Arts & Eventz

Arts Calendar

Friday July 13, 2007

FRIDAY, JULY 13 -more-


San Francisco Mime Troupe’s ‘Making a Killing’

Friday July 13, 2007

Promising “more song-and-dance than a Bush Administration press conference,” the San Francisco Mime Troupe will be Making a Killing this weekend, for free, at Cedar Rose Park, a block from Cedar and Chestnut Streets. -more-


SFMOMA Highlights Art of Sculpture

By Peter Selz, Special to the Planet
Friday July 13, 2007

It has been 35 years since the Berkeley Museum brought New York’s Museum of Modern Art exhibition, “Sculpture of Matisse,” to the Bay Area. The current show as SFMOMA permits us to re-examine the great painter’s three-dimensional work. The museum’s press release speaks of his “sculptural masterpieces.” -more-


Trinity Lyric Opera Stages Copland’s ‘The Tender Land’

By Jaime Robles, Special to the Planet
Friday July 13, 2007

This Friday Trinity Lyric Opera opens its second season with Aaron Copland’s The Tender Land at its new home in the Castro Valley Center for the Arts. -more-


Moving Pictures: The Meditative Art of Kiarostami on Display at BAM/PFA

By Justin DeFreitas
Friday July 13, 2007

It’s a perverse world that lets the name of Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami remain obscure to the vast Western film-going public. He is considered by many to among the three or four greatest artists in cinema today, the creative force behind some of the most thoughtful and compelling films of the past 25 years. -more-


East Bay: Then and Now: When Southside Apartment Living Was All the Rage

By Daniella Thompson
Friday July 13, 2007

Around the turn of the 20th century, Berkeley was promoted as a City of Homes. In 1905, the Conference Committee of the Improvement Clubs of Berkeley, California published an illustrated booklet bearing this title and featuring various private residences. But the concept of home would soon change. The San Francisco earthquake and fire brought a flood of refugees into the East Bay, and many real-estate entrepreneurs quickly rolled up their sleeves to meet the housing demand. -more-


Garden Variety: Don’t Panic! Ethical Gardening is Possible

By Ron Sullivan
Friday July 13, 2007

I’ve talked about a couple of ethical aspects of gardening over the past two weeks: ethical suppliers and basic kindness to plants, the reason I don’t buy Arizona desert species for my shady, poorly drained Berkeley garden. -more-


About the House: House Photos Are Worth Thousands of Words and Dollars

By Matt Cantor
Friday July 13, 2007

Do you know The Consultant’s Song? It goes: Maybe it’s this way, or maybe it’s that way and I get paid’O in either case’O. -more-


Quake Tip of the Week: Brace Your Chimney?

By Larry Guillot
Friday July 13, 2007

At a retrofit seminar last weekend, I saw a photo of a braced chimney that had fallen in an earthquake, just like its un-braced neighbors. -more-


Berkeley This Week

Friday July 13, 2007

FRIDAY, JULY 13 -more-


CORRECTION

Friday July 13, 2007

Tuesday’s review of Crowded Fire Theater Company’s Anna Bella Eema at Ashby Stage mistakenly attributed last year’s production of The Typographer’s Dream to Crowded Fire. The play was actually produced by Encore Theatre and remounted at Ashby Stage in association with Shotgun Players. -more-


Arts Calendar

Tuesday July 10, 2007

TUESDAY, JULY 10 -more-


Arts and Entertainment Around the East Bay

Tuesday July 10, 2007

ARIEL STRING QUARTET AT GIORGI GALLERY -more-


The Theater: Crowded Fire Theater Presents ‘Anna Bella Eema’

By Ken Bullock, Special to the Planet
Tuesday July 10, 2007

On a platform, three women sit, facing the audience. They don’t budge from their chairs until practically the end of the show, yet there’s a choreography, in Lisa D’Amour’s Anna Bella Eema, as directed by Rebecca Novick for Crowded Fire Theater Company at the Ashby Stage, and the three actors (Cassie Beck, Danielle Levin and Julie Kurtz) provide a rhythmic soundscape as well, with voice, simple musical instruments (a finger piano) and various ordinary objects as noisemakers. -more-


Moving Pictures: Silent Film Festival a Portal To the Picturesque Past

By Justin DeFreitas
Tuesday July 10, 2007

In today’s fully wired world of digital video and handheld viewing devices, it may be difficult to fathom a time when the moving picture was itself a revolutionary technology. In the first few decades of the 20th century, as the new medium was developed and perfected, it brought with it a radical cultural shift, bringing images from all over the world to neighborhood theaters. -more-


Green Neighbors: What’s in a Name? History and Big Trees

By Ron Sullivan
Tuesday July 10, 2007

It isn’t always easy to keep a giant sequoia / Big Tree / Sequoiadendron giganteum thriving down here near sea level. (It isn’t always easy even to talk about the species without someone’s caviling about whatever common name is current.) I’ve known at least two that were cut down locally, and one that just doesn’t look happy. There’s a nice row of them along the main road through Tilden Park, though, just past the regional Parks Botanic Garden, for easy viewing as you pass. You can get up close and personal with the species in the Bot Garden too, and reassure yourself about identification—they’re labeled—and compare them with coast redwood, Sequoia sempervirens. -more-


Berkeley This Week

Tuesday July 10, 2007

TUESDAY, JULY 10 -more-