Arts & Eventz

Arts Calendar

Tuesday August 15, 2006

TUESDAY, AUGUST 15 -more-


Forster’s Terns, Food Webs, And Flameproof Pajamas

By Joe Eaton, Special to the Planet
Tuesday August 15, 2006

Hovering over the shallows in search of a fish, the Forster’s tern embodies grace and elegance. Its long, pointed wings and forked tail combine aerodynamic function and esthetic appeal. John Reinhold Forster did not deserve this bird. -more-


Berkeley This Week

Tuesday August 15, 2006

TUESDAY, AUGUST 15 -more-


Arts Calendar

Friday August 11, 2006

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 -more-


Great Works from New York on Display at Magnes

By Peter Selz, Special to the Planet
Friday August 11, 2006

The Magnes Museum, the “Jewish Museum of the West,” is currently exhibiting a fine collection of paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculpture from the Jewish Museum in New York. Many of the paintings are by artists of social conscience, such as Ben Shahn, Raphael and Moses Soyer, Peter Blume, Ben Zion, William Gropper and Philip Evergood. -more-


SF Mime Troupe Brings ‘Godfellas’ to Berkeley

By Ken Bullock, Special to the Planet
Friday August 11, 2006

“Imagine a nation where religious fervor runs hot, and faith rhetoric runs hotter.” If you feel your imagination is running behind the headlines, hie you to the outdoors—a park, say, Live Oak this weekend, or Willard on the 26th or 27th—and see those headlines in the flesh but with the faith rhetoric standing on its head, as the San Francisco Mime Troupe girds up for battle with powers and principalities by putting on an act entitled Godfellas. -more-


Moving Pictures: Pacific Film Archive Takes a Look at One of Japan’s Greatest Directors

By Justin DeFreitas
Friday August 11, 2006

Earlier this year, Pacific Film Archive presented a series of films by Mikio Naruse, bringing much deserved attention to one of Japan’s greatest filmmakers. Now they’ll follow up with a series on another Japanese master, Kenji Mizoguchi. -more-


Head for the Berkeley Hills

By Marta Yamamoto, Special to the Planet
Friday August 11, 2006

“Bring your own” is a good motto to remember when visiting the neighborhoods of the Berkeley hills. With no shopping district or quaint cafes, there’s little to tempt your dollars. Unless you’re in the market for a home. Then you’re in trouble, big trouble, because what the hills area does offer is hard to resist: a showcase for architectural excellence, eye-filling views, rock outcropping parks, hidden pathways and an appealing sense of space within nature. -more-


East Bay Then and Now: Harris Allen: The Spirit of Individuality

By Daniella Thompson
Friday August 11, 2006

Architect Harris Allen had no cookie cutters in his professional tool box. No two of his buildings looked alike—each was designed for its particular site and stamped with the owner’s individuality. -more-


Tripping, Slipping and Falling Around Your House

By Matt Cantor
Friday August 11, 2006

I’m often amazed at the lack of attention paid to places where people can fall, slip or trip around the house (not to mention commercial or municipal buildings). Maybe other people aren’t as clumsy as I am. It is a plus, though, that in my job I seem to be admirably suited to finding any obstacle that might ultimately cause any other person at any future date to slip, trip or fall. No divination required; I’m just the poster boy for smacking your cranium. -more-


The Dirty Lowdown on Working With Our Lowdown Dirt

By Ron Sullivan
Friday August 11, 2006

One of the hardest things for new gardeners here—both experienced gardeners who move here and long-time locals who get inspired by the goddess Flora—is our dirt. Most of us have to garden on clay soil here, and those of us in the flatlands generally have the heaviest, the historically most stomped-on and sometimes most-contaminated clay. -more-


Quake Tip of the Week

By Larry Guillot
Friday August 11, 2006

Head For The Doorway? -more-


Berkeley This Week

Friday August 11, 2006

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 -more-


Correction

Friday August 11, 2006

A typographical error in Bob Burnett’s Aug. 8 “Public Eye” column caused a gross underestimation of the U.S. defense budget. The correct figure is approximately $550 billion. -more-