring, on Tuesday he wouldn’t rule out sticking around a little longer. 

“I can see myself on a cane – still trying to run that go route,” he said. 


Entrepreneur taps winery business right in Berkeley

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 06, 2001

When Tom Leaf moved to San Francisco from Texas in 1988, he liked to drink beer. Then one day he took a trip to the wine country, tasted a Hop Kilm 1985 Reserve Zinfandel and had a revelation. 

“If someone told me when I was in Texas I would come to California and make wine, I would have laughed,” Leaf said “But that day I went wine tasting it was literally a light-bulb experience. I fell in love.” 

By 1991 Leaf, an environmental consultant, was making wine in the basement of his San Francisco home.  

By 1994 his wines were winning awards at state and county fairs throughout the Bay Area. 

By 1999 Leaf had won over 150 awards and his passion for winemaking posed a problem.  

“I was making more wine than I could use or give away to family and friends, so I had to cut back or become professional,” he said. 

Unwilling to cut back, Leaf decided to make a career change. He hooked up with another  

 

budding wine company to share space with and began looking around the Bay Area for a good facility to start a professional winery. After looking in Sonoma, Napa and Marin they found what Leaf described as the “perfect” location in a town not widely known as a wine center – Berkeley. 

“We knew right away this was the place,” Leaf said. “It had operated as a winery for 20 years so it had everything we needed, a good water supply, drainage and existing city permits.” 

In addition, Leaf said he is located a short drive from the Napa vineyard where he purchases his grapes. 

Leaf took his life’s savings “and then some” and opened Grapeleaf Cellars in 1999 in a building that was originally a meat-packing facility on Camelia Street. 

Leaf had become part of long and little known local tradition of winemaking. His also became the fifth operating winery in Berkeley. The others are Catalpa Creek (Leaf’s co-tenant), Rubissow Sargent Wine Co., Edmonds St. John and the largest, Audubon Cellars. 

Gale Bach, the cellar master for Audubon Cellars, said there has been both professional and amateur winemaking in Berkeley for many years. Bach, who began making wine with plums from his back yard 25 years ago, said Berkeley’s climate and location is good for winemaking.  

“It’s not too hot and not too cold,” he said. “You need a relatively cool and steady temperature and it’s easy to do that here in Berkeley.” 

Bach said other advantages include plenty of warehouse space in west Berkeley, easy access to vineyards in Napa and Sonoma counties and an enthusiastic environment created by the Bay Area’s well-known love of food and good wine. 

The Oak Barrel Wine Craft has been selling winemaking equipment to home winemakers and small wineries from its San Pablo Avenue store for nearly 50 years. Owner Bernie Rooney said he sells equipment all over the state but a large percentage of his customers are Berkeley residents who are making wine in their basements and garages.  

Rooney agrees the Bay Area food culture inspires many locals to make wine. “Berkeley and San Francisco are the center of the whole food and wine scene in the Bay Area,” he said. “People here like to try new and interesting things.” 

Leaf said his first vintage of chardonnays, pinot noirs, a zinfandel and a blended table wine were a success. He produced his goal of 1,000 cases and is beginning to market them. “I’ve been spending money for two years and am just now starting to get some back in,” he said. 

Standing among the 50 French oak wine barrels and three Italian blending tanks, Leaf said he would like to have a big presence in Berkeley and that he looks forward to operating his winery here. He also invited anyone who’s interested to tour his operation and taste his wares.  

Wine tasting and tours of Grapeleaf Cellars can be made by appointment by calling 527-1305 or e-mailing tom@grapeleaf.com


San Pablo Avenue plan back to ZAB

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 06, 2001

Just before folks crowded into and overflowed out of the Council Chambers Tuesday night to voice pros and cons of a development across the street from Live Oak Park, another highly controversial development proposal was quietly and temporarily derailed. 

A threat of a lawsuit by neighbors who oppose Panoramic Interests proposed project at 2700 San Pablo Ave. and a reported counter threat of a suit by Panoramic Interests’ developer Patrick Kennedy was to be discussed by the City Council in closed session at about 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. (Litigation or the threat of litigation is one of the legitimate subjects a government body may discuss behind closed doors.) 

But a letter to the city attorney by Kennedy’s attorney Michael Durkee made the council discussion unnecessary and sent the project back to the Zoning Adjustments Board. 

“...after much thought and consideration, our client believes that a new approval process before the ZAB will allow (the developers) a better forum to address the points raised by the opposition and will clearly reveal both how their project complies with applicable law and why it will be a remarkably positive addition to the community,” according to the letter. 

Howie Muir, of Neighbors for Responsible Development, said his organization of neighbors living near the proposed project, were reacting to the fact that the ZAB had approved one project, but when the Neighbors appealed it, a new project went before the City Council and was approved. 

The council-approved project is a four-story 35-unit complex that has four live-work units and retail on the ground floor. A development with 48 units, no live-work, the entire ground floor as retail and more parking spaces had been approved by the ZAB. 

Muir said, in the lawsuit, the Neighbors would have argued that, since the project presented to the City Council was a new proposal, it needed a fresh environmental study under the California Environmental Quality Act. 

In an interview Tuesday, Kennedy said although the lawsuit “lacks merit,” he would rather take his project back to ZAB than face a protracted lawsuit. “I want the record to show that the impact on the environment is less significant,” Kennedy said. 

Councilmember Dona Spring said she was happy the project was going back to ZAB. “I think there is a chance for modification,” she said. 

Neighbors have consistently said four stories is too high for the area, while Kennedy has argued anything less would make it infeasible for him to build. 

“I’m feeling fairly elated,” Muir said.


Film prompts discussion about male teen needs

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 06, 2001

Some 500 parents and youth from Berkeley and beyond turned out for a screening of “Boys Will Be Men,” a film dealing with the difficulties of growing up male in America, at the Longfellow Middle School auditorium Monday night. 

The latest film by Berkeley filmmaker Tom Weidlinger, “Boys Will Be Men” premiered in San Francisco two weeks ago. Monday night’s screening was organized by the Berkeley PTA Council in response to what PTA member Cynthia Papermaster called “the deep need and  

yearning in our community to deal with these issues.” 

Papermaster said the prevalence of bullying, homophobia and outright violence at Berkeley Schools has reached a level where parents are desperately seeking explanations and solutions such as the ones offered in the film. 

“Boys Will Be Men” begins with experts describing how boys are often taught to be “tough” and to internalize emotions and feelings. The result, one expert argues, is that boys learn to express themselves by acting out rather than by verbalizing feelings as girls might do. 

In a line that drew laughter from the audience, the experts said boys spend their first years in school thinking to themselves “What is this place called school? It is a place run by women for girls and boys always getting into trouble.” 

The film visits a Berkeley elementary school teacher struggling to prevent hyperactive boys from becoming alienated at a school that seems designed for them to fail. Boys may have different needs than girls, but if they fail to keep up academically they risk developing an “achievement gap” that could haunt them for the rest of their lives, the teacher argues. 

Turning to adolescent boys – boys one expert describes as “tough, stoic and ready to fight at a moment’s notice” – the film follows a group of troubled teens through a wilderness program in Idaho.  

Working together to overcome a series of obstacles, the boys get a taste of pride and self-worth unlike anything they’ve experienced before. Before the ever-present eye of the camera they can be seen withdrawing from their shells of cynicism, becoming increasingly comfortable with sharing their feelings. 

“It’s an emotional experience to see those boys be inspired; kids that potentially would have so much trouble,” said Berkeley parent Craig McCaleb after the screening. 

The film offers “a wonderful explanation for how our little boys become the difficult teenagers they are,” said Berkeley parent Bill Tennant. 

In 25 years of making films for public television, Weidlinger said he’s “never seen a more immediate and universally positive reaction to one of (his) films” than the reaction to “Boys Will Be Men” in recent weeks. 

The film is scheduled air in more than 50 percent of the nations public television markets, Weidlinger said. It will air on KQED June 17 at noon. But Weidlinger said he hoped other communities would follow the Berkeley example and use the film to spark discussions and even reforms. 

After the screening Monday, the audience divided up into groups to discuss issues of male socialization in Berkeley elementary and middle schools and at Berkeley High, where incidents of violence have led to beefed-up security in recent months. 

Several in the audience asked if it wouldn’t be possible for schools to provide male youth with more of the self-esteem building activities depicted in the film. 

“Filling these kids up with knowledge isn’t enough,” McCaleb said. “(Teacher) training has to be more than the ABCs. Like it or not, teachers are thrust into this role, and they need to be trained.” 

As Weidlinger put it, “If you just punish kids for acting out, it’s really not solving the problem for them. If you don’t have kids comfortable with themselves, then that almost becomes a block to learning.”  

In a political climate that places increasing emphasis on standardized testing as a measure of school success, however, there may be even less time allotted for programs that address issues of socialization, Weidlinger warned. 

“The kind of initiatives that I’m talking about, which are less measurable in terms of test scores, may be a casualty,” he said.  

Javanne Strong, program manager for the Berkeley Unified School District’s Drug and Violence Prevention office, said the district is in the process of implementing a violence prevention program recently called “exemplary” by a U.S. Department of Education panel of experts. Many Berkeley teachers have already integrated the so called “Second Step” curriculum into regular classes, he added. 

Strong said the Second Step program trains teachers – and parents who want to become involved – to help kids confront and manage their emotions. Students are given a common vocabulary to help them discuss their feelings with teachers and with one another, Strong said. Through role playing, they learn appropriate and inappropriate ways to express anger and other difficult emotions in the context of school. 

Still, some in the audience Monday said parents face competing pressures that make it difficult to know what to teach their sons. They want their sons to be tough enough to face the inevitable bullying and competition they face in school, they said. But they don’t want to drive their children to become bullies themselves. 

“It’s such a hard thing to conquer,” said Michelle McMillan-Wilson, the parent of a three year old son and a social worker with the Alameda County office of Child Protective Services.  

“You don’t want to send them to school not prepared to deal with other kids, but you want to teach him that it’s OK to cry.” 


Board will hear public input on district budget

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Wednesday June 06, 2001

The Board of Education will hold a public hearing on its adopted budget tonight. 

Concerned residents will have a chance to review and comment on sweeping budget cuts approved last month, said Board President Terry Doran, although the board is not expected to make any changes to the budget. 

After a months-long search for candidates to replace five principals leaving the district at the end of this school year, the board will hear which candidates its staff recommends for the positions tonight.  

If satisfied with the selections, the board could name the new principals for Emerson, Jefferson, Rosa Parks, Thousand Oaks and Willard schools at tonight’s meeting, Doran said. 

The school board meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. on the second floor of the district’s administrative offices, 2134 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way. It is broadcast on KPFB 89.3 and televised on BTV ch 25.


Package for foster care housing, training OK’d

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

SACRAMENTO — California’s foster-care system for 115,000 children who can’t live with their own parents is broken, say state lawmakers who are pushing a $63 million package of bills. 

Half of the children never finish high school, a third end up in jail and a quarter become homeless, according to lawmakers and foster-care advocates. 

“The system is broken. What future do we give to these kids? What statement does it make as a society as to who we are?” Assembly Speaker Robert Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, told the Assembly. 

The Assembly on Tuesday approved five bills in its 11-bill package aimed at improving housing and education for foster teens, training and money for foster parents and support for county child welfare workers. 

While the plan passed the Assembly, it faces trouble with the tight state budget.  

The Assembly’s budget plan contains the $63 million for foster care during the 2001-2002 fiscal year, but the plans from the Senate and Gov. Gray Davis do not. 

A six-legislator conference committee is writing a compromise budget no, but the committee has not voted on the foster-care proposal. 

Children who cannot remain with their parents because of abuse, neglect or other problems are put into foster care. If family members cannot be found, they are placed with a licensed foster family, which is paid by the state. 

However, when they reach the age of 18, they no longer get help. Every year, 2,500 foster youth are “emancipated,” meaning they reach the end of foster-care services, said Assemblywoman Dion Aroner, D-Berkeley. 

Teens lead very structured, regulated lives in foster care and often are not allowed to visit friends or get a driver’s license, but then suddenly at 18 are expected to be independent, said Victoria Finkler, legislative and policy coordinator for California Youth Connection, a group of former and current foster children supporting three of the bills. 

“We think it’s pretty unrealistic to expect youth, especially when they’ve been so regulated, to be completely independent at 18,” Finkler said. 

Two of the bills approved Tuesday would extend housing assistance and training for foster teens until the age of 21. 

“We can’t expect 18-year-olds to be tossed off foster-care assistance and thrive in a world that is hostile and difficult for them,” said Assemblywoman Carole Migden, D-San Francisco, author of the housing bill. 

Many foster-care children have psychological problems because of their turbulent family backgrounds, added Assemblyman Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento. 

“Too many of these children with emotional problems who have not gotten the support they need and deserve turn 18 and have nowhere to turn. Too many of them end up on the street,” said Steinberg, author of a bill to increase the rates paid foster families by 5 percent a year at an annual cost of $5 million. 

All the bills approved Tuesday move to the Senate, where two other bills in the package are pending. The other four bills were scheduled for Assembly votes Wednesday. 

 

WHAT’S IN THE BILL 

Here are the foster-care bills approved Tuesday by the state Assembly and their votes: 

• Young adults up to age 21, instead of 18, could get $5 million in transitional housing help, AB1261 by Assemblywoman Carole Migden, D-San Francisco, 71-0. 

• Young adults up to age 21, instead of 18, could get $8 million for educational or training programs, AB1119 by  

Speaker Robert Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, 72-0. 

• Child welfare caseloads for social workers would be reduced over five years at a cost of $12 million a year, AB364 by Assemblywoman Dion Aroner, D-Berkeley, 54-17. 

• A new $3.5 million program would help counties recruit and keep foster parents, AB557 by Aroner, 57-12. 

• The rights and responsibilities of children in foster care would be listed in law, AB899 by Assemblywoman Carol Liu, D-La Canada Flintridge, 66-4.Foster-care bills scheduled for votes Wednesday: 

• Educational services for foster youth would be expanded by $15 million to cover all counties, AB797 by Assemblyman Kevin Shelley, D-San Francisco. 

• Foster parents would be given child care when they work, AB1105 by Assemblyman Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto. 

• Foster family rates would be increased 5 percent a year for four years at a cost of $5 million a year, AB1330 by Assemblyman Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento. 

• County welfare officials could reduce the money that families that take back their children after foster care are charged  

for the cost of that care, AB1449 by Assemblyman Fred Keeley, D-Boulder Creek. Foster-care bills previously approved: 

• Prospective adoptive parents would be given more information about the foster youth available for adoption, AB538 by Assemblyman Dennis Cardoza, D-Atwater, pending in Senate Judiciary Committee. 

• County child welfare agencies would be judged on the success of foster children and families, AB636 by Steinberg  

 

On the Net: 

Read about the California Youth Connection, an organization of current and former foster youth, at http://www.calyouthconn.org 

Read about the state’s program at 

http://www.childsworld.org/foster/index.htm 


City Attorney leads L.A. mayor’s race

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

LOS ANGELES — City Attorney James Hahn led Antonio Villaraigosa, a former state legislator hoping to become the city’s first Hispanic mayor in 129 years, in early returns in the race for mayor Tuesday. 

With 3 percent of precincts reporting, Hahn had 65,497 votes, or 62 percent. Villaraigosa had 39,387 votes, or 38 percent. 

The early returns were heavily weighted toward absentee votes. Hahn got more absentee votes than Villaraigosa in the primary, but Villaraigosa went on to emerge in first place, with 30 percent of the vote compared with 25 percent for Hahn. 

Absentee voters accounted for 7.6 percent of the total vote in the April primary. 

Hahn, city attorney since 1985, has won citywide office five times and enjoyed broad support from the city’s black community, which revered his late father, a four-decade Los Angeles County supervisor. 

Villaraigosa, an immigrant’s son and onetime high school dropout who rose to speaker of the state Assembly, would be the city’s first Hispanic mayor since 1872. 

The winner will replace Republican Richard Riordan, forced from office after eight years by term limits. 

Although both candidates are liberal Democrats, Hahn positioned himself as more moderate during the runoff. Some analysts cast the race as a contest between the city’s future and the status quo. 

“This is a city that is in transition. This election is a gut check,” said Antonio Gonzalez, president of the William C. Velasquez Institute, based in San Antonio, Texas. “Is L.A. ready to let new leadership assert itself, that happens to be Latino, that happens to represent the majority of the population?” 

Turnout among the city’s 1.5 million registered voters stood at 29.2 percent by 7 p.m., the city clerk’s office said. The pace of voting was slightly ahead of the same timeframe in the April 10 primary and the city’s last mayoral runoff in 1993. 

The final turnout in the primary was 33.5 percent. Hispanic turnout in the primary was a record 21.7 percent and experts said that would have to increase for Villaraigosa to win the runoff. 

In other high-profile races, former state senator and 1960s radical Tom Hayden trailed former Assistant U.S. Attorney Jack Weiss in the battle for the 5th District City Council seat, while Hahn’s sister, Janice Hahn, led in early returns for the 15th District council seat. 

State Sen. Diane Watson, a popular black Democrat, had a commanding lead in her bid to succeed the late Rep. Julian Dixon in the 32nd Congressional District race. Dixon, a Democrat, died in December. The battle between Hahn and Villaraigosa was the most fiercely contested mayoral race in decades. 

Villaraigosa’s campaign was considered a longshot when he entered the race, but the charismatic former legislator surged to a surprising first place in the primary on the strength of a broad coalition of Hispanics, labor, liberals and others. 

Hernane Ortiz, 27, of Boyle Heights joked that he was voting for Villaraigosa “because he’s Latino and I’m Latino so I gotta vote for him, right?” But he added that Villaraigosa more closely represented his views. 

“I just think he’s more in touch with me and with the things that are important to me,” he said. 

After the primary, the more reserved Hahn sought to portray Villaraigosa as soft on crime and overly liberal, keeping him mostly on the defensive. 

The last major poll before the election showed Hahn seven points ahead. 

Hahn, 50, frequently invoked the name of his popular late father, county Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, who represented the largely black neighborhoods of South Los Angeles that now constitute his son’s base. Hahn also was successful in attracting conservatives who had backed other candidates in the primary. 

Villaraigosa, 48, referred frequently to his personal history of rising from a broken home on the city’s rough east side to the highest post in the Assembly. He rejected the Hispanic candidate label, but his candidacy generated excitement among Hispanics, who now comprise 46.5 percent of the city’s population. 

The candidates sought to distinguish themselves from each other but ultimately resorted to attack ads as they burned through a combined $13 million in campaign funds. 

A Hahn ad used images of a smoking crack pipe and a razor blade cutting cocaine to slam Villaraigosa for writing a letter on behalf of a convicted cocaine dealer whose sentence was later commuted by former President Clinton. 

Villaraigosa, who was endorsed by Riordan, accused Hahn of running a “campaign of fear and smear” and sought to link him to out-of-town Indian gambling interests. 

The ads bothered some voters. Others dismissed them as typical of politics. 

“If it’s negative, it’s negative,” said Tom Capplen, 49, who was voting for Hahn because of his anti-crime stance. “What are you going to do? It’s always that way in this country at the elections.” 


Community backs teachers on strike

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

FAIRFIELD — Parents rallied outside the Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District office Tuesday afternoon to show their support for the teachers who are striking for higher wages. 

Organizers estimate that more than 1,000 people covered five blocks on either side of Pennsylvania Avenue which runs past the district’s office. But district spokeswoman Kathy Miller said no more than a “couple hundred” protesters were at the 1 p.m. rally. 

Nearly 96 percent of the district’s teachers continued to strike Tuesday, and less than half the district’s students attended classes. 

The strike began Friday afternoon, and no negotiations have been scheduled. 

Earlier Tuesday, as teachers picketed for an 11.7 percent raise outside district schools, the district held a news briefing, condemning what district spokesman Tom DeLapp called “aggressive” behavior exhibited by picketing teachers. Organizers have denied the claims. 

The district alleged picketers keyed and spit at cars and photographed substitute teachers and their car license plates with the implied threat of retaliation. The picketers are also accused of encouraging students not to attend class and to disrupt normal school activities. 

Teacher’s association president Liz Priest called the allegations “blatant lies.” 

DeLapp said the district had about 500 substitutes in place Tuesday. About 10,000 of the district’s 22,000 students attended classes.


San Jose police say 7 hostages taken at DMV

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

SAN JOSE — San Jose police responded to a call Tuesday evening that several armed men took hostages at a Department of Motor Vehicles office. 

Police received a cell phone call at 6:01 p.m. from a woman who said men armed with rifles and wearing black bandanas entered the office, spokesman Rubens Dalaison said. 

More than two hours after the initial call, police had not yet established how many gunmen there might be, or indeed whether they were still in the building once officers responded. 

There were no initial reports of injuries. 

The woman said she was calling from a bathroom inside the office, where six other employees were huddled, Dalaison said. 

“We haven’t made contact with anybody inside,” Dalaison said. 

He said the incident might have started as a robbery. The office is located at 180 Martinvale Lane in an industrial area of south San Jose. 

DMV spokesman Bill Branch said the office closed at 5 p.m. 

Branch said that while robbers have hit DMV offices before, longtime department officials could not recall a hostage incident. 

“We have had robberies occasionally at DMV offices,” Branch said. “I have no idea how much cash would have been involved.” 


Senate floor calm in last GOP run meeting

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

WASHINGTON — On the eve of a historic shift in power, Senate Democratic leader Tom Daschle pledged Tuesday to “reach out and create bipartisan coalitions” on health care and other issues when his party takes control for the first time in six years. Republicans said they would demand fair play for President Bush’s nominees and fight to keep his agenda at the forefront. 

“We should have a war of ideas, and we should have a full campaign for the Senate in 2002,” said Sen. Trent Lott, R-Miss., the outgoing majority leader. 

At the White House, President Bush welcomed a diverse group of lawmakers for a discussion of education. “We can still get things done” despite the switch, he said. 

Vermont Sen. James Jeffords, a Republican-turned-independent whose switch triggered the Senate upheaval, turned down a last-ditch appeal from one GOP senator to reconsider his move. Shortly before stepping into a closed-door Democratic caucus, he said he felt a “sense of relief that it is all over, that the final step has been taken.” 

Officials said that overnight Jeffords’ desk would be unbolted from its spot on the floor on the GOP side of the Senate chamber and reattached on the Democratic side – a move of only a few feet that signified a major shift in political power. 

The Senate convened for the last time in a tumultuous six-year period of Republican rule that began with the “Contract With America” and included the second impeachment trial in American history. The day’s legislation was an education bill, an item atop Bush’s agenda. Debate was desultory as both parties focused on the transfer of power, and lawmakers adjourned for the day without so much as a vote on an amendment. 

A committee of Republicans met with Daschle, D-S.D., late in the day to discuss organizational issues, including the size of committees and the ratio of seats for each party. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., emerged to say it had been a “cordial meeting. I think it was productive,” he added, with more talks expected on Wednesday. 

Under an expiring 50-50 power-sharing arrangement, Republicans held the chairmanships but there were equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats on each panel. 

Jeffords’ switch will create a Senate of 50 Democrats, 49 Republicans and one independent who sides with the Democrats for organizational purposes. That means Democrats get the chairmanships and a majority of at least one seat on each panel. 

Republicans conceded as much, but said they wanted fairness from the Democrats, particularly when it comes time to consider Bush’s nominees for the federal bench and other posts. 

“We’re looking for fairness, we’re looking for an opportunity for this body to function, for the president and the executive branch to be able to function. Just some assurances that there will be fairness with nominees from the president, both judicial and otherwise,” said Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa. 

It’s customary for the two parties to haggle over committee appointments and ratios at the beginning of each two-year Congress, and often the process takes three or four weeks or even more.  

Daschle and several of the GOP senators who were appointed to meet with him said in advance they doubted there would be an agreement by day’s end. 

Even without an agreement, Daschle, 53 and six years his party’s leader, becomes majority leader with the opening gavel on Wednesday.  

And in another sign of change, House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., crossed the Capitol during the day to pay the Democratic leader a visit. An aide said the two men discussed health care and other legislation. 

Daschle told reporters he hoped to show a “real difference in both the direction we hope to take the Senate agenda, as well as tone.” He cited numerous topics that he said were important bipartisan issues, including education, a patients’ bill of rights, a prescription drug benefit for Medicare, an increase in the minimum wage and energy legislation. 

“So our hope is not necessarily to move a purely ideological agenda but one that enjoys bipartisan support and ideas right from the beginning.” 

Lott also spoke of bipartisanship, but took Democrats to task for comments made last week that were dismissive of elements of Bush’s agenda such as the national missile defense system. 

“I’ve got to make sure that the American people understand that the president’s agenda, the American people’s agenda, will be considered in the Senate,” he said. 

Lott has called Jeffords’ move a “coup of one,” and he issued a memo to GOP insiders last week that said the party must “begin to wage war today for the election in 2002.  

We have a moral obligation to restore the integrity of our democracy, to restore by the democratic process what was changed in the shadows of the backrooms in Washington.” 

Sen. Joseph Lieberman, Democratic vice presidential candidate in the presidential election settled last year on a 5-4 vote of the Supreme Court, laughed at those sentiments. 

“We’ve accepted the fact that George W. Bush is now the president of the United States. That’s the reality,” he said.  

“We respect it, and I think our Republican friends have to now accept the reality that Tom Daschle is majority leader, and they have to respect that, too.”


Department urged to look into Florida election process

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department should investigate the possibility that minorities were intentionally denied voting rights in last year’s elections in Florida, the chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says. 

Mary Frances Berry said Tuesday that she plans to request a meeting with Attorney General John Ashcroft and will recommend to the commission Friday that the Justice Department be asked to look into problems outlined in a commission report. 

According to the report thousands of Floridians were deprived of their votes by outdated equipment, improper purging of voter rolls, language barriers and inadequate access to voting booths. 

Black voters were disenfranchised by a disproportionate margin, said the report, which has yet to be approved by the full commission. That vote is scheduled for Friday. 

“We are asking the Justice Department and Mr. Ashcroft to look at the facts in our report and look at the remedy he should pursue,” Berry said in an interview. “He should determine whether there was intentional discrimination.” 

Justice Department spokesman Dan Nelson said he could not comment on the commission’s report because he hadn’t seen it yet. 

“What happened in Florida is that there was bipartisan disenfranchisement – Democrats who were county supervisors did not do what they were supposed to do, and neither did the governor nor the secretary of state,” Berry said. 

The report said the state’s highest officials, singling out Republican Gov. Jeb Bush and Secretary of State Katherine Harris, were “grossly derelict in fulfilling their responsibilities and unwilling to accept accountability.” 

Charles Canady, general counsel for the governor, responded in a letter Tuesday that the report was biased and rife with errors. 

“The report grossly mischaracterizes the role of the governor and other state-level officials in overseeing the administration of elections in Florida,” Canady said. “Although Governor Bush has taken a leadership role in reforming our state’s election system, he clearly was not responsible for carrying out or overseeing the preparations for the November  

2000 election.” 

Bush said Tuesday he had not seen the report but the fact that it was leaked to the news media “points to the clear fact that this is a partisan group.” 

“They have admitted that there was no systematic effort to discriminate,” the governor said, adding that Florida has responded to the election problems by creating a model system backed by a lot of money. “So I’m moving on,” he said. 

The eight-member commission currently has four Democrats, three independents and a Republican. 

Fifty-four percent of votes rejected during the Florida election were cast by black voters, according to the report. Blacks accounted for 11 percent of voters statewide. 

“The disenfranchisement was not isolated or episodic,” said the report, the product of a six-month investigation. The commission held three days of hearings, interviewed 100 witnesses and reviewed 118,000 documents. 

The commission is charged with investigating possible violations of the federal Voting Rights Act and other civil rights protections. 

Florida officials and two members of the commission criticized the way the report was released. It was made available to three newspapers, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times. 

The new Florida law requires that all counties have modern optical scan voting machines and stop using the punchcard machines that were the source of much controversy in the Florida vote recount. It also allows for provisional ballots for people who are not on voter lists but say they are eligible to vote. Election officials would later determine if the ballots were valid. 

Commissioner Russell Redenbaugh, an independent appointed by Republicans, was sharply critical of the report. 

“Without any doubt, there’s political motivation in this process,” Redenbaugh said Tuesday. “The way this has been handled and released reflects poorly on the commission and diminishes the impact it will have. 

“President Bush needs to act to produce new leadership on the Civil Rights Commission.”


Cancer rates on the decline, maybe thanks to science

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

WASHINGTON — Rates for cancer cases and deaths went down in the 1990s, led by declines for prostate, lung and colon cancer, according to combined government and private studies. More breast cancer cases were detected, apparently because of aggressive screening. 

“This is an optimistic report because overall cancer rates are tending toward a decline,” said Holly L. Howe, one of the authors of a report appearing Wednesday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 

The big four killer cancers – breast, prostate, lung and colon-rectum – accounted for 52.7 percent of the 1998 cancer deaths in the U.S., the study found. These diseases also accounted for 55.9 percent of all new cancers. 

Death rates for eight of the top 10 cancers were all level or declining. The exceptions were the death rates for female lung cancer and for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, both of which increased. 

Howe, a researcher with the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, said prostate cancer rates have fallen dramatically, by about a third over six years, while rates for lung and colon-rectum cancers either decreased slightly or stabilized. 

The study compares the rate of cancer incidence and death in the United States from 1992 to 1998 with similar statistics from earlier years. It is the result of combined data and analysis from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Cancer Society and the NAACCR. 

“This welcome news on declining rates underscores the incredible progress we’ve made against cancer, but it also reminds us that our fight is far from over,” Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson said. 

While cancer deaths declined across the whole population, the study found, overall cancer incidences declined only for men while women experienced increases, driven by breast and lung cancers. 

Female breast cancer rates have jumped by about 40 percent since 1973, when the incidence was 82.6 per 100,000. In 1998, the rate was 118.1. The average overall annual increase was 1.2 percent per year for the six years ending in 1998. 

The breast cancer increase, said Howe, “is driven by an increase in screening by the age group at highest risk. When you have more screening, you will pick up more tumors.” 

Most of the increase in breast cancer incidence was among women age 50 to 74, the age group at highest risk. 

Howe said it is expected that increased screening – principally through mammography – will eventually result in fewer breast cancer deaths. 

“As we detect cancers earlier, we would expect there to be a decline in mortality,” she said. 

The study found that breast cancer death rates declined by 2.4 percent annually from 1992 to 1998. 

Cancers of the lung, thought to be caused primarily by cigarette smoking, continue to be the most lethal of the cancers, accounting for 28.5 percent of all cancer deaths. 

The study found that lung cancer incidence among women is declining, but death from the disease among women is up slightly. New cases of the disease declined by 2.7 percent per year among men and by 0.2 percent per year among women between 1992 and 1998. 

Lung cancer death rates among men declined by 1.9 percent per year, but rose by 0.8 percent per year among women. 

Lung cancer death “is still increasing among women, but it is slowing down,” said Howe. In the 1970s and ’80s, the death rate among women was increasing by more than six percent a year, she noted. 

Howe said the lung cancer death rate among women is following the pattern seen earlier among men, where the death rate started dropping as older smokers died and fewer young people started smoking. 

“Since women started smoking at a later age, we are still approaching the peak of lung cancer” among them, said Howe. 

Colon-rectum cancer rates across the whole population dropped by 0.7 percent a year from 1992 to 1998, with a 1.3 percent per year decline among white men and 1.1 percent among black men. The decline was 0.4 percent per year for white women, 0.3 percent for black women. 

Death rates from colon-rectum cancer dropped dramatically for white men, by 2.3 percent per year, but less so for black men, 0.9 percent per year. Among white females, the colon-rectum cancer death rate dropped by 1.9 percent per year. For black females it was down by 0.6 percent per year from 1992 to 1998. 

Death from melanoma, which accounted for 1.4 percent of all cancer deaths, increased by 1 percent per year among white males, while remaining stable among white females from 1992 to 1998. New cases increased by 2.7 percent per year among white men and 2.9 percent among white females. Melanoma is a skin cancer linked to excessive sun exposure. 

————— 

On the Net: 

Cancer report: http://newscenter.cancer.gov/pressreleases/reportq&a.html 

National Cancer Institute: http://www.nci.nih.gov/ 

Cancer statistics: http://www.seer.cancer.gov 

American Cancer Society: http://www.cancer.org 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/ 

North American Association of Central Cancer Registries: http://www.naaccr.org/ 


Napster close to deal with three record labels

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Napster, the former music industry bad-boy, announced Tuesday it had struck a distribution deal with three major record labels that are launching a music subscription service this summer. 

The agreement between Napster and the members of MusicNet is the biggest step Napster has taken so far toward legitimacy. 

MusicNet is a venture between record label owners AOL Time Warner Inc., Bertelsmann and EMI Group, as well as Seattle-based RealNetworks, whose software allows users to listen to music and watch video via streaming technology over the Internet. 

The deal makes Napster the third distribution partner for MusicNet, joining AOL RealNetworks and America Online. The MusicNet subscription services is slated to be available to consumers by late summer. 

“We are pleased to be able to offer Napster members access to the MusicNet service,” said Napster’s CEO Hank Barry. He said the deal shows Napster’s commitment to “the Napster community – the world’s most enthusiastic music fans.” 

“Today’s announcement is great for consumers, for artists and for the recording industry,” added Rob Glaser, MusicNet’s interim CEO and as well as CEO of RealNetworks. 

Members of the new Napster Service who subscribe to the MusicNet offering through Napster will be able to share MusicNet content with other subscribers. But parties to the deal haven’t said whether people will be able to download, collect and trade MP3 files like they do on Napster, a popular activity that has infuriated music copyright holders. 

MusicNet’s online subscription music service will let music fans listen to songs piped over the Internet for a yet-to-be-determined fee. Napster has also said it hopes to roll out a new version of its service this summer that would ensure royalty payments to artists and labels. 

Napster, which is still being sued by the music industry for copyright infringement, has been trying to purge copyright-protected music files from its system under a court injunction. 

But a technical solution that satisfies the music industry’s copyright protection concerns has so far proved elusive. 

Warner Music Group issued a statement Tuesday indicating that there could still be serious hitches in the deal. 

“As previously announced, our content will not be available to Napster as part of the MusicNet service until we are reasonably satisfied that Napster is operating in a legal, non-infringing manner and has successfully deployed a technology that accurately tracks the identity of files on the service,” Warner said in a statement. EMI also said that Napster’s current technology was not quite ready for primetime, despite the pending deal. 

“EMI has always said that we’d be prepared to consider licensing our music to Napster, but only when certain critical conditions are met particularly in the area of copyright. Those conditions have not yet been met,” the label said in a statement. 

Napster has said it planned to use software that maps songs based on their sound pattern. 

Napster is still mired in a copyright infringement suit filed by the Big Five record labels, Warner, BMG, EMI, Universal and Sony. 

A deal between MusicNet and Napster was not expected to affect that suit and all sides continue to work closely with a court-appointed technical adviser in bringing the file-sharing service into compliance with a pretrial injunction mandating that Napster halt trading of unauthorized music. 

Bertelsmann has loaned Napster money and technical expertise to help it develop a legal version of its file-swapping service. In exchange, Bertelsmann has the right to take a majority stake in Napster if the new system wins approval in the industry. 

While Warner, BMG and EMI seek online music solutions with the MusicNet alliance, Sony Corp. and French media conglomerate Vivendi Universal formed a similar partnership called Duet, which promises to have thousands of songs on the Internet for subscription-based download by this summer. 

Napster’s attempts at screening for unauthorized songs has severely hampered usage on its service. A study released Tuesday by Webnoize, a digital media research group, showed the average number of files shared among Napster users fell from 220 in February to 21 in May — a drop of 90 percent in three months. 

Many of those music fans have migrated to other, decentralized file-swapping systems such as Gnutella, where usage grew by nearly 5 percent in the last week alone, according to analyst Phil Leigh, who tracks digital music for Raymond James and Associates. 

 

On the Net: 

www.napster.com 

www.musicnet.com


U.N. AIDS chief says global pandemic in early stages

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Though more than 22 million people have died of AIDS and 36 million others are infected with HIV, the pandemic is still in its early stages, the United Nations’ top AIDS fighter said Tuesday as he marked 20 years since the first official report of AIDS. 

If the world does not act decisively now, AIDS could spread to countries that have so far avoided the worst of the disease, Dr. Peter Piot, the head of UNAIDS, told The Associated Press. 

“When you look particularly at Asia at Western Africa at Eastern Europe it is clear that we are really at the very early phases of the spread of HIV,” Piot said in an interview. 

More than 70 percent of the people with the virus that causes AIDS are in sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region in the world. Global health officials worry the disease could spread as rapidly through a country such as India, with a population of 1 billion, as it has through South Africa, where 11 percent of the country’s 43 million people are infected. 

Looking back, no one could have predicted the devastation that would be wrought by the disease first uncovered 20 years ago in a nine-paragraph write-up by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control about the strange deaths of five gay men, Piot said. 

In the early years of the disease, many predicted a quick cure – or at least a vaccine, Piot said. 

“I also thought that it would go away (as quickly) as it came up,” he said. 

Since then, an estimated 58 million people have contracted HIV. More than 22 million of them have died. A cure remains a dream for the infected. Efforts to find a vaccine continue. 

“This is now, without any doubt, the largest epidemic in human history, and we are certainly not at the end of it,” Piot told reporters Tuesday. 

The face of the disease has changed from that of a gay men or intravenous drug user in the United States, to that of millions of African men and women who contracted HIV through heterosexual sex and their babies, who got the disease simply by being born. 

The explosion of AIDS has proven how quickly a disease can spread across the globe in the newly connected world, Piot said. It has also taught the world a lesson in the devastation that can be caused when governments react too slowly. 

U.N. Secretary-general Kofi Annan has asked wealthy countries to contribute from $7 billion to $10 billion a year to a fund to help prevent and treat AIDS in the developing world, where the pandemic has hit worst. About half that fund will be earmarked to fight AIDS in Africa. 

The U.N. General Assembly has scheduled a special session from June 25-27 to discuss plans for fighting the pandemic. 

“There is this enormous momentum that is building up and growing internationally,” Piot said. 

Piot hopes the meeting, the first special General Assembly session ever dedicated to a disease, will produce a detailed declaration of commitment signed by every country in the United Nations. 

The declaration would need to bind countries to work toward prevention, educate young people about the disease and destroy the crushing stigma surrounding AIDS, he said. The agreement should also commit countries to solving the complex web of problems preventing those infected from receiving AIDS drugs. 

Those problems include the poor healthcare infrastructure in many of the worst-infected countries, people’s refusal to get tested for HIV, the costs associated with caring for those infected and the price of the AIDS drugs, Piot said. 

“Unfortunately, I think the focus has been a lot on the price of antiretroviral drugs, reducing an extremely complex problem into something that is simple on paper,” he said. 

Many of the hardest hit countries have detailed plans for fighting the disease, plans that, if implemented, could signal a turning point in the pandemic, Piot said. 

But the worst infected countries in the world are also some of its poorest, and they need massive and sustained help from the developing world, he said. 

“There’s not a lack of ideas, of strategies of what to do, but there’s a lack of cash,” he said. 

On the Net: 

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, http://www.unaids.org 

Treatment Action Campaign site for AIDS in Africa, http://www.tac.org.za


Mideast cease-fire in fragile state

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

JERUSALEM — Hamas cast doubt Tuesday on how long a fragile cease-fire can last when its spiritual leader said the militant group is not bound by Yasser Arafat’s call to end attacks on Israel. 

International pressure to keep the truce on track was growing, with CIA Director George Tenet expected to head to the region on Wednesday to promote Israeli-Palestinian security cooperation. 

Meanwhile, Israel announced the easing of some restrictions imposed after a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up in Tel Aviv Friday, killing himself and 20 other people, most of them Israeli teen-agers. 

The Israeli Defense Ministry said that borders would be opened to allow Palestinians to return home from Egypt and Jordan, raw materials would be allowed into and out of the Palestinian territories and Palestinian workers could return to their jobs in an industrial zone next to the Erez crossing point between Israel and the Gaza Strip. 

Scattered gunfire and clashes Tuesday injured several people in the West Bank, but marches marking the 34th anniversary of the 1967 Middle East war, when Israel captured the West Bank and Gaza Strip, were generally peaceful. 

However, late Tuesday, a five-month-old Israeli baby was seriously injured when Palestinians threw rocks at a car in the West Bank. Doctors said the baby had a serious head injury. 

Israeli officials acknowledged the relative calm, but said Israel still wants Arafat to arrest those involved in planning suicide bombings and to put an end to anti-Israel incitement. 

“No doubt some positive steps have been taken, but I would say, necessary but insufficient,” said Raanan Gissin, an aide to Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. 

Arafat called the cease-fire on Saturday, leading Israel to hold off retaliation for Friday night’s suicide bombing outside a Tel Aviv disco that killed 21 people, including the bomber. 

A joint statement issued late Monday in the name of the militant wing of Hamas and Arafat’s Fatah group said the cease-fire would be respected. But leaders of Hamas – whose support is seen as vital to a successful truce – quickly began disputing the idea. 

“When we are talking about the so-called cease-fire, this means between two armies,” Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, Hamas’ spiritual leader, told The Associated Press. “We are not an army. We are people who defend themselves and work against the aggression.” 

Yassin joined 2,000 Palestinians marching peacefully in Gaza to mark the anniversary of the 1967 war. 

Demonstrators chanted, “The intefadeh will continue until victory,” using the Arabic word for uprising. A march in the West Bank town of Ramallah also was orderly. 

A Hamas spokesman in Gaza, Mahmoud Zahar, would not directly say if further bombings were planned. But, he said, “our strategy and our tactic is to continue resistance, the intefadeh, by all means and everywhere.” 

“The people,” he added, “are convinced that this will be an effective measure to persuade the Israelis to leave.” Hamas does not accept the existence of a Jewish state. 

Ghassan Khatib, a Palestinian political analyst who attended a meeting with representatives of Hamas and Fatah, said participants “spoke in a way that expressed understanding of the circumstances that led Arafat to make the declaration.” 

Islamic Jihad, a militant group that did not attend the meeting, indicated it would give the cease-fire a chance. 

“We are respecting all the decisions taken by any Palestinian movement,” Islamic Jihad spokesman Nafez Azam said. 

West Bank Fatah leader Marwan Barghouti said the cease-fire applies only to areas under full Palestinian control. Elsewhere, he said, “resisting occupation is a legitimate right of the Palestinians.” 

The Palestinians long have held they are responsible for security only in areas they control, in part to press Israel to hand over more land. Israel rejects the idea, especially when attackers come into Israeli-controlled areas from places under Palestinian control. 

German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer was in Egypt and Jordan seeking help to stabilize the cease-fire that followed his personal appeal to Arafat. 

Meanwhile, clashes continued despite the truce. 

North of Ramallah, Israeli soldiers opened fire Tuesday with rubber-coated steel bullets on Palestinian stone-throwers, Palestinian witnesses said. Ten Palestinians were injured. The army said it fired on 600 demonstrators to disperse them. 

In and near Hebron, at least three Palestinians, including a police officer, were wounded in clashes with Israeli forces. 

Also in the West Bank, Ashraf Mahmoud Bardawil, 27, a Fatah activist in the Tulkarem area, was critically injured in an explosion in his car. The cause of the blast wasn’t clear. 


Earth study launched by scientists

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

UNITED NATIONS — On World Environment Day, the United Nations joined forces Tuesday with 1,500 leading scientists and a host of public and private organizations to launch the first major study of the health of planet Earth. 

Secretary General Kofi Annan said the four-year, $21 million study “is designed to bring the world’s best science to bear on the present choices we face in managing the global environment.” 

The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment will examine the state of the world’s grasslands, forests, farmlands, oceans and fresh waterways and fill important gaps in the knowledge needed to preserve “the health of our planet,” he told a news conference launching the initiative. 

In a report last year to the U.N. Millennium Summit, Annan noted there had never been a comprehensive global assessment of the world’s major ecosystems. 

“The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment is a response to this need,” he said. 

Timothy Wirth, president of the United Nations Foundation, which has provided $4 million to help fund the assessment, said the result will be “the first global report card on our environment” – and he predicted it would not be a good one. 

He noted the economic implications. 

“When the environment is forced to file for bankruptcy ... because its resource base has been polluted, degraded, dissipated, irretrievably compromised, then the economy goes down to bankruptcy with it – and so does everything else,” Wirth said. 

Pilot studies conducted by the World Resources Institute indicate that in many regions of the world, ecosystems are less able to meet human demand for food and clean water. Coral reefs are dying, forests are disappearing and fish stocks are being depleted. 

“From out-of-control forest fires in Southeast Asia to massive floods in China, Central America and Mozambique, natural events have been exacerbated by human degradation of ecosystems – and in every case it is the poor who have suffered the most,” said Mohamed El-Ashry, head of the Global Environment Facility. 

The assessment was designed by the U.N. Environment Program, the U.N. Development Program, the World Bank, the World Resources Institute, the Global Environment Facility – which is providing $7 million in funding – and other partners. 

On the Net: 

http://www.millenniumassessment.org 


Panel seeks ways to tackle chronic BHS problems

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

In advance of a communitywide meeting on May 19 to consider a major overhaul in the way Berkeley High School delivers its academic programs, small groups of high school staff and parents have met weekly to ponder the question. 

At issue is whether the school could address chronic problems – truancy, violence, the achievement gap and high teacher turnover, to name a few – by dividing the school’s 3,200 students into a number of “small learning communities.” Such communities allow teachers to give students more individualized attention, the argument goes, so those with special needs are less likely to “fall through the cracks.”  

At a Thursday meeting at the North Berkeley Senior Center, about 25 people, mostly Berkeley High parents and staff, listened to an informal panel describe what Berkeley High was like in the 1970s, when the school launched a dozen short-lived small learning communities with the help of a $7 million federal grant.  

Most of the panelists either studied or taught at Berkeley High in the ’70s. 

“A school as large as Berkeley High has to be broken down into smaller schools,” said panelist Arnold Perkins, a Berkeley High parent, who taught at a couple of the experimental small-learning communities in the ’70s. 

“Something different has to be done at Berkeley High,” added Perkins. “It is not working. It is actually destroying (kids’) lives.” 

Perkins said the small learning communities of the ’70s gave teachers a unique opportunity to make classroom lessons more relevant to students. Through a program known as Black House, Perkins and other teachers worked to give African-American students a broader exposure to black history than they would have found in the school’s existing history classes. 

“If you think you don’t come from any place but slavery,” then there is a limit to how much American history you want to learn, said Perkins who is African American. 

Former Berkeley High teacher Susan Groves, another panelist, said student attendance problems in the ’70s were even worse than today, with up to a third of the school’s students skipping class regularly. Groves said she and other like-minded teachers got together on their lunch breaks and formed a radical plan to re-engage students by creating a small learning community. 

Such communities give teachers the flexibility they need to respond to students’ needs, Groves said, recalling how she and other teachers in the program created individual projects for students who were missing class to draw them back in. 

“We have to develop courses that both students and teachers feel is appropriate for this period in time,” Groves said Thursday. 

It was experiments in small learning communities that forced the high school’s curriculum to expand into new areas of particular interest to students in the later half of the 20th century, Groves argued, pointing to courses in black studies, women’s studies and environmental studies that were offered for the first time in the ’70s. 

“The feeling of being in a huge school but having a small community was really fantastic,” said another panelist, a woman who studied at one of Berkeley High’s former small learning communities .  

But she added an important caveat. 

“I’m not sure it actually gave us the best education,” she said. “I think it might have been a scramble for a lot of kids when they got to college.” 

The trick, according to Perkins, is create small learning communities that give teachers the freedom to innovate, but aren’t so amorphous that less disciplined kids lose focus altogether. 

“How do you not be so liberal (that) you let them do anything they want?” Perkins asked said. 

Groves said the communities have to be held accountable. School district administrators never supported the small learning communities in the ’70s, she said, with the result that no evaluation process was ever put in place to see where they were succeeding and where they were failing. 

The school district “has never really cared very much about evaluation,” Groves said.  

“It becomes anecdotal. How can we move ahead if we don’t have some kind of formal evaluation?...We forget what has already been tried (and) keep reinventing the wheel.” 

Rick Ayers, the Berkeley High teacher who is coordinating the discussions around small learning communities, said that today, unlike in the ’70s, both the school board and the teacher’s union have shown interest small learning communities and their potential. 

Still, Berkeley High parent Jahlee Arakaki wasn’t convinced Thursday. While she conceded that the school was in “dire need” of some reform, she said it was too early to say if the small communities offered a solution to existing problems. 

What happens, she asked, if “some kids get totally immersed in (a small community) and then others feel they can’t join?” 

Berkeley High teacher Judy Bodenhausen said specialized programs already in place at Berkeley High, like the Communication Arts and Sciences program (whose limited spaces are highly coveted by students each year) have already created a two-tier system at the school.  

If small learning communities are to be implemented, Bodenhausen said, they ought to be done in such that students can participate in some of a community’s offerings regardless of whether they are fully enrolled in that community.  

Ayers said small learning communities would be “a disaster” if certain programs were identified as the elite programs while others became “default” programs. But he said Berkeley High has historically had a two-tier system, with whites and Asians dominating the higher-level course offerings. Small learning communities could undo this segregation by actively recruiting students from different backgrounds and working to unite them in a common endeavor, he said. 

All community members are invited to weigh in on small learning communities at the high school at the May 19 meeting, scheduled for 10 a.m. at the Berkeley Alternative High School, 2701 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way. For more information contact Rick Ayers at 644-4586. 


Calendar of Events & Activities

Tuesday June 05, 2001


Saturday, May 5

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, a non-profit sailing and windsurfing cooperative, give free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult. www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Tooth Man! 

10:30 a.m.  

Berkeley Main Library  

2121 Allston Way  

Tooth Man, a.k.a. Matt Perry, returns by popular demand to fascinate children with his collection of teeth from animals large and small. 

649-3964 

 

West Coast Live  

10 a.m. - Noon  

Freight & Salvage  

1111 Addison St. (at San Pablo)  

Author of Adam Dagliesh mysteries, P.D. James, and Scottish fiddler Alasdair Fraser. 

Call 415-664-9500 for reservations 

 

Free Hearing Screening 

10 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center 

Summit North Pavilion, Cafeteria Annexes, A, B & C  

350 Hawthorne Ave.  

Oakland 

Health Access/LifeSpan and Self Help for the Hard of Hearing (SHHH) are co-sponsoring free hearing screenings in recognition of Better Hearing and Speech Month. Free  

869-6737  

 

Women’s Evening at the Movies  

7:30 - 10 p.m.  

Pacific Center  

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Jennifer Tilly stars in “Bound,” as a mob man’s mistress who becomes lovers with a sexy handywoman. Join a great group of bi, lesbian, transgender and queer women to watch the flick and munch on junk food. $5 donation requested  

548-8283  

www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Owner as Contractor 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Legal aspects discussed by attorney Sterling Johnson. $75. 

525-7610 

 

Painting 

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

“Tricks of the Trade” taught by painting contractor Scott Perry. $75. 

525-7610 

 

 

Mediterranean Herbs 

1:30 p.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

Tour of herbs. Learn myths and legends, ideas for planting in home gardens. 

643-1924 

Path Wanderers 

10 a.m. 

Remillard Park 

Keeler and Poppy Streets 

Help Berkeley Path Wanderers Association weed and put new chips on Keeler Avenue Path. Bring gloves, weeding tools, shovels, wheelbarrows if you have them. 

848-9358 

 

International Conference 

Townsend Center 

220 Stephens Hall 

UC Berkeley 

9 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. 

“Cosmopolititanism, Human Rights and Sovereignty in the New Europe” is the topic. Alain Touraine of the University of Paris will speak at noon addressing the question, “Is it Possible to Create a European Citizenship?”. Continued from Friday. Free and open to the public. 643-5777 


Sunday, May 6

 

Cinco de Mayo Celebration 

10:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Civic Center Park 

MLK between Center and Allston 

Featuring live latin music and dancing, food and and arts and crafts. Free. 549-9166 

 

Reimagining Pacific Cities  

6 - 8:30 p.m. 

New Pacific Studio  

1523 Hearst Ave.  

“How are Pacific cities reshaping their cultural and environmental institutions to better serve the needs and enhance the present and future quality of life of all segments of their societies?” A series of ten seminars linking the Bay Area, Seattle, Portland, and other pacific cities. $10 per meeting.  

849-0217 

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, a non-profit sailing and windsurfing cooperative, give free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

www.cal-sailing.org  

 

BAHA House Tour  

1 - 5 p.m.  

Live Oak Park  

Sponsored by the Berkeley Historical Society and the Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association. Tour will include the early work of architects Julia Morgan, Bernard Maybeck and Henry Gutterson.  

$25 - $32  

841-2242 

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Open House  

3 - 5 p.m.  

Tibetan Nyingma Institute  

1815 Highland Place  

A free introduction to Tibetan Buddhist culture including a Tibetan yoga demonstration, a talk on the relevance of Buddhism in today’s world, a prayer wheel and meditation garden tour. 843-6812 

 

Faith, Doubt and Refuge 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

What does this mean in the Buddhist tradition? Talk by Sylvia Gretchen, dean of Nyingma Studies at the institute. Free and open to the public. 843-6812 

 

Rhododendron Walk 

10 a.m. 

UC Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

See more than 200 species. $3 admission. Limited space, call for reservation. 

643-2755 

 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

 


Monday, May 7

 

Beginning Bicyclist Workshop  

7 - 9 p.m. 

YMCA  

2001 Allston Way  

Community Room 1, Main Floor  

Jason Meggs and Zed Lopez will teach you how to keep yourself and your bike safe and even how to use your bike for shopping. Free  

Call Jason Meggs, 549-RIDE 

 

Words Hurt  

7:30 - 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Rabbi David Ordan will discuss the seriousness of gossip and it’s effects.  

$10  

848-0237 

 

Skin Cancer Screening Clinic 

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center 

Summit Campus  

2450 Ashby Ave. 

Markstein Cancer Education Center 

Skin cancer screenings are offered only to people who, due to limited or no health insurance, would be able to have a suspicious mole or other skin changes examined. Appointments are required.  

869-8833 

 

Rent Stabilization Board Meeting 

7 p.m. 

2134 MLK Jr. Way 

Council Chambers, 2nd floor 

Closed session “Hanerfeld v. City of Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board.” The rest of the meeting is open to the public. 

644-6128 

 


Tuesday, May 8

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Religious Identity for Interfaith Families 

7:30 - 9:30 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St.  

Explore the process of choosing a religion for parents and children in interfaith families with a minister, and Rabbi Jane Litman.  

$5  

848-0237 x127 

 

Home Design 

7 - 10 p.m. 

Building Education Center 

812 Page St. 

Second Tuesday of workshop taught by architect/contractor Barry Wagner. Continues weekly through May 22. $150 for four evenings. 

525-7610 

 

Blackout Summer 

7 p.m. 

Berkeley’s Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave. (at Dwight) 

Bruno Henriquez is from Cuba, which experienced rolling blackouts for more than half a decade and has promoted conservation and alternative energy production. Henriquez is director of Cuba’s solar energy agency. 

548-2220 ext. 234 

 

Take the Burn Out of Heartburn 

Ashby Campus Auditorium 

2450 Ashby Ave. 

12:30 - 2 p.m. 

Learn about gastro-esophageal reflux disease and surgery to correct the condition. Free. 

869-6737 

 


Letters to The Editor

Tuesday June 05, 2001

Four stories on San Pablo good for community 

Editor: 

Gregory Bateson wrote a book in the 1970s called “Towards an Ecology of Mind.” It influenced Gov. Jerry Brown enough that the Gregory Bateson Building was constructed in Sacramento on his watch, featuring as many “green” features as available at the time. 

Time to be mindful again of energy issues, pollution, transit, and infill housing for people of modest income. That’s precisely what the planned development of 48 low and moderate income apartments at 2700 San Pablo is all about. 

Time to transform environmentalists who want to support a better local and global environment into ecologists, that is, into people who see the interconnection of parts in living, whole systems as fundamental to healthy ways of living in our communities and building our communities. 

Time to take the quotation marks off “progressives” who oppose density in places that support housing for the people who need it and transform them into real progressives who support such housing. 

It sounds like news from Mars to a lot of people, but urban form stands at the foundation of either a healthy or dysfunctional way of urban living. 

By urban form, we who ponder such things and try to apply ecological thinking to our communities, mean thinly scattered automobile-dependent development is too expensive in every way imaginable: for low income people forced to buy cars and gasoline, for energy reserves, for the health of native plants and animals, for global climate stability. The urban form that works best on all those counts is pedestrian/transit centers oriented development of modest density - and the proposed 4 stories of the 2700 San Pablo fits well into such a density range. 

Higher density along transit corridors is an important interim step and a parallel development strategy that goes along with centers-oriented development. It will sound like a quibble to those who have not thought about urban form very much, but centers allow even more benefits than corridors, and make it possible to contemplate means to create more open spaces in our cities, such as enough spaces to imagine opening buried creeks and expanding community gardens and parks. But by being located on one of the city’s best AC Transit corridors, 2700 San Pablo takes us a long way in that direction. 

Ecocity Builders, in supporting this project, would prefer it if the building were car-free by rental agreement and did not have the 61 parking space for 48 units. This promotion of the automobile with all its detriments is crammed down the throats of developers and the ordinance that forces this out-dated means of damaging the planet should be overturned. However, while educating about that, we need to at least address the city’s poor housing construction record and build enough apartments to make a dent on the problem. And we need to put that housing in the right place to help build up efficient transit in a time of energy crisis. 

 

Richard Register 

Berkeley 

 

Four stories ‘good,’ but not for the developers 

Editor: 

Developers everywhere try to convince City Councils, to whom they have given money, that they know better what an area needs than the people who live there.  

Gordon Choyce II takes his home owner exemption on a lovely house, situated on a quiet cul-de-sac, in the El Sobrante hills, where there isn’t a 4 story building in sight. Patrick Kennedy rides down from his hill in Piedmont, an area not known for apartments or affordable housing.  

Together, they act in a paternalistic and patronizing fashion towards the neighbors, implying they know best what San Pablo’s future should be, and calling the neighbors of their pending project NIMBYs and worse. The neighbors, on the other hand are not fighting housing, affordable or low income, but are fighting density and height. They welcome housing and are realistic about its need. I hope our council will consider the impacted neighborhood when voting on the project. 

 

R. Vimont 

Berkeley 

 

‘Special interest’: saving the neighborhood 

Editor: 

Harry Pollack’s defense (4/30/01) of the ill-conceived and outsized development project proposed for the landmarked Byrne site at 1301 Oxford St. would be just another in the long PR campaign to defend an indefensible project were it not for a remarkable assertion he makes in his opening paragraph: that considerations of the size, siting and details of the project are being driven by “special interests.” Special interests?  

We’ve always understood that to mean political players that exercise undue influence because of their power and connections. Given how easily this development project has moved through the approval process, which of the players here might qualify as a special interest?  

Is Codornices Creek a special interest? Are Alameda Creeks Alliance, Friends of Five Creeks, Urban Creeks Council, Sierra Club (San Francisco Bay Chapter), Center for Biological Diversity, International Rivers Network, Berkeley Community Gardening Collaborative, Eco-City Builders, Berkeley Eco-House, California Oak Foundation, and the Golden Gate Chapter of the Audubon Society, all of which have joined the neighborhood association in appealing the Use Permit to the City Council, special interests?  

The choice is not between the synagogue’s plan and the continued neglect of the site, which has been owned by Congregation Beth El for more than three years now. Applications are currently pending for funds to acquire access to and improve this site as a resource for all Berkeley residents, far beyond what the current development proposal will do. The synagogue’s own creeks expert has criticized its proposal. And it is possible to place a religious institution on the southern portion of the Byrne site while preserving the entire riparian corridor to the north.  

Is the maintenance of the residential neighborhood character of the neighborhood surrounding the Byrne site a special interest? For the applicants to suggest that characterization underscores the take-it-or-leave-it approach of the congregation’s leaders.  

To understand what’s at issue, stand at the Oxford Street gate to the Byrne property, and take in the planned building that currently is marked off by story poles. It is approximately a football field in length. Then walk over to the Safeway on Henry St. just south of Rose. The building Beth El is seeking to build is only slightly smaller in floor area than that supermarket. It will house not only the synagogue sanctuary but offices, a day care facility, classrooms for a number of programs, a large and expandable social space and a library. It will be in use, according to synagogue leaders’ testimony, from 7 a.m. until late into the evening, and unlike the current facility, will be used for large weekend parties. 

Count the number of parking spaces in Safeway’s lot, including the underground spaces. Or in the parking lot at St. Mary Magdalene, or St. John’s on College St., or at the First Unitarian Church of Berkeley. Then compare: to accommodate the many users of this building, the applicant will provide on the Oxford Street site all of 32 parking places, leaving the balance of the cars it attracts to be absorbed by the neighborhood.  

“Balance” is the mantra used by Beth El’s leaders since they first proposed this project. Their interest in balance appears to stop at both the boundaries of the Byrne property and the limits of the congregation’s interests.  

We cannot believe this is the balance Beth El’s congregants seek. If it is, there remains no question who the true special interest is in the case of 1301 Oxford St.  

Alan S. Kay, Carole Selter Norris 

Berkeley


Arts & Entertainment

Tuesday June 05, 2001

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels like an earthworm, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins, and become little “dump” workers. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” Through May 2002 An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum “Joe Brainard: A Retrospective,” Through May 27. The selections include 150 collages, assemblages, paintings, drawings, and book covers. Brainard’s art is characterized by its humor and exuberant color, and by its combinations of media and subject matter. “Ricky Swallow/Matrix 191,” Including new sculptures and drawings; Through May 27 $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history.“Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing.This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge.“Within the Human Brain” Ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “T. Rex on Trial,” Through May 28 Where was T. Rex at the time of the crime? Learn how paleontologists decipher clues to dinosaur behavior. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for a year membership. All ages. May 5: Shikabane, Phobia, Harum Scarum, Vulgar Pigeons, Insidious Sorrow; May 11: Subincision, Next to Nothing, Fracus, Thrice, The Average Joe; May 12: The Sick, Impalid, Creuvo, Tearing Down Standards. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz May 5: 9:30 California Cajun Orchestra, 8:30 p.m. dance lesson; May 6: 7 p.m.: Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble; May 9: 9 p.m. Billy Dunn and Bluesway, 8 p.m. dance lesson; May 10: 10 p.m. Dead DJ night with Digital Dave; May 11: 9:30 p.m. The Mood Swing Orchestra, 8 p.m. dance lesson May 12: 9 p.m.The Johnny Otis Show; May 13: 9:30 p.m. Toyes, The “Smoke Two Joints” Band 1370 San Pablo Ave. (at Gilman) 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com  

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. May 5, 10 a.m. - Noon: West Coast Live with author P.D. James and Scottish fiddler Alasdair Fraser; May 5: R. Crumb 7 The Cheap Suit Serenaders; May 6: Terry Riley, George Brooks & Gyan Riley; May 8: Duck Baker and Tim Sparks; May 9: Rosalie Sorrels and Terry Garthwaite; May 10: Richard Shindell; May 11: Steve Seskin, Angela Kaset and Don Henry; May 12, 10 a.m. - Noon: West Coast Live with authors Adair Lara and Janis Newman, and the acoustic Guitar Summit guitar quartet; May 12: Robin Flower and Libby McClaren; May 13, 1 p.m.: The Kathy Kallick Band; May 13, 8 p.m.: The Pine Valley Boy. 1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

Jazzschool/La Note All music at 4:30 p.m. May 6: David Creamer Trio; May 13: Michael Zilber Group 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 or visit www.jazzschool.com 

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. May 5: J Dogs; May 8: The Rum Diary; May 9: Bitches Brew; May 10: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 11: Mood Food; May 12: Post Junk Trio; May 15: Chris Shot Group; May 16: Spank; May 17: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 18: Will Bernard and Motherbug; May 19: Solomon Grundy; May 22: Willy N’ Mo; May 23: Global Echo; May 24: Beatdown with DJ’s Delon, Yamu and Add1; May 25: The Mind Club; May 26: Netwerk: Electric; May 29: The Lost Trio; May 30: Zambambazo 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

La Pena Cultural Center May 5, 9 p.m.: Chicano de Mayo Celebration dance with O-Maya, Yaksi, DJ Corazon & La Viuda Negra, plus poets Leticia Hernandez and Robert Karimi; May 11, 8 p.m.: Erika Luckett, Irina Rivkin & Making Waves, Gwen Avery, Shelly Doty X-tet; May 12, 10:30 a.m.: Colibri; May 13, 4 p.m.: In the Cafe La Pena - Community Juerga; May 13, 3 p.m.: Juanita Newland-Ulloa and Picante Ensemble; May 17, 8 p.m.: Tribu; May 19, 8 p.m.: Carnaval featuring Company of Prophets, Loco Bloco, Mystic, Los Delicados, DJ Sake One and DJ Namane 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org  

 

Cal Performances May 5, 8 p.m.: Merce Cunningham Dance Company presents “Way Station,” “BIPED,” and “Rainforest” $20 - $42 Zellerbach Hall UC Berkeley; 642-9988 or www.calperfs.berkeley.edu 

 

Live Oak Concert May 5, 7:30 p.m. Featuring Stephanie Pan, soprano, Mirta Wymerszberg, baroque flute, Karen Ande, viola de gamba, Meg Cotner, harpsichord performing the music of Vivaldi, Bach, Boismortier, and Ortiz. $8 - $10 Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

“The Children’s Hour” May 5 & 12, 8 p.m. and May 13, 4 p.m. The Berkeley Community Chorus and Orchestra, conducted by Arlene Sagan will perform Julian White’s piece along with Beethoven’s Choral Fantasia and selections from Randall Thompson’s Frostiana, poems of Robert Frost set to music. Free St. Joseph the Worker Church 1640 Addison St. 528-2145  

 

Music & Dance of Bali May 5, 8 p.m. & May 6, 2 p.m. Gamelan Sekar Jaya, the Bay Area 45-member ensemble, will perform music and dance from Bali under the direction of Balinese guest artists I Made Subandi and Ni Ketut Arini. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 www.juliamorgan.org 

 

Music of the Big Band Era May 6, 2 p.m. Featuring the music of Glenn Miller, Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Claude Thornhill, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and Stan Kenton. $15 Longfellow School of the Arts 1500 Derby St. (at Sacramento) 420-4560 

 

Francesco Trio May 6, 4 p.m. Performing works of Haydn, Brahams and Mel Powell. $10 / under 18 free Crowden School 1475 Rose St. (at Sacramento) 559-6910 or visit www.thecrowdenschool.org 

 

Young People Chamber Orchestra May 6, 4 p.m. Celebrating the music of J.S. Bach, J. Haydn, Mozart and others. St. Johns Presbyterian Church 2727 College Ave. 595-4688 

 

New Monsoon and Om May 6, 9:30 p.m. World-influenced jam rock and improv groove/jazz trio respectively. $3 cover charge. Blakes Bar 2367 Telegraph Ave. 848-0886 www.blakesbar.com 

 

“Three Tenors No Opera” May 7, 8 - 10 p.m. This Bay Area jazz septet with three-sax front line will deconstruct the tenor classics live on KPFA, 94.1 FM 

 

Apollo String Quartet May 10, 7:30 p.m. Composed of ninth grade students from Crowden School, quartet will perform Mozart and Bartok. Berkeley Public Library’s North Branch 1170 The Alameda 548-1240 

 

“MadriGALA” May 11, 7:30 p.m. The Women’s Antique Vocal Ensemble presents a concert of chansons and madrigals from the 15th and 16th centuries. $5 - $10. Calvary Presbytarian Church 1940 Virginia St. (at Milvia) 237-2213 

 

Berkeley Opera Gala Concert May 12, 7 p.m. Berkeley Opera singers and special guest artists will be joined by Music Director, Jonathan Khuner and members of the Berkeley Opera Orchestra to provide entertainment highlighting the 2001 theme, “Opera Uncensored.” Also a silent auction, balloon raffle, champagne and more. $15 - $40 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

Juanita Newland-Ulloa & Picante Ensemble May 13, 3 p.m. Romantic songs from South America. Luncheon served at 1 p.m. at the Valparaiso Cafe. $13 - $15 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Mother’s Day Celebration May 13, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Albany Big Band will play from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. followed at 2 p.m. by Wine Country Brass. Picnic fare will be available fom Classic Catering, or bring food from home. Flowers for sale. 525-3005 

 

Tribu May 17, 8 p.m. Direct from Mexico, Tribu plays a concert of ancestral music of the Mayan, Aztec, Olmec, Zapotec, Purerpecha, Chichimec, Otomi, and Toltec. Tribu have reconstructed and rescued some of the oldest music in the Americas. $12 La Pena Cultural Center 3105 Shattuck Ave. 849-2568 or www.lapena.org 

 

Satsuki Arts Festival and Bazaar May 19, 4 - 10 p.m. & May 20, Noon - 7 p.m. A fundraiser for the Berkeley Buddhist Temple featuring musical entertainment by Julio Bravo & Orquesta Salsabor, Delta Wires, dance presentations by Kaulana Na Pua and Kariyushi Kai, food, arts & crafts, plants & seedlings, and more. Berkeley Buddhist Temple 2121 Channing Way (at Shattuck) 841-1356 

 

KALW 60th Anniversary Celebration May 20, 8 p.m. An evening of eclectic music and dance that reflects the eclectic nature of the stations’ programming. Performers include Paul Pena, Kathy Kallick & Nina Gerber, Orla & the Gas Men, and the Kennelly Irish Dancers. $19.50 - $20.50 Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 1111 Addison St. 548-1761 or www.thefreight.org  

 

Himalayan Fair May 27, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. The only such event in the world, the fair celebrates the mountain cultures of Tibet, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ladakh, Mustang and Bhutan. Arts, antiques and modern crafts, live music and dance. Proceeds benefit Indian, Pakistani, Tibetan, and Nepalese grassroots projects. $5 donation Live Oak Park 1300 Shattuck Ave. 869-3995 or www.himalayanfair.net  

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21, 2001. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

Dance 

Music and Dance of Bali May 5, 8 p.m., May 6, 2 p.m. Forty-five member ensemble Gamelan Sekar Jaya presents rhythms of Balinese gamelan in an orchestra of gongs, drums, flutes and bronze metallophones accompanied by several of Bali’s skilled dancers. $8-$16 Saturday, $5-$10 Sunday Julia Morgan Theatre 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 www.juliamorgan.org 

 

“Dance! The Soul Behind the Art” May 11, 8 p.m. The Attitude Dance Company presents jazz, hip hop, lyrical, street funk, modern and tap dancing. $6 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300  

 

Theater 

 

“Grease” May 5, 11, 12, 8 p.m. and May 6, 2 p.m. By Berkeley High Performing Arts Department. Rock-musical set in late 1950’s explores teen issues. A classic. $6 Little Theater Allston Way between MLK and Milvia 524-9754  

 

“The Oresteia” by Aeschylus Through May 6 Directed by Tony Taccone and Stephen Wadsworth, Aeschylus trilogy will be the first production staged on the Berkeley Rep’s new prosenium stage. Please call Berkeley Repertory Theatre for specific dates and times. $15.99 - $117 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. (at Shattuck) 647-2949 or www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“Death of a Salesman” Through May 5, Friday & Saturday, 8 p.m. plus Thursday, May 3, 8 p.m. The ageless story of Willy Loman presented by an African-American cast and staged by Actors Ensemble of Berkeley. $10 Live Oak Theater 1301 Shattuck (at Berryman) 528-5620 

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

Shotgun Players “Slings and Arrows: love stories from Shakespearean tragedies” written and directed by Rebecca Goodberg and developed by the ensemble and “Blue Roses” conceptualized and directed by Christian Schneider. Discussions with the audience will follow each show. Thursday-Sunday, 7 p.m. through May 5. $10 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid Ave. 655-0813  

 

Interplay Fest! May 5, 3:30 - 8 p.m., May 6, 3 p.m. A full weekend of performances by Wing It! Performance Ensemble, Cultural InterPlay Ensemble, and the Art of InterPlay Ensemble. Weekend Pass: $15, Individual performances, $7 - $10 First Congregational Church of Berkeley 2345 Channing Way (at Dana) 814-9584 

 

“Planet Janet” May 11 - June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Musical Tree of India” May 13, 2 p.m. Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre present this legend from tribal India. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere May 18 - June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

The far side of the moon through May 5, 8 p.m. May 5, 2 p.m. and May 6, 3 p.m. A solo performance by Canadian writer, actor and director Robert Lepage with an original score by Laurie Anderson. $30 - $46 Zellerbach Playhouse Bancroft at Dana UC Berkeley 642-9988  

 

 

Films 

 

 

“A Ship with Painted Sails: The Fabulous Animation of Karel Zeman” May 5: 7 p.m. Journey to the Beginning of Time, 8:35 p.m. The Treasure of Bird Island May 11: 7 p.m. Zeman Shorts, 8:55 p.m. The Fabulous World of Jules Verne May 12: 7 p.m. Baron Munchausen, 9:10 p.m. Kraba - The Sorcerer’s Apprentice May 13: 5:30 The Thousand and One Nights, 7:05 p.m. The Tale of John and Mary. Admission: $7 for one film, $8.50 for double bills. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“Women’s Evening at the Movies” May 5, 7:30 - 10 p.m. Jennifer Tilly stars in “Bound,” as a mob man’s mistress who becomes lovers with a sexy handywoman. Join a great group of bi, lesbian, transgender and queer women to watch the flick and munch on junk food. $5 donation requested Pacific Center 2712 Telegraph Ave. 548-8283 or www.pacificcenter.org 

 

“Mirele Efros” May 13, 2 - 4:30 p.m. Jacob Gordin’s classic story set in turn-of the century Grodno. A classic study in family relations. Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center Cinema 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237 x127 

 

Exhibits 

 

 

“The Sands of Time” Arab/Muslim sculptures and ceramics of Khalil Bendib. Through May 5, Monday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. or call for appointment Mussi Artworks Foundry & Gallery 719 Heintz Ave. Space 10 644-2735 

 

Youth Arts Festival A citywide celebration of art, music, dance and poetry by youth from the Berkeley Unified School District. Featuring paintings, drawings, sculpture and ceramics by K-8 students Through May 12, Wednesday - Sunday, Noon - 5 p.m. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St.  

 

“The Art of Meadowsweet Dairy” Objects found in nature, reworked and turned into objects of art. Through May 15, call for hours Current Gallery at the Crucible 1036 Ashby Ave. 843-5511  

 

“Scapes/Escapes” Ink, Acrylic, Mixed Media by Evelyn Glaubman Through June 1 Tuesday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 2:45 p.m. Gallery of the Center for Psychological Studies 1398 Solano Ave. Albany 524-0291 

 

“Watercolors and Mixed Media” by Pamela Markmann Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. A retrospective of 30 years’ work at Markmann’s Berkeley studio. Red Oak Gallery 2983 College Ave. 526-4613  

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Reception: May 2, 6 - 8 p.m. Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

Berkeley Potters Guild Spring Show and Sale May 5, 6, 12, 13, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Fifteen artists open their personal studios to the public and offer pieces for sale. Berkeley Potters Guild 731 Jones St. 524-7031 www.berkeleypotters.com 

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse. Meet the artists May 18, 19, 20 (call for times). Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Opening reception May 3, 4 - 6 p.m. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts & Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby May 7 - August 24; Reception event May 7, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m,: Colby will give a slide-lecture using contemporary women’s art depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe to illustrate her dissertation research in Women’s Spirituality at the California Institute of Integral Studies - Dinner Board Room; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

Quilt Show through May 12. M-Th, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m., Fri-Sat, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Twenty-second annual show displays over 60 quilts. Berkeley Public Library’s North Branch. 1170 The Alameda 644-6850 

 

“Tropical Visions: Images of AfroCaribbean Women in the Quilt Tapestries of Cherrymae Golston” Through May 28, Tu-Th, 1-7 p.m., Sat 12-4 p.m. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. 845-7852 All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 8: Geling Yan reads “The Lost Daughter of Happiness” May 10: Ron Hansen talks about “A Stay Against Confusion; May 11: Terry Pratchett reads “Thief of Time”; May 12: Ike Oguine reads “A Squatter’s Tale”; May 14: Edie Meidav reads “The Far Field: A Novel of Ceylon”  

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. 559-9500 All events at 7 p.m., unless noted May 7: Rachel Naomi Remen reads from “My Grandfather’s Blessings: Stories of Strength, Refuge, and Belonging”; May 10: Anchee Min reads “Becoming Madame Mao”  

 

Boadecia’s Books 398 Colusa Ave. Kensington All events at 7:30 p.m., unless noted May 11: Suzanne Gold will read from her novel “Daddy’s Girls”; May 12: Krandall Kraus will read “Love’s Last Chance: A Nigel & Nicky Mystery”; May 18: Melinda Given Guttman will read from “The Enigma of Anna O”; May 19: Jessica Barksdale Inclan will read from “Her Daughter’s Eyes” 559-9184 or www.bookpride.com  

 

Easy Going Travel Shop & Bookstore 1385 Shattuck Ave. (at Rose) 843-3533 All events at 7:30 p.m. unless noted otherwise May 10: Gray Brechin talks about “Imperial San Francisco: Urban Power, Earthly Ruin”; May 23: Jon Bowermaster discusses his book “Birthplace of the Winds: Adventuring in Alaska’s Islands of Fire and Ice”; May 29, 7 - 9 p.m.: Travel Photo Workshop with Joan Bobkoff. $15 registration fee  

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 549-2970  

 

Duomo Reading Series and Open Mic. Thursdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. May 10: Jamie Kennedy with host Mischell Erickson; May 17: Gregory Listach Gayle with host Mark States; May 24: Stephanie Young with host Louis Cuneo; May 31: Connie Post with host Louis Cuneo Cafe Firenze 2116 Shattuck Ave. 644-0155. 

 

“New Draft Programme of the Revolutionary Communist Party, USA” May 9, 7 p.m. Take part in a discussion of this blueprint for fighting and winning a revolution in the United States. Revolution Books 2425C Channing Way 848-1196 

 

Paul Polansky and Voice of Roma May 10, 3 p.m. Polansky’s poetry gives voice to the Kosovo Roma and their plight in the aftermath of their plight in the aftermath of the 1999 war. Free Kroeber Hall Gifford Room Second Floor (at College and Bancroft in Anthropology Building) 981-1352 

 

Rhythm & Muse Open Mike May 12, 6:30 p.m. An ongoing open mike series, featuring poet/artist Anca Hariton. Free Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 527-9753 

 

Tours 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour May 12: Debra Badhia will lead a tour of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre and the Arts District; May 19: John Stansfield & Allen Stross will lead a tour of the School for the Deaf and Blind; June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 

Lectures 

 

California Colloquium on Water Scholars of distinction in the fields of natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, humanities, law and environmental design speak about water resources and hopefully contribute to informed decisions on water in California. May 8, 5:15 - 6:30 p.m.: “What Makes Water Wet?” Richard Saykally, professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley (refreshments served in 410 O’Brien Hall at 4:15 p.m.) 212 O’Brien Hall, UC Berkeley 642-2666  

 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute Free Lectures All lectures begin at 6 p.m. May 6: Sylvia Gretchen on “Faith, Doubt, and Refuge in Buddhist Practice”; May 13: Abbe Blum on “Tapping Into Creativity”; May 20: Miep Cooymans and Dan Jones on “Working with Awareness, Concentration, and Energy”; May 27: Eva Casey on “Getting Calm; Staying Clear”; June 3: Jack van der Meulen on “Healing Through Kum Nye (Tibetan Yoga)”; June 10: Sylvia Gretchen on “Counteracting Negative Emotions” Tibetan Nyingma Institute 1815 Highland Place 843-6812 

 

“Hunting T. Rex” May 6, 2 p.m. A talk by Dr. Philip Currie, curator of dinosaurs, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology. Currie asks the question: Was there social interaction amongst the Tyrannosaurs? $3 - $7 Lawrence Hall of Science UC Berkeley 642-5132 or visit www.lawrencehallofscience.org 

 

Berkeley 1900 May 7, 7 p.m. Richard Schwartz, author of Berkeley 1900, a book about life at the turn of the 19th century, will speak at the Friends of Five Creeks’ monthly meeting. Albany Community Center (downstairs) 1249 Marin 848-9358 

 

Peopling of the Pacific May 11, 8 p.m. Dr. Patrick Kirch, department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley, will review results of archaeological research in the Pacific Islands, providing a current overview of Oceanic prehistory. 370 Dwinelle Hall UC Berkeley 415-338-1537  


Pinole Valley gets revenge, shuts out Yellowjackets

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Kopmar hurt in 3-0 loss; ACCAL title up for grabs 

 

The Berkeley Yellowjackets had to feel confident heading into Friday’s game against Pinole Valley at Cal’s Evans Diamond. They had a 1 1/2 game lead on the second-place Spartans, and they had ace Moses Kopmar, who had three-hit Pinole Valley earlier in the year, headed for the mound. But two hours later, they had taken a 3-0 loss that puts the league title back up for grabs, and Kopmar was sitting in the dugout after leaving the game with an injury. 

The Spartans (12-4 overall, 6-2 ACCAL), on the other hand, had just avenged the earlier loss to Berkeley (16-5, 7-2) and put themselves back in the hunt with a dominating pitching performance by Kirk Koehler. Koehler went the distance, giving up just three hits while striking out eight, seven of them looking. 

“I’ve been waiting for this game,” Koehler said afterwards. “After they beat us, I just wanted to pitch against them. This is what I’ve been practicing for.” 

Koehler only allowed one runner past second base, keeping the ’Jackets off balance by mixing his fastball with three different off-speed pitches. The Berkeley hitters looked alternately baffled and frustrated, summed up by shortstop Jason Moore’s ejection in the final inning for throwing his bat after being called out on strikes for the second time. 

“We just ran into a hot pitcher we couldn’t get to,” Berkeley head coach Tim Moellering said. 

Kopmar couldn’t duplicate his dominance over the Spartans, giving up four hits, including two doubles and a home run, in just three innings of work. Outfielder Marcus Maxwell hit him in the pitching arm with a line drive in the second, but Moellering said he took Kopmar out before the fourth because the pitcher had strained his groin. 

The Spartans were on Kopmar early, hitting the ball hard three times in the first inning, but Berkeley escaped with two nice plays by Moore. But Marcus Davis started the second inning with a ringing double. One out later, Maxwell hit Kopmar, scoring Davis. Designated hitter Tom Ruelas followed with a blast over the left field wall, earning an enthusiastic greeting at home plate by his teammates. Kopmar walked the next two batters and looked to be in trouble, but got out of the jam by blowing the ball by Spartan shortstop Tim Torres. 

Kopmar made it through the next inning, but something was clearly amiss with his delivery, and he was replaced by sophomore Sean Souders to start the fourth. The Spartans had a tough time adjusting from the fireballing Kopmar to crafty lefthander Souders, and managed just one run for the remainder of the game. Even that run was of the scratch variety, as Miguel Bernard reached first on a dropped third strike, was bunted to second, got to third on a wild pitch and scored on a swinging bunt by catcher Ryan Kiss. 

But that didn’t matter, as Koehler shut down the ’Jackets for the shutout. 

“We just came out here with nothing to lose,” he said. “We want to pretend we’re in last place, working our way to the top. It makes us play harder.” 

Moellering kept a smile on his face despite the loss of both the game and his star pitcher. 

“Well, this just makes the race more exciting,” he said. “It just means we have to win the rest of our games. I always thought we would be the top two teams, and it came down to it today.”


Visionary builds tool shed for ‘cheaper than dirt’

By Tracy Chocholousek Special to the Daily Planet
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Four years ago Jim Cisney had a vision for the Northside Community Art Garden.  

The garden, located along side the BART tracks on Northside Street, needed a tool shed, and he was interested in building a non-traditional structure.  

“I was looking for something that was in my budget. I figured there’s nothing cheaper than dirt,” he said.  

With the design and commitment of Berkeley architect John Fordice and the volunteer efforts of nearly 100 community members, including Cisney, a sustainable earth wall building called Troth was presented to the community Sunday at a dedication ceremony and potluck.  

“What started as a dream became an obsession,” Fordice said. “Without the inspiration and energy of all those who came to help over the past three and one half years, this building would not have been possible.”  

The name Troth comes from the word betrothal. Fordice chose the name to represent humanity’s faithfulness and commitment to the earth. 

“It is dedicated to the spirit that we can do things in a way that is giving of ourselves to what the world really needs, rather than what we need,” Fordice said.  

The tool shed was Fordice’s first successful large-scale cob construction. Cob is a mixture of earth, clay-bearing soil, sand and straw that when mixed together creates a natural cement. It makes up the walls of the dedicated structure at Northside Community Art Garden.  

As an architect, Fordice says that although he enjoys his profession, it can be restrictive. This project provided a way for him to integrate art and eco-technology with his knowledge of architecture.  

In 1995 he attended a workshop on building with cob in Oregon. Since then he has worked on a few small projects and is scheduled to construct a cob greenhouse at Malcolm X Elementary School in south Berkeley.  

“Troth is the first full building that I was able to complete from the ground up,” Fordice said. “I want this to be accessible to everybody, but ultimately I want it to be accessible to me.”  

Fordice said his goal is to make a living building with cob. 

Atop the building’s sod roof, pink flowers bloom. Like welcoming, outstretched arms, two cob benches extend from the sides between which French doors swing open as the entrance into the shed. 

And though the cob building does serve a purpose for the garden, many people see it as much more than just an ordinary tool shed.  

“John has introduced cob into contemporary construction. Troth proves that shelter can be created out of the very earth upon which we stand,” said Berkeley City Councilmember Linda Maio. “I have a hard time calling this a tool shed because to me it’s a work of art.”  

Maio presented Fordice with two proclamations from the city, one in recognition of Fordice’s commitment to Troth and the other in honor of his role in “ rebirthing the art of cob construction.”  

The dedication program included an extensive thank you list of contributors. In addition to dirt, numerous materials and contributions from the community were needed to fund the project that took about three years to complete. Raw materials and resources were donated by dozens of local and bay area businesses, the city and dedicated members of the Northside garden.  

“I think Jim (Cisney)’s vision was that we all come together as a community in a big party. It was kind of a much longer haul than we expected,” said Eileen Theimer, project coordinator. 

What was initially anticipated to take a few months, stretched into a few years due in part to poor weather conditions on the weekends. It took half a year to get a third of the mud wall up according to Theimer.  

“This was a tremendous amount of work. Frankly, most of the gardeners got burned out. It was very demanding in terms of time and energy,” Cisney said. 

But the hard work did not go unappreciated. About 200 people attended the dedication ceremony and brought food to participate in the potluck.  

“The turnout was twice our expectations,” said Community Garden Commons Facilitator Karl Linn.  

The Northside Community Art Garden is one of three gardens contained within the greater HopPer Commons. Along with Northside, the Karl Linn Garden and the Peralta Garden are all located within walking distance of one another at the cross-streets Hopkins and Peralta. Open to the public, the gardens provide a community space that can be reserved for various functions and used for gardening, relaxation, workshops, celebrations and neighborhood meetings. 

Originally the property of BART, the city is currently leasing the land upon which the gardens exist. 

“I’ve watched this land be transformed from a ratty lot into this magical garden,” said Laura Paradise. Paradise lives within walking distance of the garden and plans to hold a yoga class and poetry reading there next month.  

More than 75 people hold annual memberships and share planter boxes throughout the three gardens. An annual membership is $15 per person.  

“What makes this place unique is that people feel free to express themselves creatively, to feel acknowledged and supported in their creativity,” Linn said.  

To volunteer, become a member, contribute art or plan an event contact Herb Weber, HopPer Commons Association coordinator, at 351-3075.  


Calendar of Events & Activities

Tuesday June 05, 2001


Tuesday, June 5

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time  

548-8283 www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion topic is open and will follow the conversation. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Bike for a Better City Action  

Meeting 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

1356 Rose St. 

www.bfbc.org 

 

Groundbreaking of ARTech  

Building 

9 a.m. 

ARTech Building 

2101 Milvia St. 

Computer Technologies Program celebrates the groundbreaking of its new offices in the ARTech building. 

 


Wednesday, June 6

 

Fishbowl: “Everything you  

always wanted to know about  

the opposite sex but were  

afraid to ask” 

7 p.m.. to 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Find out what the other half really thinks! The Fishbowl is an interesting way to anonymously ask those burning questions. $8 for BRJCC members, $10 for general public. 848-0237 x127. 

 

South Berkeley Community  

Action Team Advisory Group  

Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Over 60’s Clinic 

3260 Sacramento, 2nd Floor 

All South and West Berkeley residents invited to the regular meeting. Among other agenda items, the planning of upcoming Town Hall meeting. Refreshments provided. 

665-6809 

 

ASAP Open House 

5 - 8 p.m. 

2070 Allston Way, Suite 2 

Access to Software for All People is having its 6th annual open house and invites the public to welcome new Executive Director John Kittredge. Refreshments and presentations of ASAP Web Design and Data Management, as well as work by high school employees.  

540-7457 


Thursday, June 7

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

Berkeley Unified School  

District 

Appreciation Dinner 

6 p.m. 

Berkeley Alternative High School 

2701 MLK Jr. Way 

Berkeley Unified School District Office of State and Federal Projects honors District Title I/State Compensatory Education, English Learner Advisory Committee representatives, and departing school principals. Guest speaker Dr. Mary Montle Bacon on “We Need to BE the Change We Want.” 

644-6202 

 

Free Writing, Cashiering &  

Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a community meeting.  

654-5486 

 

Skin Cancer Screening Clinic 

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center 

Summit Campus  

2450 Ashby Ave. 

Markstein Cancer Education Center 

Skin cancer screenings are offered only to people who, due to limited or no health insurance, would be able to have a suspicious mole or other skin changes examined. Appointments are required.  

869-8833 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly summer concert series. This week Advanced Jazz Workshop under direction of Mike Zilber. 

 

Community Environmental  

Advisory  

Commission Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Planning and Development 

First floor Conference Room 

2118 Milvia Street 

Among items to be discussed, Air Study and Chrome 6, TMD staffing, and arsenic, pentachlorophenol and creosote in playgrounds. 705-8150 


Friday, June 8

 

Strong Women - The Arts,  

Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. 549-2970  

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Backpacking Essentials 

7 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Review the fundamental how-tos of selecting gear for a weekend backpacking trip. Free 

527-4140 

 

City Commons Club,  

Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Doris Sloan, on “Treasures Along the Silk Road Oases.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 848-3533 

 

Women In Black Protests 

5 - 6:30 p.m. 

Montgomery and Market Streets 

San Francisco 

Part of a worldwide protest taking place in 103 cities, Bay Area women and men in black will protest 34 years of Israeli occupation of the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Sponsored in part by Berkeley Women In Black and the Middle East Children’s Alliance. 434-1304 

 


Saturday, June 9

 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Celebrates original crafts, international diversity, and community life. One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live performances and a variety of food. Free admission.  

Call 986-9337 

 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

The Bite of REI 2001 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Taste some of the best, lightweight backpacking food and energy snacks available. At 1 p.m. Rick Greenspan and Hal Kahn with demonstrate how to turn your outdoor trips into gourmet adventures. Free 

527-4140 

 

La Pena 26th Anniversary  

Benefit to Honor Dolores  

Huerta 

7 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

Music performances, slide show and raffle in honor of special guest Dolores Huerta, farm worker’s and women’s rights advocate. Huerta worked with Cesar Chavez to establish and lead the National Farm Workers Association in the 1960’s, and has worked tirelessly to improve the lives of farm workers for decades. Proceeds will go to La Pena and Huerta’s medical expenses. $20 - $25. 

849-2568 www.lapena.org 


Letters to the Editor

Tuesday June 05, 2001

Sewer tax should flow to sewers 

 

Editor: 

RE: Art Goldberg’s Letter – concerning the Sewer Fund. 

Our forefathers (and mothers) dumped tea in the Boston harbor to express their displeasure at “Taxation Without Representation.” 

Berkeley’s City Council gives us “Taxation With Misrepresentation,” an even greater scandal. Any ideas about what we should dump and where to express our displeasure at the sewer tax flowing to the Engineering and Housing departments, gushing to the Corporation Yard and trickling to the First Source? 

 

Rosemary Vimont 

Berkeley 

 

Safeway-size structure best elsewhere 

 

Editor: 

As neighbors of 1301 Oxford Street, we implore the council to reject the current plan for the Beth El development. 

If you walk or drive around this property, you will notice an overwhelming number of signs in front of homes stating: “Save Live Oak greenbelt/Save Codornices Creek/Save our neighborhood/Redesign Beth El.” 

I would say about 90 percent of the neighbors surrounding the proposed site have these signs displayed. We really wish the neighbors and concerned members of various environmental groups would be heard on this issue regarding a plan laden with many problems. 

There is no protection for our (and I mean belonging to all of us in Berkeley) Codornices Creek. We know the mayor is working with UC Berkeley to restore and daylight the creeks. How can we permit a driveway and parking lot if not on top of the creek, but right next to it. Either way, this will destroy forever any chance of daylighting it. 

Live Oak neighborhood has some of Berkeley’s most beautiful and historic homes. It also has the Live Oak Greenbelt running from Shattuck Avenue three blocks up to Spruce Street. The beauty of this greenbelt is the creek and the open natural setting of park like land that has not been built up. Beth El plans to destroy the beauty of this property with a huge Safeway size building, which intends not only to function as a Synagogue, but for social events beyond the normal use for religious services. 

We realize that Beth El does good deeds in the community. Well, please be advised, that many of the neighbors against this project, also donate their time and money to many good causes. We are also good people. It’s important to remember that just because you are a good organization, it doesn’t justify a plan that doesn’t fit into the neighborhood. It doesn’t justify destroying the earth. We are also very upset that Beth El has only paid lip-service at the most to the neighbors’ numerous concerns and has not worked with us at all. We would hate to think that Beth El’s leaders didn’t heed our concerns because they knew they had the political influence with the City Council and the City of Berkeley. We have already seen extreme bias on the part of city staff (whose salaries we pay) in the way they handle themselves at meetings and seem to be pushing this plan through. We have seen the ZAB lawyer and staff give thumbs-up to Beth El leaders and they are on a first name basis with the Beth El leaders. The only city commission which really looked at this project objectively is the Landmarks who rejected it due to the overwhelming size of the project, which would destroy the historical setting as it has existed for the past 150 plus years. 

Also, the City Council voted to have a mediator appointed by our City Manager and yet before any mediation has taken place there is going to be an open hearing? Shouldn’t the open hearing be held after both parties have had time to go through the mediation process? 

The neighborhood has appealed the current Beth El plan and has been joined by many environmental organizations that we’re sure of whom you have the greatest respect. 

We urge the council to reject the current Beth El plan and have it dramatically down-sized as previous City Councils did when the Chinese Church owned the property. If Beth El needs a larger site to accommodate its 600 plus families for their expanding activities, maybe they should find a different property closer to a commercial area, and enable the city, along with environmental organizations to open Codornices Creek, and preserve this beautiful site for future generations. 

 

Jim Cassell and Valerie Bach 

Berkeley 

 

 

Save the open space on Oxford Street 

 

Editor: 

Please give the good people of Congregation Beth El city hall or anything else they want but save what little bit of open space we have left in Berkeley. Take the idea from the East Bay Regional Park District to buy up and preserve for future generations what natural resources there are.  

 

Catherine Willis 

Berkele 

County school board should support its superintendent 

 

The Daily Planet received this letter addressed to the Alameda County Board of Education: 

We write and speak as elected educational officials with a commitment to continued Alameda County Office of Education services and support. It is time to come together around a budget that reflects the wishes of the County Superintendent. We believe the continuing internecine battles over Ms. Jordan’s budget will cause irreparable harm to our school districts and the students of Alameda County. The fact that the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Delaine Eastin, threatened to withhold state funding for the County of Alameda Office of Education points out your neglect in carrying out your obligations to the voters, residents, and students of Alameda County, and tarnishes your roles as public servants and elected officials. 

Sheila Jordan was elected by the voters of Alameda County to bring fresh ideas and educational policies to the County Office of the Superintendent. In this capacity she has become more visible in our many communities, has improved services to our school districts, and has focused the resources of the office of the superintendent on improvement of educational services for the children in our respective districts. 

Ms. Jordan’s budget reflects the direction that the Alameda County Office of Education will go under her leadership, as endorsed and supported by the voters of Alameda County. 

By the continued attacks on Ms. Jordan and the threats of a vote of no-confidence by the County Board of Education, the County Board appears to be more involved with petty infighting than with the real concerns of the students of our county. It is time for the County Board to act as responsible public officials and support the efforts of the Superintendent to provide a budget that reflects the direction and emphasis to improve the functioning of the County Office of Education and its support of local school districts in the county. Anything less than a reasoned and quick agreement is unconscionable; the County Board’s present course risks voter disillusionment and state sanctions, as well as damage to county educational services. We urge your leadership and efforts for the good of all the students of Alameda County. 

 

Terry S. Doran, President 

Berkeley School Board 

John T. Selawsky 

Berkeley School Board 

Darryl Moore 

Peralta Community CollegeBoard of Trustees 

 

 

y.


Arts & Entertainment

Tuesday June 05, 2001

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 8: The Enemies, Pitch Black, The Fleshies, Supersift, Texas Thieves; June 9: Groovie Ghoulies, The Influents, Red Planet, Mallrats, Goat Shanty. 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m unless noted otherwise. June 6: Whiskey Brothers; June 7: Keni “El Lebrijano” Flamenco guitar; June 9, 6 - 8 p.m.: Sauce Piquante, 9 p.m. - Midnight: Whiskey Brothers; June 12: Mad and Eddie Duran. 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music at 8 p.m. June 5: Open Mike; June 6: Bob Schoen with Cheryl McBride; June 7: Irrationals; June 8: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sallie Hanna-Rhine, 10 p.m.: Bluesman Hideo Date; June 9: Robin Gregory and Bliss Rodriguez, 10 p.m.: The Ducksan Distone; June 10: Choro Time with Ron Galen and Friends. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 5, 8 p.m.: Berkeley High Ki-Swahili Club Trip to Africa benefit, hip-hop/reggae dance party; June 6, 9 p.m.: Aux Cajunals; June 7, 10 p.m.: Dead DJ Nite with Digital Dave; June 8, 9:30 p.m. Ali Khan with Bellydance Troupe Lunatique; June 9, 9:30 p.m.: Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers; June 10, 7 p.m.: Food Not Bombs with Goodbye Flowers and INKA. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 6: Freight 33rd Anniversary concert series with Leni Stern, Jenna Mammina, Jill Cohn, Pig Iron. June :7 Alice Stuart, Folk blues, $17.50; June 8: Cats & Jammers Hot swing. $17.50; , June 9.: Danny Heines & Michael Manring; June 10: Roy Tyler and New Directions; June 12: Keith Little with Del Williams; June 13: Danu. $17.50.1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

La Peña Cultural Center “Cantiflas!” June 7 and June 8, 8 p.m. Herbert Siguenza, of the critically acclaimed trio Culture Clash, stars in this bilingual work-in-progress about legendary Mexican comedian Marion Moreno. With guest performers Eduardo Robledo and Tanya Vlach. 

$16. 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. (510) 849-2568 www.lapena.org  

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 5, Alias Smith; June 6, Lithium House; June 7, Beatdown with DJs Delon, Yamu, Add1; June 8, Harvey Wainapel Quartet; June 9, Om Trio; June 12, Ben Graves Trio 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

The Berkeley TEMPO Festival of Contemporary Performances All performances begin at 8 p.m. June 5: Music of Edmund Campion with dancers; June 6: Shafqat Ali Khan, Pakistani Khyal vocals with David Wessel and Matthew Wright; June 8: Berkeley Contemporary Chamber Players; June 9: John Scott, John Abercrombie, George Marsh, Rich Fudoli, Mel Graves. $15 Hertz Hall, UC Berkeley Campus www.tempofestival.org 

 

The Farallone String Quartet June 10, 7:30 p.m. Quartets by Haydn. $8 - $10 Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 

 

World Harmony Chorus June 10, 2 p.m. Vocal music from around the world. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

Sungugal Ballet June 10, 4:30 p.m. Featuring master percussionist Djibi Faye and West African Band with traditional West African dance. $6 - $12. Jazzschool/La Note 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere Through June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“Cymbeline” Through June 24, Tues. - Thur. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Sun. 4 p.m. Opening of the California Shakespeare Festival features one of Shakespeare’s first romances, directed by Daniel Fish. $12 - $146. Bruns Memorial Amphitheater off Highway 24 at the Shakespeare Festival Way/Gateway Exit. 548-9666 or www.calshakes.org 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shaper’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Previews June 8, 9, 10, 13. Opens June 14, runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

Pacific Film Archive June 5, 7:30: From the East; June 6, 7:30: Prank and Parody; June 7, 7:00: Viy; June 8, 7:30: Aerograd; June 8, 9:15: The Letter That Was Never Sent; June 9, 7:30: Comic and Avant-Garde Shorts; June 10, 5:30: Pitfall, 7:25: Woman In the Dunes. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“The Producers” June 10. Revisit this outrageous comedy classic, starring Zero Mostel and written by Mel Brooks. $2 Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237. 

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

East Bay Open Studios June 9 & 10, 16 & 17, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Jennifer Foxly: Oil paintings and 2-d mixed media works 3206 Boise St.; Lewis Suzuki: Scenes from California to the Philippines, florals to nudes 2240 Grant St.; Guy Colwell: Painted replicas and recent original work 2028 9th St. (open until 7 p.m.) 

 

Wosene Kosrof June 13, 7 - 8:30 p.m. Ethiopian-born Berkeley resident will be exhibiting and discussing his paintings. One piece will be up for auction, proceeds to benefit the YMCA. Free. Crystal Room, Shattuck Hotel 2086 Allston 848-9622 ext. 3541  

 

PASSING: The Re-Definition of Sex and Gender Through the Personal Re-Presentation of Self Through June 16, Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Black and white photographs by Ann P. Meredith. Free. Reception with the artist June 7, 6 - 8 p.m. Photolab Gallery 2235 Fifth St.  

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Tyler James Hoare Sculpture and Collage Through June 27, call for hours. Party June 9, 5-9 p.m. with music by Sauce Piquante. The Albatross Pub 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato June 5 - June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the past, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethiopia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910” chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. All events at 7:30 p.m. June 5: Timothy Ferris will read from “Life Beyond Earth”; June 6: Ralph Dranow and Carla Kandinsky read poetry; June 7: Dr. Amit Goswami talks about “The Visionary Window: A Quantum Physicist’s Guide to Enlightenment”; June 8: Scott Carrier reads from “Running After Antelope”; June 9: Richard Russo reads from “Empire Falls”, June 10: Irvine Welsh talks about “Glue.” 

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. All events at 7 p.m. June 6: Peter Mayle teaches “French Lessons: Adventures with Knife, Fork, and Corkscrew; June 8: For the younger readers, Eoin Colfer reads from “Artemis Fowl”; June 9: For the younger readers, Lemony Snicket reports on “The Vile Village.”  

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. Featured poets: June 11, Ivan Arguelles. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

 

 

 

Tours 

 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour. June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 


Power panel points to water district

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Public power advocates spoke out Thursday evening at a forum hosted by Assemblymember Dion Aroner, D-Berkeley. 

“Many people would tell you that we’re not having an energy crisis, but a financial crisis,” Aroner told the 40 people gathered in the City Council chambers.  

Referring to the massive payments going from Pacific Gas & Electric to Texas-based power generators to purchase energy, she quipped: “There’s been a transfer of funds from California to Texas.” 

The solution? Public ownership of power. 

But not municipalization. 

Aroner is calling for a Public Utilities Commission study on the possibility of an East Bay Municipal Utility District takeover of PG&E’s power-generating facilities on the Mokelumne River in the Sierra’s. She is backing Sen. Don Perata’s SB1008 which would require the study. 

Panelists appeared to agree. Public take over of private power distribution may not be as complex as it may seem. One does not have to start at zero. 

“EBMUD’s authority (already) includes the possible sale of electricity,” said Doug Linney, a director on the water board, who represents Alameda, San Leandro and parts of Oakland. 

In fact, the approximately 80-year-old water district is already generating some of its own electricity needs at its Pardee and Commache facilities. It generates about $3-4 million of the $8 million in electricity it uses annually, said EBMUD spokesperson Charles Hardy, in a phone interview Friday. 

Panelist Cynthia Wooten, a citizen advocate for public power, also called for the water district to take over some of the generation and distribution of electric power.  

“The truth is, PG&E has betrayed us,” she said, noting that the publicly-owned utility already has a trained and unionized labor force, as well as bonding capacity. 

The water district also asserts that it can do better than PG&E. “EBMUD can provide more power at a lower price than private operators, while reducing demand in its own water and wastewater operations,” says an EBMUD brochure. “Because it does not have to share money earned from power generation with stockholders, EBMUD can pass the savings on to California alacrity consumers.” 

A resolution from the California Municipal Utilities Association is even stronger. It says, in part: “Publicly owned electric utilities are not operated on a profit basis. Their role has always been to provide reasonably-priced electricity and services valued by the communities they serve.” 

“If there’s the will, we can get this done,” panelist Wooten said.  


Panthers romp, 28-0

By Tim Haran Daily Planet Correspondent
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Call it glorified batting practice. 

St. Mary’s coach Andy Shimabukuro said that his team’s 28-0 thrashing of St. Elizabeth’s Friday afternoon in Berkeley was a warm-up game for next week’s pivotal contest against Piedmont. 

Piedmont currently leads the Bay Shore Athletic League and with Friday’s win, St. Mary’s remains in second place (8-2 BSAL, 14-9 overall). The winner of next week’s matchup gets a first-round bye in the playoffs. 

“We took out all our starters in the second inning,” Shimabukuro said. “This was a practice for us, but we want to maintain our momentum going into next week and into the playoffs.” 

St. Mary’s momentum has carried them to wins in 12 of the team’s last 14 games, after the Panthers started the season winning just two out of its first nine. 

Friday’s game was called in the fifth inning, but still took nearly two hours and 45 minutes to complete. The St. Mary’s side of the first alone took nearly an hour to play. 

Panthers catcher Marcus Johnson led off the bottom of the first inning with a triple to right-center. It took just one more hit, a single by Jeremiah Fielder, to start the St. Mary’s scoring spree. 

St. Mary’s started the game with five straight hits and scored 17 runs in the first inning, led by Joe Starkey’s two-run double and Omar Young’s three-run double.  

The Panthers left the bases loaded at the end of one, but not before recording four straight two-out singles by Johnson, Brendan Hartoy, Mike Glasshoff and Dave Lawrence. St. Mary’s sent 23 batters to the plate in the first inning outburst. 

“I hope we can keep playing like this,” said Johnson, who went 4-for-6 and drove in two runs.  

Tom Carman threw three innings of one-hit ball for the Panthers. He struck out six and walked just one. Offensively, Carman drew two walks and drove in two runs in the third inning with a double.  

Steve Drapeau relieved Carman in the fourth and allowed no hits and one walk while striking out three Mustangs. 

After the monster first inning, St. Mary’s added another four runs in the second and seven in the third. St. Elizabeth’s retired the Panthers in order in the fourth inning when Eddie Russaw replaced Larry Allen on the mound. 

St. Mary’s drubbed St. Elizabeth’s earlier this season 13-3, which until Friday’s game was the Panthers’ highest run total this season, Johnson said.  

After starting the season poorly, the Panthers caught fire when basketball season ended and two-sport athletes Fielder and Chase Moore returned to the diamond. 

“We’ve been playing well as a team since the seniors came back from basketball,” Johnson said. “This was a little workout for Piedmont next week.”


Beth El issue goes before City Council

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

After months of controversy, the City Council will hold the first of two public hearings tonight on a synagogue and school proposed for 1301 Oxford St. 

The 32,000-square-foot project, proposed by the Beth El Congregation, has pitted the congregation against a group of neighbors, organized as the Live Oak Codornices Creek Neighborhood Association, who have vigorously opposed the design and size of the synagogue.  

Tonight’s hearing is part of an appeal by LOCCNA of the Zoning Adjustments Board approval of the project. 

A public hearing on a separate appeal, filed by Beth El member Harry Pollock on behalf of the congregation, will be held June 26. This is an appeal of a decision by the Landmarks Preservation Commission to deny an alteration permit for the project. The LPC’s denial prohibits Beth El from altering the property, which includes disallowing the congregation the right to raze existing structures on the property. The site is the location of the Byrne Mansion that burned down in 1985. Despite the loss of the building the site itself is still a designated city landmark, which LOCCNA argues would be significantly altered by the development. 

According to a report from the city manager, both appeals are scheduled to be resolved by the council no later than July 24, the last meeting before the council’s summer break. 

An indication of how controversial the proposed project has been might be the size of the appeal report which cost the city $3,888 for 35 copies of the 2,600 pages of individual correspondence, exhibits and staff reports. The unwieldy document, the largest anyone in the City Clerk’s Office can remember seeing, inspired one city employee to call it “The Ugly Thing.” 

 

LOCCNA appeals ZAB decision 

 

Sharon Duggan, an attorney representing LOCCNA and 10 other environmental groups, including the Sierra Club, the Urban Creeks Council, the Golden Gate Audubon Society and the International Rivers Network, filed the appeal to the City Council, challenging the Zoning Adjustments Board’s March 8 approval of a use permit for the project. 

The appeal claims the project, as it’s designed, will preclude a culverted section of Codornices Creek from ever being daylighted, that events at the synagogue will cause traffic and parking problems and that the main structure is out of proportion to the rest of the neighborhood.  

“To me the creek is the most important issue,” said LOCCNA member Alan Gould. “And the creek is being negatively impacted by the project’s size.” 

Beth El will protect the property 

Pollock argues the project has been changed significantly since the beginning of the application process and that the congregation will landscape a property that has been neglected. He said the congregation would be respectful of the historic nature of the site. 

“This has been a lengthy process and the end result is a better project than we started with,” Pollock said. “The project that’s coming to council is one they can be proud of approving.” 

Beth El Congregation purchased the Oxford Street property because it outgrew its present site at 2301 Vine St. “We are doubled up in classrooms and meeting rooms,” Pollock said. “This will give us a chance to move into a more appropriate site in, frankly, a more beautiful location.” 

In May, the council requested the opposing sides meet with a mediator and attempt to find a compromise. Both sides agreed and there have been two meetings in recent weeks with a third scheduled for Wednesday. The meetings are confidential and neither side will comment on whether they’ve been fruitful. 

No decision will be made at tonight’s meeting. 

The hearing will take place in the City Council Chambers at 2134 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way at 7 p.m. They will be broadcast on KPFB 89.3 FM and B-TV, ch-25. 

 


City not ready for big quake

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

In anticipation of a major earthquake that could isolate Berkeley for up to seven days, the City Council and the Board of Education are holding a joint meeting Tuesday to discuss a preparedness plan. 

A Disaster Council report estimates the city’s needs in the aftermath of a 7.0 earthquake. According to the report, an earthquake that size could render 25 percent of Berkeley residences uninhabitable leaving as many as 20,000 people without shelter.  

The Disaster Council calls for a partnership between the School Board and the city to prepare schools and neighborhoods for a major earthquake, an event most experts say could happen at any time. 

The council’s report says that the American Red Cross is woefully unprepared for a major quake. The ARC only has 10,000 cots in storage for  

the entire Bay Area, less than 

4 percent of the estimated 275,000 that will be needed.  

“The City of Berkeley is responsible for the care and shelter of its citizens following an earthquake or other disaster. We are obligated to prepare for that eventuality,” says the Disaster Council report. 

Associate Analyst of the Office of Emergency Services, Dory Ehrlich, said if there is a major quake on the Hayward fault, which runs through the UC Berkeley campus, the city will need enough tents, cots and blankets to shelter those who have lost their homes.  

The Disaster Council estimates the cost of properly preparing the city at $1.3 million. The funds have not been identified yet, but Ehrlich said the Disaster Council is hoping the city’s general fund would allocate the necessary funding for the various preparedness programs.  

The report recommends the city and School Board focus on three areas of readiness: preparing schools, stockpiling emergency supplies and citizen emergency training. 

The report suggests Berkeley stockpile emergency supplies in 20-foot-long metal storage containers. The containers would be filled with food, water, first-aid equipment as well as search and rescue supplies. The report recommends stashing the containers in schools. 

The schools have been seismically retrofitted and are expected to withstand a large earthquake. This makes them good candidates for emergency centers after an earthquake.  

Children are an especially vulnerable population in the event of a disaster and, according to the report, the city’s schools are not fully prepared. Emergency services are likely to be overwhelmed and the report suggests schools be prepared to care for students for up to seven days without outside help. 

The schools will face three tasks after a severe earthquake: sheltering and caring for children, rescue and emergency first aid, and switching to use as public shelter facilities. 

In order to accomplish these tasks, school employees will have to be trained and have access to emergency supplies. To date school employees have received very little training and only some schools have modest amounts of supplies, according to the report. 

The report suggests an increase in the Community Emergency Response Training budget of $3,750 to expand the CERT training program to Berkeley High School. The extra funding will cover the publication of 750 CERT training manuals and extra Office of Emergency Services training and support staff. 

The report warns that neighborhoods could be on their own after a major earthquake and neighborhoods should also be prepared for self sufficiency for up to seven days. 

It’s recommended the city step up its current citizen training. According to the report, 700 citizens have attended emergency training courses since August 1999. It is suggested the city continue to reach out to community groups such as Neighborhood Watch organizations and other groups to make them aware of the importance of being prepared.  

To accomplish these things the Emergency Council recommends the city hire a full-time emergency planner, a neighborhood coordinator, an emergency response trainer and office support staff. 

“The question is not whether we will suffer such an event, but when,” the report reads. “We are well on our way to being a prepared community. But now is not the time to falter, there is still much work to be done.” 

The joint City Council and Board of Education meeting will be convened on Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 2134 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way.


Student reform forum gets lukewarm response

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

“Stand up if you think students have the power to make this school a better place,” Berkeley High senior Maryan Katouli sang out over the PA system. 

Of the hundred or so students gathered in the school’s Little Theater for a three period presentation/discussion on school reform, slightly more than a dozen battled up from their chairs. A few more made it about half way up before they were defeated by the earth’s cruel gravitational pull. 

Most of the 50 or so African Americans in the room stayed firmly in their seats throughout. 

It wasn’t exactly a ringing affirmation for the idea of student-led education reform, but Katuoli and her companions up by the stage stood their ground. 

“You should all be standing,” admonished Berkeley High junior Nicole Heyman. “If we let adults make the changes, then they’re going to make the changes that suit themselves.” 

In a forum organized “by the students for the students,” Katouli, Heyman and several Berkeley High upper classmen explained the academic achievement gap in excruciating detail before offering their observations and recommendations for making Berkeley High a better school. 

To begin, one student did a Powerpoint presentation on the achievement gap. As statistic after statistic flashed across the screen, the increasing outrage in the audience electrified the air in the small auditorium.  

“It that makes you upset, then get involved in changing this school,” Heyman exhorted her classmates.  

But it wasn’t all outrage at the existence of an achievement gap so much as outrage at that these student leaders who would dare to “explain” the gap, when no one can attend Berkeley High and not know it is a place where many black and Latino students are not “performing” the way their teachers would like them to. (Last year 50 percent of Berkeley High’s African American students had a GPA of 2.0 or less, according to the students’ presentation.) 

To hammer away at the point was obviously offensive for many in the audience.  

“We know what (the achievement gap) is,” shouted one. 

“What’s you’re point,” called out another, as the hissing and catcalls continued to mount. 

The tension decreased as the day went on and different classes revolved in and out of the audience. Having finished their presentation, the student leaders began to engage the audience in a broader discussion about Berkeley High’s problems, soliciting solutions along the way.  

One African American girl complained that many minority students feel like the teachers focus on the white students and are dismissive of the minority students. When there is a substitute teacher of color in these classes, students of color all of a sudden begin to talk more than ever before, she said. 

Minority students end up thinking to themselves, “I’m not going to come to class if this teacher isn’t going to listen to me,” the girl said. 

Matt Chavez, one of the students leading the forum, said the school desperately needs more minority teachers “so students can see, you know, that we can be teachers and we can be professionals.” 

Chavez also recommended that teachers meet regularly with the parents of every student to keep them up to date on what their children need to do to get into college. To often, said Chavez, there is an institutionalized expectation that white and Asian students will go to college but African Americans and Latinos will not.  

At the end of the day, students who organized the forum said they hoped it would spark a debate and encourage students to become involved in discussions of school reform at Berkeley High.  

“We’re at a point where we can either go downhill or go uphill,” Katouli said. “It’s up to students right now to realize what we want our school to be.”  

Currently, an advisory committee made up of parents, teachers and some students is considering a reform plan that would divide Berkeley High into “small learning communities.” In small schools of about 500 students apiece, the argument goes, students could get more of the individualized attention they so clearly need. This is turn would help combat truancy, campus violence and the achievement gap, small learning community supporters say. 

Berkeley High teacher Tammy Harkins, who teachers a class on The Literature of Education Reform, said she has seen more student interest in school reform this year than at any time in here 11 years at the school. 

The time has come to recognize that schools are serving a different purpose today than before, and to reform educational programs to reflect this fact, Harkins said. It’s no longer enough serve up the traditional curriculum and expect kids to take it from there, Harkins said. 

“It’s almost as if the family has been shifted here,” Harkins said of Berkeley High. “Kids come here to be normalized, to have a relationship with adults.” 

Many students Monday said they like the idea of small learning communities, but had questions about just exactly how it would be implemented at Berkeley High. And they said the wanted to have a chance to critique any plans before they are implemented. 

“We can’t let the teacher decide what’s right for our school, because it’s our future,” said Berkeley High senior Kenyatte Davis. “It’s our lives that it really effects.” 


The Dempster House: a prominent example of a Berkeley Brown Shingle

By Austene Hall and Susan Cerny
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Berkeley Observed 

Looking back, seeing ahead 

 

Prominently perched on a steep hillside overlooking Spruce Street in north Berkeley, the Dempster House is an intriguing and distinctive mixture of Berkeley brown shingle and remnants of the Victorian era.  

A polygonal tower with a steep “witches cap” roof over the entrance is a legacy of the 1880s and 1890s.  

The house, however, is a simple rectangular shape with an open-gable roof with deep sheltering eaves.  

The large entrance porch repeats the shape of the tower and is sheltered by a polygonal- shaped roof supported by square posts and exposed beams and brackets. The house gives the appearance of being wrapped in porches.  

The Dempster House was designed by its owner, Roy R. Dempster, and constructed by the firm of Kidder and McCullough in 1908.  

The Dempsters had lost their house on Lake Merritt in the 1906 earthquake, so the house was designed to withstand earthquakes.  

Large structural beams were used and the house was bolted to the foundation. There is even a fire hose and hook-up on each floor. 

Roy Dempster graduated from the University of California in 1895 and had studied physics and philosophy. He managed the family’s interests in real estate, lumber and shipping.  

Descendants of Roy Dempster still live in the house and much of the furniture is original.  

Photos displayed throughout the house show older generations of Dempster family members sitting on chairs still used in the living room today. 

This house, and several other early 20th century homes designed by Bernard Maybeck, Julia Morgan, and others, will be open on Sunday, May 6 for the Berkeley Architectural Heritage’s annual house tour. Call 841-2242 for information.


Moe’s, Walden School founder dies

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Known for her straight talk, determination and generous spirit, Barbara Ann Hicks Moscowitz died of natural causes at her Berkeley home May 24.  

Co-founder of Moe’s Books on Telegraph Avenue and founder of the Waldon School in Berkeley, Mrs. Moscowitz was 78 years old at the time of her death. 

“She was tough,” said Gene Barone, manager of Moe’s Books. “She was her own person.” 

Mrs. Moscowitz’s political activism in the realm of civil rights, rights for Central American refugees and women’s rights, stands out to those who knew her. “She was left wing, counter culture,” Barone said. “She had refugees at her home and gave them financial assistance.” 

Her political activism tied her to the group of people who created Pacifica Radio in 1949. The vision of these pacifists did not stop at founding a radio station. “The original idea of the Pacifica Foundation was to have a school,” said Marie Switkes, who works at Waldon School, the arts-focused school Mrs. Moscowitz founded in 1958. 

Less than one week before she died, Mrs. Moskowitz attended an event with jazz singers and arts and crafts sale at the school. “She came in a wheelchair and sat in the sun,” Switkes said. 

Mrs. Moscowitz leaves behind a son, Roger Stevens, and daughters Doris Moskowitz, Alison Booth and Katy Pearre. Memorial services were held on Saturday.


Huff, a fighter for life and patients’ rights

Special to the Daily Planet
Tuesday June 05, 2001

At age 4 Stephanie Huff’s parents were told she could possibly live until 11.  

After a valiant struggle with cystic fibrosis, Stephanie died at Stanford Hospital on March 25 at the age of 39. She had a remarkable resilience, discipline and persistence in dealing with the challenges of accessing medical care for her condition and patients’ rights in general. 

Motivation and enthusiasm for life kept her alive all these years, well beyond expectations. 

She was a member of the Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarian Universalists where she sought a spiritual home. In 1999 she asked the Social Action Committee of the Fellowship for help in getting on the list at Stanford for a double lung transplant, having been turned down previously. The Committee brainstormed with Stephanie and petitioned Stanford in every possible way to reconsider but they declined to deal with the Committee. Then Judith Scherr of the Daily Planet wrote an excellent & touching article on Stephanie’s plight. This was followed by other media articles and likely persuaded Stanford to “reconsider,” but it may have been too late 

physically and she was turned down for the last time. But Stephanie was much more than her fight against the medical establishment and her “rage against the dying of the light.” (Dylan Thomas) Since her student days at Santa Cruz she had been involved with feminist, peace and justice and disability groups as well as Livermore Action Group and the San Francisco/Lesbian/Gay Chorus. Despite her failing strength, she remained vitally interested in her family, friends and current events. Till the end she drew inspiration from music, art and her devoted family. 

She is survived by her mother Carolyn Carpenter of Pt. Richmond, her father and stepmother in Hawaii and her brother and family in Massachusetts. 

A Life Celebration will be held Sunday at 5 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall at 1924 Cedar St. The Hall is wheelchair accessible and all are welcome. Stephanie’s favorite Thai and Mexican food will be served after the Memorial Service. Donations can be made in Stephanie’s memory to the Richmond Art Center, 2541 Barrett Ave., Richmond, 94804. For further information call 528-5403. 

Obituary submitted by friends of Stephanie Huff at the Berkeley Fellowship.


Engineers working on bomb-safe buildings

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

BERKELEY — The building of the future will be able to keep standing even after a bomb blast knocks out first-floor supports, scientists say. 

How far into the future? About two weeks, it turns out. 

On Monday, University of California, Berkeley, professor Hassan Astaneh supervised the final test of the new technology, which uses cables embedded in the floors and encircling the building to act as emergency support if a supporting column is destroyed. 

The collapse of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which killed 168 people and injured hundreds more, was caused by a bomb that destroyed a single supporting column. 

The new technology – the same kind of engineering that keeps suspension bridges up – will be used at the new federal courthouse that is about to be constructed in Seattle. It also is expected to go into a new federal courthouse that will start going up in San Francisco in the next few years. 

“This is our confirmation,” said Willie Hirano, a structural engineer with the Government Services Administration in Seattle who observed the test. 

The design was originally developed by the structural and civil engineering firm of Skilling Ward Magnusson Barkshire of Seattle. 

Scientists at Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory had run a number of tests and simulations. But the test Monday went further, taking the fortified floor to the limit. 

First, a critical column supporting the floor, built about three feet off the ground, was taken away, leaving just the cables holding the floor up. 

“Five, four, three, two, one!” called out professor Hassan Astaneh as thousands of pounds of pressure were slowly exerted on the floor. 

For a few minutes, bolts snapped and steel girders groaned with the ominous sound effects of a disaster movie. 

“Eighty thousand pounds on the floor ... 130,000 pounds on the floor,” Astaneh said as the concrete slab sagged with a thunderous rumbling. 

“It’s holding – 190,000 pounds, it’s holding,” Astaneh said. 

The test stopped at 190,000 pounds because that was how much pressure it took to force the test floor down to the real floor below.  

The cables held and when the pressure was reversed the test floor slowly rose about 18 inches. 

Better design can’t save people who are next to a bomb when it explodes.  

An explosion creates 40,000 pounds of pressure per square foot; the worst storm in nature exerts 40 pounds per square foot, Astaneh said. 

But the cable should save lives by preventing upper floors from collapsing and giving people room to escape, Astaneh said.  

Cables could also make repair much simpler, allowing workers to jack up the floor and fix the bolts. 

Putting cables into new construction such as the federal courthouse adds about $2 a square foot to the regular cost of $200 a square foot, Astaneh said. They also could be used in retrofitting, probably for about the same cost, he said. 

“The next step is application,” he said.


California crisis brings new talk of energy conservation

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

In the 1970s, energy conservation was Jimmy Carter in a cardigan telling people to bundle up and turn down the heat. Today, it’s about using energy-efficient fluorescent bulbs, computerized thermostats and motion sensors. 

To many Americans, California’s energy crisis is a problem isolated on the West Coast. Yet it has resurrected interest in conservation that hasn’t been heard since gas lines and the OPEC oil embargo more than two decades ago. 

President Bush on Thursday ordered federal agencies to cut power use in California where rolling blackouts have catapulted the debate over future energy supplies to the top of the national agenda. 

Bush’s conservation message came just days after Vice President Dick Cheney, who claims the whole nation could face blackouts like those in California unless it finds more oil, natural gas and coal, said America cannot “simply conserve or ration our way out of the situation we’re in.” 

Environmentalists maintain the Bush administration is using California’s electricity crisis – largely due to a failed attempt at electricity deregulation – to push through a broader energy plan to drill for oil and natural gas in now off-limits areas of Alaska and the West. Hardly any power plants run on oil, they note. 

And energy-conservation groups say if everybody made better use of the energy already being generated, America would not need many of the 1,300-plus power plants that Bush and Cheney say demand will require over the next 20 years. 

Nobody will have to sit in the dark, they say, if it were made easier for Americans to use less energy through more fuel efficient light bulbs, motors, automobiles, office buildings and homes. 

“In today’s world we are not asking people to not use their (air conditioning) – that is not today’s message of conservation,” said Rozanne Weissman, a spokeswoman for the Alliance to Save Energy, a Washington-based nonprofit group. “What we need to do is look at using our energy more efficiently and using today’s technologies to help do it for us.” 

According to the alliance: 

• If each household in the United States replaced four regular 100-watt bulbs with energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs, the output of 30 medium-sized power plants (each with a 300-megawatt capacity) would not be needed. 

• If the Bush administration’s new efficiency standards for air conditioners and heat pumps improved energy use by 30 percent instead of 20 percent, the output of 138 of these power plants would not been needed during peak use times. 

Americans could even unplug idle appliances – TVs, VCRs, cable boxes, CD players and microwaves – when they go out of town. Some of these appliances continue to consume energy when switched off. The power keeps display clocks lighted and memory chips and remote controls working. The alliance says these electric leaks cost consumers more than $3 billion a year. 

Conservation does help, according to Alexandra von Meier, director of the Environmental Technology Center at Sonoma State University in California. She told a House energy subcommittee on Thursday that residential and commercial buildings use about 35 percent of the energy – electricity and fuels – in the United States. 

“This amount of energy can be cut in half, if not more, by implementing the things we already know about how to make buildings more energy efficient and, at the same time, more comfortable,” she said, explaining how Venetian blinds hung on the outside of the technology center keeps the glass from transferring heat. 

Howard Geller, former executive director of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, told the committee about an Energy Department study in November 2000 that said increasing energy efficiency throughout the economy could cut national energy use by at least 10 percent by 2010 and by 20 percent in 2020. 

“Even though the United States is much more energy-efficient today than it was 25 years ago, there is still enormous potential for additional cost-effective energy savings,” said Geller. 

 


Conservation group buys Sierra forest land

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

A conservation group plans to buy more than 30,000 acres in the Sierra Nevada from a timber company and make that land available for public use in the next two to three years. 

The first phase of the agreement involves the Trust for Public Land buying 6,100 acres along the North Fork of the American River from Sierra Pacific Industries, a logging company, for about $6 million. 

TPL officials said at a news conference Monday they eventually could buy up to 50,000 acres from SPI for preservation. 

“We have frequently crossed the Rubicon this year, and in years to come, we’re hoping to buy the Rubicon,” said Alan Front, senior vice president and director of federal affairs for TPL, referring to one of the rivers in the area to be preserved. 

SPI, the largest private landowner in California with 1.5 million acres, decided to make the parcels available to the organization after an inventory of its land, said Mark Emmerson, the company’s chief financial officer. He said it would be more economically viable to have the land in the public trust, rather than log it. 

“It wasn’t optimal for timber production,” Emmerson said. “We could have sold it for other uses, but we think this land is of greater use visually and recreationally.” 

The first 6,100 acres will be managed by the U.S. Forest Service, and future acquisitions that are part of the agreement could be handed over to the federal or state governments, or another nonprofit organization for public use, said David Sutton, director of TPL’s Sierra Nevada Program. 

Money for the first acquisition will come partly from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund. TPL expects to raise the rest of the money from private donors. 

Some environmental organizations commended the agreement, saying it will help protect what they call “critical lands” in the Sierra Nevada. 

“We have been working on protecting the North Fork for 40 years,” said Eric Gerstung of the Sierra Club. “This means a great deal for the public and for our membership.” 

Jay Watson, regional director for the Wilderness Society, agreed. 

“The eventual public ownership of these lands will help provide long-lasting ecological integrity to these river ecosystems, as well as providing highly valuable outdoor recreation to the residents of the Golden State,” he said in a statement. 

On the Net: 

The Trust for Public Land: http://www.tpl.org 

Sierra Pacific Industries: http://www.sierrapacificind.com/ 

The Wilderness Society: http://www.wilderness.org


Judge rules against bill in smog fee suit

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SACRAMENTO — Attorneys who argued against the state’s vehicle smog fees are unlikely to receive an $88 million fee an arbitration board once awarded them, a judge ruled Friday. 

Lawyers for the state called the decision a victory for taxpayers and said they expected the fee to eventually be cut to less than $18 million, adding at least $70 million to the state treasury. 

Representatives of the firms originally awarded the large fee by referred comment to their lawyers, who did not return calls seeking comment. 

The decision came two weeks after Sacramento Superior Court Judge Joe Gray’s tentative decision that said the three-member arbitration panel that awarded the fee exceeded its authority. 

The delay was requested by the attorneys who successfully argued that the state knowingly and unconstitutionally collected a $300 fee on out-of-state car registrations until 1999. The fee was intended to limit the entry of cars from states with less restrictive emissions policies. 

The Legislature decided to return the fee plus interest in as many as 1.7 million cases. 

Elwood Lui, a Los Angeles attorney who helped the state fight the fee, said he liked the judge’s decision but expected it to be appealed. 

In 1998, a superior court judge awarded the firms $18 million when he struck down the smog fee. But Gov. Gray Davis sought to have the fees set through binding, private arbitration, because he thought the panel would drive the fee even lower. 

Gray did not specify a fee, so the attorneys may receive the original $18 million. 

The case could be settled on appeal, another arbitration panel could be convened or the Legislature could pass a law paying the attorneys a set amount. 

The attorneys first asked for $100 million, or about 17 percent of the $665 million earmarked for the smog refunds. Instead, they were given 13.3 percent, or about $8,800 an hour. 

Another aspect of the arbitrated fee is to be decided next week. Board of Equalization chairman Dean Andal has sued to stop the award on the basis that the arbitration panel spent tax dollars, a legislative power. 

Andal’s attorney, Eric Norby, said the issue would likely be settled in higher courts, but added he was pleased with the judge’s decision Friday. 

“At this point $88 million more is going back to the general fund, meaning more money for schools, police, or to pay one day’s power at least” Norby said. 

An important part of the judge’s decision was that the five firms – Milberg Weiss Bershad Hynes & Lerach LLP, Weiss & Yourman, Blumenthal Ostroff & Markham, Sullivan Hill Lewin Rez & Engel, and Richard M. Pearl — should not be paid for lobbying the Legislature to order the refunds, Norby said. 

The original case, Jordan v. state Department of Motor Vehicles, ended October 1999, six months before the legislation passed. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Gray’s tentative ruling: http://www.saccourt.com/courtrooms/trulings/dept54/apr18d54.tr 


Scientists unveil tactile book of astronomical images for blind

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

PASADENA — A new book that translates color images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope into tactile illustrations will allow the blind to touch the stars – as well as galaxies, planets and other astronomical objects captured by the orbiting observatory. 

The 87-page book is the first to pair actual images acquired by the 11-year-old Hubble with clear plastic overlays that render each in raised patterns the blind can read. Braille and large-print text descriptions accompany each of the book’s 14 images. 

“It allows people of varying visual ability to view the book together,” said Bernhard Beck-Winchatz, an astronomer at Chicago’s DePaul University who created the book with astronomer and author Noreen Grice. 

The book begins with a Hubble image of Earth and then moves outward into the universe, showing everything from Jupiter to the Eskimo Nebula. It ends with a widefield view of scores of galaxies billions of light-years away. “We can take people on a journey of discovery, starting at the Earth and to some of the deepest places seen,” Grice said during a press conference at the 198th meeting of the American Astronomical Society. 

Throughout the book, “Touch the Universe: A NASA Braille Book of Astronomy,” identical features are reproduced in tactile form by using consistent patterns or textures. Rings are illustrated with dotted lines, for instance, and curved ones represent gas currents like those that encircle Jupiter. “They can take this with their fingertips and paint an image inside,” said Benning Wentworth III, a science teacher at the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, whose students helped develop the book. 

Beck-Winchatz said the idea for the book came when he won an outreach grant connected to his Hubble research on galaxies with black holes. He soon contacted Grice, who had already written a book on astronomy for the blind, but that did not include actual photographs. 

“I really liked the idea. What I didn’t like was it only used hand sketches, when there is such a wealth of real images out there,” Beck-Winchatz said. 

Working in the kitchen of her Connecticut home, Grice traced out each image on aluminum plates. The plates were then used to create the plastic overlays, which match perfectly the underlying color photocopied images. 

The entire book was then assembled by hand, all on a shoestring budget covered by the $10,000 grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Grice said she expected the book would be prove popular with science classes for the blind. 

“This is the only way to touch something that is so distant,” she said. 

Only three prototypes exist now, but Grice and Beck-Winchatz hope to print 400 copies for sale beginning later this summer. Each should cost less than $40, or slightly more than it costs to produce. 

Although the tactile versions fall short of reproducing the intricate detail of many of the Hubble images, Wentworth said the overlays contain a powerful message for blind students of astronomy. 

“That there are objects, they are out there and they are very real and we can start painting them in our minds,” said Wentworth. 


Baja California broke from Mexico 6 million years ago

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Baja California was wrenched from mainland Mexico 6 million years ago by a series of earthquakes, starting in earnest the peninsula’s 160-mile push to the northwest, a study says. 

Geologists have long known that movement along the boundary separating the North American and Pacific plates tore Baja California from the rest of Mexico, opening up what is now known as the Gulf of California. But the timing had been a question. 

The break separating the peninsula from the mainland is the southern extension of the San Andreas fault system that runs nearly the length of California. 

But whether the movement began in a gradual process as many as 12 million years ago, or more abruptly in more recent times, remained unknown. 

Michael Oskin, a graduate student in geology at the California Institute of Technology, said he has found and matched identical volcanic rocks on opposite sides of the gulf that allowed him to pinpoint the size, timing and rate of the movement between the two plates. The results are published in the May issue of the journal Geology. 

By correlating the different tie-points – now separated by the roughly 160 miles of slip that has taken place along the fault system, but closely joined in the distant past – Oskin said the study he co-authored shows that Baja California started pulling away 12.5 million years ago, but the bulk of the the peninsula’s movement has taken place within the last 6.5 million years. 

“We have now concrete evidence that the motion history of the gulf can be very well divided around this 6.5 million-year-old time interval,” Oskin said. 

One expert in the geologic history of Baja California said the study further refines the chronology of the peninsula’s evolution. 

“This is fairly important in that it’s by far the most accurate matching point across the gulf to date, and it’s certainly the youngest that you can come up with,” said Gary Axen, an assistant professor of geology at the University of California, Los Angeles. 

Continental rifting probably first opened up what is now the Gulf of California more than 12 million years ago when subduction off the shore of northwest Mexico ground to a halt. 

The Gulf opened even farther apart some 6 million to 7 million years after that, when Baja California shifted onto the Pacific plate from the North American plate and the San Andreas fault system plunged farther southward. 

If it weren’t for barriers, the Gulf of California would stretch farther north, reaching the depression now occupied by California’s Salton Sea, which is well below sea level. However, the troughlike depression is blocked by the delta of the Colorado River, which has steadily poured sediments into the Gulf of California over millions of years. 


L.A. mayor election offers two liberals, one could make history

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Tuesday’s mayoral election is more than just a choice between two popular Democrats in a city that has long been friendly to the politics of both. 

Former state Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa, an immigrant’s son and former labor organizer, is trying to become the first Hispanic mayor since 1872 in a city that is rapidly moving toward a Hispanic majority. 

But he faces strong opposition from City Attorney James Hahn, whose voting bloc is anchored by another powerful, although diminishing, racial group, the city’s black voters. 

Los Angeles voters also will elect a new city attorney, five City Council members and a successor to the late 32nd Congressional District Rep. Julian Dixon. One of the City Council candidates is 1960s radical and former state legislator Tom Hayden, who is running against former Assistant U.S. Attorney Jack Weiss for a seat representing the city’s west side. 

Political observers have cast the mayor’s race as a contest pitting Los Angeles’ wave of the future against its status quo. 

“I categorize it as Jim Hahn’s experience versus Antonio Villaraigosa’s passion,” said Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, senior scholar at the USC School of Policy, Planning and Development. “It is Jim Hahn who represents the civic establishment of Los Angeles, versus Antonio Villaraigosa, who represents the face of the future of Los Angeles.” 

Villaraigosa, 48, is the son of an immigrant father. A self-described street kid who flirted briefly with gang influences on the city’s tough east side, he once got into a brawl in a restaurant over an insult directed at his mother. He would turn his life around, however, returning to school and eventually earning a law degree. 

Elected to the state Assembly in 1994, he rose quickly through the ranks to become speaker, long considered the state’s second most powerful position behind governor. There, he built a reputation as a likable political negotiator who quickly built coalitions of varying political persuasions to get things done. 

His Assembly career was limited by California’s relatively recent term-limits law that restricted him to six years in office. 

Hahn, a four-term city attorney, also was forced to give up that job by Los Angeles’ new term-limits law. 

Like Villaraigosa, he jumped into the race to succeed Mayor Richard Riordan, a popular Republican moderate who is leaving office after eight years, also because of term limits. 

His late father, Kenneth Hahn, became a political legend as the white man who earned the love of Los Angeles County’s black community during the 40 years he represented it on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. 

It was said that no pothole went unpaved or public telephone unrepaired in Kenneth Hahn’s district, and the affection that record brought him has translated into rock-solid support for his son in the city’s black neighborhoods. 

Both candidates, meanwhile, are liberal Democrats, although Villaraigosa is seen as somewhat to the left of Hahn. 

Hahn has sought to use that to his advantage in the candidates’ battle for the moderate to conservative voters that the election is expected to turn on. 

He has accused Villaraigosa of being soft on crime during his years in the state Legislature and attacked him in political ads for writing a letter of support, as several other prominent Los Angeles officials did, in support of a convicted cocaine trafficker seeking a presidential pardon. 

That has given Hahn, among some observers, status as the candidate of the white status quo. That group, although no longer a majority in Los Angeles, still makes up a substantial portion of its voters. 

If Villaraigosa loses, “I think that the broader perception will be that Los Angeles is not yet ready for a Latino mayor,” Jeffe said. 

However Tuesday’s race plays out, with Los Angeles’ Hispanic population approaching 50 percent, it could be only a matter of time before the city elects its first Hispanic mayor since Cristobal Aguilar lost his bid for a fourth term in 1872 in what was then becoming a more Anglo-dominated city. 

“The old Los Angeles can only hope that when political change comes, it will come in the form of an inclusive and flexible candidate like Villaraigosa,” Los Angeles Times Associate Editor Frank del Olmo said in a commentary in Sunday’s paper. “The alternatives to him are a lot more nationalist about their Latino identity and will be a whole lot tougher to deal with when the time comes.” 

——— 

Associated Press Writer Erica Werner contributed to this report. 


Immigrant may be sedated before deportation

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SACRAMENTO — A federal attorney is suing the Immigration and Naturalization Service over the case of an illegal immigrant whom the agency has said it might sedate before deporting to China. 

A federal public defender filed suit in Sacramento that would prevent Chinese national Bao Hua Dong from “being forcibly drugged” before an INS deportation officer puts her on a plane. 

“I’ve never seen anything like this before,” said Linda Harter, the assistant public defender who filed the suit. 

Harter said in the suit that the INS has threatened to sedate Dong, who is held nearby in a Yuba County jail, before agents again try to deport her. No date has been set for her return to China. 

Last November, the INS tried to put Dong, 26, on a United Airlines flight originating in San Francisco. But a gate attendant refused to let her aboard because she was hysterical, according to court documents. 

Dong tried to enter the country illegally at San Francisco International Airport in December 1998, using a falsified passport of a 40-year-old Japanese woman. 

A lawyer representing the INS said the agency would not sedate Dong without permission from a court. 

“Sometimes it is necessary to sedate an alien, but we always obtain a court order first,” Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Glyndell E. Williams told a U.S. District Court judge at a hearing Tuesday. Judge William B. Shubb ruled that he did not have jurisdiction over the matter. 

INS officials would not discuss the case in detail. INS spokeswoman Sharon Rummery told the San Jose Mercury News that though she does not know of such a case, “when the person is violent or will hurt themselves or others, then under supervision of a doctor ... it would be necessary.” 


Health plans would have to cover drug, alcohol abuse

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SACRAMENTO — California health care plans would have to cover treatment for drug and alcohol abuse under a bill approved Monday by the state Senate. 

The measure, by Sen. Wesley Chesbro, D-Arcata, was sent to the Assembly by a 23-14 vote, despite a complaint by one Republican that it would boost health care costs and result in fewer employers paying for coverage. 

“If our goal is to make sure that the only health care anybody gets is a government health care program, we are well on the road to accomplishing that,” said Sen. Ray Haynes, R-Temecula. 

“The people that this bill will hurt the most are people who need health care coverage the most, those on the lower end of our economic ladder.” 

But Sen. Jackie Speier, D-Daly City, said California has the lowest health care premiums in the country and that the Chesbro bill would cost less than $1 per health care plan enrollee per month. 

“If we’re ever going to get someone off drugs or alcohol, it is because of the intercession by a health care professional...,” she said.  

“It’s worth the expenditure.” 

Chesbro said studies show the requirement in his bill would be cost-effective.


Legislators bracing for summer blackouts

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

MONTEREY — Despite months of seeking solutions to the energy crisis, state officials are still preparing for blackouts this summer, Assembly Speaker Robert Hertzberg said Friday. 

The state Office of Emergency Services will closely watch for any problems, and improved early notification programs are in the works so communities can prepare for when the lights go out, the San Fernando Valley Democrat said. 

Most importantly, the crisis is not a time for politics as usual and finger-pointing, he said. 

“This is war. This is so critically important,” he told a meeting of the California Society of Newspaper Editors and The Associated Press News Executives Council.  

“You can’t screw around with the small stuff. ... We’re trying to be problem-solvers.” 

Hertzberg pointed to how the crisis forced the Legislature to look beyond polls and focus groups for solutions. 

“We came up with a new paradigm of how we solve problems,” he said. 

When the scope of the problem became known in December, lawmakers were ill prepared, he said. Many members had been in office less than two weeks. 

The remainder feared repercussions from the deregulation law passed in earlier sessions. 

When Gov. Gray Davis called a special session, Hertzberg formed only one committee so that lawmakers could remain focused on finding solutions. 

The number of laws introduced also were limited in the first month of the special session. Joint caucuses of Democrats and Republicans worked together, he said. 

Hertzberg said lawmakers also sought the “biggest and best” experts, including lawyers and executives familiar with past cases of utility bankruptcies. 

“Away from the politics – no focus groups, no polling, none of that garbage – they told us the nature of the problem and how to solve it” he said.  

“Our job was to translate that.” 

In response to questions, Hertzberg defended the secrecy surrounding negotiations for long-term contracts.  

Enough information was disclosed to reassure the investment community, he said, adding that any more details could have affected the bidding process. 

 

Despite efforts to resolve the problem, it’s not clear whether the lights will stay on in California as summer nears, he said. 

The end of May and early June will be a critical time because many power stations are being shut down for maintenance and the state’s new long-term contracts have not taken effect. 

“I suspect we will have blackouts,” he said. “It’s not going to be good. None of this is good.” 

 

WHAT’S NEXT 

• The state Assembly could consider a bill Monday that would authorize $12.5 billion in bonds for power buys. Republican members have balked at financing that much money, suggesting that the state instead use some of its surplus to buy electricity for customers of three cash-strapped utilities. 

• Also Monday, a bill that would impose a windfall profits tax on electricity generators will be heard in a Legislative committee. 

• The governor meets Wednesday with the CEOs of several major energy suppliers to discuss the money they’re owed by the state’s two largest utilities, the state’s creditworthiness and how wholesalers can help the state during the energy crisis. Davis says he won’t be discussing any of the investigations into price manipulation in the wholesale market. 

• Davis’ representatives continue negotiating with Sempra, the parent company of San Diego Gas and Electric Co., to buy the utility’s transmission lines. 

The problem: 

High demand, high wholesale energy costs, transmission glitches and a tight supply worsened by scarce hydroelectric power in the Northwest and maintenance at aging California power plants are all factors in California’s electricity crisis. 

Edison and PG&E say they’ve lost nearly $14 billion since June to high wholesale prices the state’s electricity deregulation law bars them from passing on to consumers. PG&E, saying it hasn’t received the help it needs from regulators or state lawmakers, filed for federal bankruptcy protection April 6. 

Electricity and natural gas suppliers, scared off by the two companies’ poor credit ratings, are refusing to sell to them, leading the state in January to start buying power for the utilities’ nearly 9 million residential and business customers. The state is also buying power for a third investor-owned utility, San Diego Gas & Electric, which is in better financial shape than much larger Edison and PG&E but also struggling with high wholesale power costs. 

The Public Utilities Commission has raised rates as much as 46 percent to help finance the state’s multibillion-dollar power buys.


Doctor who first noticed AIDS reflects on 20 years

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Dr. Michael Gottlieb sent the researcher up to 5-East in the UCLA Medical Center. 

Scout the wing for interesting immunological cases, Gottlieb told him, and bring back something to discuss. 

The researcher did just that, returning with word of a young gay man had a low white blood cell count, strange fungal infections and a rare type of pneumonia normally found only in people with severely suppressed immune systems. 

It took just two more patients for Gottlieb to realize something was afoot. 

“It was clearly something new and something unique and the mystery was what was causing it.  

That was the burning question,” Gottlieb, now a 53-year-old immunologist in private practice, said in a recent interview. 

Some sleuthing found two more patients in the San Fernando Valley. Another at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. A Centers for Disease Control officer located a fifth. 

A report on the five cases was submitted to the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.  

The bare-bones, page-and-half write-up appeared June 5, 1981, overshadowed by reports of dengue fever in American tourists returning from the Caribbean. 

Although it wouldn’t be isolated or named for another two years, AIDS had arrived after lurking undetected in infected humans for decades. 

Armed with the five Los Angeles cases, the CDC started looking in other cities with sizable populations of gay men. 

“Lo and behold, there were lots of cases,” said Gottlieb of the disease he would later be criticized for provisionally dubbing “GRID,” or Gay Related Immunodeficiency Disease. 

In the first years, the number stayed small. By the end of 1981, there were fewer than 200 AIDS cases in the United States. 

“It appeared to be an outbreak, not an epidemic,” Gottlieb said.  

“In 1981, it’s a colossal understatement to say no one would have predicted 20 years later 34 million people around the world would be infected.” 

The death toll has been staggering. In the 20 years since Gottlieb and his colleagues tracked those first five cases, nearly 450,000 have died of AIDS in the United States alone.  

Worldwide, the number is 22 million. 

Gottlieb said his early patients were understanding of science’s ignorance of what was killing them, on average just nine months after suffering from the first opportunistic infections that were the disease’s hallmark. 

“They must have felt like astronauts returning to Earth with an extraterrestrial virus and no one knew what to do,” he said. 

Today, after two decades of working with AIDS patients, Gottlieb said he is afraid the mainstream population is growing tired of hearing about the disease, for which there is still no cure. 

New and powerful drugs, however, are allowing people with AIDS to live longer than ever before.  

While not a cure, it has allowed Gottlieb to continue working in the field. 

“With AIDS, there was the cumulative burden of having so many of my patients die,” said Gottlieb, who says he has lost hundreds of patients.  

“Even as a physician, you grieve.”


State seizes tax boycotter’s records

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

HUNTINGTON BEACH — State tax officials have raided the home and office of an Orange County business owner who has refused to withhold taxes from employee paychecks. 

The state Franchise Tax Board agents seized financial and employment records, coins and tax-avoidance books from George Jesson’s Huntington Beach electronics business and Fountain Valley home on Wednesday. 

According to a search warrant, Jesson is suspected of failing to withhold taxes from paychecks in 1997, 1998 and 1999. Jesson says he stopped withholding taxes only last year. 

In media interviews, he has repeatedly said there is no law requiring he withhold taxes from employee paychecks. He also recently said he is refusing to pay his own income taxes. 

“There’s nothing, absolutely no law, that applies to your personal wages,” Jesson was quoted in Friday’s Los Angeles Times. 

State officials declined to comment. 

Jesson and his No Time Delay Electronics are among two dozen businesses nationwide that publicly have defied government requirements that taxes be “paid as you go” through withholding, Social Security and other employment tax programs. 

The names of the businesses surfaced in news reports last year. Federal and state tax officials have said they are investigating a small number of the withholding cases. 

According to authorities, employers who fail to withhold taxes and turn them over may be required to pay up to double the taxes, plus interest, and can be prosecuted for felony tax evasion. 

Jesson has said he wants the case to go to court so he can “expose the corruption of the system.” He said he believes in “lawful taxes,” such as sales, property, export, import, alcohol, tobacco, firearms and utility taxes.


Nevada OKs medical marijuana defelonization

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

CARSON CITY, Nev. — Seriously ill patients should be able to use marijuana for medical purposes, Nevada lawmakers decided Monday, in a vote that puts the state on a potential collision course with the federal government. 

The Assembly vote on the last day of the legislative session also relaxes one of the toughest drug possession laws in the nation, downgrading the charge for possession of small amounts from a felony to a misdemeanor. 

The state Assembly concurred in Senate amendments to the medical marijuana-defelonization bill and sent the measure to Gov. Kenny Guinn, who is expected to sign it. 

“I think it’s time that Nevada closed the door on antiquated drug policies and reduced possession of an ounce or less to a misdemeanor and focused its efforts on prevention and treatment,” said Assemblywoman Chris Giunchigliani, D-Las Vegas. 

The bill lets seriously ill Nevadans have up to seven marijuana plants for personal use. A state registry would be created for patients whose doctors recommend they use marijuana for medical reasons. 

Other amendments allow the state to apply to the federal government for permission to sponsor medical research into whether marijuana helped ease pain, nausea or other symptoms of seriously ill patients.  

Also, the state Department of Agriculture could apply to the federal government for a seed lab. 

For people other than registered patients, possession of an ounce or less of marijuana would be a misdemeanor carrying a $600 fine, with escalating fines for subsequent offenses. Possession would not become a felony until the fourth offense. 

Under current law, regarded as one of the toughest of its kind in the nation, Nevada makes it a felony to possess an ounce or less of marijuana. Violations can lead to prison terms.  

In a minor marijuana case, probation is mandatory, but violating probation can lead to prison terms of up to four years. 

Nevadans voted overwhelmingly in 1998 and 2000 to amend the Nevada Constitution to authorize use of marijuana by those suffering from cancer, AIDS, glaucoma and other painful and potentially terminal illnesses. 

The task of implementing the voters’ mandate was left to the Legislature. The lawmakers took action despite a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a California case that a federal law classifying the drug as illegal makes no exception for ill patients. 

The high court’s action leaves those distributing the drug for that purpose open to prosecution 

Besides Nevada, voters in Arizona, Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Oregon and Washington have approved ballot initiatives allowing medical marijuana. In Hawaii, the legislature passed a similar law and the governor signed it last year. 

On the Net: 

Nevada Legislature: http://www.leg.state.nv.us/


Farmers will be paid for water diverted to save fish

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

CORCORAN— A federal judge has ruled that the government must pay farmers in the arid Central Valley for depriving them of irrigation water to protect endangered fish. 

Growers had argued that by using water they paid for to protect chinook salmon and delta smelt, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service effectively took fields out of production and took money from farmers. 

“It was water that was bought and paid for,” said Michael Nordstrom, a lawyer for Tulare Lake Basin Water Storage District, which filed the suit.  

“The court has ruled they are clearly entitled to do it under the Endangered Species Act, but if they do it they have to pay for it.” 

The farmers sued in 1998, claiming the federal government took $25 million of water over a period of three years ending in 1994 by shutting down pumps that divert water south through the valley to Los Angeles from the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta. 

On Monday, U.S. Court of Federal Claims Judge John Paul Wiese in Washington, D.C., ruled the farmers are protected under the Fifth Amendment, which prohibits the government from taking private property without paying for it. A hearing to determine what the government owes the farmers has not yet been scheduled. 

The ruling could have broad implications for farmers and urban water users in western states, where federal rules protecting wildlife are increasingly in conflict with water allocations. 

“For us as a grower it’s big,” said Fred Starrh, a cotton farmer in Kern County. “For the growers across the United States it’s big. If it stands, I think it could bring reasonableness to the process. We’ve just been sitting here getting hammered.” 

Interior Department lawyers were studying the opinion and planned to discuss it further next week, but do not believe it has wide implications throughout the West, said spokeswoman Stephanie Hanna. 

Starrh pays about $3 million a year to irrigate his 12,000-acre ranch. He pays the total by June for water that may never be delivered. 

This year he is idling 3,200 acres because he only expects a third of his contract. He said he will only get a partial refund for the water he doesn’t receive. 

The cost of maintaining a certain water level in the delta to protect species could easily amount to tens of millions of dollars a year for water users. In addition to water expenses, there are other factors such as lost production and lost wages – factors that hurt the state’s economy. 

“At least now they’ll have to look at what they’re doing and say it’s going to take X number of dollars to take this water,” Starrh said. 

California Trout, one of a raft of environmental groups that wrote briefs opposing the farmers, said the problem is that too much river water is allocated for other uses. 

“They’re dividing up water to the extent that they believe the water is all there and it’s not,” said Jim Edmondson, the group’s conservation director. “In their vernacular I don’t know how you get 40 pounds of potatoes in a 20-pound sack.” 

In the state’s complex water picture, divided into myriad districts by arcane rules and administered by the federal and state contracts, it was not immediately clear what impact the ruling would have on districts that supply households or those that get their water from the federal government. 

 

In many instances, federal water contracts may be outside the scope of the suit because users only pay for what they receive. 

“Our contracts are written in a way that allows us to short our contractors under certain circumstances,” said Jeff McCracken, spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which supplies 20 percent of the water to irrigation districts and urban users in California and is the largest supplier of water in the West. 

Metropolitan Water District, which purchases half the water from the state project for 17 million users in Southern California, was not a plaintiff in the suit and did not expect to benefit from the decision. 

Steve Arakawa, manager of water resources, said the Los Angeles agency is trying to work with the state to ensure a reliable water supply while also protecting the environment. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Judge Wiese’s opinion: http://www.law.gwu.edu/fedcl/Opinions/Wiese/01/Tulare.pdf 


Conviction overturned for defendant deemed mentally disabled

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

WASHINGTON — Texas jurors who sentenced a retarded killer to death did not get clear instructions about how to weigh the defendant’s mental abilities against the severity of his crime, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. 

The ruling overturned the death sentence of Johnny Paul Penry, whose lawyers claim their client has the mind of a 7-year-old and likes to play with coloring books. 

The case, sent back to a federal appeals court, does not answer a larger question about whether execution of the mentally retarded is constitutional. The court has agreed to use a different case to review that question next fall. 

The vote was 6-3 on the crucial question of the instructions, although the court was unanimous in ruling that a Texas court properly admitted evidence of Penry’s future dangerousness. 

Penry was convicted of murdering Pamela Moseley Carpenter in Texas in 1979. She was the sister of former Washington Redskins place-kicker Mark Moseley. 

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, writing for the majority, said the instructions to the jury were “constitutionally inadequate” to protect Penry’s rights. 

The Texas trial court did not follow previous Supreme Court guidance issued when Penry’s case reached the court before on the jury instruction issue. The earlier ruling by the high court overturned Penry’s death sentence and he was resentenced to die a second time. 

The second sentencing left no vehicle for jurors to express the view that Penry should get life, not death, based on mitigating evidence, O’Connor said. 

O’Connor wrote that jurors were asked to vote “no” to specific questions if they thought the death penalty was inappropriate – even if their answers to those questions would have been “yes.” 

“The jury was essentially instructed to return a false answer in order to avoid a death sentence,” O’Connor wrote. 

The Texas Legislature recently passed a bill banning the execution of mentally retarded persons. Gov. Rick Perry hasn’t said whether he will sign it. Texas leads the nation in executions. 

State Sen. Rodney Ellis, who sponsored the bill, has said six mentally retarded people have been put to death in Texas since the state resumed executions. State Rep. Juan Hinojosa says seven retarded inmates are on death row. 

Justice Clarence Thomas dissented in the court’s decision, joined by two fellow conservatives: Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justice Antonin Scalia. 

“Without performing legal acrobatics, I cannot make the instruction confusing,” Thomas wrote. 

 

The Supreme Court made headlines last fall when it accepted Penry’s latest appeal, in part because death penalty opponents say juries too often get inadequate instructions and in part because of Penry’s own notoriety. 

Penry has been in the forefront of the debate over capital punishment almost from the moment he confessed to killing Carpenter. 

After a complicated and highly publicized passage through the Texas courts, the Supreme Court accepted his first appeal and in 1989 used his case to establish two related tenets of capital punishment practice. 

The court ruled then that execution of the mentally retarded is constitutional, but juries considering the death penalty must understand how to weigh retardation as a mitigating factor. 

Penry’s case returned to the Texas courts, where his lawyers claim the second jury that sentenced him to death got no better instructions than the first. 

That is the question the Supreme Court agreed to review in his case, but it soon became a sidelight. 

One day before the justices heard arguments in Penry’s case in March, they raised the stakes much higher by agreeing to hear a separate North Carolina case that asks the same question Penry did 12 years ago: Does executing the mentally retarded violate the Eighth Amendment prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment? 

If the court reverses itself with that case and declares that the retarded must be spared, the issue of proper death penalty jury instructions would be irrelevant. 

At issue for the court this time was whether the Texas jury that imposed Penry’s second death sentence understood its options. Texas authorities claimed the instructions were clear, and that the jury knew it could impose a life sentence instead of death. 

Penry’s lawyers claimed the instructions failed the test the Supreme Court set out with its 1989 ruling in what has become known as Penry I. 

Texas resentenced Penry in 1990, using the same verdict form as in the first trial. The form asked whether Penry deliberately killed the woman, whether he was provoked and whether he was a continuing threat to society. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Supreme Court: http://www.supremecourtus.gov 


Number of independent voters nearly doubled

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SACRAMENTO — The number of California voters shunning political parties has nearly doubled in 10 years, but Democratic and Republican officials say they aren’t worried. 

“Election results, that’s where the real loyalty is to Democrats in California,” said Democratic Party spokesman Bob Mulholland. “The Democrats won big in California in 1996, 1998 and 2000. The voters left the Republican altar four years ago and haven’t been seen since.” 

Jim Camp, political director for the California Republican Party, said the GOP registered 25,000 new members in March and April and that the presence of President Bush in the White House would bring in more converts. 

“That’s one of my biggest goals, bring back the declines-to-state (a party),” Camp said. “With a president like George Bush we will bring them back.” 

The secretary of state’s office said Friday that nearly 15.6 million Californians were registered to vote in February, a record for the month and a 20 percent increase since 1991. 

Over the same 10-year period, the number of voters refusing to register with a political party jumped from 1.2 million to more than 2.2 million. 

Those so-called declines-to-state now make up 14.4 percent of California’s electorate, compared to 9 percent in 1991. The 14.4 percent is a record, said Alfie Charles, a spokesman for the secretary of state’s office. 

“In California, voters have consistently shown a propensity to base their decisions on individuals rather than political parties,” said Secretary of State Bill Jones, California’s top elections official.  

“These latest registration numbers help demonstrate that trend.” 

Democrats’ share of the electorate dropped from 49.5 percent in 1991 to 45.6 percent this year. Republican registration dipped from 39.3 percent to 34.8 percent in that period. 

At the same time, minor parties jumped from 2.2 percent to 4.4 percent of voters. 

Democrats had their highest share of the California electorate in 1942, when they had 60.2 percent of registered voters, Charles said. 

The highest Republican percentage — 67.9 percent — was in 1926. 

The state’s 15.6 million registered voters make up 72.19 percent of the adults who could vote if registered. The record is 96.2 percent in 1940. 

There are 1.7 million more Democrats in California than Republicans, but Republicans outnumber Democrats in 32 of the state’s 58 counties. 

The biggest Democratic counties are Alameda, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Sutter, Orange and Placer counties have the highest percentage of Republicans. 


Arizona, Nevada economic growth leaders

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

WASHINGTON — Arizona and seven other Western states outperformed the rest of the country in economic growth during much of the 1990s while Hawaii and Alaska suffered the worst growth rates, the Commerce Department said Monday. 

Arizona led all other states during the 1992-99 period, turning in an average growth rate of 7.3 percent. Neighboring Nevada was not far behind with average growth of 7.0 percent, according to a new report on economic activity during what has become the country’s longest economic expansion. 

During the 1992-99 period, the national economy was growing at average annual rates of 4 percent. 

In addition to Arizona and Nevada, states that did significantly better than the 4 percent national average were Oregon, with an economy averaging growth of 6.8 percent, followed by Colorado, 6.6 percent; Idaho, 6.6 percent; New Hampshire, 6.3 percent; Utah, 6.3 percent; New Mexico, 6.2 percent; Georgia, 5.8 percent; Texas, 5.4 percent; and North Carolina, 5.1 percent. 

Most of the states enjoying high growth rates were seeing big gains in the manufacture and sale of computers and related products such as software programs. 

But at the other end of the scale, Hawaii turned in the worst economic performance during this period, with its economy actually shrinking on average by 0.3 percent. Government analysts said that the state had trouble emerging from the last recession, in 1990-91, and then was hard hit by the 1997-98 Asian currency crisis, which cut into the state’s tourism business. 

Alaska was next to last in the growth category with an average increase of just 0.5 percent during the eight-year period. Other states with weak performances were West Virginia, 2.4 percent average; Wyoming, 2.5 percent; North Dakota, 2.5 percent; Maine, 2.6 percent; Montana, 2.7 percent; Pennsylvania, 2.8 percent; New Jersey, 2.9 percent; Vermont, 3.0 percent; Maryland, 3.0 percent; and Rhode Island, 3.0 percent. 

In the 12 states with the weakest growth rates, gains in high-tech industries were offset by significant weakness in old-line manufacturing industries such as apparel and textiles and lumber and wood products. 

California, with the biggest economy, averaged growth of 3.9 percent during the eight-year period, just under the national average but far below many of its fast-growing Western neighbors. Its economy was slow to emerge from the 1990-91 recession, reflecting in part big cutbacks in federal spending on defense, which hit California particularly hard. 

On the Net: 

Bureau of Economic Analysis site: http://www.bea.doc.gov


Kidnapper says he’ll commit child crimes from jail

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

The man found guilty Wednesday of kidnapping and sexually assaulting an 8-year-old girl has had a lot to say to media representatives in the day following his conviction. 

The FBI has been working to find out where Curtis Dean Anderson was when three Bay Area girls, Michaela Garecht, Amber Swartz and Nikki Campbell, disappeared more than a decade ago. 

Anderson Defense attorney Carl Spieckerman said that Anderson “has a very good alibi where he was in custody someplace” when those disappearances happened. 

But Authorities say that may not be true. 

And in a phone interview from his jail cell, Anderson, 40, told KTVU reporter Rita Williams late Thursday evening that he, in fact, was not in custody at the time Scwarz and Garecht vanished.  

However, Anderson said he did not kidnap them. 

In another interview with KRON reporter Linda Yee, Anderson threatened late Thursday that, if sent to jail, he will perpetuate pedophile crimes from behind bars. 

He said he will effectively teach other inmates, especially those ready for parole, how and where to molest children. 

“I’ll send out people yearly to do what I can’t do no longer.” 

Anderson said he started molesting children when he was 10 years old.  

Then he made a statement apparently indicative of the fact that he believes pedophilia to be something not everyone views as illegal. 

“If I did it a hundred times and have only come to police attention once,” he said, “doesn’t that say to you that maybe the other people involved don’t think of it as a crime like you in society do.” 

Following Wednesday’s conviction, Anderson claimed he kidnapped and killed a 7-year-old in a high-profile case, and said he has snatched 10 other girls off the streets in years past. 

Anderson told Fairfield Daily Republic reporter Rowena Lugtu-Shaddox that he abducted and killed 7-year-old Xiana Fairchild, who disappeared from Vallejo in December 1999.  

Her skull was found in January on a rural road in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

He said Thursday he has information about the girl’s disappearance, but that he won’t give any of it to investigators unless they cut him a deal. 

“I’m the only one who knows all of what happened to Xiana,” Anderson told the newspaper. “This is gonna go down like the Zodiac.” 

Anderson was referring to a series of five murders in California in 1969 and 1970 believed to be committed by someone calling himself “Zodiac” in letters to police and newspapers. 

Anderson claims to have kidnapped and sexually assaulted 10 other girls over the past 30 years, but has provided authorities with no evidence to directly link him to other crimes. 

“I was on a good roll for 30 years, enjoying my sexual preferences,” Anderson said.  

“It was a better way of working for 30 years. This is the first time I’ve been in a courtroom (for such a crime).” 

Anderson said that many of those girls returned home after convincing him that what he had done to them was “no big deal,” he said. 

When asked Thursday evening if authorities had Xiana’s killer in jail, Anderson said, “No comment.” 

He remains a suspect in the Xiana case, authorities say, but no charges have been filed. Police say they need credible information to link Anderson to that case. 

“A lot depends on evidence. It’s not necessary to have the body. It’s not essential,” said Vallejo Police Lt. JoAnn West. “It just depends on the information.” 

Anderson’s defense attorney, Carl Spieckerman, said he had no indication his client would make the statements about other abductions, and that doing so would endanger him in prison where pedophiles are treated harshly. 

“It seems like he’s got a death wish,” Spieckerman said. 

Anderson admitted he’s worried about his 250 year jail sentence, adding that if he’s not protected in prison, he’ll be murdered.


Light trading spurs moderate advances

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

NEW YORK — Caution asserted itself on Wall Street Monday as investors, still nursing doubts about when the economy will improve, bought stocks but made few major commitments. 

Blue chips managed a moderate rally on gains in a handful of energy and technology issues, but the overall market was less robust in a choppy and unusually quiet session. 

The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 71.11 at 11,061.52. 

Broader indicators had more modest advances. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 6.44 to 1,267.11, and the Nasdaq composite index advanced 6.49 to 2,155.93. 

It was the third straight gain for all three indexes, but analysts weren’t impressed. The advances amounted to less than 1 percent on each indicator and volume was light. The New York Stock Exchange recorded its second slowest trading session of the year, while the Nasdaq Stock Market broke its low-volume record for 2001. 

“Overall, what you’re seeing here is a rally in a few high-priced Dow stocks, but not any kind of a broader, more powerful move on the larger market,” said Richard Dickson, technical analyst at Hilliard Lyons. “I think investors are still confused about the earnings outlook and what’s going on with technology. There are not a lot of compelling reasons to buy, but there are a lot of reasons to be cautious.” 

That reluctance spilled over to the technology sector, making for a mixed session. IBM rose 75 cents to $113.64, while Intel fell 24 cents to $28.50 on worries the chip maker will issue an earnings warning at a mid-quarter update scheduled for later this week. 

Oil and pharmaceutical stocks were stronger. ExxonMobil gained $1.88 to $90.83, rising with other oil sector stocks amid a meeting of the OPEC producing nations. Johnson & Johnson rose $2.14 to $100.14. 

Investors have been skittish in recent weeks on concerns that a widely anticipated fourth-quarter recovery for corporate profits might not happen. The market rallied strongly in April and early May on that hope, but a mix of conflicting economic data and earnings warnings since then have unnerved investors. 

Adding to those worries are the second-quarter earnings due out in a few weeks. Those results are expected to be disappointing, but the murky economy outlook has intensified worries that more companies than expected will have weak returns. The tech sector is considered especially vulnerable. 

“It’s the calm before the storm of second-quarter earnings and people are battening down the hatches,” said Tom Galvin, chief investment officer at Credit Suisse First Boston. “People aren’t expecting much in the way of good news, so that’s keeping buyers on the sidelines.” 

Wall Street appeared unsure of how to react to a statement by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan that he was encouraged by signs that U.S. gasoline prices might decline, but that the Fed is keeping a close watch for signs of potential inflationary pressures. 

Concerns about inflation could prompt the Fed to be less aggressive in cutting interest rates; although the agency has cut rates five times already this year, investors are counting on more reductions to stimulate the economy. The Fed’s next meeting starts June 26. 

Advancing issues led decliners nearly 2 to 1 on the NYSE. Volume came to 835.38 million shares, slightly ahead of the previous low-volume record of nearly 826.06 million set May 25. Consolidated volume came to 1.00 billion, compared with 1.18 billion shares Friday. 

The Nasdaq Stock Market volume was just under 1.32 billion shares, less than the 1.34 billion shares traded May 14. 

The Russell 2000 index rose 5.60 to 507.32. 

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei stock average rose 0.4 percent. Germany’s DAX index gained 0.9 percent and Britain’s FT-SE 100 rose 0.8 percent. France’s stock market was closed for a holiday. 

——— 

On the Net: 

New York Stock Exchange: http://www.nyse.com 

Nasdaq Stock Market: http://www.nasdaq.com 


Capital murder, felonies charged in L.A. bus hijacking

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Prosecutors filed a potential death penalty murder case Friday against a man who allegedly shot a man and tried to get away by hijacking a bus that sped through downtown until a violent collision that killed a minivan driver. 

Carlos Ray Garcia, 40, of Reseda was charged with capital murder, attempted murder, carjacking, six counts of kidnapping for carjacking, robbery, attempted carjacking and evasion of an officer resulting in death. 

Acting Head Deputy District Attorney Patrick M. Dixon also alleged a special circumstance of murder during a carjacking, kidnapping and robbery.  

The complaint also alleged that Garcia used a handgun to commit the crimes. 

Garcia was held ld without bail because it is a potential capital case, but the district attorney’s office said the decision on whether to seek the death penalty would not be made until after the preliminary hearing. 

The counts filed against Garcia did not include a hate crime. 

Police said the shooting that led to the bus chase apparently was motivated by hate because Garcia allegedly told victim Anthony Lewis, 35, that he did not like black men associating with Hispanic women.  

Lewis remained in critical condition Friday. 

Lewis was shot Wednesday afternoon in the Rampart area near the offices of the city police union.  

Police quickly gave chase as Garcia allegedly jumped aboard the Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus and forced the driver to speed off at gunpoint. 

The bus, carrying four women passengers and a 4-year-old girl, raced through downtown for five minutes before broadsiding the minivan, killing Guadalupe Arrevalos, 34, of Norwalk, and crashing into a parcel delivery truck and a row of cars in a parking lot. 

Authorities said Garcia jumped out of the wrecked bus and tried to carjack an automobile before he was swarmed by police and arrested. 

Police found the handgun. 

Prosecutors said Arrevalos, a Central Library worker and mother of three, was the victim in the counts alleging murder and evading an officer.  

Lewis was the victim in the attempted-murder count. 

Bus driver Ema Gutierrez, 48, and the five bus passengers were named as victims in the counts alleging kidnapping for carjacking. 

The carjacking and robbery counts also involved the commandeering of the bus.  

The attempted-carjacking charge involved the car Garcia allegedly tried to take after the crash.


3 injured on I-80

Daily Planet staff
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Three people, who tried to change a flat tire in the left lane of Interstate 80, were sent to the hospital with minor injuries after the car they were driving was rearended by another. 

California Highway Patrol officer Levy Barnes said at 9:15 a.m., the Pontiac Sunbird apparently had a flat tire, which caused the driver to stop on the freeway just north of the Powell Street exit in Emeryville without pulling out of traffic. 

Shortly after the car stopped and the three occupants exited the car to inspect the flat front-left tire, a Ford Arostar ran into the rear of the Sunbird, which in turn pinned the three people against a concrete divider.  

The three people, a woman and two men, who were inspecting the tire were taken to the to the hospital. The woman, who is in her mid-50s has a broken leg, the driver also in his 50s was complaining of chest pains and the other male, in his 40s, had unspecified injuries. The driver of the Arostar was uninjured, Barnes said.


Death penalty opponents ready for McVeigh execution

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SPENCER, Ind. — In a fluorescent-lit barn 40 miles from a federal penitentiary, Glenda Breeden applies paint to 14-foot-tall papier-mache puppets of Uncle Sam and Jesus. 

Breeden and dozens of her friends plan to cart the garish puppets to the prison in Terre Haute for use in demonstrations against the May 16 execution of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. 

For the first federal execution in nearly four decades, Uncle Sam will wear a banner that reads: “Stop Me Before I Kill Again.” A sign on the Jesus puppet will ask: “What Would Jesus Do?” 

“It’s something visible,” Breeden said, her hands dripping with plaster. “It gets a lot of people’s attention.” 

Similar preparations are happening elsewhere across the country as demonstrators get ready to descend on the U.S. Penitentiary. On execution day, 20 prison buses will transport demonstrators from city parks to the prison grounds, where McVeigh, 33, is scheduled to die by injection. 

Tents will be put up on the grassy field outside the prison to shelter demonstrators, and straw bales will provide limited seating. Warden Harley Lappin has met with state and national anti-death penalty groups, explaining detailed rules they must follow. Breeden’s puppets won’t be permitted on the grounds – only signs that can be rolled up are allowed. 

“The folks we’ve talked with have indicated that they plan to come here and be law-abiding, peaceful protesters,” Lappin said. “We realize what we’re facing. ... It’s the execution of someone who’s very high profile in nature.” 

Some death penalty opponents say McVeigh’s notoriety is not a factor – they would be protesting any execution. 

“For most of us, it’s really about public policy and should the government be in the business of killing people,” said Abe Bonowitz, director of the national organization Citizens United for Alternatives to the Death Penalty. 

Bonowitz, who plans to lead a march in Terre Haute the day before the execution, said his organization is encouraging people nationwide to hold vigils and protests in their communities. 

Demonstrators in Massachusetts will take to Boston Common the night before the execution, passing out anti-death penalty fliers and holding a vigil. Around the same time, there will be a demonstration in front of the federal building in Fresno, and an interfaith prayer service in Tucson, Ariz. Similar events are scheduled in Florida, Washington, Missouri and Nebraska. 

In Oklahoma City, a small vigil is being planned near the Oklahoma City National Memorial, but no major anti-death penalty demonstrations have been discussed, said Bud Welch, who has been an ardent death penalty opponent since his daughter, Julie, was killed in the bombing. 

“It’s just going to be low-key,” said Welch, who plans to be in Terre Haute. 

While the prison will fence off equal-sized areas for pro- and anti-death penalty advocates, Lappin said he has not heard from any pro-death penalty groups planning to attend. 

Diane Clements, president of Houston-based Justice For All, said death penalty supporters don’t need to speak out – the courts have already spoken. 

“People don’t generally go out and have public demonstrations in support of the law,” Clements said. “The execution will move forward no matter who’s standing outside the gates.” 

The April 19, 1995, blast at the Alfred P. Murrah Building killed 168 people. 

Death penalty opponents acknowledge the nature of McVeigh’s crime makes it hard for some to protest his execution. For others, the fact that it’s a federal execution makes it all the more important to speak out. 

“Because it’s federal, some people who were never that active are saying, ’I finally have to do something, I have to do something now,”’ said Jill Farlow, an activist from Indiana. “Other people say, ’This was so heinous, I just can’t do this.”’ 

Breeden’s husband, Bill Breeden, who teaches a class on the death penalty at a Unitarian church in nearby Bloomington, sums up what he believes McVeigh’s execution will accomplish: “It’s really just giving him another fuse to light. We’re giving him exactly what he wants.” 

On The Net: 

Citizens United for Alternatives to the Death Penalty: http://www.cuadp.org 

Justice For All: http://www.jfa.net 


Lawmakers angry over U.N. panel ejection of U.S.

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

WASHINGTON — The ejection of the United States from the U.N. Human Rights Commission has infuriated lawmakers, and some are calling for withholding $650 million in payments to the United Nations. 

“This decision is ludicrous,” House Majority Leader Dick Armey, R-Texas, said Friday.  

“What they’ve done is thrown out the world’s oldest democracy and put a country with the world’s worst human rights record in its place, Sudan.” 

At the White House, spokesman Ari Fleischer called the U.S. ouster from the panel “a disappointment,” but said it “will not stop this president or this country from speaking out strongly on matters of human rights.” 

The panel itself has lost prestige, Fleischer indicated, as it “may not be perceived as the most powerful advocate of human rights in the world,” given its inclusion of Sudan and Libya, two nations the panel has accused of human-rights violations, and exclusion of the United States. 

The House is scheduled to vote next week on an $8.2 billion State Department authorization bill that contains $582 million in back dues for the United Nations – long a contentious issue in Congress. The bill also includes $67 million to rejoin UNESCO 17 years after the United States left over concerns about political polarization and mismanagement. 

Now, those payments could be in jeopardy. 

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., said he and other lawmakers are “very seriously considering amendments that would reflect our dramatic loss of faith in the United Nations’ structure.  

“Withholding funds is the best way to reflect such a loss of faith.” 

And there’s “a real possibility” such amendments could succeed, said Rep. Benjamin Gilman, R-N.Y., former chairman of the House International Relations Committee. 

“I think there’s going to be a severe reaction in the Congress,” Gilman said. In addition to cutting U.N. money, he said, “someone approached me last night on the floor (of the House) about withholding aid from countries that voted against us.” 

Even Gilman’s own endorsement of paying back dues is wavering: “I’ve been supportive of paying the delinquency, but now I’m not too sure I want to rush into it.” 

The United States had held a seat on the human rights panel since it was created in the 1940s.  

It lost that seat through a secret vote Thursday in which France, Sweden and Austria were chosen for the three spots allocated to Western countries. 

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms, a frequent critic of the United Nations despite being an architect of the back-dues payment agreement, said, “The absence of the United States will mean that the victims of human rights abuses will no longer have a spokesman to defend their hopes for liberty and freedom.” 

Former Secretary of State and U.N. Ambassador Madeleine Albright said the expulsion was a reflection of “short-term anger that has long-term effects, and I think it’s very unfortunate.  

It’s a serious blow, but it’s as much a blow to the U.N., ... which has sidelined itself on human rights issues.” 

To Kim Holmes of the conservative Heritage Foundation, the ouster was “an intentional slap at the United States.”  

A number of countries, including allies, he said, “are unhappy with the Bush administration and looking for a way to signal  

their displeasure.” 

Allies have expressed distress over the Bush administration’s rejection of the Kyoto global warming treaty and its decision to move ahead on a national missile defense system despite their opposition, among other things. 

State Department spokesman Richard Boucher demurred from that view, saying, “I wouldn’t throw this into an entire critique of U.S. foreign policy by everybody in the world or anything like that.”  

Instead, Boucher blamed regional solidarities and vote swapping.  

The United States campaigned “very actively for membership” and got more than 40 assurances of support before winding up with only 29 votes, Boucher said.  

“As far as who the dozen or so were that told us they would support us and didn’t vote for us, I don’t think we know at this point.” 

The latest dispute comes at a time when the post of U.N. ambassador in New York remains vacant.  

The White House announced nearly two months ago that Bush would nominate longtime career diplomat John D. Negroponte to the post, but the nomination has yet to be submitted to the Senate. 

Some administration critics have suggested the absence of an envoy at the United Nations may have contributed to a lack of vigilance in detecting that a move was afoot to deny the United States a seat. 


Forest road ban to take effect, then be amended

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

WASHINGTON — The Bush administration will allow a ban on road-building in much of the nation’s federal forest lands to take effect next week but will propose changes to it in June, Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said Friday. 

The ban, a pivotal part of former President Clinton’s environmental legacy, ropes off 58.5 million acres – about a third of the federal forest land – from developers, loggers and mining companies. These industries have been lobbying to have the measure reversed. 

Veneman did not provide details on the changes that will be offered. But she said they will seek to ensure local input on individual forest decisions. She called the plan a “commonsense approach to roadless protection.” 

“Through this action we affirm the department’s commitment to the important challenge of protecting roadless values,” she said at a news conference. 

Clinton’s policy, announced Jan. 5, was supposed to take effect in March. The Bush administration delayed implementation until May 12 while it conducted a review. 

Veneman said the review showed a need to make sure the concerns of states, communities, Indian tribes and individuals are addressed. She said the proposed amendments next month “would lay out a process for local input on local decisions for local areas.” 

Once the amendments are proposed, a public comment period will begin, Veneman said. How soon a plan is finalized will depend on how many comments are received. 

Clinton’s plan generated 1.6 million public comments. 

The vast majority of roadless federal forests are in the West, including parts of Idaho’s Bitterroot range and Alaska’s Tongass, viewed by environmentalists as North America’s rain forest. 

Smaller sections are scattered across the country from Florida’s Apalachicola National Forest and Virginia’s George Washington National Forest to New Hampshire’s White Mountains. 

The Clinton administration began creating the rules about three years ago, but did not issue them until two weeks before President Clinton left office. 

The ban was praised by environmentalists as a way to protect the nation’s most pristine forest lands from developers and preserve critical wildlife habitats. Opponents, including the timber and mining industries, said the rules needlessly place valuable resources off-limits. 

The state of Idaho and timber company Boise Cascade sued in federal court in Boise seeking to block the rule from taking effect. The Bush administration had until Friday to file a brief with the court outlining its analysis of the rule. 

Veneman said the administration planned to tell the court it does not favor an injunction blocking implementation of the ban but will work on amending the plan. In an interim decision, U.S. District Judge Edward J. Lodge rejected a call to immediately block the Clinton policy. But he said there was “strong evidence” the rule-making process was hurried, that the Forest Service was not prepared to produce a “coherent proposal or meaningful dialogue and that the end result was predetermined.” 

Prior to Veneman’s announcement, Chris West, vice president of the American Forest Resource Council, said he would be disappointed if the Bush administration kept the ban in place while a new rule was created. Such a move could put forests in the West at risk to insects, disease and fire because the roadless areas will be inaccessible, he said. 

 

 

“What has us worried is what they are going to be doing in the interim,” said West, whose Portland, Ore.-based group represents timber interests. 

Veneman said as the administration works to come up with amendments, it will seek to ensure protection against wildfires, insects and other issues that could affect communities, homes and property. 

Marty Hayden, legislative director for Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund, said Thursday he was worried any changes would return the government to where it was three years ago — trying to maintain 380,000 miles of roads that have an $8.5 billion maintenance backlog. 

“They have chosen not to suspend it because they are feeling the heat of the public support that was behind the rule in the first place,” Hayden said. “But they are still heading down a path for undoing it.” 


Unemployment hits 4.5 percent as companies shed jobs

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

WASHINGTON — The unemployment rate jumped to 4.5 percent in April, reviving fears of recession as companies shed the largest number of jobs in a decade. The White House stoked that concern, suggesting that economic growth in the first quarter might be less than originally reported. 

The Labor Department’s report Friday reinforced worries that rising layoffs might cause consumers to cut back sharply on spending and tip the country into a recession. 

“How do you spell ugly? How about horrible? It doesn’t get much worse than this, I hope,” said economist Joel Naroff of Naroff Economic Advisors. 

Just a week ago, the government reported that the economy grew at a surprisingly strong rate of 2 percent in the first three months of this year, raising hopes that the darkest days of the slowdown had passed. 

But White House spokesman Ari Fleischer said Friday that first-quarter growth might have been slower than that, referring to projections being made by some private economists. 

“The president continues to be concerned about the strength of the economy and the slowness in the economy,” Fleischer said. “He believes that the best way to protect the economy and get it moving again is for Congress to take prompt action to pass the budget and to put his tax cut  

into place, especially on a retroactive fashion.” 

However, Wall Street investors saw a silver lining in the dismal news, believing it raised hopes that the Federal Reserve will aggressively cut interest rates and Congress will provide tax relief. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 154.59 points to finish at 10,951.24, the highest level since Feb. 6. 

Some private economists believe first-quarter growth could be revised down a bit, based on expectations of weaker business investment and consumer spending. Others, however, think growth might be a bit stronger. 

The government routinely comes out with three estimates of economic growth for a given quarter, each one based on more complete information. The next estimate of first-quarter growth will be released May 25. 

But the real concern among private economists is the performance of the economy in the current second quarter. Friday’s employment report for April provided analysts with a critical new piece of information and raised concerns that the worst of the economic slowdown is not over. 

“The April employment figures are recession-type numbers,” said First Union economist Mark Vitner. “The economy is losing momentum and ... the odds of recession have increased.” 

Last month, 223,000 people lost their jobs, the largest reduction since February 1991, when the country was still mired in its last recession. 

It was the second straight month of job losses. In March, 53,000 people were cut from payrolls, which actually was an improvement over the reduction of 86,000 the government had previously reported. 

 

Sung Won Sohn, chief economist at Wells Fargo, said that the promotions, rebates and price cuts that helped to fuel consumer spending earlier this year cut into corporate profits and were now triggering layoffs. 

“The bottom line is that a profit recession is leading to a higher jobless rate,” Sohn said. 

The big loss in jobs boosted April’s unemployment rate to a 2-1/2 year high of 4.5 percent, a 0.2 percentage-point increase over March’s’ 4.3 percent rate. 

“The reaction of consumers to increased layoffs will be critical” in determining whether the country can dodge a recession, warned Lynn Reaser, chief economist for Bank of America Capital Management. 

She and other economists are still hopeful that aggressive action by the Fed will keep the economy afloat. The central bank has already cut rates four times this year and economists are looking for another half-point reduction at the Fed’s next meeting on May 15. 

April’s employment picture surprised analysts, who had forecasting a smaller 0.1 percentage increase in the unemployment rate. 

In Friday’s report, job losses were widespread, although retailers managed to hire 22,000 people, many of them at bars, restaurants and food stores. 

Manufacturing, which has been hardest hit by the slowdown, lost another 104,000 jobs last month, pushing total reductions since June to 554,000. Two-thirds of those job losses occurred in the past four months. 

Construction companies, which have been adding jobs over the last several months, cut 64,000 jobs in April, possibly reflecting the impact of heavy rains in some parts of the country. 

Employment in a variety of business services fell by 121,000 last month. Temporary employment services experienced another sharp decline of 108,000 last month, and have lost 370,000 jobs since September. 

There was some good news for workers in the report. Their paychecks continue to grow. Average hourly earnings rose 0.4 percent in April to $14.22 an hour. That matched the gain in March. The length of the average workweek in April was unchanged at 34.3 hours. 

——— 

On the Net: 

Employment report: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.toc.htm 


Florida lawmakers overhaul election system

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Six months after Florida plunged the presidential race into chaos, lawmakers approved a sweeping election overhaul Friday that will banish the hanging chads and butterfly ballots that made the state a laughingstock. 

The $32 million measure now goes to Gov. Jeb Bush, who is expected to sign it as early as next week. 

“We took advantage of the scrutiny the state got and rather than trying to relive the past, we’ve been focusing on making sure 2002 looks a lot different,” Bush said. 

Since the November recount that put Bush’s older brother in the White House, Florida has passed the most significant election reform package in the country. 

The plan, approved 120-0 by the House and 38-2 by the Senate, will establish uniform guidelines for recounts in close elections. It will also eliminate mechanical lever voting and punchcard and hand-counted paper ballots. 

Instead, every precinct will have optical-scan ballot systems for the 2002 elections. The plan earmarks $24 million for counties to buy the equipment. 

“In one word, hooray!” said Deanie Lowe, the Volusia County elections supervisor. “I am just thrilled to death over what they’ve accomplished.” 

The legislation requires a machine recount if the margin of victory in any race is half a percent or less and a manual recount of the overvotes and undervotes – ballots where voting machines pick up multiple choices or no clear choice – if the margin is one-quarter of 1 percent or less. 

The secretary of state must also draft rules on how to read ambiguous ballots. During last fall’s recounts, counties used differing standards, creating disputes over hanging, pregnant and dimpled chads. 

Also, provisional ballots will be given to people who are not on voter rolls but say they are eligible to vote. Elections officials will later determine if the ballots are valid. Last fall, some voters, many of them black, complained they were wrongly denied the right to vote. 

“Florida led the country into a disastrous election morass, but now it’s showing the way out of the morass,” said Larry Sabato, a University of Virginia political science professor who is conducting a nationwide elections reform study. 

“It’s much less likely Florida will ever be in that embarrassing position again. This could serve as model legislation for other states.” 

In Georgia, lawmakers have passed a bill that requires a statewide electronic voting system in place by 2004, but they did not include money to pay for it. Maryland lawmakers have voted to require all counties to use a uniform voting system, possibly as early as next year. 

Florida’s governor was eager to change the state’s maligned election system after recounts delayed his brother’s election for 36 days and left many Democrats believing Al Gore had won. 

The punchcard ballots were blamed for tens of thousands of uncounted votes. The final tally had George W. Bush winning the state by just 537 votes out of about 6 million cast. 

“Clearly, if what they passed had been in place a year ago, Al Gore would be in the White House and George Bush would be back in Texas,” Democratic National Committee chairman Terry McAuliffe said Friday. 

McAuliffe has noted that manual recounts were supported by Florida Republicans after being opposed by Bush aides during the recount debacle. 

The new optical scanners read ballots on which voters fill in a bubble or complete an arrow. There will be no more recounts with elections workers squinting at chads. 

“This is a milestone piece of legislation,” said Hillsborough County elections supervisor Pam Iorio, president of the Florida State Association of Supervisors of Elections. “Out of a negative situation came very positive change.” 

Palm Beach County’s Theresa LePore, a Democrat vilified by both parties for designing the butterfly ballot blamed for confusing voters, said she was disappointed lawmakers didn’t make the supervisor of elections a nonpartisan position. 

Her canvassing board’s chairman, Judge Charles Burton, praised the plan and said every state should have uniform standards for manual recounts. 

“You should not leave it up to various boards when you’re making a partisan decision,” he said during a panel discussion on election reform in Boston. “We were counting dings, spit marks and drool marks.” 

On the Net: 

Florida Legislature: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Welcome/index.cfm 


Grocers want clarity on biotech food products

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

WASHINGTON — Food companies reeling from recalls of biotech corn products say the government shouldn’t let genetically engineered crops go to market unless there are tests to tell those crops apart from conventional varieties. 

Last fall, the biotech industry was embarrassed when a type of genetically engineered corn that wasn’t approved for human consumption was found in taco shells.  

At the time, a sophisticated test for detecting a special protein in the corn hadn’t been developed. 

“We’ve learned a lot of lessons, that’s the bottom line,” Lisa Katic, director of scientific and nutrition policy for the Grocery Manufacturers of America, said Friday. 

“We need to know what’s in our products.” 

Officials with biotech companies say that testing methods will be made available to the government. 

Biotech soy and corn are found in foods throughout U.S. supermarkets because biotech and conventional crops are routinely mixed together. 

In a letter sent to the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, the grocery manufacturers say they must be able to tell whether ingredients include gene-altered crops.  

Many overseas buyers don’t want foods made from biotech crops, and the European Union and Japan require such foods to be labeled. 

The agency is considering tightening up its approval process for biotech crops in response to consumer and food industry concerns. 

The agency has proposed a mandatory review process for new biotech products that will include posting scientific data on the Internet. FDA also proposed voluntary labeling guidelines for foods that claim either to be nonbiotech or to have special biotech ingredients. 

Genetic engineering in agriculture involves splicing a gene from one organism, such as a bacterium, into a plant or animal to confer certain traits, such as herbicide or insect resistance in plants. 

Monsanto Co. has created a herbicide-resistant wheat that may be ready as early as 2003. Biotech varieties of fruit, vegetables, fish and livestock are in various stages of development. 

“We believe that detection methods for biotech-derived food and feed that are traded globally should be available to regulatory agencies,” said Loren Wassell, a spokesman for Monsanto. 

The biotech StarLink corn that spawned the food recalls has since been removed from the market, and the Environmental Protection Agency has said it will not approve another biotech crop unless it is allowed for both animal feed and human use. 

StarLink was not approved for food because of unanswered questions about its potential to cause allergic reactions. It was supposed to be kept separate from food-grade corn, but many farmers weren’t informed about the restrictions, or else ignored them. StarLink has subsequently been found in both grain and seed supplies. 

Critics of biotech food say that while diagnostic tests are needed, FDA also should require new biotech crops to go through the more rigorous and lengthy approval process required of food additives.  

The grocery manufacturers, like the biotech companies, oppose that idea. 

“It sounds like GMA has the last half of the piece,” said Joseph Mendelson, legal director for the Center for Food Safety, an anti-biotech advocacy group. 

On the Net: FDA: http://www.fda.gov 

GMA: http://www.gmabrands.com 


Pope arrives in Greece, faces centuries of mistrust

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

ATHENS, Greece — Pope John Paul II arrived in Greece on Friday for a personal pilgrimage with much wider implications: trying to heal nearly 1,000 years of discord between the Vatican and Orthodox churches. 

John Paul is the first pope to visit Greece in nearly 13 centuries.  

His six-day trip – his first international voyage in a year – retraces the biblical journeys of the Apostle Paul through Greece, Syria and Malta. 

The pope, walking slowly off the plane, was saluted by an Air Force honor guard. No senior members of the Greek Orthodox Church turned out to welcome him – underscoring the delicate and potentially tumultuous nature of the pope’s visit. 

The pope hopes help close the deep estrangement between the Vatican and Orthodox churches. Christianity split into the two branches nearly 1,000 years ago in disputes over papal authority. 

The effort for greater contacts would receive a major boost if supported by the Greek Orthodox, one of the pillars of faith for the world’s more than 200 million Orthodox. 

The leader of the Greek Orthodox Church, Archbishop Christodoulos, is expected to make a public statement demanding a formal papal apology for the Crusades that led to the fall of the Greek Byzantine Empire and other perceived misdeeds against the Orthodox Church. Such a statement by the pope could help open an important ecumenical dialogue. 

But the Greek Orthodox Church also represent a hotbed of dissent.  

Its clergymen and followers have long looked upon the Vatican with suspicion that has often spilled into open hostility. 

The ill feelings draw from potent sources: religion, ethnic pride and a perception of historical injustice. 

“It is blasphemy to the memory of our saints to allow the pope in Greece,” said Athens University theologian Giorgos Metalinos at an anti-pope gathering Wednesday of more than 1,000 people. 

Protesters – from monks to parish priests – plan more rallies during the pope’s 24-hour stay. They promise to drape monasteries in black and ring church bells in a symbol of mourning. At some churches, Greek and ancient Byzantine flags were lowered to half-staff. 

Some zealots have threatened to block the papal motorcade from reaching Areopagus hill, the judicial center of ancient Athens where Paul made his sermons in A.D. 51. 

But the opposition appeared to fizzle just hours before the pope’s arrival.  

Some former protest leaders appealed for calm – apparently bowing to pressure from the government and mainstream church leaders. 

Security forces were taking no chances, setting up roadblocks and dispatching more then 5,000 police officers across the city. 

The demonstrators represent the Greek government’s worse fears: that they will steal attention from the pope and show the world that prosperity and modernization has not fully erased the nation’s anti-Western outlook. 

“These fringe groups are not the voice of Greece,” insisted Foreign Ministry spokesman Panos Beglitis.  

And at the Greek parliament, the flag of the Holy See waved alongside the Greek flag. 

Still, most Greeks are raised to be wary of Roman Catholics. More than 95 percent of Greece’s 11 million people  

are baptized into the  

Orthodox church. 

School books blame the Crusaders for the fall of the Greek Byzantine Empire in the 15th century – the prelude for what Greeks consider their ultimate humiliation: nearly 400 years of domination under the Muslim Ottoman Empire. 

But that was better than bowing to the Roman Catholic West, most Greeks are taught, and everyone knows the anti-Vatican adage: “Better the Turkish turban than the papal tiara.” 

The pope has been to mostly Orthodox countries before: Romania and Georgia.  

But the Greek backlash is more intense. Greek Orthodox clerics portray themselves as guardians of both the nation’s ethnic identity and the original spirit of Christianity. 

Many still believe the Vatican seeks to infiltrate the Orthodox heartland, stretching from the Balkans to Russia.  

They particularly condemn Eastern Rite churches, which follow many Orthodox traditions but are loyal to the Vatican. An influential Eastern Rite cleric, Cardinal Ignace Moussa Daoud, was dropped from the papal delegation after objections from Greek Orthodox leaders. 

The Vatican, in turn, has spoken about alleged discrimination against Greece’s 50,000 native-born Roman Catholics.  

There are also about 150,000 Catholic immigrants.


Computer chip designer loses key ruling

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Computer chip designer Rambus Inc. has lost a crucial round in its legal fight to enforce patent claims that could generate $1 billion in royalties. 

A federal judge in Virginia on Friday dismissed Rambus’ allegations that German chip maker Infineon Technologies infringed on patents for chip designs that help accelerate the speed of video game consoles and personal computers. 

The ruling represented a significant setback for Los Altos-based Rambus, which is pursuing a dozen patent infringement claims against Infineon, Hyundai and Micron. The chip makers are suing Rambus for breach of contract and seeking to invalidate Rambus patents. 

Investors reacted swiftly to the news, released shortly before the stock market closed for the week. The Nasdaq Stock Market temporarily halted trading in the stock. When trading resumed, Rambus’ shares plunged $3.55, or 19.6 percent, to close at $14.60. However, they regained some of those losses in the after-hours session, rising 92 cents. 

The outcome of the patent battles will have a huge impact on Rambus’ fortunes. If Rambus prevails, the company could collect $1 billion in annual royalties from chip sales, estimated Morgan Stanley Dean Witter analyst Mark Edelstone, who downgraded Rambus’ stock on Friday’s news. 

Rambus is on a pace to generate about $100 million in royalties during its current fiscal year. 

The adverse ruling could force Rambus to lower the royalties charged its licensees, which include Samsung, Hitachi, Toshiba and NEC. 

“If the courts rule these patents are invalid, you have to wonder how long these other companies are going to want to pay royalties,” Edelstone said. 

Rambus earned $21.1 million on revenues of $66 million during the first half of its fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. Royalties accounted for 77 percent of the company’s revenues during the period. 

Rambus intends to appeal Friday’s ruling. 

“Rambus will continue to fight to protect our intellectual property,” CEO Geoff Tate said. “Though Rambus is a relatively small company, we will not be cowed by the aggressive tactics of some industry giants who would take our innovations without any compensation.” 

The company, which holds more than 100 patents worldwide, will get its next chance to prove its case against Infineon in a European trial scheduled to begin May 18. 

Several chip patents recently issued to Rambus aren’t affected by Friday’s ruling, according to the company. 

Rambus’ unusually high royalty rates helped provoke the legal confrontation. In the Virginia trial, Rambus executives disclosed that the company charges a 3.5 percent royalty for one of its memory chip designs, about three times the industry average. 

The higher royalty expense can make the difference between a profit and loss for chip makers. 

——— 

On The Net: 

http://www.rambus.com 


Fed study suggests investors are sluggards

By John Cunniff The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

Popular assumptions can create vast misimpressions, such as the one that the typical American household has become a daring investor in stocks, devouring market data and trading aggressively. 

It isn’t so, or at least a careful study suggests that to be the case. The study goes even further, using words such as “passive” and “languid” in describing investors’ behaviorr, and stating that they respond “sluggishly.” 

If the study’s authors are correct, it demolishes an impression held by a vast number of people that Americans have become masters of their financial fate, daringly creating wealth like no others in history. 

It includes even some corporate chairmen, and stock brokers, market gurus, advertisers, new-age authors and book publishers, commentators and members of the media who have declaimed about the new American investor. 

They had good reason to believe they were right. Hard numbers, the sort of thing these types profess to believe in but do not always comprehend correctly, seemed to support their opinions. 

Federal Reserve figures, for example, showed household stock holdings grew from $2.6 trillion to $12.6 trillion in the 1990s. And stocks that had been just 13 percent of household assets in 1990 jumped to  

33 percent. 

Could the Fed have been wrong? It could have been, of course, but it wasn’t. 

The explanation comes from the latest study, this one issued by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which explains the vast distinction between aggregate and typical, and the dangers of confusing them. 

The Fed’s statistics for the 1990s are aggregates for an economic sector, the household sector. To simply divide the aggregate numbers by the number of households misconstrues and misinforms. 

If the aggregates were the result of enormous numbers of Americans changing their behavior of many years, it would represent a social change of huge proportions. But it was not so, the authors say. 

In a study for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Joseph Tracy and Henry Schneider found behavioral change appears to have played only a moderate role, as did demographic shifts and changing pension plans. 

“Despite intensive media attention to the stock market boom of the 1990s,” they write, “most households that owned some stocks during the period did not rush to buy more. Similarly, most households that held no stocks refrained from acquiring them.” 

The average household equity share rose in the 1990s “not so much because Americans were flocking to Wall Street’s party, but because those already attending decided to stay on.” 

By staying on, a rather passive approach, these existing investors enjoyed spectacular returns, realizing what Tracy and Schneider found was “an astonishing 26.3 percent average annual return from 1996 to 1999.” In short, Americans during the soaring market were hardly the daring venturers in financial space envisioned by so many, but the same old Milquetoasts of old. 

But now a word or two about the benefits of passivity: 

“One implication of our results is that the typical household may behave in similarly languid fashion if market returns over the current decade drop below their historical average,” Tracy and Schneider said. 

“In that event, the average household equity share is likely to fall, but by less than it would if households were racing for the exits.” In that sense, languidness serves as a stabilizer, an antidote to volatility. 

John Cunniff is a business analysts for The Associated Press


Market Watch

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

NEW YORK — Stocks moved higher Friday as more dismal economic news raised hopes that the Federal Reserve will aggressively cut interest rates. 

The Labor Department reported that the nation’s unemployment rate shot up to 4.5 percent in April, the highest level in 2 1/2 years. The figures also showed that businesses slashed their payrolls by the largest amount since the recession in 1991. 

At the White House, meanwhile, press secretary Ari Fleischer said President Bush “remains very concerned about the strength of the economy.” He added that the Bush administration believes it’s “entirely possible” that the government’s recent 2 percent reading for the nation’s first-quarter economic growth will be revised downward. 

Stocks rose on expectations that the economic news will prompt Fed policy makers to cut interest rates a half a percentage point when they meet May 15. Earlier, the odds had been on a quarter-point cut. 

Ed Yardeni, chief investment strategist for Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown in New York, said it was extremely rare for the White House to predict a revision in a key economic measure such as the 2 percent gross domestic product reading. He suggested the Bush administration “is positioning here for a quick passage of the tax cut” favored by the president. 

He said the employment figures “clearly indicate economic weakness is spreading to the consumer sector” and said that increased the likelihood of a half percentage point, or 50 basis point, interest rate cut by the Fed. 

Scott Marcouiller, a vice president and market analyst at A.G. Edwards & Sons of St. Louis, concurred. 

“The odds of a 50 basis point cut increased dramatically in the last 48 hours,” he said. 

The size of the increase in the unemployment rate and the cut in jobs surprised many analysts. They were predicting the unemployment rate would rise to 4.4 percent and that businesses would add jobs during the month. 

— The Associated Press 

The figures worry investors because weakness in employment tends to depress consumer spending. That, in turn, could prolong the economic weakness that has been evident in the economy since late last year. 

Among those taking big hits in early trading were Wind River Systems Inc., with its shares dropping $2.47 to $23.71. The company late Thursday cut its first-quarter earnings projections to a range of 4 cents to 6 cents a share. It cited a significant slowdown in customer spending and said it will cut its work force by up to 15 percent. 

Advancing issues slightly outnumbered declining shares on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to 477.98 million shares compared with 502.33 million at the same time a day earlier. 

The Russell 2000 index, which measures the performance of smaller companies stocks, was down 0.42 at 485.23. 

——— 

On the Net: 

New York Stock Exchange: http://www.nyse.com 

Nasdaq Stock Market: http://www.nasdaq.com 


Businesses focus on Cinco de Mayo to enter Hispanic market

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Tracking growth of the nation’s Hispanic population, the Cinco de Mayo holiday has become a bull’s-eye for businesses targeting a largely untapped market. 

Never mind that May Fifth is little hyped in Mexico, where re-enactments of a fleeting victory over French forces in 1862 are far more sober than the beer-soaked bashes that erupt in U.S. cities. 

“It’s a promotional opportunity for corporations, because basically marketers have invented Cinco de Mayo as a holiday,” said Carlos Santiago, founder of a Newport Beach-based multicultural consulting firm. 

Once the domain of food and drink suppliers, the holiday has become a shortcut for companies that seek access to America’s 35 million Hispanics. Credit card firms, retiree service groups and even corporate recruiters are joining the likes of Taco Bell and Corona beer for a chance to pitch the Hispanic market. 

Though it commemorates Mexico’s most famous military triumph, Cinco de Mayo has become both an expression of Mexican-American pride and a fiesta with crossover appeal to the entire country. This Saturday, places as far afield as Park City, Utah, and Rogers, Ark., will throw their first Cinco de Mayo festivals. 

They’re examples of how Hispanics – led by Mexican Americans – have fanned out from major immigrant states such as California, Texas and New York. Recent census data report that, nationally, the Hispanic population grew by 58 percent in the 1990s. 

Their purchasing power appears to be growing at least as fast. 

The disposable income of Hispanics jumped 118 percent during the 1990s to $452 billion in 2001, according to a study by the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth. That increase dwarfed the 68 percent rise in disposable income among non Hispanics. Nationally, the study pegged total disposable income at just over $7 trillion. 

More people with more money to spend – it excites advertisers, who are bounding toward a market that’s not yet overwhelmed by product jingles. 

Santiago estimates Hispanics should command about $16 billion of the estimated $200 billion spent on advertising each year. Instead, Santiago said, the total is around $2 billion. 

Groups such as the American Association of Retired Persons are looking to catch up. AARP spent about $100,000 paying for a performance stage and literature at Los Angeles’ Cinco de Mayo festival last Sunday. 

“I thought it was awesome,” said Nancy Franklin, the group’s director of membership development. “A lot of people are not aware of AARP in the Hispanic community.” 

Western Union will co-sponsor New York City’s Cinco de Mayo event this weekend. And Minnesota-based credit card issuer Metris Cos. plans to sponsor Cinco de Mayo festivals, part of its aggressive marketing to Hispanic customers. 

That’s not to say that traditional supporters of the holiday are beating a retreat. 

“It’s really a cornerstone of our annual marketing plan,” said Don Mann of San Antonio-based Gambrinus Co., the largest U.S. importer of Corona beers. “We’re promoting it to the general market. Some of these other companies that are new to it are focusing on the Latino market.” 

Cinco de Mayo also has become an occasion for companies to push not just their products, but their work environments as well. Federal Express set up a booth at the Cinco de Mayo festival in Fort Worth, Texas, and logged 300 job applications. 

And the schmoozing doesn’t have to take place at a street stall. 

On Wednesday evening, the Fox Entertainment Group sponsored an event at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach. It attracted dozens of Hispanic professionals, who heard pitches from Fox as well as other companies such as Wells Fargo and Deloitte & Touche. 

“Right now there’s a big demand to recruit,” said Miguel Figueroa, president of the Los Angeles-area chapter of the National Society of Hispanic MBAs, which organized the event. “The company gains exposure, they also gain talent.” 

——— 

On the Net: 

Santiago & Valdes Solutions: http://www.santiagovaldessolutions.com/ 

AARP: http://www.aarp.org/ 

National Society of Hispanic MBAs: http://www.nshmba.org/ 

Fox Entertainment: http://www.fox.com 


Possibility of an even weaker economy

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

NEW YORK — Wall Street has no doubt that the stock market and the economy will eventually regain the kind of strength they enjoyed for much of the last decade. 

The question is when. 

Investors and market observers won’t like the answer from this past week: Longer than they had thought, perhaps not even this year. 

A spike in unemployment and warnings from companies of weak second-quarter and full-year earnings bode ill for a near-term recovery. Indeed, analysts say, the economy could still be recession-bound and that stock prices might have further to fall. 

“Listen, we are in for a grind here,” said Charles White, portfolio manager at Avatar Associates in New York. “It doesn’t mean stock prices have to go materially lower, but it means that the catalyst for being off to the races is a ways off.” 

Investors were disturbed this past week by two labor reports that quelled some of their resurgent optimism and reawakened worries about recession. 

The market still managed to move sharply higher on Friday – with the Dow Jones industrials reaching a closing high not seen since early February – but only because investors believe the economy is so weak that the Federal Reserve will have no choice but to deliver a big interest rate cut when its policy makers meet May 15. 

The most troubling news about the economy came Friday when the Labor Department said the unemployment rate jumped to 4.5 percent in April, its highest level in 2 years. The report also said businesses cut their payrolls by the largest amount since the recession in 1991. 

The data followed Thursday’s news that first-time claims for jobless benefits reached a 5-year high the previous week. 

Employment reports are watched closely because consumer spending, which accounts for two-thirds of the U.S. economy, is directly tied to whether Americans are working and feeling secure about their jobs. 

“We have known for some time that we were in a manufacturing (and technology) recession and a profits recession; now it threatens to spread to the consumer,” said Robert Stovall, market strategist for Prudential Securities. 

There’s no mistaking now, he added, that many companies have suffered as the economy has slumped. 

One example from the past week was Newell Rubbermaid, which warned of poor profits for the remainder of the year after missing first-quarter expectations. The housewares and consumer products maker also said it will slash 3,000 jobs, or 6 percent of its workforce. 

The weak labor data and corporate warnings overshadowed a strong economic report the previous week, when the Commerce Department said the gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 2 percent in the first quarter. 

“The GDP report was just a false cue. It seemed to be an aberration of a trend,” said A.C. Moore, chief investment strategist for Dunvegan Associates in Santa Barbara, Calif. “The economy is pretty weakened here.” 

The White House acknowledged as much on Friday as press secretary Ari Fleischer said the Bush administration believes it’s “entirely possible” that the government’s recent 2 percent reading for the nation’s first-quarter economic growth will be revised downward. 

Friday’s rally aside, so long as there’s proof that the economy and business climate is quite weak, the market won’t be able to maintain its upward momentum, said White, the portfolio manager. 

“The market has been going up recently on the hopes and dreams of a recovery by the fourth quarter,” White said. “It was way too soon to discuss recovery.” 

If history repeats itself, however, stock prices could head higher in the second half. Traditionally, the market’s major indexes begin to show improvement six months after the Federal Reserve begins lowering interest rates. The central bank made its first cut just after New Year’s. 

History has even more to offer investors who need encouragement, said Moore of Dunvegan. 

“It’s been a bull market since the Dark Ages,” he quipped. 

Despite the continuing uncertainty, the market’s major indexes managed to end the week with healthy gains. 

The Dow finished the week up 141.19, or 1.3 percent, at 10,951.24 on a 154.59 gain Friday. That was the Dow’s highest close since it reached 10,957.42 on Feb. 6. 

The Nasdaq composite index rose 115.85, or 5.6 percent for the week. It closed Friday at 2,191.53 on a gain of 45.33. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 ended the week up 13.56, a 1.1 percent change, after rising 18.03 to 1,266.61 Friday. 

The Russell 2000 index rose 7.24 Friday to 492.89, ending the week up 2.92 or 0.6 percent. 

The Wilshire Associates Equity Index — which represents the combined market value of all New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange and Nasdaq issues — ended the week at $11.687 trillion, up $178 billion from the previous week. A year ago, the index was $13.385 trillion. 


Berkeley schools seek more teacher diversity

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Monday June 04, 2001

That national teacher shortage hasn’t hit Berkeley as hard as some districts. 

Whether it’s the city’s progressive reputation, the presence of UC Berkeley, the public school district’s record of innovation, or the weather — Berkeley schools seem to draw teachers from all over. 

A job fair earlier this year drew nearly 250 teaching candidates, inquiring about 25 to 50 openings anticipated over the summer. 

Despite its best efforts, however, the Berkeley Unified School District is far from meeting its goal of recruiting a teaching staff whose racial composition is comparable to its students. 

“I don’t know, frankly, if it will even happen in my life time,” said the district’s new personnel chief, David Gomez, in an interview last week. 

In 1999, the district had teacher/student racial disparity in three key areas. That year, 518 teachers were 72 percent white, 14 percent African-American and 5 percent Hispanic, compared to a student body that was 31 percent white, 39 percent African-American and 13 percent Hispanic.  

There simply aren’t enough people of color going into the teaching profession to even begin to meet the demand, Gomez said. 

In neighboring Oakland, for example, only 6 percent of the district’s 54,000 students were white in 1999, compared to 48 percent of its teachers. 

Berkeley must draw from an even smaller pool of minority candidates than some districts, Gomez said, because it traditionally hires only teachers with several years experience under their belt. “That’s the frustration,” Gomez said. “We get great candidates — hard workers with good attitudes — but they lack the training and experience. 

“We know the need is there, and we’re starting to take steps to get to the goal,” Gomez added. “But it’s an upward battle. It’s difficult.” 

In addition to its larger recruitment fairs, the district holds fairs specifically for minorities each year. It works with a local non-profit called “Project Pipeline,” which identifies college students of color who are good candidates for the teaching profession and helps them work toward their teaching credentials.  

In any given year, the district employs a number of Project Pipeline students as interns, helping them broaden their teaching experience while they work towards credentials.  

But programs like Project Pipeline are handicapped by the declining numbers of students of color entering and graduating from top universities, Gomez said. 

“When affirmative action was taken away from the UC, you lost a really good group,” Gomez said. That group, Gomez said, could have been recruited into the teaching profession. 

According to Gomez, it is a vicious cycle. Students of color attend public schools with few teachers of color to act as role models, which contributes to the academic achievement gap, which keeps students of color from attending top colleges, which prevents the pool of qualified minority teachers from growing. 

Affirmative action, of course, was supposed to reverse cycles like this. But in absence of a political solution like affirmative action, it falls increasingly to school districts themselves. Districts now have to get involved in outreach and other efforts to prepare qualified minority teachers, Gomez said. 

In the past, one of the ways the district has done this is by having its teachers and principals recruit talented young people of color to volunteer at the various school sites as, “instructional assistants.” This approach allows the district to groom its own minority teachers. By mentoring talented individuals one by one the district can encourage them to work towards their teaching credentials.  

Gomez said he is applying for grants that would allow him to “formalize” and expand this program in the near future.  

Gomez said he also plans to visit college classrooms next year himself, helping to get the word out that the Berkeley Unified School District wants more teachers of color and is prepared to help interested students pursue a career in teaching.  

 


Calendar of Events & Activities

Monday June 04, 2001


Monday, June 4

 

“Boys Will Be Men” 

6:45 p.m. 

Longfellow Theater 

1500 Derby St. 

Special Father’s Day showing of the acclaimed documentary for Berkeley teen’s and their families. Introduced by Tom Weidlinger, followed by audience discussion. Free. 

849-2683 

www.berkeleypta.org 

 

Rent Stabilization Board  

Meeting 

7 p.m. 

2134 MLK Jr. Way 

Council Chambers, 2nd floor 

Among other items, the board will hear the appeal by both the tenants and the landlord of 2223 and 2227 Bonar Street of the decision of the hearing examiner. 

644-6128 

 


Tuesday, June 5

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion topic is open and will follow the conversation. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Bike for a Better City Action  

Meeting 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

1356 Rose St. 

www.bfbc.org 

 

Groundbreaking of ARTech  

Building 

9 a.m. 

ARTech Building 

2101 Milvia St. 

Computer Technologies Program celebrates the groundbreaking of its new offices in the ARTech building. 

 


Wednesday, June 6

 

Fishbowl: “Everything you  

always wanted to know about  

the opposite sex but were  

afraid to ask” 

7 p.m.. to 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Find out what the other half really thinks! The Fishbowl is an interesting way to anonymously ask those burning questions. $8 for BRJCC members, $10 for general public. 848-0237 x127. 

 

 

 

 

South Berkeley Community  

Action Team Advisory Group  

Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Over 60’s Clinic 

3260 Sacramento, 2nd Floor 

All South and West Berkeley residents invited to the regular meeting. Among other agenda items, the planning of upcoming Town Hall meeting. Refreshments provided. 

665-6809 

 

ASAP Open House 

5 - 8 p.m. 

2070 Allston Way, Suite 2 

Access to Software for All People is having its 6th annual open house and invites the public to welcome new Executive Director John Kittredge. Refreshments and presentations of ASAP Web Design and Data Management, as well as work by high school employees.  

540-7457 

 


Thursday, June 7

 

Berkeley Metaphysical  

Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

Berkeley Unified School  

District 

Appreciation Dinner 

6 p.m. 

Berkeley Alternative High School 

2701 MLK Jr. Way 

Berkeley Unified School District Office of State and Federal Projects honors District Title I/State Compensatory Education, English Learner Advisory Committee representatives, and departing school principals. 

644-6202 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly summer concert series. This week: Advanced Jazz Workshop under direction of Mike Zilber.. 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a community meeting.  

654-5486 

 

Skin Cancer Screening Clinic 

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center 

Summit Campus  

2450 Ashby Ave. 

Markstein Cancer Education Center 

Skin cancer screenings are offered only to people who, due to limited or no health insurance, would be able to have a suspicious mole or other skin changes examined. Appointments are required.


Letters to the Editor

Monday June 04, 2001

Oil triumvirate in the big white house 

Editor: 

“BRILLIANT” 

Absolutely brilliant. One word, not 200, is enough to describe Bush’s Long Range Energy Policy. We must thank The Almighty God, the God of Texas, Israel and Taiwan and the Whole Warmed World for putting these three great geniuses Bush, Cheney and Powell in the big white house. A new millennium of bliss and abundance is upon us, the word “conservation” forever banned from the vocabulary. I think we should repaint the white temple in gold, the soft golden hue of oil. 

Jan H. Visser 

Berkeley 

 

Davis’ plea for help is a bad sign 

Editor: 

Governor Gray Davis’ recent plea for a quick Presidential energy fix in the form of price caps is an ominous sign that he has given up on his own solutions. 

Apparently Governor Davis has completely run out of ideas on how to fix the energy crisis he ignored for two years until it was too late, and his begging for price caps comes in the face of bipartisan opposition to such a short-sighted solution. 

The fact is that last December, Davis’ energy advisors at the ISO asked the FERC to remove price caps because they were constricting supply and threatening blackouts. Even President Clinton’s FERC chairperson opposed price caps because they can lead to blackouts. 

What’s worse, now Governor Davis has hired paid political attack dogs on the state payroll to point fingers at Washington. If the Governor’s only solution is to blame Washington for his own problems, then he ought to consider forfeiting his paycheck because he will have completely abdicated his responsibility to provide Californians with solutions. 

Here are some unsolicited suggestions. Let’s make California an energy-independent state by 2004. Let’s invest in our own home-grown energy sources and use energy more efficiently. Let’s ensure we have healthy utilities and that our state isn’t burdened for decades by high energy costs. 

The bottom line? Davis should take off his price cap and put on his thinking cap. That’s the only way we’re going to weather this crisis. 

Assemblyman Dave Cox 

California Assembly Republican Leader  

 

Berkeley should look into Brown’s program 

Editor: 

In Oakland, Mayor Brown has proposed a program for renewable energy in which the city will waive fees and expedite plans for residents who want to install solar panels. 

Berkeley should do likewise. 

Phil McArdle 

Berkeley 

 

It will be hard to find someone to punish for power crisis 

Editor: 

Some of us are pondering how to properly punish the pusillanimous politicians who have perpetrated the present power crisis by passing the deregulation proposal a few years ago. 

Normally, we can turn the responsible rascals out and put the other set of rascals into office for a while. But there are some problems with this. 

For one thing, none of the legislators who produced this monstrosity will personally be up for re-election. Whether because of term limits or for other reasons, all of these rascals, having kicked their constituents in the teeth, have sensibly decided that now would be a good time for a career change. 

For another thing, deregulation was not only a bi-partisan project; the vote was unanimous. No legislator in either party or in either house voted against it. 

However, people are not elected to the state legislature as individuals, but as part of a political party whose program they are pledged to implement. 

Since both major parties are responsible for the current looting of virtually the entire state, it seems only fair that we should vote against all the candidates of both these blatantly pro-business parties. 

But since we can only vote against something by voting for something else, we need to have a party with a clean record on de-regulation on the ballot. 

The Peace and Freedom Party has nearly enough voters registered in its name to regain the ballot status it had formerly. Registrars are reporting that large numbers of voters are abandoning the old, discredited parties and registering independent. But a “declines to state” puts no alternative on the ballot. 

At this point, the most constructive step we can take towards resolving the power crisis may be to switch our registrations to Peace and Freedom. 

Marion Syrek 

Oakland


Cal crew claims 3rd straight IRA title

Daily Planet Wire Services
Monday June 04, 2001

The No. 1 ranked Cal men’s varsity eight won its third-consecutive IRA National Championship in Cherry Hill, NJ, on Saturday. Cal raced from the front all the way down the 2000-meter Cooper River racecourse to cross the line in 5 minutes and 34 seconds – three seconds faster than runner-up Princeton. The Bears capped another undefeated and secured Steve Gladstone a ninth IRA Championship. Cal’s JV eight and varsity four won IRA titles of their own and the freshman eight took bronze. It was the Bears 12th varsity IRA title moving Cal into a tie with Navy at No. 2 on the all-time list.  

“I’m very, very happy,” Gladstone said. “All our crews performed well. They rowed precise and courageous races. It was a great race by the varsity.”  

In the varsity challenge cup, Princeton had a better start and a slight advantage. By the time the Bears reached 400 meters, they were working on a half-length advantage. Cal had a length on third-place Washington at 800 and Princeton was dropping off Cal’s pace. By the 1000, Cal had a length on both the Tigers and Huskies and were readying themselves for the sprint to the finish. In the end, Cal took gold, Princeton silver and UW Bronze. Cornell Brown and Northeastern rounded out the field.  

“Before the race we decided that we were going to go for it at the 1200,” said coxswain Michael Vallarelli. “We had a solid start and gradually settled in to race pace which was a bit higher than usual. With 800 meters to go we sat up and drove to the line.”  

“That was it,” said junior Scott Frandsen. “That was flat out for 2000 meters.”  

The Cal varsity four also emerged from the IRA with a National Championship. The Bears led form start to finish laying down a blistering first thousand to lead by open water at the midpoint of the race. Completely spent heading into the final 400 meters, the Bears held off Wisconsin and Cornell to claim gold, Georgia Tech, Minnesota and Princeton rounded out the top six.  

It was a special day for senior and team captain Luke Walton. Walton with the help of his teammates, completed a perfect collegiate racing career – a feat never before accomplished by a four-year oarsman at Cal and believed to be an accomplishment he shares with only a handful of men (none of whom could be identified) in the history of the sport. Walton’s crews have recorded victories over 200 crews in 35 starts at 23 regattas. He has a frosh and three varsity IRA gold medals.  

“We work real hard at Cal and I’ve been fortunate to be a part of this program,” said Walton. “The thing is that it is not about individuals here. We are a team. While my record is the culmination of a personal goal, it was the team that set the record. I just want people to realize that.”


Not so scary clown

Jon Mays/Daily Planet
Monday June 04, 2001

Muralist Juana Alicia paints a “scary clown” face on Mike Pratt, 5, at a Rosa Parks School ice cream social yesterday afternoon. Alicia, a parent of a Rosa Parks student, is a  

professional artist and recently unveiled a mural titled “Sanctuary,” a collaboration with her husband Emmanual Montoya, at San Francisco International Airport.


St. Mary’s boys finish third at state meet

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Monday June 04, 2001

Guy finishes 3rd in hurdles race, relays falter; Warren, Duffy both win medals 

 

Heading into the CIF State Championship Track & Field Meet on Saturday, St. Mary’s head coach Jay Lawson said everything would have to go perfectly for the his boys to take home a state team championship. With entries in just four final events, the Panthers didn’t have much room for error. 

Well, things didn’t go perfectly, and Lawson’s squad ended up in a tie with Cleveland for third place with 18 points despite some heroic performances in the day’s final race. The Panthers finished fourth in both relays, and the school’s two triple jumpers both had foul trouble and finished lower than expected. Arroyo Grande took first placewith 28 points, and Granite Hills second with 25. 

The bright spot on the day for the boys was Halihl Guy’s third-place finish in the 300-meter low hurdles, coming in at a school-recond and personal-best 36.26 seconds. Both of the runners who beat Guy, Granite Hills’ Jeff Hunter and J.W. North’s Jeff Garrison, ran times that were in the top five performances in the nation this season. 

“I wanted to get first, but I was going up against some elite athletes,” said Guy, who will likely sign with Washington State this week. “I just ran my best. There was nothing else I could do.” 

Lawson said he needed to get points from both of his triple jumpers, Asokah Muhammed and Solomon Welch, if the Panthers were to have a chance for the team title. But both jumpers had foul trouble, with Muhammed getting off just three legal jumps and just one from Welch. Muhammed ended up fourth with his best effort of 47-09.25, and Welch finished last among the nine finalists with a jump of 45-08.50, which effectively ended any title hopes. 

The St. Mary’s relay team was also a bit of a disappointment, finishing fourth in both the 4x100 and 4x400, but the trouble in those races was an injury to one of the team’s stars. Chris Dunbar pulled his hamstring four weeks ago, and clearly wasn’t 100 percent on Saturday. He gamely went out and ran in both relay races, but his sprints were clearly slow, especially in the 4x400. Running the opening leg, he fell behind the other teams and handed off after 51 seconds, nearly three full seconds slower than his usual 400-meter time. Although Guy, Courtney Brown and Muhammed all ran very fast times, they weren’t able to make up more than three places, finishing in 3:18.27 with Muhammed just beating Santa Margarita to the finish line. 

“We would have won if I was healthy, there’s no doubt in my mind,” Dunbar said after the final race. “My teammates all showed up and I didn’t, that’s all there is to it.” 

But that’s not how his teammates saw it. They each praised Dunbar for even attempting to race on Saturday when it was obvious that he was hurting. 

“Chris poured all his heart into the relays today,” Guy said. “It made me want to run even faster, seeing him giving us everything he had today.” 

Despite duplicating last season’s third-place finish at the state meet, the Panthers clearly considered Saturday a disappointment. But Lawson pointed out that a Division IV school finishing third in the state is still very impressive. 

“Today was like a roller-coaster ride. We came in with such high expectations, we have to remember that we did very well, and represented our school very well,” he said. “A little school just finished third up here with the big boys.” 

Two St. Mary’s girls also finished the season with medal-winning performances. Kamaiya Warren finished third in the shot put with a throw of 44-03.50, and Bridget Duffy came in fourth in the 1,600-meter in 4:56.98. The future looks bright for both juniors, as Duffy was beaten by three seniors and Warren one. 

“It’s nice to know that I can come back next year and not have those girls out there,” Duffy said of her older competition. “I was looking to medal, and I did, but it’s hard knowing those girls are a bunch faster.” 

Warren said she plans to train harder than ever this summer to have a strong senior year. 

“This is going to be a serious summer for me. I’m going to work really hard,” she said. “I want to come out and win both the shot put and discus next year.”


University Avenue 71-unit housing project approved

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Monday June 04, 2001

The Zoning Adjustments Board approved a use permit for a proposed development of 71 residential units and 7,200 square feet of commercial space at 1392 University Ave. at Acton Street late last week. 

About 30 residents, most opposing the project, crammed into a second floor conference room at 2120 Milvia St. last Thursday to attend a public hearing on the project, according to neighborhood activist Howie Muir. 

The City Council gave the land, which was owned by the state, to the developers, for-profit Panoramic Interests and the nonprofit Jubilee Restoration at a May 25, 1999 council meeting in exchange for a minimum of 20 affordable housing units.  

The council chose Panoramic Interests and Jubilee Restoration over the nonprofit Affordable Housing Associates despite the fact that Panoramic was proposing a much larger development than what zoning policy allows.  

The AHA proposal not only fit within zoning guidelines but was recommended by the Housing Advisory Commission. 

The council gave the project to Panoramic and Jubilee by a vote of 6-3 with Vice Mayor Maudelle Shirek and Councilmembers Dona Spring and Linda Maio voting no. 

Councilmember Dona Spring said the council chose Panoramic and Jubilee because the president, Patrick Kennedy, has an undue amount of influence over the majority of the councilmembers. 

“Patrick Kennedy is an expert at getting councilmembers indebted to him,” she said. “He finds their needs and desires and does everything he can to capitalize on them.” 

Kennedy is the developer of the downtown Gaia Building and will soon start development of a controversial four-story project at 2700 San Pablo Ave. 

Muir said after the ZAB members listened to public comment, most of which decried the size of the development, board member David Blake said the ZAB could do little to alter the size of the development because of a resolution the City Council adopted at the same time it awarded the property to Kennedy. 

According to that resolution, the project will include 15, 2-bedroom units for tenants who earn 50 percent of the area median, which for a family of three is $30,400 a year. The other five units will be set aside for earning 80 percent of the area income, which for a family of three is $48,640. 

“We gave the developers that land and I just hope were getting our money’s worth of affordable housing out of the deal,” Spring said. 

The property was appraised at $1.5 million in 1999. 

Spring said she would like to see Kennedy do the right thing and add at least another 15 units of affordable housing to the project. 

“If he rents those units out to Section 8 tenants, he’ll be getting market, or close to market, rents,” She said. “And there are so many Section 8 families in Berkeley who can’t use their vouchers because there are so few available units.”


Little public input on disabled access plan

Staff
Monday June 04, 2001

By Matthew Lorenz 

Special to the Daily Planet 

 

Berkeley’s Commission on Disability met Saturday at North Berkeley Senior Center to ask residents what type of improvements they would like for disabled access.  

In particular, commissioners wanted to know if there a particular building, street corner or park in Berkeley that is inaccessible and if there are places a ramp could be erected or a curb cut. 

But abysmal public turnout cut the meeting short. Commissioners are hoping that a meeting scheduled for mid-month will be better attended. Commissioner Karen Craig is also pushing for more public notice before the next meeting.  

“We don’t know how many people would have shown up. I myself this week talked to some people who had no idea that this meeting was going on, and had other plans and therefore couldn’t come,” Craig said. “If you make the meeting an open forum, not only about the transition plan, [more people may come]. We need people’s input.” 

The commissioners are writing the city’s Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan, which seeks to remove barriers that prevent people with disabilities from full enjoyment of city programs. They are holding a pair of public hearings so the public can voice specific needs and general concerns relating to the plan.  

But Saturday’s public hearing was cut short by commissioners when two residents complained that word of the hearing had not reached far enough.  

Ray Dobard was the first to speak in the public comment period. 

“Today is a public hearing and workshop concerning disability related discrimination barriers and to promote accessibility of the cities facilities, however, [I think] this alleged public hearing has not been sufficiently and adequately promoted,” Dobard said.  

Dobard did, however, commend the underlying concerns that led to the hearing. 

“It is an appropriate time to have this commission to ensure that [myself] and all other disabled persons’ viewpoints be heard and considered in a fair and impartial manner,” he said. 

Jim Donelson heard about the meeting only by accident. 

“I also agree with [Dobard’s comment about] lack of communication. I know there’s a whole lot of people who would like to be at this meeting, but I didn’t even know this commission existed until [yesterday],” he said. “Now I don’t know how to get the word out or what you all have been doing, but I would be more than happy to help you get the word out — that this commission does exist, that they have meetings and that people should and will come and participate in the meetings.” 

Eric Dibner, the city disability services specialist who works with the commission, explained that the meeting was advertised through press releases, on the city’s website and through mailings. 

Craig agreed with both Dobard and Donelson. 

“Considering that I want to hear more from Jim [Donelson] and I want to hear more from the public, I feel that more advertising needs to be done — paid advertising and real outreach if we want to hear the public,” she said. “I’m embarrassed. We have already, as a commission, talked about this and listened to this. This was supposed to be for the public.” 

Dibner indicated the kinds of things that meeting will help to decide, and which the public will hopefully contribute. 

“The transition plan is the city’s obligation to describe where barriers in buildings will be removed,” Dibner said. “We need to hear from people who are facing barriers in their interactions with the city, so that we know what the important barriers are for the community.” 

Commissioners adjourned the meeting two hours early. The second public hearing will take place on Wednesday, June 13 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. 

 

To subscribe to the disability services mailing list send an e-mail to edibner@ci.berkeley.ca.us with the subject “Mailing List.”


BUSD reacts to alleged racial slur

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Saturday June 02, 2001

A number of African-American students at Willard Middle School walked out of a classroom in protest Wednesday after a teacher allegedly used a racial slur, according to sources at the school. 

Willard administrators declined to comment on the alleged incident Friday. 

Berkeley Associate Superintendent of Administrative Services David Gomez said Friday that he was “aware of the allegations” and had taken “appropriate” action. 

The teacher has been suspended from work pending an investigation into possible misconduct, Gomez said. 

“Our policy is, as soon as we get a complaint against any of our teachers we separate the teacher from the situation so the district can do an investigation,” Gomez said.  

After students accused the teacher of referring to two students as “niggers” Wednesday, Willard Principal Gail Hojo quickly removed the teacher from the classroom, said Lee Berry, a parent volunteer at the school.  

But Berry said he was dismayed to find the teacher back on campus Thursday. 

“I got so angry my eyes about popped out of my head,” said Berry, an African American. 

By Friday, Berry said he was relieved to see the district had taken action. 

“What she did was wrong,” Berry said of the teacher’s alleged slur.  

But he added: “After getting over my anger and reading statements from about six different kids and reading a statement from (the teacher), I really don’t think she meant anything malicious by it.” 

If the teacher did in fact used a racial slur, then the district is warranted in suspending her from work, Willard PTA President Joanie Hamasaki said Friday. 

“Berkeley is a diverse city. Every diverse group in Berkeley should be respected,” Hamasaki said. “A teacher should be there to be a friend and mentor (to students).”


Calendar of Events & Activities

Saturday June 02, 2001


Saturday, June 2

 

Car Seat Safety Clinic 

10:00 a.m. 

Kittredge St. Parking Garage, second level 

The Berkeley Police Department will demonstrate proper techniques for car seat installation and use, and offer safety checks and tips. Families are welcome to visit the Habitot Children’s Museum located across the street from the garage. Free. 

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, a non-profit sailing and windsurfing cooperative, gives free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 548-3333 

 

Family Storytime  

10:30 a.m.  

Berkeley Main Library  

2121 Allston Way  

Storyteller Olga Loya tells tales from around the world. Geared for children three to eight and their parents. Free 649-3964 

 

Commission On Disability  

Hearings 

1 - 4 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst St. 

Open forum, opportunity for public to present ideas and concerns about barriers for people with disabilities and accessibility of City facilities. Public comment on Berkeley’s proposed “Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan.” Will continue on June 13. 

981-6342 

 

Longfellow Middle School’s  

Outdoor Arts Festival 

Noon - 4 p.m. 

Longfellow Courtyard 

1500 Derby St. 

Live music performances, silent auction of student and community art, BBQ and bake sale. Talent showcase and awards ceremony from 2 - 3 p.m. Free admission, open to the public. 665-1980 

 

Birdwatching Walk  

and Breakfast 

8 a.m. 

Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

This is the time of year when the greatest variety of birds can be found in the Garden, including some rare species. Join Chris Carmichael and Dennis Wolff for breakfast and a walk. $25, limited space, call to reserve. 

643-2755 

 

Berkeley Historical Society  

Walking Tour 

10 a.m. - noon 

Thousand Oaks Elementary School 

Tour of Thousand Oaks School and neighborhood. $5 - $10, reservations required. 848-0181  

Junior Solar Sprint Challenge 

10 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Lawrence Hall of Science 

UC Berkeley 

Kids will race and display their solar-powered model cars. 

642-5132 

 

Public Workshop on Oxford St. Parking Lot 

10 a.m. - Noon 

Lee Frank Building 

2200 Shattuck Ave. 

The City of Berkeley Planning Commission Subcommittee is holding a workshop to discuss the proposed uses and design for the Oxford Street parking lot. 

981-5400 


Sunday, June 3

 

Rosa Parks Spring  

Celebration and Fund-raiser 

Noon - 4 p.m. 

Rosa Parks 

920 Allston Way 

Silent auction, quilt raffle, cake walk and field events. 644-8812 

 

Music and Meditation 

8 - 9 p.m. 

The Heart-Road Traveller 

1828 Euclid Ave. 

Group meditation though instrumental music and devotional songs. Led by Lucian Balmer and Baoul Scavullo. Free. 496-3468 

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club,gives free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Hands-on Bicycle  

Repair Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn how to adjust front and rear derailleurs from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free 527-4140 

 

Healing Through  

Tibetan Yoga 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Slow movements of Kum Nye encourage self-healing and deeper spiritual dimensions in experience. Demonstrated and discussed by Jack van der Meulen. Free and open to the public. 843-6812 

Family Day at Magnes  

Museum 

12:30 - 3 p.m. 

2911 Russell St. 

A celebration of cultural heritage, the day is co-sponsored by the San Francisco African American Historical and Cultural Society. Free admission.www.magnesmuseum.org 

 

Dedication of TROTH 

2 - 4:30 p.m. 

Northside Community Art Garden 

On Northside St. 1 block N. of Hopkins 

TROTH, a special earth wall toolshed and product of nearly 3 years of volunteer labor, will be dedicated today. Potluck meal and words from gardeners, City representatives and BART. 

841-3757 

— compiled by  

Sabrina Forkish 

 

 

 

China Forum 

2 p.m. 

Moffitt Building 101 

UC Berkeley 

Wu JiaXiang, social/political critic and writer, talks about the Tiananmen paper and the June 4 massacre. Free. 

 


Monday, June 4

 

“Boys Will Be Men” 

6:45 p.m. 

Longfellow Theater 

1500 Derby St. 

Special Father’s Day showing of the acclaimed documentary for Berkeley teen’s and their families. Introduced by Tom Weidlinger, followed by audience discussion. Free. 

849-2683 

www.berkeleypta.org 

 

Rent Stabilization Board Meeting 

7 p.m. 

2134 MLK Jr. Way 

Council Chambers, 2nd floor 

Among other items, the board will hear the appeal by both the tenants and the landlord of 2223 and 2227 Bonar Street of the decision of the hearing examiner. 

644-6128 

 


Tuesday, June 5

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion topic is open and will follow the conversation. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Bike for a Better City Action Meeting 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

1356 Rose St. 

www.bfbc.org 

 


Wednesday, June 6

 

Fishbowl: “Everything you always wanted to know about the opposite sex but were afraid to ask” 

7 p.m.. to 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Find out what the other half really thinks! The Fishbowl is an interesting way to anonymously ask those burning questions. $8 for BRJCC members, $10 for general public. 848-0237 x127. 

 

South Berkeley Community Action Team  

Advisory Group Meeting 

7 p.m. 

Over 60’s Clinic 

3260 Sacramento, 2nd Floor 

All South and West Berkeley residents invited to the regular meeting. Among other agenda items, the planning of upcoming Town Hall meeting. Refreshments provided. 

665-6809 


Letters to the Editor

Saturday June 02, 2001

Corp yard still noisy, polluting 

 

Editor: 

Almost a decade has elapsed since a small group of West Berkeley residents living around the city’s Corporation Yard came together to protest the impacts of the vehicle maintenance facility on the community. This public outcry was directed towards the maintenance facility’s traffic, fueling station, and the almost complete absence of any environmental protections.  

Topping the list of community concerns were issues of air quality, chemicals and hazardous waste storage, and storm water pollution controls. Public Works argued that management was actually environmentally pro-active and blamed the  

operational impacts on the rundown eighty-year old facility. However, local residents found out firsthand that the facility’s age was just part of the problem.  

In April 1992, while on a tour of the facility, the community witnessed a street sweeper illegally dumping the liquid portion of its street collection into the Yard’s storm drain, a clear violation of the Clean Water Act. This public incident, though quite embarrassing for city staff, reinforced the neighborhood’s contention that the time had come for changes in both the facility and its municipal maintenance activities.  

Over the next several years, Public Works met regularly with the neighbors to address the operations of the vehicle facility. However, few changes actually occurred. Residents should have realized early on in the community process that the Yard meetings were being used to silence public discussion.  

Neighborhood involvement was reduced to little more than a series of public relations meetings while Public Works waited politely for residents to talk themselves out and go away. And so they did, but the environmental compliance problems remained. 

The 1992 sweeper dumping incident also revealed to the community that such Corporation Yard activities require a Federal discharge permit. Moreover, Berkeley was, and is, a member of Alameda County’s storm water program. One of the program’s central components is that of municipal maintenance activities and best management practices for environmental protection. The county program responded by both reprimanding Berkeley and encouraging the city to move forward in modernizing its maintenance operations. The choice, since that time, has been Berkeley’s.  

Unfortunately, the city’s choice, like other county storm water members, has been to view this area of capital improvement as a very low priority. This has only reinforced public criticism that the county’s storm water program amounts to little more than revenue enhancement for the city. 

Two weeks ago, the Corporation Yard was cited for polluting the storm drains in the Yard. The Notice of Violation made public the fact that there had been prior notices for corrective actions dating as far back as 1995. The citation, written on a rainy day, was linked directly to the antiquated and inadequate protection and containment of sand, asphalt, hazardous wastes, equipment and contaminated soils on site. It should be noted that the Yard’s EBMUD discharge permit is currently out of compliance for this same reason. From a management perspective, this long-term Public Works failure to comply with environmental regulations is outrageous.  

Last November, Berkeley’s Public Works celebrated being the first city in the state to receive an accreditation for excellence by the Public Works Association. It’s not surprising that the accreditation team, as it toured the Corp Yard, apparently overlooked these obvious shortcomings. It should be remembered that environmental protection is a relatively new mandate for Public Works activities here and across the nation. The time has come to fully capitalize an upgrade of Corp Yard activities and storage areas. Let’s do it right. Being responsive to environmental protection and compliance requires real commitment and cash. It’s really not an option. Today, it’s the law! 

 

L A Wood 

Berkeley 

 

Don’t build parking under Civic Center 

Editor: 

Mayor Dean’s proposal to put underground parking beneath Civic Center Park at Martin Luther King Jr. Way is a bad idea that will increase congestion, waste taxpayer money and damage the environment. Claiming the scarcity of downtown parking justifies the proposal, the mayor implies that those opposing the idea are acting punitively toward drivers. Although I drive and would welcome additional parking I oppose the mayor’s proposal. During construction the project will decrease the availability of parking, increase traffic congestion, disrupt the Farmers Market, destroy trees, reduce access to the park, increase noise levels, and pollute the air with diesel exhaust and particulate matter.  

Construction is the problem, not the solution. Excessive downtown construction has eliminated dozens of parking spaces. Parking and access to several businesses, are suffering as a result the library retrofit and Gaia project. When completed new construction seems to shrink available parking. This was the the case when the mayor and City Council voted to spend a quarter million dollars on downtown “improvements,” that destroyed dozens of trees and added concrete “bulbs”, which eliminated parking spots on University Avenue. 

While an underground garage would add some parking to the downtown area we need to ask at what price. How much would it cost taxpayers? How many trees would be destroyed? What impact would it have on the Farmers Market? What effects would trucks, bulldozers, cranes, jack hammers and tons of building materials have on noise levels and the environment? What effect would the garage have on the park above? Trees, plants and grass that are sustained through contact with the earth would instead be planted atop a concrete structure that would permeate the soil with fumes from auto exhaust. How would this pollution affect the health of young children that play in the park? What type of vision is this for a park that sits aside a Farmers Market, and is the annual staging area for Earth Day festivities and dozens of other celebrations?  

The solution to scarce parking is not to hide the problem underground. In the immediate future a moratorium on excessive downtown construction would preserve precious parking space. Construction blocks visibility and access, causing retail stores and restaurants to loose business. Berkeley should create a system of frequent shuttle busses to major shopping areas. The City Council should work with BART and AC transit to give proof of mass transit travel, and encourage merchants to provide private incentives to people who bicycle or utilize mass transit. Dedicate one street for the exclusive use by bicycles. 

Long term solutions such as the creation of a City-wide AC transit pass are an excellent idea. But the Council must wake up to the reality that AC transit provides deplorable service. Simply stated, if buses ran frequently and served commuters well, fewer people would be using automobiles.  

The Council should also place a bond measure on the ballot to build a comprehensive Berkeley-wide light rail system. By raising funds to go it alone Berkeley may prod AC transit into acting on the long talked about plans to create a regional light rail system.  

For too long drivers in this City have been pawns in a political game that reduces the availability of parking. Those who favor development use driver frustration to gain support to create parking facilities.  

Those who oppose automobiles think punishing drivers by reducing parking will force them to abandon their cars.  

Both approaches have failed miserably. Long term planning that reduces the need for automobiles, rather then quick fixes like building more parking, or punishing drivers by making it difficult to park, is what’s needed to reduce automobile traffic in the City of Berkeley.  

 

 

Elliot Cohen 

Berkeley


Arts & Entertainment

Staff
Saturday June 02, 2001

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery.” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon” A suspended skeleton of a flying reptile with a wingspan of 22-23 feet. The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 2: El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast; June 8: The Enemies, Pitch Black, The Fleshies, Supersift, Texas Thieves; June 9: Groovie Ghoulies, The Influents, Red Planet, Mallrats, Goat Shanty. 525-9926  

 

Albatross Pub Music at 9 p.m unless noted otherwise. June 6: Whiskey Brothers; June 7: Keni “El Lebrijano” Flamenco guitar; June 9, 6 - 8 p.m.: Sauce Piquante, 9 p.m. - Midnight: Whiskey Brothers; June 12: Mad and Eddie Duran. 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473  

 

Anna’s Music June 2: Robin Gregory and Bliss Rodriguez, 10 p.m.: The Ducksan Distone; June 3: Danubius; June 4: The Renegade Sidemen; June 5: Open Mike; June 6: Bob Schoen with Cheryl McBride; June 7: Irrationals; June 8: Anna and Susie Laraine and Sallie Hanna-Rhine, 10 p.m.: Bluesman Hideo Date; June 9: Robin Gregory and Bliss Rodriguez, 10 p.m.: The Ducksan Distone; June 10: Choro Time with Ron Galen and Friends. $2 weeknights, $3 weekends. 1801 University Ave. 849-ANNA  

 

Ashkenaz June 2, 9:30 p.m.: Zydeco Flames; June 3, 3 - 6 p.m. Brassworks, 7 p.m The Wavy Gravy Camp Winnarainbow Benefit Boogie, with music by the Flying Other Brothers, Pete Sears of Jefferson Airplane, Greg Anton and David Gans; June 5, 8 p.m.: Berkeley High Ki-Swahili Club Trip to Africa benefit, hip-hop/reggae dance party; June 6, 9 p.m.: Aux Cajunals; June 7, 10 p.m.: Dead DJ Nite with Digital Dave; June 8, 9:30 p.m. Ali Khan with Bellydance Troupe Lunatique; June 9, 9:30 p.m.: Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers; June 10, 7 p.m.: Food Not Bombs with Goodbye Flowers and INKA. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 2: Rebecca Riots; June 3: Hurricane Sam; June 6: Freight 33rd Anniversary concert series with Leni Stern, Jenna Mammina, Jill Cohn, Pig Iron. June :7 Alice Stuart, Folk blues, $17.50; June 8: Cats & Jammers Hot swing. $17.50; , June 9.: Danny Heines & Michael Manring; June 10: Roy Tyler and New Directions; June 12: Keith Little with Del Williams; June 13: Danu. $17.50.1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

La Peña Cultural Center “Cantiflas!” June 7 and June 8, 8 p.m. Herbert Siguenza, of the critically acclaimed trio Culture Clash, stars in this bilingual work-in-progress about legendary Mexican comedian Marion Moreno. $16. 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. 849-2568 www.lapena.org  

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 2: Avi Bortnick Group; June 5, Alias Smith; June 6, Lithium House; June 7, Beatdown with DJs Delon, Yamu, Add1; June 8, Harvey Wainapel Quartet; June 9, Om Trio; June 12, Ben Graves Trio 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

The Berkeley TEMPO Festival of Contemporary Performances All performances begin at 8 p.m. June 2: Roscoe Mitchell with George Lewis, David Wessel and Thomas Buckner; June 5: Music of Edmund Campion with dancers; June 6: Shafqat Ali Khan, Pakistani Khyal vocals with David Wessel and Matthew Wright; June 8: Berkeley Contemporary Chamber Players; June 9: John Scott, John Abercrombie, George Marsh, Rich Fudoli, Mel Graves. $15 Hertz Hall, UC Berkeley Campus www.tempofestival.org 

 

Empyrean Ensemble June 2, 8 p.m. Final concert of the season, featuring soprano Susan Narucki in the world premiere of Mario Davidovsky’s “Cantiones Sine Textu,” as well as works by other composers. 7 p.m. panel discussion with the composers. $14 - $18 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave 925-798-1300  

 

Berkeley High Jazz Combo June 3, 4:30 p.m. $6 - $12. Jazzschool/La Note 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 

 

Schubert Festival June 3, 4 p.m. Mini-Schubert Festival as part of the Sundays at Four Chamber Music series. Will feature Schubert’s Trout Quintet, String Trio, and more. $10 Crowden School 1475 Rose St. 559-6910 www.thecrowdenschool.org 

 

The Farallone String Quartet June 10, 7:30 p.m. Quartets by Haydn. $8 - $10 Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 

 

World Harmony Chorus June 10, 2 p.m. Vocal music from around the world. $5 - $10 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave. 925-798-1300 

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

Dance 

 

Sungugal Ballet June 10, 4:30 p.m. Featuring master percussionist Djibi Faye and West African Band with traditional West African dance. $6 - $12. Jazzschool/La Note 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 

 

Theater 

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere Through June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“Cymbeline” June 2 through June 24, Tues. - Thur. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Sun. 4 p.m. Opening of the California Shakespeare Festival features one of Shakespeare’s first romances, directed by Daniel Fish. $12 - $146. Bruns Memorial Amphitheater off Highway 24 at the Shakespeare Festival Way/Gateway Exit. 548-9666 or www.calshakes.org 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shaper’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

“A Life In the Theatre” Previews June 8, 9, 10, 13. Opens June 14, runs through July 15. Wed. - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. David Mamet play about the lives of two actors, considered a metaphor for life itself. Directed by Nancy Carlin. $30-$35. $26 preview nights. Berkeley City Club 2315 Durant 843-4822 

 

 

Films 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 2, 7:00: A River Called Trash; June 3, 5:30: Ruslan and Ludmila; June 5, 7:30: From the East; June 6, 7:30: Prank and Parody; June 7, 7:00: Viy; June 8, 7:30: Aerograd; June 8, 9:15: The Letter That Was Never Sent; June 9, 7:30: Comic and Avant-Garde Shorts; June 10, 5:30: Pitfall, 7:25: Woman In the Dunes. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“The Producers” June 10. Revisit this outrageous comedy classic, starring Zero Mostel and written by Mel Brooks. $2 Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237. 

 

Nomad Videofilm Festival 2001 June 1, 10:40 p.m. Featuring world premieres from four S.F. Bay Area mediamakers: “Roadkill” by Antero Alli, “Forest” by Farhad J. Parsa “Visit” by Jesse Miller, B, “Fell Apart” by Doan La Fine Arts Cinema, 2541 Shattuck Ave. $7 (510) 848-1143/464-4640, pix & details: http://www.verticalpool.com/nomad.html 

 

“TRAGOS: A Cyber-Noir Witch Hunt” an Antero Alli film June 2, 10:40pm Fine Arts Cinema, 2541 Shattuck Ave. $7 (510) 848-1143/464-4640, pix & details: http://www.verticalpool.com/tragos.html 

 

Exhibits 

 

“Elements of Art” June 2, 4 - 6 p.m. Youth Arts Studio, an art show and reception exhibiting the work of 15 Berkeley Middle School Fine Art Students. Free. All Souls Episcopal Church 2220 Cedar St. 848-1755 

 

“Elemental” The art of Linda Mieko Allen Through June 9, Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Traywick Gallery 1316 Tenth St. 527-1214 www.traywick.com 

 

East Bay Open Studios June 9 & 10, 16 & 17, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Jennifer Foxly: Oil paintings and 2-d mixed media works 3206 Boise St.; Lewis Suzuki: Scenes from California to the Philippines, florals to nudes 2240 Grant St.; Guy Colwell: Painted replicas and recent original work 2028 9th St. (open until 7 p.m.) 

 

Wosene Kosrof June 13, 7 - 8:30 p.m. Ethiopian-born Berkeley resident will be exhibiting and discussing his paintings. One piece will be up for auction, proceeds to benefit the YMCA. Free. Crystal Room, Shattuck Hotel 2086 Allston 848-9622 ext. 3541  

 

PASSING: The Re-Definition of Sex and Gender Through the Personal Re-Presentation of Self Through June 16, Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Black and white photographs by Ann P. Meredith. Free. Reception with the artist June 7, 6 - 8 p.m. Photolab Gallery 2235 Fifth St.  

 

Ledger drawings of Michael and Sandra Horse Exhibit runs through June 18. Gathering Tribes Gallery 1573 Solano Ave. 528-9038 www.gatheringtribes.com  

 

“Alive in Her: Icons of the Goddess” Through June 19, Tuesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Photography, collage, and paintings by Joan Beth Clair. Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave. 848-0528 

 

Tyler James Hoare Sculpture and Collage Through June 27, call for hours. Party June 9, 5-9 p.m. with music by Sauce Piquante. The Albatross Pub 1822 San Pablo Ave. 843-2473 

 

Ako Castuera, Ryohei Tanaka, Rob Sato June 5 - June 30, Tues. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Group exhibition, recent paintings. Artist’s reception June 9, 6:30 - 9 p.m. with music by Knewman and Espia. !hey! Gallery 4920 B Telegraph Ave., Oakland 428-2349  

 

“Watershed 2001” Through July 14, Wednesday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Exhibition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation that explore images and issues about our watershed. Berkeley Art Center 1275 Walnut St. 644-6893 

 

Bernard Maisner: Illuminated Manuscripts and Paintings. Through Aug. 8 Maisner works in miniature as well as in large scales, combining his mastery of medieval illumination, gold leafing, and modern painting techniques. Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 849-2541 

 

“Musee des Hommages,” Masterworks by Guy Colwell Faithful copies of several artists from the pasts, including Titian’s “The Venus of Urbino,” Cezanne’s “Still Life,” Picasso’s “Woman at a Mirror,” and Boticelli’s “Primavera” Ongoing. Call ahead for hours 2028 Ninth St. (at Addison) 841-4210 or visit www.atelier9.com 

 

“Geographies of My Heart” Collage paintings by Jennifer Colby through August 24; Flora Lamson Hewlett Library 2400 Ridge Rd. 649-2541 

 

Images of Portugal Paintings by Sofia Berto Villas-Boas of her native land. Open after 5 p.m. Voulez-Vous 2930 College Ave. (at Elmwood) 

 

“Queens of Ethipoia: Intuitive Inspirations,” the exceptional art of Esete-Miriam A. Menkir. Through July 11. Reception with the artist on June 2, 1 - 3 p.m. Women’s Cancer Resource Center Gallery 3023 Shattuck Ave. 548-9286 ext 307 

 

“The Decade of Change: 1900 - 1910”chronicles the transformation of the city of Berkeley in this 10 year period. Thursday through Saturday, 1 - 4 p.m. Berkeley History Center, Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center St. Wheelchair accessible. 848-0181. Free.  

 

Readings 

 

Cody’s Books 2454 Telegraph Ave. All events at 7:30 p.m. June 3: Sheldon Greene reads from “Burnt Umber”; June 4: Alan Rinzler facilitates last part of a writer’s workshop with “GET THAT MANUSCRIPT OFF THE SHELF!”; June 5: Timothy Ferris will read from “Life Beyond Earth”; June 6: Ralph Dranow and Carla Kandinsky read poetry; June 7: Dr. Amit Goswami talks about “The Visionary Window: A Quantum Physicist’s Guide to Enlightenment”; June 8: Scott Carrier reads from “Running After Antelope”; June 9: Richard Russo reads from “Empire Falls”, June 10: Irvine Welsh talks about “Glue.” 

 

Cody’s Books 1730 Fourth St. All events at 7 p.m. June 6: Peter Mayle teaches “French Lessons: Adventures with Knife, Fork, and Corkscrew; June 8: For the younger readers, Eoin Colfer reads from “Artemis Fowl”; June 9: For the younger readers, Lemony Snicket reports on “The Vile Village.”  

 

Weekly Poetry Nitro Mondays 6:30 p.m sign up, 7 - 9 p.m. reading. Performing poets in a dinner atmosphere. Featured poets: June 4, Gaya Jenkins; June 11, Ivan Arguelles. Cafe de la Paz 1600 Shattuck Ave. 843-0662 

 

Tours 

 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour. June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 


St. Mary’s Guy avoids disaster at state meet

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Saturday June 02, 2001

What was supposed to be the culmination of Halihl Guy’s high school track career nearly went down in flames Friday night at the CIF State Championship Meet qualifiers, but everything turned out fine in the end. 

Guy’s first event at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento was the 4x100-meter relay, in which the Panthers held the third-best time in the state this season. St. Mary’s main concern was the health of relay member Chris Dunbar, who hadn’t run in a meet for three weeks while nursing a hamstring pull. Dunbar ran well, if tentatively, and the Panthers qualified for Saturday’s final in 41.65 seconds, a fifth-best in the meet. That time is .45 seconds slower than the team’s best time, and Dunbar said he ran at about 85 percent after his hamstring bothered him late in his second leg of the race.  

“I got out pretty good, but I tightened up in the last 20 meters,” Dunbar said. “But it was OK for my first time going full-speed for three weeks.” 

St. Mary’s head coach Jay Lawson decided to hold Dunbar out of the 4x400-meter relay on Friday to rest the injury, but Dunbar said he would “run both races tomorrow, definitely.” 

Although the Panthers finished fifth in the preliminaries, the second through fifth places were all within .1 of a second of each other. If Dunbar can let it fly today, the Panthers could take home the gold. Their main competition appears to be Granite Hills, which flew through their heat to a time of 41.16 seconds, the best time in the state this season. Taft, whose mark Granite Hills broke on Friday, had baton trouble and failed to qualify for the final. 

Guy’s next event was his weakest, the 110-meter high hurdles. Although his coaches didn’t expect him to finish in the top nine places to qualify for Saturday’s final, Guy was out to prove a point after winning the North Coast Section title with a personal best last weekend. Guy was a little too pumped up, however, and false started during his heat, disqualifying himself. 

Guy’s best event is the 300-meter low hurdles, and he quickly took the lead in his heat. But he again made a big mistake, hitting the last hurdle with his lead leg. Guy stumbled, barely managing to stay in his lane across the finish line. His stagger caused two more runners to crash into each other, causing a pileup at the finish line. 

“I don’t know what went wrong for Halihl in that race,” Lawson said. “I guess he just didn’t drive hard enough over that last hurdle. I don’t need that kind of stress.” 

The Panthers hopes for a boys’ team title is still alive going into the finals despite Guy’s errors. Triple jumpers Asokah Muhammed and Solomon Welch both qualified for today’s competition, with Muhammed jumping 48-10, a personal best. 

“There are a bunch of teams still in the mix, and it’s all about who’s still alive on Saturday,” Lawson said. “We definitely accomplished what we needed to today.” Also qualifying for Saturday’s finals were two St. Mary’s girls. Kamaiya Warren had the second longest throw to qualify in the shot put, and Bridget Duffy finished third in her heat of the 1,600-meter race with a time of 5:00.39. 

Warren’s best throw on Friday was 44-06.75, but she came in a distant second to San Luis Obispo’s Karen Freburg by more than six feet. Freburg has come close to breaking the national prep record in the event several times, and barring a rash of fouls on Saturday should take the state title easily. But Warren said she doesn’t get discouraged finishing so far behind Freburg. 

“My thing is to chase after her,” Warren said. “I know that the closer I get to her, the better I am. Besides, you never know what can happen.” 

The Berkeley High girls’ relay team will be the school’s lone representative today, finishing in seventh place with a time of 47.67 seconds. The St. Mary’s team finished eleventh in the event. 

Berkeley High’s surprise entrant on Friday, North Coast Section 400-meter champion Stephon Brooks, got a rude awakening at the state meet. Brooks finished dead last in his heat. But Brooks is just a sophomore this year, so you can expect to see him again. 

The results for the 4x400-meter relays and girls triple jump, both of which had Berkeley entrants, were unavailable at press time. 

 

QUALIFIERS 

300- meter low hurdles, boys 

Halihl Guy St. Mary’s 

 

Shot put, girls  

Kamaiya Warren St. Mary’s 

 

1,600-meters, girls  

Bridget Duffy St. Mary’s 

 

Triple jump, boys  

Asokah Muhammed St. Mary’s Solomon Welch St. Mary’s 

 

4x100 relay, boys  

St. Mary’s 

 

4x100 relay, girls Berkeley


Helping juveniles goal for League

By Andrea Buffa Special to the Daily Planet
Saturday June 02, 2001

The Berkeley, Albany and Emeryville chapter of the League of Women Voters joined forces last year with Californians for Justice, Coleman Advocates for Youth and Families and other organizations to fight against Proposition 21, the Gang Violence and Juvenile Crime Prevention Act.  

The League is concerned with the effects of Proposition 21, and on Thursday night, more than a year after the proposition passed, 60 members of the chapter came out for the group’s annual meeting to learn about juvenile justice in the post-Proposition 21 era. 

“We’re very much concerned with youth and youth at risk. Our positions point to wanting to help teenagers and younger children get back on the right track,” said Jo Ann Price, president of the League of Women Voters’ local chapter. That concern led the chapter to invite Alameda County Juvenile Court Presiding Judge Brenda Harbin-Forte to address the group’s annual meeting at the Northbrae Community Church. 

According to Harbin-Forte, Alameda County has seen only four or five cases in which the district attorney referred a young person to adult court to be tried, as Proposition 21 allows.  

Proposition 21 increased the number of circumstances under which a juvenile offender can be sent directly to the adult court system; eliminated discretion in juvenile sentencing and increased the penalties for youth convicted of certain offenses. 

Harbin-Forte said she believes the juvenile justice system needs reform, including more prevention programs for young people and rectification of the problem of the over-representation of youth of color in the system. She encouraged the League of Women Voter members to become involved with children in the juvenile justice system by becoming court-appointed children’s advocates. 

Although the local chapter of the League of Women Voters voted at the Thursday night meeting to continue to support juvenile justice policies which “promote services to meet the needs of Alameda county youth and minimize delinquency,” it has no plans to take any action to demand reforms in the juvenile justice system.  

Its priorities for the next year are education (specifically, closing the achievement gap), the completion of the Berkeley General Plan, and housing in Albany, Berkeley and Emeryville. 

The state League of Women Voters, on the other hand, is a plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging Proposition 21. Along with Coleman Advocates and Peter Bull of the Youth Law Center, the state League has filed a lawsuit contending that the proposition addressed three issues: juvenile court, gangs, and three strikes legislation. According to the California Constitution, an initiative may only address a single subject. The case is on hold while other cases challenging Proposition 21 are considered by the California Supreme Court. 

The Berkeley, Albany and Emeryville chapter of the League of Women Voters has 400 members, the third largest in California and is “very energetic,” says one member who’s been involved with League chapters throughout the state. 

Its decision making process is slow but thorough. Before deciding to take action on an issue, a chapter studies the question for two years. Then its actions are usually limited to lobbying for legislation or filing a lawsuit on concerns ranging from campaign finance reform to energy deregulation. For more information or to become a member, call the chapter office at 843-8824. 

 


City may add incentives for solar energy

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Saturday June 02, 2001

To kick start the use of alternative energy in residences, the mayor will ask the City Council on Tuesday to consider fast-tracking the city’s permit process and waiving fees for those who install solar devices. 

If approved, the city manager will work with the Planning and Development Department to determine the best way to speed up the permit process.  

“I thought we’d better get this on the agenda, because I want to make sure we are on the fast track on these issues,” said Mayor Shirley Dean. 

Dean made energy conservation a priority during her State of the City speech on May 1. She has been a strong advocate of recent technological developments in photovotaic power, a form of solar power that turns the sun’s energy into electricity. 

Photovotaic panels can be installed in homes and apartments for about $10,000 per unit, according to a report from the mayor’s office. That cost can be offset by two state rebate programs, which can reduce the cost to as low as $3,000, according to the report. 

In addition, Pacific Gas & Electricity is offering a program that will hook photovotaic-equipped residences up to the power grid thereby allowing them to sell excess energy produced by the panels back to the utility.  

Dean said she is meeting with local banks to see if they will offer low-interest loans to homeowners who install the systems. 

At the People’s State of the City Address on Tuesday, Councilmember Dona Spring proposed a bond measure that would raise funds to pay for all homes and apartments to be equipped with photovotaic systems at no cost to the property owner. 

Planning and Development Interim Deputy Director Vivian Kahn said she had not seen the mayor’s recommendation and could not comment on any specifics, but she said Oakland’s Planning Department had adopted a similar program. 

“Streamlining the process could take amending the zoning ordinance and adopting a new fee schedule to waive application fees,” she said. 

On other energy fronts, Dean said she has been meeting with the 14 Alameda County mayors to discuss an effective way to influence the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which is responsible for setting “just and reasonable” energy rates for gas and electricity. The commission has not set a rate cap on the wholesale price of natural gas or electricity despite skyrocketing rates set by energy wholesalers. 

In Dean’s written recommendation, she states that California paid 28 cents for 1 million Btus of natural gas in 1998. Within two years that price has soared to $8.14. 

“We’re quite serious about this and have not ruled out a possible Mayors’ March on Washington to get FERC’s attention,” Dean said. “This is a bipartisan issue in the county and state, lights go out for Republicans the same way they do Democrats.” 

The issue will be considered by the council on June 5. The “special” meeting is scheduled to start at 5:15 p.m. with public comment. Then the council will go into closed session to discuss two issues. It will then recess to open session again to consider the energy recommendation.  

The council will convene a second meeting at 7 p.m. to hold a public hearing on the Temple Beth El project at 1301 Oxford St. The meetings will take place in Old City Hall at 2134 Martin Luther King Jr. Way. 


Early north Berkeley house celebrated its natural surroundings

By Susan Cerny Special to the Daily Planet
Saturday June 02, 2001

Berkeley Observed 

Looking back, seeing ahead 

 

The Thousand Oaks district of north Berkeley was subdivided in 1909 by John Spring (1862-1933) a local capitalist who was involved in much of the land speculation in Berkeley, Albany and El Cerrito around the turn of the 20th century. He was associated with Francis Marion “Borax” Smith (who assembled the Key System electric streetcar line), Duncan McDuffie, Louis Titus and Frank Haven.  

The expansion of public transportation through the North Berkeley Tunnel and down Solano Avenue in 1911 made it possible to live several miles from the center of town.  

This location was known for its rock formations and spreading oaks interspersed with grassy glades. It was a favorite place for walking and picnics. Because of its beauty a bond measure was proposed to set aside 100 acres for a public park but the measure failed. Perhaps, as this picture shows, there was so much open space the need to fund parks seemed unnecessary. While there is a wide diversity of style and size of homes in this neighborhood, the rock outcroppings are a distinctive feature of Thousand Oaks. There is a large rock behind this house, (on the left side of the picture). Many houses on Vicente Road (above Colusa Avenue) have large rocks in their front gardens and some houses are even built on top of the rocks. The house was designed by James W. Placheck a prolific Berkeley architect. He designed many buildings including the Main Branch of the Berkeley Public Library.  

Susan Cerny writes ‘Berkeley Observed’ in conjunction with  

The Berkeley Historical Association


BRIEFS

Staff
Saturday June 02, 2001

La Peña event honors activist, union leader Dolores Huerta 

Teacher, community activist, union leader, lobbyist, organizer, advocate and mother of 11, Dolores Huerta has won many awards and public recognition for her dedication to farm workers’ rights, women’s rights and the environment.  

She will be honored for her work June 9 at La Peña Cultural Center’s 26th anniversary. 

In 1955, Huerta began work as a grassroots organizer with the Community Service Organization. Seven years later, in Delano she met Cesar Chavez, with whom she created the National Farmworkers Association, a precursor to the United Farm Workers. 

The event, which costs $20, will help defray some of Huerta’s recent medical expenses. 

Huerta herself will be present, as well as Dulce Mambo, Piri Thomas, La Paz, Jose Luis Orozco, Raphael Manriquez, Herbert Siguenza and Father Bill O’Donnell. Maria Chavez will present a slide show. The event begins at 7 p.m. at 3105 Shattuck Ave. 

 

YMCA art gathering  

fund-raiser features auction  

Wosene Kosrof, an Ethiopian-born artist who lives in Berkeley, has donated a painting to the Berkeley YMCA. The piece will be sold at a silent auction and all proceeds will benefit youth at the YMCA. Kosrof’s work explores the aesthetic dimensions of Amharic, one of the major languages of Ethiopia.  

The Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, the Rockefeller collection, the United Nations and many others have Kosrof in their collections. The YMCA is hosting an art gathering in the Crystal Room of the Shattuck Hotel at 8:30 p.m. on June 13 where Kosrof will exhibit and discuss his paintings and the YMCA piece will be up for auction. The Shattuck Hotel is at 2086 Allston Way. Admission is free. 

 

Groundbreaking celebration for Computer Technologies Program 

The Computer Technologies Program will be celebrating the groundbreaking of its new facilities in the ARTech building at 2101 Milvia at 9 a.m. on Tuesday.  

The ceremony represents the culmination of the three year project by CTP and Panoramic Interests to create a multi-use building in downtown Berkeley. 

The CTP, a nonprofit organization that provides computer job training to students with disabilities, will occupy the entire second floor of the new building, almost tripling the size of its facilities. A cafe will occupy the ground floor and 20 housing units will comprise the top three stories. The outside of the building will feature works of several local artists and include a wrought iron gate, tile murals and mosaic benches. 

— staff reports


Man convicted of planting Fremont bombs

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

HAYWARD — An unemployed crime lab technician has been found guilty on all 11 counts, including attempted murder, for planting bombs under the homes of Fremont’s police chief and other city officials. 

The verdict, reached Thursday but read in Alameda County Superior Court early Friday, followed a week of deliberations and months of testimony in the case. 

Rodney Blach, 54, has said federally trained agents carried out the six bombings, and that he was being framed. 

His lawyer, William Linehan, argued the case was largely circumstantial, relying only on Blach’s motive and opportunity. He said he was disappointed with the verdict and would ask for a new trial. 

The six bombs were planted during a 48-hour period in March 1998. 

The first one ripped a 10-foot hole in the roof of police Chief Craig Steckler’s home and set the front porch on fire. The same afternoon, City Councilman Bob Wasserman, Steckler’s predecessor as police chief, found an explosive in a brown paper bag on his front walk. Authorities defused that bomb. 

Two pipe bombs damaged newly constructed homes and another explosive went off at a water tank. Police detonated a sixth bomb. 

No one was injured. 

Blach, who was a chemical engineer with the Chicago Police Department crime lab from 1974 to 1979, taunted investigators and seemed to savor his role as a suspect during the 18-month investigation. 

He said he planted keys in his San Diego home and taped notes with clues beneath his desk and a shaving cream can to see if investigators could find them. He lived in the Fremont neighborhood where he planted the bombs, but moved to San Diego after he became a suspect. 

Blach, who had no prior criminal record, has been described by acquaintances as a conspiracy theorist. According to grand jury testimony, he planted a pair of time-delayed pipe bombs under a Fremont home because he thought it was going to be bought by a prominent family he considered to be the “Afghan Mafia.” 

The less potent explosives at the homes of the police chief and city councilman were diversions, according to court records. 

Prosecutors said Blach had a long-standing grudge against Fremont resident Terry Lee Ritter, 48, and his wife, Shamim Siddiq Ritter, 42, a real-estate loan agent. He believed they had purchased the $1.4 million-plus Corte del Sol home. 

However, the family neither bought the house nor moved in. When the bombs did detonate in March 1998, a girl from a different family that had purchased the residence was shaken but not injured. Investigators believe Blach could face life in prison.


Creator of ‘Dennis The Menace’ dies at 81

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Hank Ketcham, whose lovable scamp “Dennis the Menace” tormented cranky Mr. Wilson and amused readers of comics for decades, died early Friday morning at age 81. 

Ketcham had suffered from heart disease and cancer, said his publicist, Linda Dozoretz. 

“He passed away very peacefully. He had had some bad spells and he slipped away in his sleep,” said Ellen James, a neighbor and family friend. 

Ketcham stopped drawing the weekday strip at the end of 1994 but let it continue under a team of artists and writers. 

Inspired by the antics of his 4-year-old son, Ketcham began the strip in 1951. In March, Ketcham’s panels celebrated 50 years of publication — running in 1,000 newspapers, 48 countries and 19 languages. 

“It just took my breath away,” said Brian Walker, who writes “Hi and Lois” with his brother, Greg. “Like the rest of the cartoonists in his generation, he died with his boots on. He may have said he was retired, but he was still working.” 

Despite its longevity, the strip changed little since the 1950s. Dennis was always a freckle-faced “five-ana-half” — an appealing if aggravating mixture of impishness and innocence. 

“Mischief just seems to follow wherever Dennis appears, but it is the product of good intentions, misdirected helpfulness, goodhearted generosity, and, possibly, an overactive thyroid,” Ketcham wrote in his 1990 autobiography, “The Merchant of Dennis The Menace.” 

“But what a dull world it would be without any Dennises in it! Peaceful, maybe — but dull,” he said. 

Dennis also inspired several books of cartoons, a musical, a television series, a 1993 movie and a playground in Monterey, not far from Ketcham’s studio in Pebble Beach. 

“It’s a joyful pursuit realizing that you’re trying to ease the pain of front-page news or television,” Ketcham told The Associated Press in a March interview. There’s some little bright spot in your day that reminds you that it’s fun to smile.” 

A Seattle native, Henry “Hank” Ketcham dropped out the University of Washington in 1938 after his freshman year to pursue his childhood dream. He got his first job as an animator for Walter Lantz, the creator of “Woody Woodpecker,” and then for Walt Disney, working on “Pinocchio,” “Bambi,” “Fantasia” and others. 

He was pulled away to Washington D.C. by the Navy during World War II where he drew cartoons for military posters, training material and war bond sales. He then moved to Carmel as a freelance cartoonist. 

It was there in October 1950 that Ketcham’s first wife, Alice, burst into his studio exasperated after their 4-year-old son, Dennis, destroyed his bedroom instead of napping. 

“Your son is a menace!” she screamed. 

Just five months later on March 12, 1951, “Dennis the Menace” was born in 16 newspapers. Ketcham couldn’t believe the audience his blond, freckle-faced boy in droopy overalls attracted. 

“I’m not a big social butterfly. I don’t worry about people out there and what they feel about it,” Ketcham said. “I don’t even realize there are people looking at it and following it so closely until I’ve traveled and then I realize, ’Holy smokes how come everybody knows about Dennis?”’ 

One of those times came during his first trip abroad in 1959. He had set up a humor exchange with the Soviet Union to swap Dennis drawings out for Soviet-sketched cartoons during the Cold War. 

When the CIA got wind of his plans, they asked him to take snapshots with a spy camera and draw anything that might be useful to intelligence. 

“We were flying from Moscow to Kiev, and it was during the day and I looked out the window and I saw some shapes. Big circles and long rectangular shapes,” he said. “I had my sketch book and I would put them down and the flight attendant would walk by and I would put a big nose and some eyes and make the whole thing into a funny face. So I had a whole book full of funny-face cartoons at the end that I didn’t know how to read.” 

Sometime later, Ketcham met a CIA official and mentioned his days behind the Iron Curtain. 

Ketcham said, “I’m sorry, I didn’t have anything to report. He said, ’Yeah, I know, Hank, we haven’t sent any more cartoonists on any more missions.”’ 

Ketcham stayed in Europe, drawing Dennis from Geneva, Switzerland for nearly 20 years. He took the real-life Dennis, then 12, with him after the boy’s mother died of a drug overdose in 1959. But when Dennis struggled with his studies there, he was sent to boarding school in Connecticut. Ketcham and his second wife, Jo Anne Stevens, remained in Europe. 

Dennis went on to serve a 10-month tour of duty in Vietnam and returned suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. He has little contact with his father today. Still, he’s kept “Dennis the Menace” books, dolls and other cartoon paraphernalia displayed at his house. 

“He’s living in the East somewhere doing his own thing,” Ketcham said in March. “That’s just a chapter that was a short one that closed, which unfortunately happens in some families.” 

Ketcham moved back to California in 1977 with his third wife, Rolande and their two children, Scott and Dania, and drew the comic from his home along scenic 17 Mile Drive. 

Unlike “Peanuts” creator Charles Schulz, who insisted on drawing every panel himself and had a clause in his contract dictating that original drawings would end with his death, Ketcham stopped drawing Sunday panels in the mid-1980s. 

and retired from weekday sketches in 1994. Ketcham’s assistants, Marcus Hamilton and Ronald Ferdinand, handled the bulk of the work after that with Ketcham overseeing the feature daily by fax. The team will continue the panels despite his death. 

“People used to ask me, ’What will happen when Mr. Ketcham isn’t still around?”’ Hamilton said. “He never directly told me this, but I think he was trying to say, ’Pay attention to how I train you because someday you may have to train someone else.”’ 

After putting down his pencil, Ketcham grabbed a brush and began a decade of painting oils and watercolors of jazz musicians, dark portraits of women’s faces, cartoonists and golf scenes. He even painted the birthing center at a hospital in Monterey, which worked as physical and mental therapy after his own stint in the hospital. 

But even as a cartoonist, Ketcham is remembered as one of the master artists. 

“One thing about Hank that I feel, he is the best pen and ink line artist in America today,” said Bil Keane, who created “Family Circus,” syndicated since 1960. “He still is a brilliant technician when it comes to drawing the lines that make his cartoons so beautifully artistic.” 

Brian Walker, the son of “Beetle Bailey” and “Hi and Lois” creator Mort Walker, put together a 50th anniversary “Dennis the Menace” exhibit at the International Museum of Cartoon Art in Boca Raton, Fla., which opened Saturday and runs through Aug. 26. 

Ketcham’s son Scott attended the opening and called Ketcham frequently with feedback from the tribute, Walker said. 

“That’s so wonderful for Hank Ketcham ... that he knew he was being honored by his peers,” said Jan Eliot, who draws “Stone Soup” and once asked Ketcham for guidance on her work. “I admired his drawing very much. His humor was of another generation, and it’s the generation that we’re losing now.” 

The comic will likely live on for years without Ketcham. 

“It’s just classic. The material as well as the art is well done,” Jim Davis, who created “Garfield,” said in March. “You can relax and just enjoy the feature. You know you’re in good hands when you’re reading something as classic as Dennis.” 

Ketcham is survived by his wife, Rolande; his daughter, Dania Ketcham and his two sons, Scott and Dennis Ketcham. 

 

CARRYING THE LEGACY 

SAN FRANCISCO — As Marcus Hamilton waited Friday for workers to fix his fax machine that had been struck by lightning while he was away at the National Cartoonist Society awards, he got a call saying cartoonist Hank Ketcham had died. 

Hamilton began drawing “Dennis the Menace” for Ketcham in 1994. He was trying to fax his latest sketches of America’s favorite 5-year-old towheaded tornado for Ketcham’s final approval. 

“Today was very sad,” said Hamilton, who will continue drawing the weekday 50-year old comic panel. “He’s really been like a second father to me. He’s directed my life for the last eight years.” 

But Hamilton said Ketcham passed on a high note. His lifetime of cartooning was honored at the International Museum of Cartoon Art in Boca Raton where a 50th anniversary “Dennis the Menace” exhibit will be displayed through Aug. 26. 

“I was honored to work on this tribute, and I’m glad we successfully completed it and that Hank knew what a success it was,” said Brian Walker, the son of “Beetle Bailey” and “Hi and Lois” creator Mort Walker, who assembled the display. 

Hamilton said he is now proud to continue the comic with Ronald Ferdinand, who began drawing the Sunday panels in the mid-1980s. 

 

 

Hamilton considers it pure luck that he received that honor. He said his career with Ketcham began after he saw the veteran cartoonist on television promoting a “Dennis The Menace” film in 1993. Ketcham said he would like more time to play golf, paint and travel, and Hamilton picked up the phone, seeing a job opportunity. 

“This is his little boy that he’s trained me to draw,” Hamilton said. “I am still flabbergasted that this has all occurred.” 

On Wednesday evening, Hamilton said Ketcham sent his last e-mail, which Hamilton printed for future inspiration. 

It read: ”... This if of course a continued training exercise to sharpen your talents and prepare you for producing Dennis all on your own.” 

“I think he must have had an inkling of an idea that his time was growing short,” Hamilton said. “He was such a teacher.” 

 


Southern California teacher dies of meningitis

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

REDLANDS — A first-grade teacher died suddenly from meningococcal disease but her students were at little risk of contracting the bacterial infection, officials said Friday. 

Barbara Schroeder, 54, of Redlands, died at 3 a.m. Thursday, about 12 hours after arriving at Redlands Community Hospital, spokeswoman Jane Dreher said. 

The mother of three taught at McKinley Elementary School. On Friday, flags flew at half-staff and counselors were on campus to help children deal with the shock of losing their teacher overnight, said Ken Tolar, a spokesman for Redlands Unified School District. 

Classes continued with a substitute teacher. Youngsters at the school 70 miles east of Los Angeles put up a poster with hand-painted red hearts and the message: “McKinley rules! Mrs. Schroeder was the best!” 

On Thursday, the school sent letters home with all 400 of its students to notify parents of Schroeder’s death. Included was public health material on meningococcal disease, a rare, rapidly progressing infection of the bloodstream. 

Typical symptoms include a sudden fever combined with a headache and a stiff neck, often accompanied by nausea and vomiting. A purplish rash may develop. 

The illness can only be passed along through contact with the nose or throat discharges of an infected person. It is treatable with antibiotics. 

The bacteria that cause the illness cannot live outside the body for more than a few minutes. 

“If the organisms are coughed onto a desk or toy, for example, they will soon die,” said a letter from school Principal Toni Bristow. “They are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air near a person.” 

“Our students are not at risk unless they had had some type of very close personal contact and our understanding is that they’re at no greater risk than anyone else in the community,” said Cindy Andrews, a school district spokeswoman. 

Kim Woods, a San Bernardino County public health epidemiologist, said those most at risk would be immediate family members who might have shared a drink or a kiss with an infected person. 

Typically, there are 300 to 400 cases of meningitis a year in California, state health officials say. Meningitis killed three people in the San Francisco Bay area this spring, including two students, and sickened several others. 

The county sees a handful of cases each year, Woods said. 

But the severity of the disease and the rapidity with which it develops make it especially scary for parents. 

There is “no rhyme or reason why some people become sick and some don’t,” she said. “That’s why it is so sad. This one will strike healthy people.”


Activists talking energy to 250,000 this summer

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

LOS ANGELES — An environmental group has launched a door-to-door campaign to remind 250,000 Californians to conserve energy this summer. 

The California Public Interest Research Group announced Thursday it wants to encourage residents statewide to reduce electricity use and urge their elected officials to expand alternative solar, wind and geothermal power. 

“Unfortunately, most of the debate is revolving around the ’dig it up and burn it up’ methods of old, dirty energy sources,” said Kathleen Barr, the group’s energy campaign director. 

Although President Bush and Gov. Gray Davis have backed increases in alternative energy and conservation, fossil fuels continue to occupy center stage. 

Bush’s recently released energy policy calls for more oil and gas drilling, expanded use of nuclear power and 1,300 new power plants over the next 20 years. Davis has accelerated the schedule for approving new power plants, lifted pollution restrictions and is considering changes that would allow emergency diesel generators – among the dirtiest energy sources – to run more often to stave off rolling blackouts. 

But Davis spokesman Steve Maviglio said the governor also is working to reduce the state’s dependence on fossil fuels.  

He recently signed legislation authorizing more than $800 million in conservation incentives, Maviglio said, adding California has the nation’s most lucrative benefits for installing solar and wind systems. 

CALPIRG’s efforts “are in sync exactly with what the governor’s doing,” Maviglio said. 

The CALPIRG campaign, which began about two weeks ago, is intended to drum up support for state legislation that would require energy providers to get 20 percent of California’s power from renewable sources by 2010.  

Those sources currently make up about 10 percent of the state’s electricity. 

CALPIRG is handing out postcards to Davis urging him to support that legislation, written by Sen. Byron Sher, D-Stanford. The group also expects to collect 40,000 comments to send to Bush and Davis, urging them to support cleaner energy sources. 

Previous CALPIRG summer campaigns focused on supporting increases in electric-vehicle production and improving water quality, said David Rosenfeld, field director for the energy campaign. 

The current campaign is unique, he said, because people are so familiar with the power issue. 

“It’s the best thing we’ve ever canvassed in terms of awareness of the problem,” he said. “The stakes are so high.”


Gov. Davis announces agriculture program

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

BAKERSFIELD — Gov. Gray Davis announced a “Buy California” program Friday, promoting native farm products as part of an initiative to invigorate economic growth in the farm-rich Central Valley. 

The governor called on lawmakers to support the marketing plan, which would cost $5 million for the state and $5 million from agricultural interests to promote produce, dairy and poultry. 

“You’re all familiar with the success of ’It’s the Cheese,”’ Davis said, referring to a dairy marketing campaign on TV and billboards.  

“Coming soon it will be the almonds, the grapes, the cherries, the tomatoes, the alfalfa, and the sweet potatoes too.” 

Davis made his announcement at the second Central Valley Economic Summit, which brought together local, state and federal officials from across the valley to discuss the challenges faced in this part of the state. 

While the valley is home to the nation’s richest agricultural land, it’s also a place of great disparity, with high unemployment and rural poverty.  

Farmers face a shortage of water, law enforcement faces a mounting methamphetamine problem and bad air quality plagues the region. 

At the same time, the region stretching from Bakersfield to Redding is experiencing some of the fastest population growth in the state as migrant workers come to work the fields and Bay Area commuters relocate in search of cheaper housing. 

“We’re putting a lot of money in the Central Valley because this is where the growth is, this is where people are going to be for the next 25 to 40 years,” Davis said. 

But one lawmaker in the audience said the valley’s lack of state funding, compared with other regions, required the governor’s commitment to combat the legislative strongholds from urban areas. 

“Historically, we’re long on words and short on dollars,” said Assemblyman Dean Florez, D-Shafter.  

“We simply lack the funding and can’t match the 22 legislative votes of the Los Angeles delegation.” 

Davis said he has given the valley more attention than any previous governor and pointed to commitments in education, including the University of California campus in Merced that he has pledged to have open by 2004. 

Lack of education is one of the greatest barriers to leading the valley to prosperity 

As the valley changes demographically, more doctors will be needed from different cultural backgrounds to treat the diverse communities, said Dr. Deborah Stewart, an associate dean the University of California, San Francisco medical program in Fresno. 

However, one of the areas biggest problems is that so many students don’t go to college or pursue advanced degrees. 

“They don’t believe they can do it,” said Stewart.  

“No one in their family has gone to college, nevermind med school.” 

He also announced an additional $32 million in statewide grants and bonds for groundwater storage and water conservation projects, with about half that money for the San Joaquin Valley. 

Davis couldn’t avoid the topic of energy – his “least favorite subject.” 

As he has done throughout the state’s power crisis, Davis distanced himself from the cause of the problem, bashed out-of-state companies that own the power plants for price gouging, and trumpeted his fast-track approval of a plants throughout the state. 

He also thanked Kern County for hosting the greatest number of new plants proposed and reminded farmers that $70 million is available to help them install energy efficient equipment and save money on power bills. 

 

 

Law enforcement officials spoke with Davis about the continuing meth problem in the valley. Davis was shown household chemicals that could easily be purchased to cook meth. The center of the state is becoming the epicenter for production of the highly addictive, mind-altering drug. 

The governor proposed $45 million to fight the drug, but the Legislature whittled that figure down to $30 million, which is still considered significant because the federal government has only provided $1.4 million, said Stanislaus Sheriff Les Weidman. 

“From our vantage point, what’s killing us isn’t the energy, it’s the meth epidemic,” Weidman said. “Thirty million, that’s a huge boon to us.” 


Firefighters prepare for wildfire to spread

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

SUSANVILLE — Firefighters battling a 4,459-acre blaze in the Sierra Nevada were forced to deal with windy conditions Friday. Gusts up to 40 mph pushed estimates for full containment to Monday. 

Weather forecasters issued a “red flag” warning for 15 to 20 mph west winds. 

The blaze was 85 percent contained, however, and personnel have begun to demobilize, dropping the number of those fighting the blaze to 1,700. 

The fire, which began Sunday, has cost $4.4 million in firefighting expenses and destroyed $2.5 million worth of timber, mostly on national forest lands. 

It began near Susanville, about 80 miles northwest of Reno, Nev., on private timberland. The blaze was sparked by a man shooting targets in the woods, said state Dept. of Forestry spokeswoman Wendy McIntosh. The man, whose name was not released, was cited for causing a fire and letting it escape. 

Two firefighters were injured while battling the blaze. 

The fire skirted eight homes, coming as close as 30 feet to some of them. About 140 residents were evacuated, but most had returned to their homes by Thursday. 

In southern New Mexico, a wildfire that has burned about 1,900 acres in the Guadalupe Mountains was 90 percent contained Friday, with full containment hoped for by Sunday, a fire information officer Karen Takai said. 

Some 376 firefighters and support personnel were fighting the blaze, burning in the Lincoln National Forest about 10 miles from Carlsbad Caverns National Park. No buildings had been threatened by the blaze, and no injuries were reported. 


PG&E bankruptcy judge won’t challenge state

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

California power regulators can still order the state’s largest utility to perform an accounting change the company claims will end its chance to recover billions in undercollected electric rates from its customers, a federal bankruptcy judge ruled Friday. 

In his decision, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Dennis Montali dismissed Pacific Gas and Electric Co.’s complaint against the Public Utilities Commission, saying the bankrupt utility must defer to the PUC’s regulation. 

“The public interest is better served by deference to the regulatory scheme and leaving the entire regulatory function to the regulator, rather than selectively enjoining the specific aspects of one regulatory decision that PG&E disputes,” Montali wrote in his decision. 

The decision settles weeks of speculation over whether PG&E could successfully avoid what it considered an illegal order from the PUC by asking Montali to halt the request, hence, potentially pitting the federal bankruptcy court against a state regulatory agency. 

The dispute emerged after the cash-starved utility filed for federal bankruptcy protection April 6, unable to collect enough money from ratepayers to pay its expenses due to a rate freeze and soaring wholesale power prices. 

The PUC had ordered PG&E, as well as fellow financially floundering utility Southern California Edison Co., to rebalance their accounts to better reflect how much money they earned selling off power plants under the state’s 1996 deregulation law against how much money they lost being unable to charge the full cost of electricity. 

The accounting change order emerged from a request by San Francisco-based consumer group The Utility Reform Network. The group told the PUC that without the change, ratepayers would be forced unfairly to empty their pockets to rescue the utility from its debt. 

PG&E has repeatedly called the change illegal, and one of its first motions after bankruptcy was to ask Montali on April 9 to block the PUC’s March 27 order. 

In a printed statement Friday, PG&E said it was “disappointed that the court did not grant immediate relief from the unlawful and retroactive CPUC order. However, today’s decision was not on the overall merits of the CPUC action.” 

The utility “will continue to pursue all legal challenges to this unlawful CPUC decision,” the statement said. 

In its own printed statement, the PUC said it was pleased by Montali’s decision to dismiss PG&E’s complaint against the commission. 

“The Commission is pleased, but not surprised, that Judge Montali has ruled that PG&E cannot evade proper state regulation by choosing to file for bankruptcy and seeking protection from Bankruptcy Court,” said PUC President Loretta Lynch. 

——— 

On the Net: 

http://www.pge.com 

http://www.cpuc.ca.gov 

http://www.canb.uscourts.gov 


U.S. cancer patient arrested buying painkillers in Mexico

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

SAN DIEGO — An elderly American cancer patient who says he traveled to Tijuana, Mexico, to buy Valium to relieve his pain has been arrested and jailed on suspicion of drug smuggling. 

George Paul Murl, 81, of Oxnard was being held Friday in a state penitentiary in Tijuana after he was arrested outside a pharmacy with 600 Valium pills, U.S. and Mexican authorities said. 

Murl was arrested on May 24 because he did not have a legitimate prescription for the pills, said Lorenzo Garibay, a spokesman for the Tijuana police department. 

Police turned the case over to federal prosecutors, which is standard in drug cases, Garibay said. 

“If you have a prescription it’s no problem,” he said. “If not, you can be arrested as a drug trafficker.” 

But an American minister who has visited Murl in prison said the elderly man did have a prescription and has been buying Valium in Tijuana for several years because it is cheaper than in the United States. 

The minister, David Walden of San Diego, said Murl has prostate cancer and should be released from prison on humanitarian grounds. 

“He’s sick. He needs medical attention,” said Walden, who has carried food and other supplies to American prisoners in the Tijuana penitentiary for six years. 

Tijuana’s many pharmacies have long attracted U.S. consumers with lower prices. But arrests for illegally buying certain drugs are fairly common. 

Walden said several of the 48 U.S. citizens currently at the penitentiary were arrested on similar offenses but Murl is the oldest by far. 

Murl, a World War II veteran, was told that he faces up to five years in prison if convicted, Walden said. 

A representative of the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana has visited Murl and found him in “good condition given the circumstances,” said consular spokesman Clint Wright. 

“In view of his age and health condition, we’re encouraging Mexican authorities to expedite the case,” Wright said. 


Environmentalists sue to help Sierra amphibians

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

Two rare amphibian species in the Sierra Nevada are in danger of extinction and likely would be protected under the Endangered Species Act except for a federal moratorium on new listings, a government biologist acknowledged Friday. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service imposed the moratorium in November, citing a backlog of lawsuits by environmentalists, and announced it would act only in response to court orders. 

So environmentalists have taken that route again, suing to force protection of the Sierra Nevada mountain yellow-legged frog and the Yosemite toad. 

“I think unless things dramatically change in the near future they deserve to be listed,” said Jason Davis, a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Sacramento who has studied the demise of the frogs and toads. 

“The species probably won’t go extinct in the next three to four years, but they could shortly thereafter if something isn’t done,” he told The Associated Press by telephone. 

Conservationists say the decline of the frog and toad from Yosemite National Park north to Lake Tahoe reflects the degradation of aquatic ecosystems throughout the West. 

“We’re on the brink of losing what were once the two most common amphibians in the high Sierra,” said Jeff Miller, spokesman for the Center for Biological Diversity in Berkeley, Calif. 

“More than half of the native amphibians in Sierra Nevada watersheds are in serious decline and in need of formal protection,” said David Bayles, conservation director for the Pacific Rivers Council in Eugene, Ore. 

Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund filed the suit on behalf of the two groups in U.S. District Court in San Francisco on Thursday. 

“The Fish and Wildlife Service’s delay in protecting the frog and toad ... is illegal and potentially dangerous for these declining species,” said Laura Hoehn, the lead attorney for Earthjustice. 

Pesticides, air pollution, livestock grazing near streams and introduction of non-native fish are among the factors contributing to the decline of both species, the lawsuit said. 

The groups petitioned the agency for the listings 15 months ago and the agency concluded in October that the listings might be warranted. 

But the agency missed legally mandated deadlines in March to issue final decisions on the frog and the toad, as it has in the case of dozens of other listing petitions in recent years, citing a shortage of money and backlog of higher priority species. 

“We probably should have had a proposed rule in this case,” Davis said. 

“Currently, the moratorium mandated by the director of the Fish and Wildlife Service says we need to halt all listing actions except those being driven by a court order,” he said. “I’ve been basically told to box up all my stuff and wait for further word.” 

The agency’s former director, Jamie Clark, told regional directors Nov. 17 to halt work on any listing actions not under court order or settlement agreement, saying “it will not be practical for the service to respond to any new petitions this fiscal year,” ending Sept. 30. 

The Bush administration has proposed increasing Fish and Wildlife’s budget for endangered species by $2 million to $8.5 million, but that remains well short of the $120 million the agency says it needs to clear out a backlog of listings. 

The new lawsuit says the Yosemite toad has disappeared from 47 percent of its historic habitat in the national park and surrounding national forests. The Sierra Nevada population of mountain yellow-legged frog has suffered similar declines. 

The Yosemite toad is found along lake shores and ponds at high elevation. The female has a colored mosaic of dark blotches on an olive-tan background, and adult males mature to a bright lemon color. 

Davis said the stocking of non-native trout appears to be the biggest cause of the loss of frogs because the rainbows and browns feast on the tadpoles. 

“They wipe out the frogs and force them into more marginal habitat,” he said. 

On the Net: 

Center for Biological Diversity: http://www.biologicaldiversity.org 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: http://www.fws.gov 

Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund: http://www.earthjustice.org


Young African AIDS activist dies at 12

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — Nkosi Johnson, a boy who was born with HIV and became an outspoken champion of others infected with the AIDS virus, died Friday of the disease he battled for all 12 of his years. 

Nkosi was praised for his openness about his infection in a country where people suspected of carrying the AIDS virus often are shunned by their families and chased from their communities. Former South African President Nelson Mandela called him an “icon of the struggle for life.” 

“Children, such as Nkosi Johnson, should be enjoying a life filled with joy and laughter and happiness,” Mandela said in a recent statement. “On a frightening scale, HIV/AIDS is replacing that joy, laughter and happiness with paralyzing pain and trauma.” 

Nkosi collapsed in December with brain damage and viral infections, and had not been expected to live much longer. His foster mother, Gail Johnson, said he died peacefully in his sleep in the morning. 

During his short life, Nkosi successfully contested the policies that kept HIV-infected children out of public schools. He talked about his own infection, challenging people to re-examine their fear of those afflicted with AIDS. 

“He had an awareness of the threat to his life and the importance of his life in lessening the threat to other people with AIDS,” High Court Justice Edwin Cameron, who is also infected with the virus, said recently. Nkosi was “a person with maturity far beyond his years, with the wisdom and courage of many adults accumulated together,” Cameron said. 

Nkosi was born Feb. 4, 1989, with the virus that causes AIDS. His mother could not afford to bring him up, and Gail Johnson became his foster mother when he was 2. Nkosi’s mother died of AIDS-related diseases in 1997. 

That same year, Gail Johnson and Nkosi successfully battled to force a public primary school to admit him despite his infection. The fight led to a policy forbidding schools from discriminating against HIV-positive children, and to guidelines for how schools should treat infected pupils. About 200 HIV-positive children are born in South Africa each day, but most die before they reach school age. 

Nkosi became internationally known with a speech at the opening of the 13th International AIDS conference last July in Durban, South Africa, in which he asked that AIDS sufferers no longer be stigmatized. 

Nkosi helped raise money for Nkosi’s Haven, a Johannesburg shelter for HIV-positive women and their children. He was crushed when a 3-month old baby his foster mother cared for died of AIDS. 

“He hated seeing sick babies and sick children,” Johnson said. 

The experience led to his speech at the AIDS conference, where he urged the South African government to start providing HIV-positive pregnant women with drugs to reduce the risk of transmission of the virus during childbirth. 

A year later the government is still studying proposals to use the drugs. 

”(Nkosi) was a symbol of resistance in a different sort of way, and I hope that this is now a lesson for us as government to do our best to deal with this AIDS scourge,” Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a member of parliament and head of the ruling African National Congress’ women’s league, told 702 talk radio. 


Build an in-ground gardening bed

By James and Morris Carey The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

Gardening is a favorite pastime for both of us. While neither claims to have a green thumb, we can hold our own. 

When we were kids, we and our two sisters helped our dad tidy up the garden every Saturday. Weeding, raking, trimming, sweeping and planting were a weekend ritual. 

James acquired experience at an early age. From the time he was 9 until he graduated from high school, he cared for an elaborate and large garden of an aunt and uncle. 

The garden consisted of four large turf areas, a formal rose garden, a baronial hedge that bordered the property, a fruit orchard, decorative planting borders and potted plants galore. James soon discovered that there was more to gardening than pulling weeds and raking leaves — although there was plenty of that, as well. The art of pruning roses, trimming hedges and tilling soil soon became a part of James’ routine. 

If you have less than desirable soil, take several samples gathered from various locations throughout your yard to your local nursery or garden professional. The pro will be able test the pH of the soil and make specific recommendations concerning the types of organic material that should be used to “amend” the soil. Soil amendments should be mixed in with the existing soil using a rototiller.  

If the idea of major excavation and soil replacement or amendment isn’t your cup of tea, and all you want are a few top-quality planting areas for vegetables or flower beds, think “garden beds.” There are two types of garden beds – one is dug directly into the ground – an “in-ground bed” and the other is raised, and is appropriately named a “raised bed.” 

In both cases, a wood frame is built as a border to the bed. In the case of the in-ground bed, the wood framing at the perimeter is partially embedded into the soil with about 6 inches exposed above ground. The boards for a raised bed are higher (about 1 inch to 18 inches above ground) and essentially act as retaining walls. 

What’s the difference between the two? Is one better than the other? Actually both styles accomplish the goal of better quality soil and improved drainage. The raised bed, however, has a couple of advantages that the in-ground bed doesn’t. The soil in a raised bed warms earlier in the spring and has better drainage. What’s more, since raised beds aren’t subject to foot traffic, the soil remains loose and easy for roots and water to penetrate. 

Making a planting bed is easy. You’ll need a circular saw (a hand saw will work if you need the exercise), a driver-drill, a small sledgehammer, a pick, a shovel and a steel rake, some lumber, wood stakes, construction screws and soil. 

First, decide how large you want your planting bed to be and whether you want it in-ground or raised. When considering size, remember that the center of the bed should be reachable from the edges. Say yourbed will measure roughly 4 feet by 8 feet and be in-ground. Your material list should consist of two 4-foot pressure-treated 1-by-8’s and two 8-foot pressure-treated 1-by-8’s. Don’t forget six 1-foot redwood or cedar stakes and construction screws to attach the boards to the stakes. 

Note: pressure-treated material is suggested because it is more rot- resistant. If you will be using the garden bed for vegetables, use redwood or cedar due to potential soil contamination from the toxic chemicals contained in pressure-treated material. Before building the frame, lay out the location on the ground and rototill and amend the soil. This will prevent damage to the frame by the rototiller after installation. 

Start the box construction by attaching the two 4-foot lengths of wood to the 8-foot lengths, using the construction screws. Next, place the box in the desired location and use a pick and shovel to create a shallow trench that the box will recess into – a few inches will be adequate. Drive stakes at all four corners and one at the center of each of the two long sides for added stability. The top of the stake should be driven slightly below the top of the boards. Drive construction screws through the outside face of the boards into the stakes. 

If you have your heart set on a raised bed, substitute the 1-by-8’s with 2-by-12’s and use 2-by-2 stakes that are 18 to 24 inches long. Finish the job by filling the box with premium soil, seeds or plants and water. You’ll be the envy of your neighborhood. 

For more home improvement tips and information www.onthehouse.com. 

James and Morris Carey are feature writers for The Associated Press


Markets rally may have been just right

By Joyce Rosenberg The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

NEW YORK — The Nasdaq surges more than 41 percent over seven weeks and then drops back nearly 10 percent in just five days. 

The Dow industrials climb 20 percent over a two-month period before falling 4 percent in six sessions. 

After a protracted slump on Wall Street, it might look like the market moved a little too high too fast during its spring rally. It also might seem, given the still-uncertain outlook for earnings, that many investors didn’t learn enough from the painful lessons of the past two years. 

But some analysts, looking behind the percentages, find reasons to believe investors are right to be buying at their recent clip. 

“It’s part of the process of rebuilding confidence in the market. It’s just natural to have the upswings and the profit-taking and backing and filling that we’ve seen,” said Jim Herrick, managing director of trading for Robert W. Baird & Co. in Milwaukee. There was plenty of backing and filling in the market this past week, which saw the Dow tumble 166 points Wednesday and then recover a combined 117 on Thursday and Friday. The Nasdaq suffered hefty 75- and 91-point declines Tuesday and Wednesday, but recouped 65 the next two days. 

More retrenching – perhaps a lot of retrenching – is anticipated because the market is just starting warnings season, the period when companies that are expecting disappointing earnings release their forecasts. Those predictions and the release of actual second-quarter results starting in early to mid-July are likely to shake investors’ resolve and set off some substantial selling. But analysts, still believing the worst is over on Wall Street, don’t expect the declines to be serious. 

“We’re quite sure that the bear market ended the beginning of April,” said Eugene Mintz, financial markets analyst at Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. Like other analysts, Mintz noted that investors have a lot of money and they are now intent on buying, where a few months ago their inclination was to sell. 

If the market’s handling of a warning this past week from Sun Microsystems Inc. is an indicator, it should in the end be able to cope with bad earnings news. 

Sun said Tuesday that the revenue in its fourth quarter, which ends June 30, could fall as much as 24 percent from a year ago, while per-share earnings would come to between 2 and 4 cents, compared with the 6 cents Wall Street expected. Wall Street initially was unnerved by the news, leading to Wednesday’s big drop. But by Thursday the market had a moderate rebound and it continued its advance Friday despite dim profit outlooks from DuPont Co. and BellSouth Corp. 

What the market has going for it is its tendency to be a leading indicator for earnings and the economy, rising six to nine months before a significant improvement in fundamentals becomes a reality. 

With the Federal Reserve widely expected to lower interest rates for the sixth time this year when it meets in late June, the market is likely to advance on expectations of healthier profits in the first quarter of 2002. 

Still, analysts aren’t predicting the market will rally in the near future at the pace it enjoyed during the spring. 

“As we come out of difficult times in the stock market, you will have these surges again and plateau for a while,” said Joseph Battipaglia, chief investment strategist at Gruntal & Co. 

“There’s a tug of war,” he said. “On one hand, the Fed is easing interest rates, and there’s news on the economy that speaks to something better than recession. On the other hand, there’s earnings season and companies’ confessionals and analysts downgrading their investment ratings. It makes the market volatile in the short term.” 

The Dow ended the week little changed, falling 14.96 or 0.1 percent, to 10,990.41 after a gain of 78.47 Friday. 

The Nasdaq fell 101.59 or 4.5 percent for the week after rising 38.95 Friday to 2,149.44. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index had a 17.22 or 1.3 percent loss for the week, rising 4.85 Friday to 1,260.67. 

The Russell 2000 index fell 6.90 or 1.4 percent for the week after gaining 5.22 Friday to close at 501.72. 

The Wilshire Associates Equity Index — which represents the combined market value of all New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange and Nasdaq issues — ended the week at $11.671 trillion, off $178.420 billion for the week. A year ago the index was $13.734 trillion. 

End adv for weekend editions 


Ford, DaimlerChrysler sales decline in May

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. and DaimlerChrysler AG’s Chrysler arm reported sharp declines in U.S. auto sales for May, while General Motors Corp. managed a slim gain. 

Ford, in the midst of a costly program to replace 13 million Firestone tires, said domestic sales dropped 12 percent. Chrysler said its sales last month were off 8 percent. 

GM, the world’s largest automaker, said its sales inched up 1 percent. 

The companies’ results excluded sales from foreign brands. 

While sales of GM passenger cars dropped 8 percent last month, a 9 percent jump in truck sales accounted for the automaker’s overall sales increase. 

“It was a very good month for the industry” coming off a record 2000, said Paul Bellew, GM’s executive director for market and industry analysis.  

Last year, sales by U.S. automakers totaled a record 17.4 million. 

George Pipas, Ford sales analysis manager, blamed the drop-off in sales on increased competition, higher gas prices and “the U.S. economy not growing as much as a year ago.” 

Profits were also hurt by weak sales of Ford’s sport utility vehicles. Sales of the restyled 2002 Explorer dropped 16.5 percent from sales of its predecessor a year ago. 

Ford announced the tire recall last week after concluding Wilderness AT tires installed on several of its SUVs, including the best-selling Explorer, would fail at a greater rate than competitors’ tires.  

Ford will take a $2.1 billion after-tax charge this quarter to pay for the program. 

Some foreign automakers fared better. Honda reported its best-ever May with a 5.4 percent rise.  

Nissan showed an almost 7 percent sales increase. BMW’s sales jumped 32 percent and sales of Hyundai vehicles soared 34 percent. Volkswagen sales rose 4 percent. 

On the Net: 

Ford Motor Co., http://www.ford.com 

DaimlerChrysler AG, http://www.daimlerchrysler.com 

General Motors Corp., http://www.gm.com/


In saturated market, PC makers woo Hispanics

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

SAN JOSE — The technology economy’s downturn has opened the eyes of personal computer makers to the nation’s booming Hispanic population, which has grown 58 percent to 35.3 million in the past decade. 

The overall U.S. market for computers is saturated. Computer ownership among white households is 55.7 percent; among Asians, it’s 65.6 percent. 

Yet just 33.7 percent of Hispanic households owned a PC in August 2000, according to the latest available data from the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration. 

“It’s simple math,” said Eric Newburger, a statistician with the U.S. Census Bureau.  

“If you’re selling computers, you’ll see that a lot of the Hispanic population doesn’t have computers.” 

Computer marketers, their sales badly sagging, are waking up to Latino customers like Otelia Mendoza. 

A Mexican immigrant living in East Palo Alto, Mendoza recently bought a Gateway computer to help her five children through school. 

“It took a long time for them to notice us – computers have been around for 10 years,” said her 13-year-old, Genaro Lombera Jr. “Just because we’re Mexicans doesn’t mean we don’t need computers.” 

The nation’s top PC vendors – Dell Computer Corp., Compaq Computer Corp., IBM Corp., Hewlett-Packard Corp., Gateway Inc. and Apple Computer Inc. – all have some services aimed at Spanish speakers, including multilingual help desks or Web sites. 

But none have marketing campaigns as intensive as Gateway, which drew 20,000 visitors to its small store in Stockton, in California’s Central Valley, by inviting champion boxer Oscar de la Hoya. 

The San Diego-based PC maker was the first to make a major push, increasing its Spanish-speaking call center staff from nine to 65 beginning in September, and putting merchandise and staff dedicated to Hispanics in nearly half its 300 stores. 

Compaq plans its own Spanish-language initiative by the end of July, offering Presario 5000T desktop models with Spanish-language software, operating manuals and keyboards, including such characters an “n” with a tilde, which were previously available only in Latin America. 

IBM, meanwhile, is increasing its involvement with Hispanic associations and businesses; HP is setting up product booths at cultural festivals. 

“We realized we weren’t talking to them, we were talking at them,” said David Turner, vice president of marketing for Gateway’s consumer division. “Now we’re talking to them, and they’ve responded favorably.” 

Gateway said it made three times the revenue from Hispanic customers in the first quarter of 2001 than in all of 2000. By year’s end, it expects revenue from Hispanic customers will be 13 times greater than in 2000. 

Partnering with Univision Communications Inc., which owns the nation’s leading Spanish-language broadcast network and Internet service provider, Gateway also runs television commercials that are made from scratch – and not just a translated version – for a Spanish-speaking audience. 

Marketing experts who have seen Gateway’s ads say the PC maker has smartly captured the attention of Hispanic viewers, appealing to their strong family values and aspirations to succeed. 

One ad features a middle-class Latino family gathered around a PC, the father commenting on how Gateway helped his family fulfill a seemingly impossible dream of getting a computer. 

Gateway officials are being careful to avoid the hall of shame of Hispanic marketing – ads that lose their relevance or manage to insult their audience by mangling translations. 

For instance, a Spanish version of a “Got Milk?” commercial had to be pulled off the air because the translation asked the equivalent of “Are you lactating?” 

Compaq, based in Houston, is equally ambitious about targeting Hispanics. 

“We see this as a potential gold mine,” said Mark Vena, director for consumer desktops in Compaq’s Home and Office division. 

None of the companies would say what they’re spending on these marketing initiatives, but all say the efforts will pay off. 

The new focus could have come earlier, said Felipe Korzenny, principal and co-founder of Cheskin, a market research and consulting firm. 

“They’ve been under the wrong impression that making specific cultural efforts were not relevant to their category,” he said. 

Compaq officials admit targeting the nation’s Hispanic segment wasn’t on their radar until PC sales slowed. 

“When you were looking at 20- to 30-percent growth rates over the last two or three years, you can afford to not do something like this,” Vena said. 

Now, PC makers need new markets. The first quarter of this year saw the industry’s first-ever U.S. revenue decline. 

The numbers are more promising among Hispanics, now even with non-Hispanic blacks as the nation’s largest minority group. 

According to a Cheskin market study, the percentage of Hispanic non-computer owners who intended to buy one rose to 40 percent last year. More than two-thirds didn’t have a preferred brand. 

At the moment, it’s anybody’s market to dominate. 

Compaq leads with an 18 percent share of computers owned by Hispanic adults; IBM and Gateway follow with 15 percent each, according to the Cheskin study. Apple has 13 percent; HP, 11 percent; and Dell, 8 percent. 

Advertising experts say high-tech players should learn from Old Economy companies that have long catered to Hispanic consumers, such as Coca Cola or Procter & Gamble, one of the first to make product labels in Spanish. 

Such companies have invested millions in time, money, and community involvement to lure Hispanics – and have won their consumer loyalty in return. 

“People are looking for comfort levels,” said Robert Grayson, a consultant and 20-year veteran in marketing. “Having a tilde key (on a computer keyboard) is great, but it goes beyond the need of the tilde because you can still write ’senor’ without the tilde. What that says is, ’You’re thinking of me,’ – and that’s ethnic marketing.” 


Panthers looking for perfection

By Jared Green Daily Planet Staff
Friday June 01, 2001

Heading into the final track & field event of the season, the St. Mary’s Panthers are in better shape than ever before. But even with nearly every hopeful on the team qualified for the CIF State Championships this weekend at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, the Panthers will need to achieve perfection to win a team title. 

“This is the first time we’re heading to the state meet feeling like we can really compete for a team championship,” St. Mary’s head coach Jay Lawson said. “But for that to happen, everything would have to go perfect for us.” 

With several athletes owning impressive marks in various events, Lawson’s team does indeed have the potential to take home the state title on the boys’ side. The Panthers only qualified athletes in five of the 16 events, but are expected to at least qualify for Saturday’s finals in all five. 

The burden will fall most heavily on the shoulders of senior Halihl Guy, who will be involved in four of the five events. Guy won both hurdles races at the North Coast Section championship meet last weekend, and is expected to challenge for a top-three finish in the 300-meter low hurdles. He is also a key component of St. Mary’s two relay teams. 

Success in the relays for the Panthers will depend on the health of Chris Dunbar. The junior was scratched from the NCS meet due to an injury, and is still questionable for this weekend. If Dunbar is able to go, the 4x100 team should challenge for first place, as the Panthers own the third-best time in the state this season. If Dunbar is unable to perform at his peak level, the team’s title hopes could go down the drain. 

Triple jumpers Solomon Welch and Asokah Muhammed will try to gather points in their event, an Muhammed will also run in the relays. 

For the St. Mary’s girls, it will be a full day on Friday, as they have entrants in 10 of the 16 events. But other than thrower Kamaiya Warren and distance runner Bridget Duffy, the Panthers’ girls may struggle just to qualify for Saturday’s finals. 

Warren was expected to be a dual entrant, but scratched on all three attempts in the discus in the BSAL league championship meet. Although Warren felt she had a better shot at a state title in that event, she should finish high in the shot put on Friday, as she owns the fourth-best throw in the state this year. But Warren has a big mountain to climb; Karen Freberg of San Luis Obispo has thrown more than six feet farther than Warren, nearly breaking the national prep record in the event. 

“You know, anything is possible. I won’t ever say that I can’t do something,” Warren said of her title hopes. “We’ll just have to see how things work out this weekend.”


Staff
Friday June 01, 2001

 

Habitot Children’s Museum “Back to the Farm” An interactive exhibit gives children the chance to wiggle through tunnels, look into a mirrored fish pond, don farm animal costumes, ride on a John Deere tractor and more. “Recycling Center” Lets the kids crank the conveyor belt to sort cans, plastic bottles and newspaper bundles into dumpster bins. $4 adults; $6 children age 7 and under; $3 for each additional child age 7 and under. Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesday and Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Sundays, Memorial Day through Labor Day) Kittredge Street and Shattuck Avenue 647-1111 or www.habitot.org  

 

Judah L. Magnes Museum “Telling Time: To Everything There Is A Season” through May 2002. An exhibit structured around the seasons of the year and the seasons of life with objects ranging from the sacred and the secular, to the provocative and the whimsical. 2911 Russell St. 549-6950  

 

UC Berkeley Art Museum $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; children age 12 and under free; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 642-0808 

 

The Asian Galleries “Art of the Sung: Court and Monastery.” A display of early Chinese works from the permanent collection. “Chinese Ceramics and Bronzes: The First 3,000 Years,” open-ended. “Works on Extended Loan from Warren King,” open-ended. “Three Towers of Han,” open-ended. $6 general; $4 seniors and students age 12 to 18; free children age 12 and under; free Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 642-0808 

 

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology Lobby, Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley “Tyrannosaurus Rex,” ongoing. A 20 by 40-foot replica of the fearsome dinosaur made from casts of bones of the most complete T. Rex skeleton yet excavated. When unearthed in Montana, the bones were all lying in place with only a small piece of the tailbone missing. “Pteranodon”The Pteranodon lived at the same time as the dinosaurs. Free. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 642-1821 

 

UC Berkeley Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology “Approaching a Century of Anthropology: The Phoebe Hearst Museum,” open-ended. This new permanent installation will introduce visitors to major topics in the museum’s history. “Ishi and the Invention of Yahi Culture,” ongoing. This exhibit documents the culture of the Yahi Indians of California as described and demonstrated from 1911 to 1916 by Ishi, the last surviving member of the tribe. $2 general; $1 seniors; $.50 children age 17 and under; free on Thursdays. Wednesday, Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Kroeber Hall, Bancroft Way and College Ave. 643-7648  

 

Lawrence Hall of Science “Math Rules!” A math exhibit of hands-on problem-solving stations, each with a different mathematical challenge. “Within the Human Brain,” ongoing. Visitors test their cranial nerves, play skeeball, master mazes, match musical tones and construct stories inside a simulated “rat cage” of learning experiments. “Saturday Night Stargazing,” First and third Saturdays each month. 8 - 10 p.m., LHS plaza. Computer Lab, Saturdays 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. $7 for adults; $5 for children 5-18; $3 for children 3-4. 642-5132 

 

Holt Planetarium Programs are recommended for age 8 and up; children under age 6 will not be admitted. $2 in addition to regular museum admission. “Constellations Tonight” Ongoing. Using a simple star map, learn to identify the most prominent constellations for the season in the planetarium sky. Daily, 3:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 seniors, students, disabled, and youths age 7 to 18; $3 children age 3 to 5 ; free children age 2 and younger. Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Centennial Drive, UC Berkeley 642-5132 or www.lhs.berkeley.edu  

 

924 Gilman St. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted $5; $2 for year membership. All ages. June 1: Alkaline Trio, Hotrod Circuit, No Motiv, Dashboard Confessional, Bluejacket; June 2: El Dopa, Dead Bodies Everywhere, Shadow People, Ludicra, Ballast; June 8: The Enemies, Pitch Black, The Fleshies, Supersift, Texas Thieves; June 9: Groovie Ghoulies, The Influents, Red Planet, Mallrats, Goat Shanty. 525-9926  

 

Ashkenaz June 3, 7 p.m The Wavy Gravy Camp Winnarainbow Benefit Boogie. This event benefits the multicultural circus and performing arts camp  

in Mondocino County. With music by the Flying Other Brothers, Pete Sears of Jefferson Airplane, Greg Anton and David Gans. $10 to $15. 1370 San Pablo Ave. 525-5054 or www.ashkenaz.com 

 

Freight & Salvage All music at 8 p.m. June 1: The Riders of the Purple Sage; June 2: Rebecca Riots; June 3: Hurricane Sam; June 6: Freight 33rd Anniversary concert series with Leni Stern, Jenna Mammina, Jill Cohn, Pig Iron. June :7 Alice Stuart, Folk blues, $17.50; June 8: Cats & Jammers Hot swing. $17.50; , June 9.: Danny Heines & Michael Manring Virtuoso guitar and bass. $17.50.1111 Addison St. www.freightandsalvage.org 

 

La Peña Cultural Center “Cantiflas!” June 7 and June 8, 8 p.m. Herbert Siguenza, of the  

critically acclaimed trio Culture Clash, stars in this bilingual work-in-progress about legendary Mexican comedian Marion Moreno. With guest performers Eduardo Robledo and Tanya Vlach. 

$16. 3105 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. (510) 849-2568 www.lapena.org  

 

Jupiter All shows at 8 p.m. June 1: New Monsoon; June 2: Avi Bortnick Group 2181 Shattuck Ave 843-8277  

 

The Bill Horvitz Band and the Adam Levy Threesome June 1, 8 p.m. TUVA Space 3192 Adeline  

 

The Berkeley Festival of Contemporary Performances All performances begin at 8 p.m. June 1: Steve Coleman and Five Elements; June 2: Roscoe Mitchell with George Lewis, David Wessel and Thomas Buckner. $15 Hertz Hall, UC Berkeley Campus www.tempofestival.org 

 

Empyrean Ensemble June 2, 8 p.m. Final concert of the season, featuring soprano Susan Narucki in the world premiere of Mario Davidovsky’s “Cantiones Sine Textu,” as well as works by other composers. 7 p.m. panel discussion with the composers. $14 - $18 Julia Morgan Center for the Arts 2640 College Ave 925-798-1300  

 

Berkeley High Jazz Combo June 3, 4:30 p.m. $6 - $12. Jazzschool/La Note 2377 Shattuck Ave. 845-5373 

 

Schubert Festival June 3, 4 p.m. Mini-Schubert Festival as part of the Sundays at Four Chamber Music series. Will feature Schubert’s Trout Quintet, String Trio, and more. $10 Crowden School 1475 Rose St. 559-6910 www.thecrowdenschool.org 

 

Berkeley Symphony Orchestra June 21. All performances begin at 8 p.m. Single $19 - $35, Series $52 - $96. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley 841-2800  

 

 

 

 

“Big Love” by Charles L. Mee Through June 10 Directed by Les Waters and loosely based on the Greek Drama, “The Suppliant Woman,” by Aeschylus. Fifty brides who are being forced to marry fifty brothers flee to a peaceful villa on the Italian coast in search of sanctuary. $15.99 - $51 Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St. 647-2949 

 

“Planet Janet” Through June 10, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 7 p.m. Follows six young urbanites’ struggles in sex and dating. Impact Theatre presentation written by Bret Fetzer, directed by Sarah O’Connell. $7 - $12 La Val’s Subterranean Theatre 1834 Euclid 464-4468 www.impacttheatre.com 

 

“The Misanthrope” by Moliere Through June 10, Fri - Sun, 8 p.m. Berkeley-based Women in Time Productions presents this comic love story full of riotous wooing, venomous scheming and provocative dialogue. All female design and production staff. $17 - $20 Il Teatro 450 449 Powell St. San Francisco 415-433-1172 or visit www.womenintime.com 

 

“Cymbeline” June 2 through June 24, Tues. - Thur. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Sun. 4 p.m. Opening of the California Shakespeare Festival features one of Shakespeare’s first romances, directed by Daniel Fish. $12 - $146. Bruns Memorial Amphitheater off Highway 24 at the Shakespeare Festival Way/Gateway Exit. 548-9666 or www.calshakes.org 

 

“The Laramie Project” Through July 8, Wed. 7 p.m., Tues. and Thur. -Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Written by Moises Kaufmen and members of Tectonic Theater Project, directed by Moises Kaufman. Moises Kaufman and Tectonic members traveled to Laramie, Wyo., after the murder of openly gay student Matthew Shepherd. The play is about the community and the impact Shaper’s death had on its members. $10 - $50. The Roda Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2015 Addison St. 647-2949 www.berkeleyrep.org 

 

Pacific Film Archive June 1: 7:30 Reason, Debate, and a Tale; June 2: 7:00 A River Called Trash; June 3: 5:30 Ruslan and Ludmila. Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft Way (at Bowditch) 642-1412 

 

“The Producers” June 10. Revisit this outrageous comedy classic, starring Zero Mostel and written by Mel Brooks. $2 Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 1414 Walnut St. 848-0237. 

 

Nomad Videofilm Festival 2001 June 1 10:40p.m. featuring world premieres from four S.F. Bay Area mediamakers: “Roadkill” by Antero Alli, “Forest” by Farhad J. Parsa “Visit” by Jesse Miller, B, “Fell Apart” by Doan La Fine Arts Cinema, 2541 Shattuck Ave. $7 (510) 848-1143/464-4640, pix & details: http://www.verticalpool.com/nomad.html 

 

“TRAGOS: A Cyber-Noir Witch Hunt” an Antero Alli film June 2, 10:40pm Fine Arts Cinema, 2541 Shattuck Ave. $7 (510) 848-1143/464-4640, pix & details: http://www.verticalpool.com/tragos.html 

 

“Strong Women - Writers & Heroes of Literature” Fridays Through June 2001, 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly literature course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 549-2970  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tours 

 

 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Free. University of California, Berkeley. 486-4387 

 

Berkeley City Club Tours 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley. The fourth Sunday of every month, Noon - 4 p.m. $2 848-7800  

 

Golden Gate Live Steamers Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Lomas Cantadas Drive at the south end of Tilden Regional Park Small locomotives, meticulously scaled to size. Trains run Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rides: Sunday, noon to 3 p.m., weather permitting. 486-0623  

 

Berkeley Historical Society Walking Tours All tours begin at 10 a.m. and are restricted to 30 people per tour $5 - $10 per tour. June 2: Trish Hawthorne will lead a tour of Thousand Oaks School and Neighborhood; June 23: Sue Fernstrom will lead a tour of Strawberry Creek and West of the UC Berkeley campus 848-0181 

 


Friday June 01, 2001

A compromise for the Beth El dilemma 

Editor: 

As a near-daily user of Berryman Path, a former member of Beth El temple, and a frequent creek cleanup participant, it seems to me that there’s a compromise solution to the Beth El / Codornices Creek controversy. It relies on the historical accident of Berryman Path being legally a street.  

Because of this, the path’s slice of land is unusually wide - 20 feet, while most of Berkeley’s paths are more like 10 or 5 feet. According to project maps (Alternative Parking 1 and 2), Beth El’s proposed parking and drive-through area just barely overlaps the 60-foot-wide creek corridor.  

So, my proposed compromise: The city deeds over Berryman Path to Beth El. Beth El moves the parking area 20 feet north, daylights the creek, builds a 5-foot-wide walking and biking path next to the creek, and gives the city a permanent easement for public use of the new path. 

Beth El would still have to make some other changes in their plan, for instance moving the fenced perimeter and building at least one pedestrian bridge over the creek.  

However they would be getting a large chunk of extra land for their trouble, which seems like a good deal. Also, this idea doesn’t solve any of the non-creek-related objections to the project, but my impression is that those objections are secondary and Beth El has already done a reasonable job of addressing them. 

I hope all involved parties will consider this idea seriously. 

 

Jef Poskanzer Berkeley 

 

Vandalism at garage senseless 

 

Editor: 

Can someone please explain to me the reason for defacing someone’s personal property?  

Is it for laughs? Out of spite? Jealousy? Or sheer boredom? 

Since starting her new job three months ago, my wife began parking in a downtown Berkeley garage.  

One month ago we purchased a new black convertible to further enjoy the divine weather we have all grown accustom to here in Northern California. Being recent transplants from the Northeast, this was just what the doctor ordered. 

Three weeks ago to the day our new car, which has yet to adore a California license plate, was senselessly keyed while my wife was at work.  

The entire passenger side of the car was damaged along with the rear trunk lid.  

All of which occurred in broad daylight. Does anyone monitor these garages?  

Does the garage have no responsibility for maintaining a safe and secure environment? After all we do pay a monthly fee to park in the garage, it’s not free. 

The cost to repair the vehicle was $1,500, most of which came directly out of our own pocket, and the repair process itself took three weeks.  

We also learned of another car (same make) which had been keyed the very same day. 

It’s anyone’s guess how many others failed to file a complaint with the garage.  

This act of violence and destruction should not be tolerated in our community.  

Worst of all this was not an individual targeting another, but rather someone simply destroying a stranger’s property. 

This morning, a mere three weeks after the incident and only one day out of the shop, the car was keyed a second time. Apparently, several others in the garage were also damaged.  

This time, in addition to filing a complaint with the garage, the police were called.  

Of course, this will solve nothing.  

I have a difficult time understanding how this happens not once, but numerous time in the same garage.  

For those looking for parking, there is one more free spot available downtown.  

You’re welcome to it. 

Douglas Scalia Concord 

 

Need staff to monitor our environment 

Editor: 

Berkeley is the “Eco-city” with the environmentally progressive reputation, right? WRONG!! It appears that Berkeley’s priorities have changed. 

The Toxics Management Division is the department that Berkeley citizens, the Council, and the Environmental Commission rely upon to provide local environmental protection from exposures to substances such as chromium, lead, dioxin, pesticides, radioactive materials, airborne chemicals, hazardous waste, etc.  

Recently I learned from the city finance director that the additional critically-needed staff position for the TMD has been cut from this year’s city budget proposal. According to the TMD manager, without the needed additional staff, the department not only will be unable to implement already approved but unfunded programs such as lead abatement, woodsmoke education, dioxin curtailment, and well surveying, but will have to drastically cut back on many of the services it currently provides such as dealing with pollution from manufacturers in West Berkeley and timely response to newly discovered environmental threats.  

For example, you probably have read about the hexavalent chromium (CR6) recently uncovered in a groundwater plume at the Harrison Playfield site and the arsenic in wood in play structures in children’s play parks.Is this gross misprioritization of the use of city resources OK with you?  

If not, it is not too late, but I urge you to act quickly because the budget package is due to be voted on by the City Council on June 26.  

Without council intervention, senior city staff fully intends to let this happen. Please call your City Councilmember and/or Mayor Shirley Dean and tell them that they must vote to reinstate the TMD position in this year’s budget. Your councilmember’s office phone number is listed in the White Pages of the telephone directory or you can obtain it and email addresses by calling the City Clerk at 644-6480. 

Jami Caseber Berkeley 

Director, Citizens Opposing a Polluted Environment 

Berkeley 


Friday June 01, 2001


Friday, June 1

 

Free Writing, Cashiering  

& Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

“Rumi: Mystic and Romantic  

Love, Stories of Masnavi” 

5 p.m. 

St. John’s Presbyterian Church 

2727 College Ave. 

Free public talk by Professor Andrew Vidich. Childcare and vegetarian food provided. 

707-226-7703 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave.  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Board of Library Trustees  

Special Meeting 

12 noon 

Department of Human Resources 

Bay Laurel Room 

2180 Milvia, 1st floor 

Regular meeting with public comments followed by closed interview session for the Director of Library Services position. 

 

City Commons Club,  

Luncheon and Speaker 

11:15 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Joe Garrett, speaking on “Survival in the Banking Wars.” Lunch served at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 


Saturday, June 2

 

Car Seat Safety Clinic 

10:00 a.m. 

Kittredge St. Parking Garage, second level 

The Berkeley Police Department will demonstrate proper techniques for car seat installation and use, and offer safety checks and tips. Families are welcome to visit the Habitot Children’s Museum located across the street from the garage. Free. 

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, gives free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

Visit www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Family Storytime  

10:30 a.m.  

Berkeley Main Library  

2121 Allston Way  

Storyteller Olga Loya tells tales from around the world. Geared for children three to eight and their parents. Free  

649-3964 

 

Commission On Disability  

Hearings 

1 - 4 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst St. 

Open forum, opportunity for public to present ideas and concerns about barriers for people with disabilities and accessibility of City facilities. Public comment on Berkeley’s proposed “Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan.” Will continue on June 13. 

981-6342 

 

Longfellow Middle School’s  

Outdoor Arts Festival 

Noon - 4 p.m. 

Longfellow Courtyard 

1500 Derby St. 

Live music performances, silent auction of student and community art, BBQ and bake sale. Talent showcase and awards ceremony from 2 - 3 p.m. Free admission 665-1980 

 

Birdwatching Walk  

and Breakfast 

8 a.m. 

Botanical Garden 

200 Centennial Drive 

This is the time of year when the greatest variety of birds can be found in the Garden, including some rare species. Breakfast and a walk. $25, limited space. 643-2755 

 

Berkeley Historical Society  

Walking Tour 

10 a.m. - noon 

Thousand Oaks Elementary School Tour of Thousand Oaks School and neighborhood. $5 - $10, reservations required. 848-0181  

Sunday, June 3  

Rosa Parks Spring  

Celebration and Fund-raiser 

Noon - 4 p.m. 

Rosa Parks 

920 Allston Way 

Silent auction, quilt raffle, cake walk and field events. 

 

— compiled by 

Sabrina Forkish 

 

Free Sailboat Rides  

1 - 4 p.m. 

Cal Sailing Club 

Berkeley Marina 

The Cal Sailing Club, a non-profit sailing and windsurfing cooperative, give free rides on a first come, first served bases on the first full weekend of each month. Wear warm clothes and bring a change of clothes in case you get wet. Children must be at least five years old and must be accompanies by an adult.  

Visit www.cal-sailing.org  

 

Hands-on Bicycle Repair  

Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn how to adjust front and rear derailleurs from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free  

527-4140 

 

Healing Through Tibetan  

Yoga 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Slow movements of Kum Nye encourage self-healing and deeper spiritual dimensions in experience. Demonstrated and discussed by Jack van der Meulen. Free and open to the public. 

843-6812 

 

Family Day at Magnes  

Museum 

12:30 - 3 p.m. 

2911 Russell St. 

A celebration of cultural heritage, the day is co-sponsored by the San Francisco African American Historical and Cultural Society. Free admission. 

www.magnesmuseum.org 

 

Dedication of TROTH 

2 - 4:30 p.m. 

Northside Community Art Garden 

On Northside St. 1 block N. of Hopkins 

TROTH, a special earth wall toolshed and product of nearly 3 years of volunteer labor, will be dedicated today. This “cob” building was created from 50 years of soil, and is the newest of many local works which showcase art and eco-technology. Potluck meal and words from gardeners, City representatives and BART. 

841-3757 

 


Monday, June 4

 

“Boys Will Be Men” 

6:45 p.m. 

Longfellow Theater 

1500 Derby St. 

Special Father’s Day showing of the acclaimed documentary for Berkeley teen’s and their families. Introduced by Tom Weidlinger, followed by audience discussion. Free. 

849-2683 

www.berkeleypta.org 

 


Tuesday, June 5

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion topic is open and will follow the conversation. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Bike for a Better City Action Meeting 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

1356 Rose St. 

www.bfbc.org 

 

Wednesday, June 6 

Fishbowl: “Everything you always wanted to know about the opposite sex but were afraid to ask” 

7 p.m.. to 9 p.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Find out what the other half really thinks! The Fishbowl is an interesting way to anonymously ask those burning questions. $8 for BRJCC members, $10 for general public. 848-0237 x127. 

 

Thursday, June 7  

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a community meeting.  

654-5486 

 

Skin Cancer Screening Clinic 

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center 

Summit Campus  

2450 Ashby Ave. 

Markstein Cancer Education Center 

Skin cancer screenings are offered only to people who, due to limited or no health insurance, would be able to have a suspicious mole or other skin changes examined. Appointments are required.  

869-8833 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly summer concert series. This week Advanced Jazz Workshop under direction of Mike Zilber. 

 

Friday, June 8  

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Backpacking Essentials 

7 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Review the fundamental how-tos of selecting gear for a weekend backpacking trip. Free 

527-4140 

 

City Commons Club, Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Doris Sloan, Ph.D., on “Treasures Along the Silk Road Oases.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 

Saturday, June 9 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Celebrates original crafts, international diversity, and community life. One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live performances and a variety of food. Free admission.  

Call 986-9337 

 

The Bite of REI 2001 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

REI 

1338 San Pablo Ave. 

Taste some of the best, lightweight backpacking food and energy snacks available. At 1 p.m. Rick Greenspan and Hal Kahn with demonstrate how to turn your outdoor trips into gourmet adventures. Free 

527-4140 

 

La Pena 26th Anniversary  

Benefit to Honor Dolores Huerta 

7 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

Music performances, slide show and raffle in honor of special guest Doloras Huerta, farm worker’s and women’s rights advocate. Huerta worked with Cesar Chavez to establish and lead the National Farm Workers Association in the 1960’s, and has worked tirelessly to improve the lives of farm workers for decades. Proceeds will go to La Pena and Huerta’s medical expenses. $20 - $25. 

849-2568 www.lapena.org 

 

Sunday, June 10 

Counteracting Negative Emotions 

6 p.m. 

Tibetan Nyingma Institute 

1815 Highland Place 

Exercises presented by Sylvia Gretchen, Dean of Nyingma Studies. Free and open to the public. 

843-681 

 

Live Oak Park Fair 

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

One hundred artists and craftsmakers display their work, with live entertainment and food. Free admission.  

Call 986-9337 

 

“Kindertransport: A Personal Account” 

10:30 a.m. 

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

1414 Walnut St. 

Hear the moving story Ralph Samuel, who escaped Nazi Germany as the age of eight. Samuel was one of an estimated 10,000 children who were rescued through the efforts of the Kindertransport operation. $4 BRJCC members, $5 for general public. Admission includes brunch. 848-0237. 

 

Tuesday, June 12 

 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Cooking for BEFHP Women 

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

BEFHP Women’s Resource Center 

2140 Dwight Way 

Come help the Berkeley Emergency Food and Housing Project prepare, serve, and cleanup a hot meal prepared for Berkeley’s homeless women and children. Teens 16+. 

 

 

Wednesday, June 13  

Defining Diversity 

7 - 9 p.m. 

Ecology Center 

2530 San Pablo Ave.  

Different interpretations of biological and cultural diversity and how it’s used for very different purposes.  

548-2220 

 

Commission On Disability Hearings 

4 - 6 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center 

1901 Hearst St. 

Open forum, opportunity for public to present ideas and concerns about barriers for people with disabilities and accessibility of City facilities. Public comment on Berkeley’s proposed “Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan.”  

981-6342 

 

Lead-Safe Painting and Home Remodeling 

6 - 8 p.m. 

Claremont Branch Library 

2940 Benvenue Ave. 

Free course on how to detect and remedy lead hazards in the home. 

567-8280 

 

“Illusions of the ‘New Economy’” 

7:30 p.m. 

La Pena Cultural Center 

3105 Shattuck Ave. 

Talk by professor and author Dick Walker. $5 donation requested. 

415-863-6637  

 

Claremont Elmwood Neighborhood Association General Meeting 

7:30 - 9:30 p.m. 

St. Clement’s Episcopal Church 

2837 Claremont Blvd. 

Covers area of Berkeley south of Dwight Way and east of Collage Avenue. Presentations on neighborhood issues. 

549-3793 

 

Thursday, June 14 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley High Folklorico De Aztlan. 

 

Friday, June 15  

Free Writing, Cashiering & Computer Literacy Class 

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  

AJOB Adult School  

1911 Addison St.  

Free classes offered Monday through Friday. Stop by and register or call 548-6700. 

www.ajob.org 

 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

City Commons Club, Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Edward Fox on “Regional Development Plans of The Wilderness Society.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 

Saturday, June 16  

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Berkeley Arts Festival Music Circus 

1 p.m. - 5 p.m. 

Shattuck Ave. between University Ave. and Channing Way 

The Music Circus will feature dozens of eclectic performances ranging from string quartets to blues and jazz. Free bus fare to and from the event offered by AC Transit. 665-9496. Free. 

 

 

Tuesday, June 19 

Berkeley Camera Club  

7:30 p.m. 

Northbrae Community Church  

941 The Alameda  

Share your slides and learn what other photographers are doing. Monthly field trips. 

Call Wade, 531-8664 

 

Young Queer Women’s Group 

8 - 9:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center 

2712 Telegraph Ave.  

Make some new friends, expand your horizons and get support with a bunch of queer women all in the same place at the same time (somewhere between 18 and 25).  

548-8283 or visit www.pacificcenter.org 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

2 - 7 p.m. 

Derby Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Intelligent Conversation  

7 - 9 p.m.  

Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center 

A discussion group open to all, regardless of age, religion, viewpoint, etc. This time the discussion will center on frugality, generosity, simplifying life, and dealing with money. Informally led by Robert Berend, who founded similar groups in L.A., Menlo Park, and Prague. Bring light snacks/drinks to share. Free  

527-5332 

 

Fibromyalgia Support Group  

Noon - 2 p.m.  

Alta Bates Medical Center 

Maffly Auditorium, Herrick Campus  

2001 Dwight Way  

This session will be a rap session.  

601-0550 

 

Thursday, June 21 

Berkeley Metaphysical Toastmasters Club  

6:15 - 7:30 p.m.  

2515 Hillegass Ave.  

Public speaking skills and metaphysics come together. Ongoing first and third Thursdays each month.  

Call 869-2547 

 

LGBT Catholics Group  

7:30 p.m. 

Newman Hall  

2700 Dwight Way (at College)  

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender Catholics group are “a spiritual community committed to creating justice.” This session will be a “Pride Mass.”  

654-5486 

 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Capoeira Arts Cafe. 

 

Friday, June 22 

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1 - 3 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

City Commons Club, Luncheon and Speaker 

11:45 a.m. 

Berkeley City Club 

2315 Durant Ave. 

This week featuring Jeffrey Riegle, Ph.D., on “Historical Reasons for China’s Current Conduct.” Come early for social hour. Lunch at 11:45 for $11-$12.25. Come at 12:30 to hear the speaker only for $1, students free. Reservations required for three or more. 

848-3533 

 

Saturday, June 23 

“Feast of Fire” benefit for the Crucible 

10:30 p.m. 

The Crucible 

1036 Ashby Ave. 

Act III, The Flight of Icarus, will feature live music, and performances by several groups including Capacitor and Xeno. Price of admission benefits the Crucible, a multi-disciplinary community arts center. $20 at the door. 

 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 

Sunday, June 24 

Hands-On Bicycle Repair Clinics  

11 a.m. - Noon  

Recreational Equipment, Inc.  

1338 San Pablo Ave.  

Learn how to fix a flat from one of REI’s bike technicians. All you need to bring is your bike. Free  

527-4140 

 

Thursday, June 28 

Summer Noon Concerts 2001 

Noon - 1 p.m. 

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza 

Shattuck at Center St. 

Weekly concert series. This week Berkeley Opera performs pieces of Carmen. 

 

Friday, June 29  

Living Philosophers  

10 a.m. - Noon  

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way)  

Hear and entertain the ideas of some modern day philosophers: Jacob Needleman, J. Revel, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Saul Kripke, Richard Rorty and others. Every Friday, except holidays. Facilitated by H.D. Moe.  

 

Therapy for Trans Partners  

6 - 7:30 p.m.  

Pacific Center for Human Growth  

2712 Telegraph Ave. (at Derby)  

A group open to partners of those in transition or considering transition. The group is structured to be a safe place to receive support from peers and explore a variety of issues, including sexual orientation, coming out, feelings of isolation, among other topics. Intake process required. Meeting Fridays through August 17.  

$8 - $35 sliding scale per session  

Call 548-8283 x534 or x522 

 

Strong Women - The Arts, Herstory and Literature 

1:15 - 3:15 p.m. 

North Berkeley Senior Center  

1901 Hearst Ave. (at MLK Jr. Way) 

Taught by Dr. Helen Rippier Wheeler, author of “Women and Aging: A Guide to Literature,” this is a free weekly cultural studies course in the Berkeley Adult School’s Older Adults Program.  

Call 549-2970  

 

Saturday, June 30 

Berkeley Farmers’ Market 

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Center Street between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Milvia Street 

548-3333 

 


Shakespeare in the park

By Ben Lumpkin Daily Planet staff
Friday June 01, 2001

Students get taste of Elizabethan Era with ‘Summer’ play 

 

Oxford Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Dana Wahlberg doesn’t have the luxury of speaking in Elizabethan English herself. 

Between lessons Thursday Wahlberg was multitasking at a dizzying pace. With one eye on documents and one ear to the phone, she still managed to fire off comments, commands and questions to her students, her head swiveling back and forth across the room like a tennis instructor’s ball machine. 

“What’s the matter?” Wahlberg asked one student, having somehow picked a crestfallen face out of the flurry of activity in the room, through the tiniest of glances in the girl’s direction.  

“You don’t look too happy,” she said. “You were great. Just a little louder tomorrow.” 

Question, comment, praise, and advice in just 16 words. How Shakespeare’s head would spin! 

And yet it is no doubt thanks to people like Wahlberg that Shakespeare is alive and well in the age of sounds bites and 60-hour work weeks. 

For the last 12 years, Wahlberg has made it her personal mission to involve each student who passes through her class in a Shakespeare production.  

It’s not part of a specially funded after-school program.  

It’s not part of a districtwide arts curriculum. It is one woman’s crusade to expose her students to the work of a playwright some scholars credit with “inventing” the English language. 

“This is the most important thing I do for their education,” Wahlberg said. 

While math, science and history lessons might sail out of a student’s memory by the end of the summer, Wahlberg said, “Every single child in this room will remember when they’re 50 years old that they were ‘blank blank’ in ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream.’ ” 

For Wahlberg, it isn’t about giving students a quick taste of Shakespeare. She will accept nothing less than the total immersion that comes from memorizing Shakespeare’s lines and bringing them to life before an audience of peers. 

“My students speak Elizabethan English at home,” Wahlberg said. “They take to (Shakespeare) faster than adults. They just really, really understand it because Shakespeare’s themes are so universal.” 

For the last six weeks, Wahlberg’s 23 students have been busy memorizing lines from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” For the last two weeks they have hiked up the hill to Codornices Park once a day to rehearse in the blazing sun. Thursday morning was dress rehearsal day, in front of an audience of kindergartners. The main performance is at 10 a.m. today at the north end of Codornices Park at Euclid Avenue and Eunice Street. 

“She should teach high school drama,” Oxford student Tim Hewitt said of Wahlberg after the rehearsal Thursday. “She makes us work so hard for just fifth graders.” 

But Wahlberg is unapologetic. All students secretly want a chance to perform on stage, she said, because it gives them a chance to shine. Furthermore, she said, the experience of overcoming stage fright and seeing a difficult performance through to its end does wonders for a fifth grader’s self-confidence. 

Anyone present at the rehearsal could see all the hard work had paid off. The enthusiasm, energy and thought the students put into the delivery of their lines – many of them lines that could twist the tongues of the most literate adult – was enough to make the kindergartners buckle over with laughter. 

It was even enough to spark an uncharacteristic burst of verbosity from Wahlberg. 

“This is the best dress rehearsal I’ve ever seen,” Wahlberg told her students, as the gathered in the shade after the show. “You were tremendously great.” 

An hour later, as they prepared for the start of a new lesson back at Oxford school, the remark still seemed to be ringing in the students’ ears. 

“She thinks we can do anything,” said Spencer Moody, one of the lead characters in the play. 

Hewitt pondered the remark a moment before responding. 

“Basically, we can,” he said.


McKnight makes move south to fill Cal spot

Daily Planet Wire Services
Friday June 01, 2001

Kirsten McKnight, a veteran of the Pacific-10 Conference, has been named assistant women’s basketball coach at the University of California, head coach Caren Horstmeyer announced Thursday.  

McKnight fills the vacancy created when Sue Phillips-Chargin opted to return to her previous job as head women’s basketball coach at Archbishop Mitty High School. Her hiring completes the Cal staff, which also includes assistant coaches Shaunice Warr and Camille Burkes.  

“We’re excited with our new addition to the Cal coaching staff,” said Horstmeyer. “Kirsten brings well-rounded experience from her time coaching at Oregon. She knows what it takes to build a program into a consistent championship-caliber team.”  

McKnight’s responsibilities at Cal will include assisting with recruiting and working with the development of the guards. Horstmeyer also announced that Warr would be assuming additional recruiting responsibilities as the senior member of her staff.  

McKnight returns home to the Bay Area after serving for three seasons as an assistant coach at the University of Oregon. During her tenure, the Ducks won two Pac-10 championships and competed in three NCAA Tournaments. 

The Larkspur product also competed in four NCAA Tournaments as a guard for the Oregon women’s basketball team beginning with the 1994-95 season. She began her collegiate playing career as a walk-on and was awarded a full scholarship by her junior season, and was voted by her teammates as the 1998 Bev Smith Most Inspirational Player.


Study details skate park’s chrome 6 cleanup

By John Geluardi Daily Planet staff
Friday June 01, 2001

The Parks and Waterfront Department released an environmental study Wednesday on the proposed Harrison Street Skate Park nearly seven months after discovery of a chrome 6 groundwater plume halted work on the project. 

The study, or Subsequent Mitigated Negative Declaration, explained that its intent was to “describe the re-design of the skate park in light of the Hexavalent chromium (chrome 6) found in the groundwater and to provide for public view of this information.” 

The study reviewed actions the city has taken and solutions implemented since the discovery of the chrome 6 plume. 

Since the Stop Work Order was issued for the 18,000-square-foot skate park in November, the city has spent at least $295,000 in cleanup and re-design fees. Ed Murphy, project manager for the skate park said the cost of city staff time has not been estimated yet. 

One city commissioner said the additional costs could have been avoided had the Parks and Waterfront Department followed normal procedures.  

“As soon as the skate park design called for digging nine feet down for the skate bowls, the city should have ordered a study of the groundwater,” said Community Environmental Advisory Commissioner LA Wood. “When you do things backward you end up spending more money and that so far has been the legacy of Harrison Field.” 

Parks and Waterfront Director Lisa Caronna said her department went forward with the project based on a 1999 initial environmental study that did not indicate there was chromium 6 in groundwater below the construction site.  

But the 1999 study did not consider the excavation of the skate bowls, which had not yet been planned. 

“Let me just say that we had been involved with the site for four years before the project began and we did testing, testing and more testing,” Caronna said. “But we are not avoiding the fact that we made a mistake.” 

The skate park is located at Fifth and Harrison streets immediately adjacent to the Harrison Soccer Field. The soccer field and skate park are flanked by Interstate 80, train tracks and a variety of industrial businesses. 

Chrome 6 is a Class A carcinogen that is harmful if swallowed and especially dangerous if inhaled, according to Environmental Protection Agency. According to the study, the groundwater in the skate bowls contained levels of chrome 6 between 1,200 and 2,100 micrograms per liter. 

A December study by the Emeryville-based SOMA Corporation determined that there was little threat to humans because the site had been closed off and there were no apparent pathways for human intake. 

Problems for the skate park began last November when groundwater flowed into pits being excavated for the bowls. Bill MacKay, one of the owners of Western Roto Engravers Color Tech on Sixth Street, happened to be across the street from the site, noticed the water and immediately notified Toxics Management Department that the water may contain chrome 6. 

MacKay suspected the presence of the chrome 6 because his company was responsible for the plume. He said he reported the plume to the city in 1990 and has since spent nearly $1 million to remove the responsible tanks from his shop and monitor the plume’s movement, which he regularly reported to the city. 

Since the discovery, the city hired private toxic management contractors to haul away 45,000 gallons of contaminated water and another 80,000 gallons were stored next to the site in 20,000 gallon tanks where it was treated and released into a nearby storm drain, according to Hazardous Materials Supervisor Nabil Al-Hadithy. 

Murphy said the clean up of groundwater was completed Thursday. 

According to the study, the skate park design has been altered so the five bowls will be mostly above ground. In addition, Murphy said the excavated bowls were compacted with gravel, covered with thick sheet of plastic and will soon be covered with six-inches of concrete to assure the groundwater is completely sealed off from the surface area of the skate park. 

“Ideally we’d like to have the park completed something this year,” Murphy said. 

Two air quality studies are about to begin at Harrison within the next week. One will monitor airborne particulate matter generated by the heavy traffic on Interstate 80, diesel fuel emissions from trains and the garbage transfer station at Second and Gilman streets.  

The other study will monitor the air over the park for chrome 6. Murphy said the results of the studies won’t be available for at least a year. 

“We have spent more money evaluating the environmental conditions of this site and know less about it that any other site I know of,” Wood said.


Cal crew wins heat

Daily Planet Wire Services
Friday June 01, 2001

The Cal men’s varsity eight won its opening round heat at the IRA National Championship regatta on the Cooper River in Cherry Hill, N.J., on Thursday. The win advanced the Bears to the semifinal in the Varsity Challenge Cup.  

The top three finishers in the each of Friday’s two semifinals will advance to the grand final and race for the National Championship on Saturday, June 2. 

“It was a good day for all our crews,” said Cal head coach Steve Gladstone. “They started the regatta with some solid performances.”  

In the varsity heat, the Bears got off to a quick start and immediately took a four-seat advantage over Wisconsin. Cal had a length by the 750-meter mark and had broken open water by the 1000. Cal controlled the race from the front, taking the win and advancing to the semifinal. Cal’s winning time was the slowest of any varsity heat, but it was evident that there was plenty of untapped speed as the crew rowed the final 500 meters at approximately 30 strokes per minute. Princeton, Brown and Penn won the other heats and advanced with Cal to the semifinal round, while the other semifinalists will be determined in the repechage round.


Time almost up for deciding courthouse fate

By Judith Scherr Daily Planet staff
Friday June 01, 2001

Options for building a new courthouse in Berkeley are practically nil, Deputy City Manager Phil Kamlarz said Thursday. 

Kamlarz and City Manager Weldon Rucker met with county officials Wednesday to try once more to push for time to explore building a new county courthouse somewhere in Berkeley. But time seems to have just about run out, Kamlarz said.  

The county is ready to remodel the building at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, making it earthquake safe, more secure, improving the ventilation and bringing it into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, said Assistant County Administrator Dona Linton. Court representatives are pushing the county to have the building ready by the end of 2003.  

Linton said that as soon as the county supervisors approve a resolution that will be before them on Tuesday, the county can begin to develop the project. 

“We have to move forward right away,” she said Thursday. 

Kamlarz, on the other hand, said he thought the city had until June 30 to convince the county to evaluate new sites. He said even if a site were found, he doubted the city could come up with the funds for a project of this magnitude. It would take a ballot measure to raise the funds, he said. Costs for a new building have been variously estimated at $20 to $65 million. 

Building a new Alameda County Courthouse in Berkeley has been in the eye of a political firestorm ever since the courts showed interest in the project more than a decade ago. 

City Council factions fought over different sites and community organizations took sides as well. Among the locations rejected was a site near Addison Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way. Objections included the removal of affordable housing units and a landmarked building.  

Another location considered was the “Hinks” parking garage, located next to the downtown library. The owner reportedly didn’t want to sell the property and downtown businesses objected to the location. 

Other sites considered and rejected included the Ashby BART station and the North Berkeley BART station.  

More recently the Pacific Gas & Electric building on the corner of Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Center Street has been under consideration. A PG&E spokesperson said it is for sale. Old City Hall, where the school administration is currently located, has also been considered. 

Meanwhile the county has redirected funds it once had set aside for Berkeley to a new courthouse it plans to build in Dublin. 

Only $3 million remains. It will be spent on the remodeling, Linton said. 

Part of the Civic Center planning process that included the new Public Safety Building was an Environmental Impact Report. Open space where the county court now sits was part of that plan and considered in the approval of the EIR, a document mandated in certain instances by the California Environmental Quality Act. Remodeling rather than razing the courthouse “may be a violation of the civic center EIR,” said City Councilmember Dona Spring, underscoring the importance of keeping a court building and court functions in the city. 

Linton said any question of problems with the EIR will have to be addressed by the city and not the county. 

If the city is obligated to accept the courthouse where it stands, Spring said the county ought to hire a consultant to design the building facade to be compatible with the historic Old City Hall to the south and the new Public Safety Building to the North.  

Mayor Shirley Dean agreed. 

“When we sited the Public Safety Building (next to the courthouse), we did not plan on that old building being there,” said the mayor, who has participated in many of the meetings with county officials. 

While tearing the building down is now out of the question, Linton said redoing the facade is part of the plan.  

“The county is in the position to call the shots,” Spring said. 


‘Belt’ a strapping story of prostate cancer

By Sari Friedman Daily Planet correspondent
Friday June 01, 2001

 

Readings 

 

‘Hit Below the Belt: Facing  

Up to Prostate Cancer’ 

By F. Ralph Berberich, M.D. 

Ten Speed Press 

Cody’s  

(2454 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley) Tues., July 17, 2001 at 7:30 p.m. 

 

Barnes & Noble  

(2352 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley) Thurs., July 19, 2001 at 7:30 p.m. 

 

 

What happens when a socially and financially secure 55-year-old, white male Berkeley resident, who is a pediatrician and a former oncologist is stricken with that most common and (considered) humiliating of conditions? Prostate cancer.  

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the second-most prevalent cancer afflicting American men. Skin cancer is the first. Men over the age of 50 are at most risk, and black men are twice as likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than whites. 

All the rates of prostate cancer in America are currently on the rise. 

“Hit Below the Belt: Facing Up to Prostate Cancer” by F. Ralph Berberich, M.D., tells the story of one medically-savvy patient’s progress – from the awful shock of the initial diagnosis to the doctor’s weary and battered arrival on the wary plateau of remission.  

Unlike most first person accounts of having had prostate cancer, “Hit Below the Belt” is written in the most physically and emotionally graphic style imaginable.  

Seemingly everything Berberich experienced is described such as sexual responses of a man newly deprived of the male hormone, testosterone: “It’s one thing to read that you may lose sexual interest, and it is another to walk down the street, see a gorgeous woman, and have your mind register familiar sexual attraction but only in theory (while another more powerful imposed hormone force repulses any sexual response).” 

Berberich describes the exacting torment of waiting for medical results. He vividly enumerates the experience of radiation treatment. Riveting descriptions of the way a surgeon’s knife cuts through the tissue planes are also supplied. 

Dr. Berberich provides detailed accounts of virtually every prostate cancer treatment option available to western medicine in the United States and Canada, ranging from radical prostatectomy to hormone deprivation. Since this is a patient well-ensconced in the medical profession, he is able to phone, e-mail and visit numerous specialists; he is able to spend about a year exploring and understanding an array of medical journals; and, with the help of contacts, he gains relatively easy emergency access to a helpful and expensive drug not covered under his medical insurer’s formulary.  

In a horrible twist of fate the author’s partner is told she has been diagnosed with endometrial cancer on the very day that Berberich is given the diagnosis of prostate cancer.  

Berberich praises his partner for the way she takes care of him. And he discusses the importance of his family, religion, and other support networks in assisting a patient on the road toward health. 

One of the author’s mentors once told him, “With cancer, ya never know.” 

Will having cancer lead to the renewed hope of long life or to a quickly approaching physical death? Will the patient experience psychological or spiritual renewal or will he become increasingly self absorbed?  

For a physician, accustomed to being an authority on other people’s health, being afflicted with a serious illness – and trying to meet the enormous challenges therein – can be especially poignant.


Regulators ‘close to proving power manipulation’

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — A year after California’s electricity price shocks began, regulators say they are close to proving how power wholesalers aggravated a crisis that so far has raised customer rates by $5.7 billion, saddled two utilities with $8.2 billion in losses and dumped a $13 billion bailout bill on taxpayers. 

California lawmakers and regulators are determined to recover some of that money from the power wholesalers who have cashed in on the crisis. 

Toward that end, the California Public Utilities Commission, Attorney General Bill Lockyer and the California Electricity Oversight Board are trying to prove out-of-state wholesalers illegally manipulated the market to create artificial supply shortages that have driven wholesale electricity prices as high as $1,900 per megawatt hour. 

Before California’s power woes began in June 2000, wholesale prices on the spot market rarely climbed above $150 per megawatt hour. 

California’s Legislature also has formed two special investigative committees to look into the allegations of market misconduct. And at least five suits, including one filed by San Francisco City Attorney Louise Renne, are seeking damages from power wholesalers on behalf of all Californians. 

At the very least, the investigators say they will show the wholesalers violated federal laws against “unjust and unreasonable” electricity prices. 

“I don’t think these are going to be very hard cases to make,” said Owen Clements, chief special litigator for San Francisco. “Even if they didn’t break the letter of the law, they clearly have violated the spirit of the law.” 

The investigators also suspect that the wholesalers have orchestrated a variety of more sinister abuses, possibly by colluding. Those allegations will be hard to prove, according to legal and energy experts. 

The power wholesalers say they have done nothing wrong, arguing that they are being turned into scapegoats by a 1996 deregulation law sculpted by California lawmakers and the two utilities, Pacific Gas and Electric and Southern California Edison, that have reported a combined $8.2 billion in losses since June 2000. 

Michael Aguirre, a San Diego attorney handling one of the private suits, fears California regulators and politicians are spending more time rattling cages than digging into the labyrinthine operations of the power wholesalers. 

“Investigations like this require a lot of hard work, not a lot of rhetoric,” Aguirre said. “So far, everyone seems to be talking loudly while carrying a small stick.” 

The PUC investigation appears to be the farthest along. 

With the help of former utility workers hired to assist in the investigation, the PUC has been poring through power plant documents in an effort to prove that some facilities shut down unnecessarily — sometimes at the direction of Houston energy traders monitoring the market over the Internet — to diminish supply and drive up prices. 

Once prices spiked, the plants ramped up production to reap big profits, under the theory being investigated by the PUC and Lockyer’s office. 

“I feel very confident that we are finding compelling evidence to prove our case,” said Gary Cohen, the PUC’s general counsel. 

Cohen said the PUC could file a civil suit against the wholesalers by the end of June. Lockyer expects to wrap up his investigation in late July, at the earliest. 

“The (wholesalers) say they are just playing the market the way that it was set up to operate, and to a certain degree, that’s true,” Cohen said. “We need to come up with a legal theory to show what they did was wrong.” 

Both the PUC and Lockyer also are investigating allegations that the power wholesalers used industry Web sites to accumulate sensitive supply and demand information in a possible violation of antitrust laws. 

To gain insight into the behind-the-scenes decisions made by wholesalers during the past year, Lockyer is offering multimillion dollar rewards to power plant workers and energy traders who provide the state with inside information that helps prove the power companies manipulated the market. 

Power wholesalers say regulators are way off base in their probes. Industry officials maintain that the plants, many of which are 30 to 40 years old, shut down for legitimate equipment repairs and maintenance. 

“No one in our industry cuts back on production so a competitor can make more money. It just doesn’t happen, at least not on planet Earth,” said Gary Ackerman, executive director of the Western Power Trading Forum, a Menlo Park trade group. 

——— 

LONG BEACH LAWSUIT 

 

Sick of what they call outrageous monthly gas bills, 12 Long Beach residents sued their city Thursday, saying officials violated the law by charging much more than neighboring Southern California Gas Co. 

The lawsuit, which seeks class-action status, claims $38 million in damages. It was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court. 

“A lot of people have experienced 600 percent rate increases here,” lead plaintiff John Donaldson, a 55-year-old retired executive, said. 

“To be fair, gas has gone up for everybody. Everyone is paying double what they did a year ago. But if you live in Long Beach, you are paying four to six times more than you did a year ago,” Donaldson said. 

The suit alleges that the city, which runs its own gas utility, began overcharging in December 2000. For the previous 20 years, the city had based its rates on Southern California Gas, a formula required by city law, the suit says. 

Long Beach City Attorney Robert E. Shannon blamed the high rates on the city’s suppliers, saying they charged “grossly inflated rates” that the city had no choice but to pass on to residents. 

“While the city of Long Beach recognizes and sympathizes with its natural gas consumers who were subjected to an outrageous rise in natural gas rates beginning in December 2000, the rate increase was due to an unlawful conspiracy by other parties to restrict the supply of gas purchased by the city,” Shannon said in a statement issued Thursday. 

 

He said the city sued those suppliers earlier this year and if it wins any damages it will pass them on to consumers. 

Attorney Virginia Keeny, who represents those suing Long Beach, complained that her clients have been trying for months to get relief from their City Council, only to be told to “wear warmer sweaters.” 

“It is outrageous and unfeeling, especially in light of the fact that may of the people who were coming to the City Council meetings were elderly and poor and were facing cutoff notices because of $500 gas bills,” she said. 

Those suing also say the city brought on the crisis itself by illegally spending money it was supposed to have kept in a reserve account to cover price increases. 

In the past 10 years, the city has transferred a total of $250 million from its gas department into its general fund, Donaldson said. But he wasn’t sure how much of that money might have been improperly moved. 

“There is nothing wrong with taking extra funds and putting them in the general fund,” he said. “There is something wrong with doing that at the expense of making sure the utility is being run responsibly.” 

 

 

On The Net: 

California Public Utilities Commission: http://www.cpuc.ca.gov 

California attorney general: http://www.caag.state.ca.us 


NASA finds lots of asteroids have twins or moons

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

 

LOS ANGELES — Astronomers are finding a new batch of binary asteroids – space rocks locked in an orbital dance with a partner. 

The latest discovery was announced Wednesday when radar images showed that asteroid 1999 KW4 is actually a pair of objects separated by about a mile, something that had been suspected for the past year. 

Radar images show a small moon just one-quarter of a mile across running clockwise around a companion three times as large. 

The discovery boosts to roughly 10 the number of binary asteroids imaged by radar since 1993 when the spacecraft Galileo spotted the first, 243 Ida and its tiny moon Dactyl. Another seven suspected pairs haven’t been confirmed. 

The small tally is expected to grow as astronomers refine the techniques used to view the miniature planetary systems. 

“Some day, people will go to a binary asteroid and what an interesting sky they will see,” said Steven Ostro of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 

Observations of paired craters on the Earth and other bodies led astronomers to suspect that binary asteroids existed. 

On Earth, the craters – all of equal age – are too large and too far apart to have been formed by a single asteroid breaking up in the atmosphere. The odds of two asteroids hitting the Earth in the same location and at the same time are slim – unless they were paired before impact. Not all asteroid moons orbit asteroids. The two moons of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, are probably asteroids captured in orbit by the planet’s gravitational tug. 

Czech astronomer Petr Pravec said the study of near-Earth asteroids is becoming more important – especially if scientists are going to entertain ways to defend the planet from potential asteroid impacts. 

“If some of them are on a collision course with the Earth in the future, it will be more difficult to divert them than if they were a single asteroid,” Pravec said. The asteroid pairs found so far vary in their size and relationship. Pairs like 90 Antiope are nearly twins, each 50 miles or so across. Some, like 2000 DP107, are also of about equal size, but just hundreds of feet in diameter. Others are far more lopsided, like the case of 87 Sylvia, which at 176 miles across dwarfs its moon, just 5 percent as large. 

Collisions may have formed many of the binary asteroids, meaning each little moon is, literally, a chip off the old block. In other cases, passing close to Earth may have pulled off material, dumping it into a mini-orbit. 

In the case of 1999 KW4, the objects may be the remnants of an extinct comet. Orbital observations will allow astronomers to determine the mass, density, composition and porosity of each member of the pair. 

“That tells us an awful lot about these things without having to go there,” said Bill Merline, a senior research scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., who has discovered three binary asteroids.


Groups offer feds deal for endangered species

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

LOS ANGELES — Environmental groups are offering a deal they hope federal officials can’t refuse: Some relief from lawsuits in exchange for quickly getting species declared endangered. 

Members of two groups well-known for filing lawsuits to protect declining species — the Center for Biological Diversity and Defenders of Wildlife — said their offer would break through a moratorium on listings to protect some of the nation’s most imperiled animals and plants. 

But they added that a deal would be only a stopgap. In a report released Wednesday, the groups also called on President Bush to increase funding for endangered species and scrap a proposal that would weaken protections. 

“There are species out there that could literally be extinct in a month or two,” said Kieran Suckling, executive director of the Tucson, Ariz.-based center. For example, he said, the Mississippi gopher frog’s habitat has shrunk to a single pond that itself is shrinking; National Guard units have been pumping water to keep the species alive. 

The groups are offering to allow what effectively would be extensions of court-ordered deadlines for Fish and Wildlife to establish critical habitat for endangered plants and animals. Suckling said the groups may allow reprieves of six months or a year. He wouldn’t say which species are being offered up for delays. 

With the money Fish and Wildlife wouldn’t have to spend complying with court orders, the agency would list some of the most imperiled animals and plants, possibly including the gopher frog, the Aleutian sea otter and the Miami blue butterfly. 

Fish and Wildlife spokesman Hugh Vickery said a deal would free up much-needed funding. “We’re desperate to try to get species on the list,” Vickery said, especially 37 species already proposed for listing. 

Fish and Wildlife banned almost all new listings in November. This month it added one species to the list – the Ventura marsh milkvetch – because most of the work had already been completed. A court order will require the agency to add another species, the yellow billed cuckoo, in July, Vickery said. 

The National Marine Fisheries Service, which declared the white abalone an endangered species Tuesday, does not have a moratorium on listings. 

Vickery said money is tight because environmentalists have been “clogging the works” with lawsuits demanding critical habitat for listed species. When the government declares an area to be critical habitat for a species, Fish and Wildlife biologists must be consulted for any work requiring federal approval. 

Wednesday’s report said the problem is not too many lawsuits, but too little money. Scientist Jane Goodall, actors and seven environmental groups unveiled the report at a press conference where they called on Bush to expand funding and to abandon a proposal that would restrict the public’s ability to sue for more species protections. 

The world’s species “are like rivets in an airplane, and how many rivets can we lose in the airplane that holds all of us aloft?” actor Ed Begley Jr. asked. 

The Bush administration has proposed increasing Fish and Wildlife’s budget for endangered species by $2 million to $8.5 million, but that remains well short of the $120 million the agency says it needs to clear out a backlog of listings. 

Environmental groups propose eliminating the backlog by spending $24 million a year for five years. 

 

 


Sierra fire close to containment; costs in millions

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

SUSANVILLE — Nearly 2,000 firefighters and support personnel battling a forest fire that threatened homes and forced evacuations in the Sierra Nevada expected to have the 4,300-acre blaze fully contained by Friday. 

So far, the mountain fire that burned up to the Susanville city limits about 80 miles northwest of Reno, Nev., has cost $3.7 million in firefighting expenses and destroyed $2.5 million worth of timber, mostly on national forest lands, federal officials said Thursday. 

More than 150 fire engines, 10 helicopters, four air tankers and 18 bulldozers worked to complete containment lines around 70 percent of the so-called Devil fire late Thursday afternoon. 

It was expected to be fully encircled, or contained, late Thursday and the fire fully under control by Monday, June 4, the Susanville Interagency Fire Center said. *The fire threatened the town of Susanville on Sunday, forcing evacuations of 60 homes and a hospital and coating streets with dark soot. 

Gusty, erratic winds caused the fire to jump the Susan River to the north late Wednesday, burning a 5-acre area and again threatening homes in the Thumper Hill and Britt Road areas. But “aggressive attack by helicopters, fire engines and ground crews resulted in containment of the spot with no damage to homes,” said the statement from the fire center, which is staffed by the Bureau of Land Management, Forest Service, National Park Service and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The Susanville blaze started about seven miles west of town Sunday on private timberland after being sparked by a man shooting targets in the woods, said state Dept. of Forestry spokeswoman Wendy McIntosh. The man, whose name was not released, was cited for causing a fire and letting it escape. 

Two firefighters were injured while battling the blaze, including one with a possible broken arm. 

 

 

 

 

The fire skirted eight homes, coming as close as 30 feet to some of them. About 140 residents were evacuated, but most had returned to their homes by Thursday. 


Toilet bubbles could mean clog in sewer line

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

Q: I have a plumbing problem wherein the toilet appears to bubble up water and the bowl completely fills with water upon flushing. It requires about 30 minutes for the water to drain out. When it does, it almost completely drains out. I have tried using a plunger, but to no avail.  

A. It sounds like you have a clog somewhere in your sewer line.  

To clear a clog, get a mirror and use it to look deep into your toilet’s drain. If you see nothing, remove the toilet and see if anything is stuck in the lower portion of its drain.  

If the toilet is A-OK, the next step is to use a closet auger (a short flexible coil-spring cable that is used to dislodge debris in a sewer line). It’s usually safe to attempt to dislodge debris with a closet auger. A closet auger is made for short cleaning runs and doesn’t have the potential to damage a sewer line like its full-size big brother. The sales clerk at the hardware store can explain how to use the smaller device. 

Once the sewer line has been cleaned, the toilet will have to be reinstalled. Don’t forget to use a new wax ring to create a watertight seal between the toilet and the sewer line.  

This is one place you definitely don’t want a leak. The old wax ring will almost certainly leak. A closet auger often solves the problem and eliminates a call to a plumber. 

 

Q: We have a small sink in our family room. The faucet ran hot and cold water slow, but it came out. Then one day it just stopped, no water at all, why? 

A. This is a common problem that can be fixed in one of three ways: by cleaning the aerator at the tip of the faucet spout, by checking or changing the faucet valve gasket(s) or by replacing the nipples (short pipes) that protrude through the wall beneath the sink. 

The first thing you should check is the faucet spout. Unscrew the aerator tip to remove it and turn on the water.  

If water comes out, it means your culprit is a clogged aerator. Clean it with vinegar and a toothbrush. If the aerator isn’t the problem, remove the valve stems to see if the gaskets inside are preventing the free flow of water. 

(For detailed instructions and a picture go to www.onthehouse.com, and type “faucet repair” into the search engine.) 

If your investigation of the faucet proves fruitless, and nothing looks clogged, it’s time to scrutinize the nipples that come out of the wall.  

The nipples are connected to angle stops (shut-off valves) that are below the sink and against the wall. The nipples and the shut-off valves are usually made of different materials.  

Electrolysis occurs when dissimilar metals are in contact. The resultant corrosion can completely clog the inside of a nipple.  

We have no idea why the valve always seems to skate through unscathed. Shut off the main water valve, remove the shut-off valves, remove and replace the nipples with modern Teflon-coated nipples (they won’t corrode because they prevent electrolysis from occurring) and put everything back the way you found it. 

WARNING: The fittings and pipes in the wall could possibly be corroded, as well. This means that the project could turn out to be a big job. Be prepared for this possibility.


Census shows California aging well

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — A steady influx of young immigrant families, coupled with an exodus of older, wealthier residents, has helped California resist the graying seen across America during the last decade. 

The patterns, revealed in new Census Bureau data, will reshape everything from education to crime to public health. And while some see California aging gracefully, others fear dynamics that will pit schools against nursing homes. 

“It’s our youthful immigrants who will take care of us as we’re older, so we better figure out a way to help them now,” said Fernando Torres-Gil, director of UCLA’s Center for Policy Research on Aging. 

Because of its size, California remains the state with the largest number of elderly, according to Census 2000 data. 

Even so, Californians’ median age is just a few months past 33, a full two years younger than the median for the United States. In 1990, with a median age of 31, Californians were about 18 months younger than the rest of the country. 

Only four states are younger. Residents of Utah, with a median age of 27, have not yet celebrated their 10th high school reunion. On the other end, West Virginians – with a median age just short of 39 – live in the state with the oldest population. 

While California is younger than the rest of the country, the state also isn’t aging as quickly. 

One major reason: California is adding kids more quickly than the nation. Nationally, the number of people 19 years old or younger rose 13 percent during the 1990s. In California, the increase was 18 percent. 

Demographers attribute this baby boomlet to the state’s burgeoning population of immigrants, who generally arrive in their late 20s and tend to have more kids than native-born residents. 

Without immigrant-headed families, the state’s average resident would be three years older, according to Steve Camarota of the Washington-based Center for Immigration Studies. 

The divergent interests between an older, whiter population and younger immigrants could inflame debates about who gets public funds. 

“There are plenty of school districts in the Bay Area who a few years back fell into the trap of thinking they wouldn’t need as many facilities,” said Paul Fassinger, research director at the Association of Bay Area Governments. “And now we see prefabricated buildings being wedged into the corners of campuses.” 

Such school districts are searching for new properties in a tight market. Older property owners, some of whom have no kids in local schools, shoulder that tax burden. 

“That is a recipe for political turmoil,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates restricting the flow of immigrants. 

Political tension over immigration has subsided in recent years. Meanwhile, communities that attract new immigrants are growing – and remaining relatively young. 

Nowhere is that clearer than the immigrant-heavy Central Valley. The state’s seven youngest counties are all there, with Merced County the youngest at a median age of 29. 

Immigrant families with four or more kids are no exception in cities such as Fresno. That’s where Socorro Acosta lives with her husband and four kids, ages two months to 14 years. 

“Rent is not that high and there is always work here, in the field or the packing companies,” said Acosta, who came to the United States 12 years ago as a 19-year-old. “Here there are many programs that help the immigrants.” 

In contrast, counties in the state’s northern reaches and Sierra Nevada foothills grew older for two reasons – retirees arrived from places such as the San Francisco Bay Area, and younger workers left a moribund economy. Sparsely populated Trinity County in the far north, and Calaveras County in the Sierra Nevada foothills, are the oldest counties. The median age for residents in both is close to 45 years. 

Meanwhile, droves of Californians are electing to live their golden years outside the  

Golden State. 

Estimates vary, but demographers agree that hundreds of thousands of people left California during the recession of the early-mid 1990s. Most projections show that trend continuing into 1999, when somewhere between 80,000 and 115,000 more people left the state than came to stay. 

Many went to Western states such as Washington, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon and Colorado, though Texas received the most former Californians, according to demographer William H. Frey of the Santa Monica-based Milken Institute. 

Some of those emigrants were low-skilled, younger workers. But many were wealthier people looking to cash out home equity for the autumn of their lives, Frey said. 

“The pre-retirees are people moving here for their last job,” said Jeff Hardcastle, Nevada’s state demographer. 

California’s high cost of living is also a factor – not only does it deter seniors from moving here, it also pushes some to leave. 

“It’s a little cheaper than L.A., the taxes are better,” said Marilyn McVey, a 56-year-old who moved from Los Angeles to a planned community in Las Vegas more than a year ago. 

Not that all state residents are buying a one-way ticket for their 60th birthday. 

“California will not be wanting for elderly at all levels of the socio-economic stratus,” Frey said. 

On the Net: 

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov


Higher AIDS infection rates among young

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

ATLANTA — Social worker Anthony McWilliams says he sees it every day – a new generation of gays and bisexuals numb from years of endless AIDS statistics and warnings about the epidemic. 

“It becomes blah, blah, blah – noise to them,” said McWilliams, a counselor for AID Atlanta. “It’s just not getting through to them. They need to hear it a new way.” 

Two decades after the discovery of AIDS, a new government survey suggests gay men and bisexuals too young to remember the disease’s explosive first years are contracting it at alarming rates. 

The survey shows 4.4 percent of gay and bisexual men ages 23 to 29 are newly infected each year with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.  

For blacks in that group, the figures are staggering: One in seven becomes HIV-positive each year – roughly the same infection rate currently found among adults in South Africa. 

“The numbers we’re publishing right now are more like the findings you see in the ’80s than the findings you see in the ’90s,” said Linda Valleroy, who led the survey for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Left unchecked, the infection rates could lead to a resurgence of AIDS after years of progress to control it. 

“We have to stop and take a look at the devastation that potentially could occur among these young men,” said Dr. Helene Gayle, the CDC’s AIDS chief. “These are precious and important lives.” 

AIDS prevention groups called the figures extremely disturbing, saying the country needs to devise new ways to reach young adults at risk. 

“These are young people who didn’t see their friends dying, didn’t lose lovers and friends and people who were important to them,” said Marty Algaze, a spokesman for Gay Men’s Health Crisis. “It’s very scary. This is a new generation of people who should know better, but don’t.” 

Health officials were particularly concerned about the infection rates among young black gays and bisexuals, saying the stigma in the black community of having HIV or AIDS may be keeping testing rates low. 

The study included nearly 3,000 gay and bisexual men who were tested anonymously for HIV from 1998 to 2000 in Baltimore, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and Seattle. 

Government analysts acknowledged the data could be flawed: The men were recruited only at dance clubs, bars, shopping centers and gay-and-lesbian community centers, so the true rates for all young gay and bisexual men could be different. 

There are no comparable historical data on infection rates for young black gays and bisexuals. 

A CDC study earlier this year found HIV infections disturbingly common in large U.S. cities among gay men of all races in their 20s.  

That study found that 3 percent of Asians, 7 percent of whites, 15 percent of Hispanics and 30 percent of blacks are infected with the virus. 

And a San Francisco study found the rate of new HIV infections among gay and bisexual men in that city nearly tripled from 1997 to 1999. 

The government’s effort to contain HIV/AIDS may be cursed by its own success, CDC analysts said. 

New HIV infections have leveled off in America at about 40,000 a year and improved medicine allows AIDS patients to live longer, healthier lives. 

“People don’t perceive that you get infected and you die in two months anymore,” said Phill Wilson, executive director of the African-American AIDS Policy and Training Institute at the University of Southern California. 

“There’s all these posters around that say you can climb mountains and do whatever with HIV and AIDS.  

“There’s not enough messages about the price you have to pay,” he said. 

Since the discovery of AIDS – first reported in a June 5, 1981, government health bulletin as a strange form of pneumonia – there have been about 750,000 reported cases in America. Nearly 450,000 of those patients have died. 

In Washington, Surgeon General David Satcher hailed the nation’s HIV and AIDS prevention efforts Thursday, but he called the anniversary a solemn milestone. 

“Twenty years into the AIDS epidemic, as a nation and as individuals, we may need a stark reminder that the best way to stop AIDS is to prevent HIV infection in the first place,” he said. 

 

On the Net: 

CDC: http://www.cdc.gov 

Coalition AIDS anniversary site: http://www.20yearsofaids.org 

Gay Men’s Health Crisis: http://www.gmhc.org 

AID Atlanta: http://www.aidatlanta.org


BRIEFS

Friday June 01, 2001

Business leaks 300 to 400 gallons of ammonia 

Berkeley firefighters called for a shelter-in-place on Wednesday, for a number of blocks surrounding the Takara Sake Factory in west Berkeley, where an ammonia spill occurred about 3:45 p.m. 

Assistant Fire Chief Michael Migliore said no reports of injuries came in following the spill. He said a leak of between 300 and 400 gallons of ammonia was reported at the factory, located at Fourth and Addison streets. 

The problem apparently arose as workers there attempted to transfer the volatile material from one tank to another and a gasket or a similar device failed. 

The shelter in place order was lifted before 8 p.m., Migliore said. 

About 35 people were evacuated in the area between Fourth and Fifth streets and Allston Way and Addison Street. Those who did not wish to leave were asked to remain indoors during the four-hour incident. 

A larger area – from Fourth Street to Bancroft Way, including University Avenue and down to Aquatic Park – was temporarily cordoned off to keep people from getting into the problem area. 

 

Ashkenaz hosts Camp  

Winnarainbow Benefit  

For 29 years children have been coming together at Camp Winnarainbow to learn juggling, tightrope walking, improvisation, music, dance and other performing arts. This multicultural circus camp was founded by local activist and clown Wavy Gravy and his wife, Jahanara, to provide an arena where children of all backgrounds can work and play together in a supportive atmosphere, according to a press statement. Wavy Gravy will appear at Ashkenaz Sunday at 7 p.m. in a benefit on behalf of the camp’s Scholarship Program. Also performing are The Flying Other Brothers with Pete Sears and Greg Anton, David Gans and surprise guests.  

 

Junior college transfer numbers rise for UC 

Students transferring from community colleges to the University of California increased by more than 9 percent for the fall of 2001, with minorities up nearly 18 percent, the university announced today. African Americans, American Indians and Latinos accounted for the large leap in minority transfers with respective increases of 14 percent, 85 percent and 16 percent. 

UC President Richard Atkinson said, “Transferring from the community colleges is an excellent and affordable way to come to the University of California, so it is encouraging to see the increases in transfer students this year.” 

A partnership between the university and Gov. Gray Davis calls for a 6 percent annual increase through 2005-06 of transfer students from community colleges to the university. The university said the recent findings indicate that the partnership is well on its way to attaining that goal. 

“Increasing student access to UC through the transfer route is one of the university's highest priorities,” Atkinson said. 

 

 

— staff, wire reports


Fee move by eBay likely to be followed

Staff
Friday June 01, 2001

The Associated Press 

 

SAN JOSE — People across the country who sell things on eBay are furious with the auction site because of its recent move to charge subscription fees for a popular piece of software that makes it easier to list items. 

In irate notes on message boards and e-mails to the company, sellers accuse eBay of getting greedy and belying its warm and fuzzy community-focused image. Some are threatening a class-action suit because older versions of the software, which cost as much as $200, stopped working. 

Everyone else who uses the Internet should take note. 

An increasing number of companies, including giant Microsoft Corp., are expected to embrace subscription models and move away from selling software for a one-time fee. The companies say they simply can’t afford to keep giving away free upgrades. 

“The trend is undeniable – it’s just a question of how long it’s going to take,” said Rob Enderle, a research fellow with Giga Information Group. “The existing model isn’t working. You can certainly try to live in the past, but whether you’re a Microsoft or an eBay, you’re probably going to get bypassed.” 

Microsoft has introduced subscription-based options for business software, including the new Office XP, and called the move a “first step toward offering software as a service” — meaning subscription plans for all users. Oracle Corp. gives away sales force management software for now, but has indicated it eventually will charge a subscription. 

The eBay software was known as Auction Assistant, and now is called Seller’s Assistant. Because it helps eBay users post attractive presentations of their products and manage the transactions, it is popular among people who list several items at once. 

It was created by Pennsylvania-based Blackthorne Software, which eBay acquired in 1999. 

Users say they bought Auction Assistant and its supercharged version, Auction Assistant Pro, for $50 to $200 over the years with the understanding that Blackthorne would upgrade the software for free when improvements were available, or when needed because of technical changes in the massive eBay site. 

In February, Blackthorne informed users Auction Assistant was being upgraded, taking on the new Seller’s Assistant name and switching to a subscription model – $4.99 a month for the basic version, $15.99 for Pro. Existing Auction Assistant users were told they could get a year’s subscription to the new software for free. 

On April 1, Blackthorne’s president, John Slocum, wrote on the company’s online discussion board that almost two-thirds of Auction Assistant users had switched to Seller’s Assistant. He added that, after April 30, Blackthorne “cannot assure users that Auction Assistant will continue to be fully functional or compatible with the eBay site.” 

Despite the warning, many users were caught off guard when their Auction Assistant programs stopped working last week. They accused eBay of intentionally making Auction Assistant useless to force them to buy the new software. 

“Why weren’t we just grandfathered in, since we already owned the same program?” said Cindy Izon of Tulsa, Okla., who sells decorative dolls on eBay. “It makes me so mad.” 

Dan Rushing of Albuquerque, N.M., lamented what he called eBay’s “extreme arrogance.” 

Collectibles seller Carol Hudson of Chattanooga, Tenn., wrote in an e-mail interview: “Most of us have been angry with them for two or three years because of their ‘do it our way or get lost’ attitude. But this time, they have really gone too far and shown their true colors.” 

EBay spokesman Kevin Pursglove said nothing was done intentionally to disable older versions of Auction Assistant. He said what occurred is most likely “the natural obsolescence that’s going to be developing any time a piece of software ages.” 

He also said the subscription model is necessary to finance continued improvements to the Blackthorne software, and disputed suggestions the company was taking unfair advantage of its dominating position in the online auction business. 

“I realize that’s a fairly common remark when any customer has a certain level of frustration, but it doesn’t do the business any good to ‘bleed people dry,”’ Pursglove said. “We want users to continually come to eBay, to continually use the Blackthorne programs to sell on eBay.” 

 

Arthur Newman, head of Internet research at ABN Amro Inc., supported eBay’s stance and said it is part of the new economics of the Web. 

“I think the Internet over the last few years has spawned a whole generation of people who expect to get everything for free and forget you have to pay for services,” he said. “If people can’t make money providing them, they’re going to stop providing them. There’s a limit to good will. EBay is hardly alone in starting to charge for things.” 

——— 

On the Net: 

Main site: http://www.ebay.com 

Message boards: http://pages.ebay.com/community/chat/index.html 


Opinion

Editorials

California auto insurance rates defy upward trend

The Associated Press
Thursday June 07, 2001

While Californians are getting squeezed by electricity costs, they’re getting the best deal in the country on car insurance because of a unique state law, a new study by a consumer group shows. 

Auto insurance prices in California declined 4 percent between 1989 and 1998 while jumping an average 38.9 percent nationwide, according to the survey released Wednesday by Consumer Federation of America. 

Insurance premiums have increased the most in Nebraska (up 81.7 percent from 1989 to 1998), South Dakota (75.2 percent), West Virginia (65.8 percent), Kentucky (64.3 percent) and Arkansas (61.5 percent), the survey shows. They have increased the least in New Hampshire (up 2 percent), Pennsylvania (11.7 percent), Massachusetts (12 percent), Maine (13.2 percent) and New Jersey (15.8 percent). 

Consumers nationwide spend an annual average of more than $700 per vehicle and $1,500 per household, totaling $100 billion nationwide, according to Consumer Federation. 

California was the only state that showed a decline. At a news conference, Ralph Nader and other consumer advocates credited Proposition 103, passed by the state’s voters in 1988, which tightened insurance regulation. 

“California stands out,” said Robert Hunter, director of insurance for Consumer Federation, who prepared the study. He said Proposition 103 brought smaller rate increases, fewer uninsured drivers and more insurance companies to the state — as well as fatter profits for the companies. 

State insurance regulators around the country “should look to California for guidance about how to effectively regulate” insurance, said Hunter, a former Texas insurance commissioner. 

Proposition 103, among other things, required insurance companies to open their books to justify rate increases, gave drivers with clean records a 20 percent discount, allowed banks to sell auto insurance to stimulate competition and required the state commissioner to provide consumers with rate comparisons. 

An insurance industry official denounced Proposition 103 as “government price-fixing” and instead attributed the decline in California’s rates to improved highway safety and greater seat belt use, a crackdown on insurance fraud and legal changes making it more difficult and expensive to file lawsuits in car accidents. 

Insurance premiums around the country have declined since 1998 after several years of increases, for those same reasons, David Snyder, assistant general counsel of the American Insurance Association, said in a telephone interview. 

Hunter said state-by-state figures were not available for years after 1998. 

Nader, who led the campaign for Proposition 103, said insurance companies’ opposition to a similar law for other states is part of a new push by U.S. industry for deregulation, encouraged by the business-friendly Bush administration. 

“Deregulation spells death, disease and injury which could be prevented,” he told reporters, citing the deaths the government has linked to Ford Explorers equipped with Firestone tires. Nader has said weakened regulatory powers of the federal highway safety agency were a factor in the crashes. 

Consumer Federation and other groups, including Consumers Union, the Center for Economic Justice and the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights, are asking state insurance commissioners to consider adopting a California-style law. 

Spokesmen for the National Association of Insurance Commissioners had no immediate comment on the new survey. 

On the Net: 

Consumer Federation of America: http://www.consumerfed.org 

American Insurance Association: http://www.aiadc.org


Activist settles suit with publisher over book

The Associated Press
Wednesday June 06, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — Random House Inc. has agreed to stop distributing copies of a philosophical memoir by Bryan Magee that accuses a noted lecturer, author and one-time confidant of Bertrand Russell of being a CIA operative. 

In “Confessions of a Philosopher: A Personal Journey Through Western Philosophy from Plato to Popper,” first published in the United States in 1998, Magee says Ralph Schoenman was a CIA operative planted to spy on Russell, a noted 1960s opponent of the Vietnam War. 

He also called Schoenman “appallingly sinister” and “calculated and manipulative,” according to court documents. 

“He said I was like an evil dwarf out of Wagner’s “Ring” cycle,” Schoenman said Tuesday. “At 5-11, I’m probably the largest dwarf on record. 

“The passages ... were clearly intended to reinvent and incite prejudice and to create a climate of distrust of me and my relationship with Russell. This was a full-board attempt at character assassination and it had to be stopped,” he said. 

The settlement was reached with Random House May 15, according to Schoenman’s lawyer, Adam Belsky. 

“We are pleased that we’ve been able to resolve our differences,” said Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum, who added he was unfamiliar with the details of the settlement. 

The publisher agreed to stop distributing any copies of the book containing references to Schoenman and agreed to replace original editions in more than 700 universities and libraries with the new version published in January 2000. 

“This settlement has not only made certain that future editions of the book will now be accurate, but, by providing corrected editions to all libraries, ensures that the historical record will be corrected as well,” Belsky said. 

Additional settlement terms were undisclosed because of a confidentiality agreement. 

Magee’s book was originally published in England in 1997 by Orion Publishing Co. In August 1999, Schoenman, who said he’s never spoken to Magee, sued for libel after a friend alerted him to the offending passages. 

”(Magee) made no effort to contact me before, during or after the publication of the book,” said Schoenman, who was a close friend and colleague of Russell between 1960 and 1968. 

That case was settled in October 1999 after the author and the publisher acknowledged the statements about Schoenman were false and apologized for any damage they may have caused his reputation, according to court documents. They also agreed to pay Schoenman’s legal fees and $95,000 in damages. 

At about the same time, Random House was in the process of publishing the book in the United States. 


UC Regents set to revisit affirmative action vote

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

BERKELEY — Six years after capturing the national spotlight by dropping affirmative action admissions, University of California regents are poised to revisit the contentious topic. 

At issue are new policies that would replace the 1995 resolutions that effectively dismantled UC’s old affirmative action system. 

Regents can’t reinstate affirmative action because of Proposition 209, the 1996 state ballot measure that prohibited using race or gender as factors in state hiring, contracting or education. 

But supporters say approving the new policies, scheduled for a vote later this month, would send an important message to minorities. 

“We hopefully repair our reputation worldwide,” said Regent Bill Bagley.  

“Obviously, this doesn’t effect the return of affirmative action. But it certainly tells all of the academic world and all of the qualified minorities that the board of regents of this university is no longer the sponsor of this divisive movement.” 

The 1995 resolutions forbade considering race or gender in hiring, contracting or admissions at UC.  

They also decreed that at least 50 percent of all admissions be based on grades alone – up from the previous minimum of 40 percent – and included a statement committing the university to promoting diversity by, among other things, considering students’ individual hardships. 

The diversity statement has become the basis for a multimillion-dollar program aimed at getting more California public school students interested in and qualified for UC. 

The new policies would affirm the diversity commitment, note that Proposition 209 does away with the need for a separate UC policy on race and refer the question of how many students should be admitted by grades alone to a faculty committee for review. 

After race-blind admissions went into effect in 1998, admissions of blacks and Hispanics, traditionally underrepresented at UC, fell sharply.  

At flagship Berkeley, admission of black students dropped nearly 70 percent, from 515 in fall 1997 to 157 in fall 1998. 

Since then, the numbers have increased.  

Blacks, Hispanics and American Indians comprised 18.6 percent of in-state freshman admissions at all eight undergraduate campuses this fall, compared to 18.8 percent in 1997. 

Still, underrepresented minorities have yet to reach 1997 levels at the most competitive campuses. 

Repealing the 1995 vote would “reassert UC’s commitment to welcoming students from all backgrounds,” Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, an ex-officio regent, said in remarks prepared for a speech at UC Davis last month.  

“It would remove the UC as the ’poster child’ for the anti-affirmative action movement on America’s college campuses.” 

Regent Ward Connerly, who wrote the 1995 resolutions, did not return a telephone call to The Associated Press on Friday. 

The 1995 policies passed 15-10 on hiring and contracting and 14-10 on admissions (Bagley abstained from the admissions vote in return for getting the diversity statement added as an amendment). 

Since then the political makeup of the board has changed as members finished their terms and were replaced by the state’s new Democratic Gov. Gray Davis. 

Davis’ predecessor, Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, an ex-officio regent, presided over the July 1995 vote.  

Wilson made repealing affirmative action a cornerstone of his brief run at the Republican presidential nomination. 

Davis, who was the state’s lieutenant governor in 1995 and therefore also an ex-officio regent, voted against dropping affirmative action. As governor, he has said he won’t go against Proposition 209; a spokeswoman said Friday he is reviewing the new proposal.


Trial begins for alleged killer of dog

The Associated Press
Tuesday June 05, 2001

SAN JOSE — Trial begins this week for a former telephone repairman accused of an infamous act of road rage – throwing a woman’s little white dog into traffic after a minor accident. 

Andrew Burnett, 27, could face up to three years in prison if convicted of killing Leo, the bichon frise. Burnett pleaded innocent last month. 

The dog’s owner, Sara McBurnett, received supportive messages from animal lovers around the country after Leo was killed near the San Jose airport on Feb. 11, 2000. 

McBurnett said her car tapped the bumper of a black sport-utility vehicle that had just cut her off. When the driver approached her car, she rolled down her window to apologize. Enraged, the man reached in and snatched Leo, threw him into oncoming traffic and fled, McBurnett said. 

Initial hearings in the trial are scheduled for Monday, and prosecutor Troy Benson said he expects jury selection to begin Tuesday. 

Burnett was arrested in December on charges he stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment from his former employer, Pacific Bell, and lied to get out of a speeding ticket.


Bear bursts into rental store

The Associated Press
Saturday June 02, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — A 200-pound black bear crashed through a glass door and was holed up in a Hertz rental store in Salinas for 4.5 hours Friday before police officers closed off the street, surrounded the building and tranquilized the animal. 

“We put up this big wrought iron fence eight feet high. The idea was to keep people out, but that sucker just jumped up on that thing and took about two seconds to just scale it,” said Quetzal Grimm, Hertz Equipment Rental branch manager. “He fell on the ground and then just bolted through one of the bottom panes of our doors.” 

Grimm said the bear was not injured and was eventually found hiding beneath some doors leaning against a wall. 

The sedated bear was carried from the store and taken by state Department of Fish and Game officials to be released into the wild. 

Grimm said the glass door was the only thing damaged during the ordeal. 

“He’s like the original Gentle Ben,” Grimm said. “It was amazing, and you can’t even say anything about it. It’s like, ’There’s a bear in your office!’ ” 

Salinas Police Sgt. Roger Milligan said everyone involved took extra precautions not to harm the bear, following an incident last week where another black bear climbed a tree in downtown Carmel.  

That bear fell 70 feet to its death after being shot with a tranquilizer dart. The bear suffered a ruptured liver, abdominal bleeding, broken ribs and a torn lung in the fall. 

Milligan said Friday’s incident was a first in his 27 years with the department. 

“I’ve had to deal with cows and steers and cattle, but not bears,” he said.


Circuit Court blocks timber sales

The Associated Press
Friday June 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO — In a blow to the logging industry, a federal appeals panel blocked the harvest of thousands of acres of old-growth forest in southwestern Oregon, ruling Thursday the federal government did not adequately address the plight of protected salmon. 

The sweeping decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also may halt the proposed logging of hundreds of thousands of acres throughout California, Oregon and Washington state – all idled pending the panel’s ruling. 

“This is a victory for salmon,” said Patti Goldman, of the Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund, which sued the government on behalf of a host of environmental and fishing groups. 

In the Oregon case, the three-judge appellate panel said the National Marine Fisheries Service failed to adequately consider the harm logging would have on endangered salmon runs on 20 of 23 Umpqua National Forest and Bureau of Land Management parcels in the Umpqua River Basin around Roseburg, Ore. 

The basin, comprising those lands draining into the Umpqua River, is home to Umpqua cutthroat trout and threatened runs of Oregon Coast coho salmon that are protected under the Endangered Species Act. 

The suit contended endangered Oregon salmon runs, which have been dwindling and have forced thousands of fisherman out of work, would be harmed by proposed logging from Douglas Timber Operators, a consortium of logging companies. 

While fishing concerns heralded the ruling, logging interests said Thursday’s decision may doom harvesting federal lands throughout the West. 

Mark Rutzick, Douglas Timber Operators’ attorney in Portland, said the court’s ruling may have created standards “that are impossible to meet.” The timber companies, he said, may ask the appeals panel to reconsider its decision or ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case. 

Even so, the federal government said it intends to have the acreage in question logged, but first must figure out how to satisfy the courts. 

“We can’t move ahead with these timber sales yet,” said Rex Holloway, a National Forest Service spokesman in Seattle. 

Bob Dick, of the American Forest Resource Council in Olympia, Wash., which represents a variety of logging companies in the West, said the “environmental community will be satisfied with nothing less than zero harvesting.” 

He noted that 40 percent of the nation’s wood supplies are imported from countries with minimal or no environmental standards. 

“Some people think we are cutting down trees for the perverse act of cutting down trees,” he said. “We’re not meeting demand in this country.” 

Douglas Timber Operators’ case stems from 1999, when U.S. District Judge Barbara Rothstein of Seattle ordered the timber sales halted until the government could show that fish would not be harmed and the sales complied with the Clinton administration’s 1994 Northwest Forest Plan and the Endangered Species Act. 

The Oregon case has wide-ranging implications for hundreds of thousands of acres the federal government has slated for logging in California, Washington state and other parts of Oregon. 

The same federal judge who blocked the Umpqua River Basin logging also blocked logging on 170 parcels the government designated throughout the West. Judge Rothstein stopped logging in those states in December on the same grounds as she did for the Umpqua River Basin sites around Roseburg. 

Under federal law, the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management were required to get a “biological opinion” from the fisheries service before proceeding with any logging plans in the Umpqua River basin, where fish runs have dipped into single digits in some years. 

The appeals court, in agreeing with Rothstein, said the opinions did not address short-term effects on salmon, which run from the ocean to rivers to spawn, and the cumulative effects of all the proposed logging combined. 

The panel said the government’s studies did not meet guidelines set out in Clinton’s forest plan. That plan, in response to the federal listing of the northern spotted owl, is aimed at balancing the demand for timber from public lands with the need to protect habitat for dwindling populations of fish and wildlife. 

The plan covered 24.5 million acres of federal forest lands throughout the range of the spotted owl and reduced logging in Northwest forests by about 80 percent from levels of the 1980s. 

The fisheries service issued biological opinions that logging in Oregon’s Umpqua River Basin, which resides within the northern spotted owl’s range, was not likely to jeopardize the cutthroat trout and the Oregon Coast coho salmon. 

The appeals panel found that the government provided no scientific evidence to support its conclusion that new growth in logged areas would adequately offset the degradation caused by the logging projects to ensure the continued existence of the fish in question. 

The court said that the government failed to consider short-term impacts and instead relied on the premise that the area would be restored in a decade. The government’s studies said the logging ultimately would not affect anadromous fish, which migrate from the ocean to rivers to spawn. 

“This generous time frame ignores the life cycle and migration cycle of anadromous fish,” the court said. “In 10 years, a badly degraded habitat will likely result in the total extinction of the subspecies that formerly returned to a particular creek for spawning.” 

Glen Spain, Northwest regional director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Association Inc., a plaintiff in the suit, said the decision could help restore salmon stocks and eventually bring work to thousands who have lost their jobs. 

“They were just assuming the fish would survive. You can’t do that,” Spain said. 

Brian Gorman, a spokesman for the National Marine Fisheries Service in Seattle, said he had just received the ruling and could not comment extensively. 

“Obviously, we will do what the court tells us to do,” Gorman said. “It did seem to think we should have taken short-term effects on salmon habitat into greater consideration.” 

The case is Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Association Inc. v. National Marine Fisheries Service, 99-36027.